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Arc {G3C-D.3 




HiAtbtLiti College l,il)rarn 




BEQSJEST OF 

GEORGINA LOWELL PUTNAM 



OF BOSTON 



Received, July i, 1914 



1 



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1 



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"^xabe ^ofectts 



ISSUED IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



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TRADE TOKENS 

300UC5 in tbe Seventecntb Centurp 

IN 

ENGLAND, WALES, AND IRELAND, 
BY CORPORATIONS, MERCHANTS, TRADESMEN, Etc. 



Jl ^cw anb 'gievifs^b $6Uton of 'gBiKtam ^oone*5 'gBovlfe, 

BY 

GEORGE C. WILLIAMSON, 

F.R.S.L., 

FJ!. Hist. S^., F.S.S., F.C.H.S., Memb. Num. Soc., Lond.^ Memb. SocUti Fran^aist tU 

Numismatique et dArchiologie^ Hon. Corr. Memb. American Numismatic 

atul ArchttologwtU Society ^ and of the Numismatic and Antiguarian 

Society of Montreal , etc. , etc. 

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL COLLECTORS OF TOKENS 
IN THE UNITED KINGDOM AS EDITORS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTIES. 



ILLUSTRATED BY NUMEROUS PLATES AND WOODCUTS, AND CONTAINING 

NOTES OF FAMILY, HERALDIC, AND TOPOGRAPHICAL INTEREST 

RESPECTING THE VARIOUS ISSUERS OF THE TOKENS. 



VOL. II. 



LONDON : 
ELLIOT STOCK, 62, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C. 

1891. 



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Arti(,%6.%z 



ttar/ard ColL^cre Library 
July 1, 1914. 
^^ Bequest of 
Oaorgina Lowell Putnam 



V 






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(Content0 of tDol H. 





PACE 


Man, The Isle of . 


. 80s 


Channel Islands, The .... 


807 


Middlesex ...... 


809 


Monmouthshire (One Woodcut) 


833 


Norfolk ...... 


. 837 


Plate of Norfolk Tokens 


882 


Northamptonshire ..... 


. 883 


Northumberland .... 


903 


Nottinghamshire ..... 


• 907 


Oxfordshire ..... 


919 


Rutland ...... 


• 939 


Scotland ..... 


9SI 


Shropshire ...... 


• 9SS 


Somerset (Illustrated by Woodcuts) 


967 


SouTHWARK (Illustrated by Woodcuts) . 


• 997 


Staffordshire (Illustrated by Woodcuts) . 


1049 


Suffolk (Illustrated by Woodcuts) 


. 1061 


Plate of Suffolk Tokens 


1107 


Surrey ...... 


1107 


Plate of Guildford Tokens 


"54 


Plate of Surrey Tokens 


• "54 


Sussex ...... 


"55 


Wales 


1 185 


Warwickshire ..... 


"99 


Westmorland (Illustrated by Woodcuts) 


. 1217 


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vi CONTENTS. 

PACB 

Wiltshire (Illustrated by Woodcuts) . . 1227 

Worcestershire (Illustrated by Woodcuts) . .1251 

Four Plates of Worcestershire Tokens . 1302 

Large Folding Copperplate of Worcestershire 

Coins and Tokens .... 1302 

Yorkshire (One Woodcut) .... 1303 

Two Plates of Yorkshire Tokens . . . 1350 

Ireland . . . . . .1351 

Uncertain Tokens . . . . .1419 

Editor's Note as to Date of Book . . . 1428 



Index I. Enumeration of Tokens . 

Index II. Places .... 

Index III. London Localities . 

Index IV. Southwark Localities . 

Index V. Shapes 

Index VI. Values .... 

Index VII. Trades of Issuers . 

Index VIII. Peculiarities 

Index IX. Christian Names of Issuers 

Index X. Surnames of Issuers . 

Index XI. Sundry Devices 

Index XII. Armorial Bearings in the Field 



. 1429 

1430 
. 1442 

1445 
. 1446 

1446 
. 1447 

1450 
. 1451 

1508 
. 1566 

1580 



Appendix. 



List of Subscribers. Vide Note. 



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tlbe 5sle of Obm. 

Number of Tokens issxjed 2 

Place issuing Token i 



vof^ 11. 52 

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Traders' Tokens 



ISSUED IN 



THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



VOL. II. 



ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, WALES, AND 
IRELAND. 



Zbc 30lc of flDan^ 

1. O. lOHN . MVRREY . l668 = HIS PENNY. I . M. 

-/?. QvocvNQVE . GESSERis ' STABiT = The ihrcc Icgs of Man. I 

On a specimen in ihe Bodleian Collection, at Oxford, someone has engraved 
"of . DOVGLAS . IN . MAN** in place of the three legs of the Isle of Man, pro- 
bably copying No. 2. 

John Murray gave security to exchange his pennies, which his executors per- 
formed, when the copper money of the Earl of Derby was issued in 1709. — 

2. O, lOHN . MVRRAY . l668 = HIS PENNY. I . M. 

A*. QVOCVNQVE. GESSERIS . STABIT = OF DOVGLAS IN MAN. I 

The above is larger than No. i. 



Ztbc Cbanncl 30lanb0- 

We have not met with any tokens of these islands, nor can we find 
that they ever issued any. From their nearness to France no 
doubt the denier and double toumois of France formed the inferior 
currency. 

52—2 



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Number or Tokens issued 259 

Number of Places issuing Tokens .... 50 

Town Pieces issued None. 



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London having been created by a recent Act a separate county, the 
tokens of Middlesex are reduced by the whole of those issued in the 
new County of London. 

The tokens of Middlesex are, however, numerous, and the Editor 
had every hope of making them a series of peculiar interest from 
the presence of numerous notes on the issuers. A series 
of fataUties has, however, befallen the bulk of the notes. The 
originals of some were passed on for correction to a brother 
collector who, in a change of residence, entirely lost sight of them, 
and others in the possession of another helper were accidentally 
committed to the flames. Owing to the fact that many of these notes 
had been collected from odd sources abroad many years ago, it was 
impossible to replace them, and the Editor is therefore obliged, with 
much regret, to present the county of Middlesex corrected up as 
closely as possible, but containing very few notes as to issuers. 

It has too frequently happened in relation to Middlesex that the 
absorbing interest of lx)ndon has prevented much attention being 
given to those portions of the county which are not considered por- 
tions of the Metropolis. 

Up to the present time no collector has been found who will 
systematically investigate the history of many of the Middlesex 
tokens, and a fair field is open full of many choice opportunities to a 
zealous investigator of archaeological lore. 

To Mr. H. S. Gill, J. P., of Tiverton ; Mr. Gerard E. Hodgkin, of 
Richmond, and Mr. Luther Clements, of Peckham, the Editor is 
indebted for aid in compihng the county list, and up to the discoveries 
of the present date it is believed it will be found accurate and 
complete. 

Several places issuing tokens are added to those mentioned by 
Boyne, including Finchley, Heston, Knightsbridge, Newington Green, 
Turnham Green, and Walham Green. 

Of new tokens and varieties eighty-two have been added to Boyne's 
list, raising the aggregate from 179 to 261. 

There are no town pieces amongst the number, and there is but 
one penny token issued at Stoke Newington. 

Eight of the tokens are of unusual shapes ; one issued at Acton is 
octagonal, and the Knightsbridge one is the same shape. 

Two issued at Hampton Court are heart-shaped, and also one 
Hoxton token and one Mimms token are of this picturesque shape. 



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8l2 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

One Hampton token is square, and another Hoxton token is 
diamond-shaped 

The series embraces two issues of the greatest possible rarity. 

The token of the Toy at Hampton Court is the rara avis of all 
collectors, while Mr. Hodgkin's specimen of the Chelsea College 
token is believed to be unique. 

Many of the inns which issued their tokens are still in existence, 
amongst which may be mentioned the Gate House, Angel, and Red 
Lion, at Highgate ; the Mother Red Cap, at Holloway ; the White 
Lion, Islington ; the World's End, Shadwell, and others. 

The very rare pattern piece issued in 1644 in the city of London 
is retained in the list, although not strictly belonging to the series, but 
it is a piece of unusual beauty and peculiar interest. 



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MIDDLESEX. 813 



ACTON. 

1. O. THOMAS . BVLLMVR = The King's head crowned. 

/^, OF . ACTON . 1664 = T . M . B. J 

2. O. ANNE . FINCH . AT . Y^ = A COck. 

jR. IN . ACTON . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

The HIS is probably a mistake on the part of the die-sinker. 

3. O. GERVASE . LAWSON . HIS . HALFE . PENNY (in foUF lines). 

J?. IN . ACTON . 1667 = St. George and the dragon. J 

4. O. lOHN . MVNN = A man making candles. 

jR. OF . ACTON . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY. I . G . M. (Octa- 

goncU) \ 

5. O, lOHN . MVNN . TALLOWE = A man making candles. 

R, CHANDLAR . IN . ACfON = I . I . M. \ 

6. O, THOMAS . SEXSTON = T . E . S. 

R, IN . ACTON . CHANLER = T . E . S. \ 

7. O, lAMES . WILSON . IN . ACTON = A thlStle. 

R, HIS . HALF . PENY . 1669 = I . E . W. \ 



BOW. 

8. O. RALPH . ALEXANDER = A wheatsheaf. 

R. OF . BOW . MEALMAN = HIS HALFE PENEY. \ 

9. O, GEORGE . AYLIFFE . AT . WHIT = A bear. 

R, IN . BOW. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

la O. lOHN . HANSCOMBE . AT . THE = The King's head crowned. 

R. KINGS . HEAD . IN . BOWE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 
I . S . H. \ 

11. O, WILL . MEARES . AT . Y= = Three tuns. 

R, IN . BOW . 1658 = W . M . M. \ 

1 2. O, EDWARD . ROBERTES = A Saracen's head. 

R. AT . BOWE . BRIDGE = E . I . R. 



BRENTFORD. 
13. O, AT . THE . KINGS . ARMES = The Royal Arms. 

R, IN . OVLD . BRANFORD = W . M . C. 



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8i4 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

14. O. lOHN . ERiNG . 1 669 = The Grocers* Arms. 

jR, IN . OLD . BRANFORD = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . E. J 

15. O, THOMAS . HOBBS . AT . Y^ = A wyvern. 

jR. IN . NEW . BRAINTFORD = HIS HALFE PENV. T . I . H. J 

16. O. CHANDLER =L . E . L 

/^, OF . OLD . BRAINFORD = L . E . I. \ 

17. O, LVKE . IVORY = A man making candles. 

J^, BRENTFORD . CHANDR = L . E . I. \ 

A variety reads : 

18. O, LUKE . IVORY . OF = aS No. 1 7. 

jR, OLD . BRENTFORD . CHANDR = aS No. 1 7. i 

19. O. lOHN . MOORE . IN . NEW = I . M . M. 

^. BRAINTFORDE . 1651 = 1 . M . M. \ 

20. A variety reads brainford. 

21. O. EDWARD . SWIFT . 1 668 = The Drapers' Arms. 

/^. IN • OVLD . BRANTFORD = HIS HALF PENY. i 

CHELSEA. 

22. O, CHELSEY I COLLEDGE | FARTHING | 1667 (in four HneS 

across the field). 
jR. A view of the college. 

Chelsea College was founded in 1610 by Dr. Matthew Sutcliffe, Dean of Exeter, 
** to this intent, that learned men might there have maintenance to answere all the 
adversaries of religion." Archbishop Laud called it Controversy College, and the 
Roman Catholics in derision gave it the name of an alehouse. After the death of 
the third Provost, Dr. Slater, suits were commenced in the Court of Chancery 
respecting the title, when it was decided that Dr. vSutcliffe's estates should revert 
to their rightful heirs, upon their paying to the college certain sums of money. 
The college buildings were afterwards devoted to various inappropriate purposes, 
being at one time used as a receptacle for prisoners, and at another as a nding- 
house. 

In 1667 (the year in which this token was issued) Evelyn delivered by order to 
the Royal Society the possession of Chelsea Collie as a gift from Charles II. It 
was afterwards repurchased by that monarch (but query if the purchase-money 
was ever paid), and its site utilized for the present hospital. 

It does not seem at all clear for what purpose or by whom the farthing was 
issued, but it may be mentioned that tokens were issued by the authorities of New- 
gate Prison and Christ's Hospital. [London, Nos. 2043 and 632-3] 

A specimen is in the possession of Mn J. Eliot Hodgkin, F.S.A.^ and is probably 
unique. No/es and Queries^ 7th S., March 10, 1888, p. 185. 

23. O, Henry .Butts . His . Halfe . Peny (in four lines). 

R, IN. CHELLSEY . 1667 = A greyhound. \ 

24. O, AT . THE . CROWNE = A crown. 

R. IN . CHELSE . 1657 = P . M . L. 

25. O. DANIELL . DALTON = A building. 

R. IN , CHELSEY . COLLEGE = D . E . D. \ 



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MIDDLESEX. 8i5 

26. O, WILLIAM . FREEMAN = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R, IN . LITTLE . CHELSEY . 1667 = VICTVALLER. \ 

27. O, Thomas . Munden . His . Halfe . Peny (in four lines). 

R. IN . CHELLSEY . 1 666 = The Prince of Wales's feathers. \ 

28. O, lOHN . STAMFORTH = A public building. 

R. AT . CHELSEY . COLLEDGE = I . M . S. \ 

29. O. ADRIAN . WESTERBAN . AT . Y" = (detrtted). 

R. IN . CHELSEY . 1667= HIS HALF PENY. \ 



CHISWICK. 

30. O. WILLIAM . BOND = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. IN . CHISWICK . 1666 = W . S . B. i 

31. O. GEORGE . BROWN . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. CHISWICK . 1668 = G . V . B. i 

32. A variety reads on reverse chiswick . groc*^ = g . v . b. 

33. O. lOHN . coke . IN = The Butchers' Arms. 

R, CHISWICK . BVCHER . 1670 = HALF PENY. I . C \ 

34. O, lOSEPH . GASQVOYNE=I . S . G. 

R. OF . CHISWICK . 1658 = 1 . S . G. \ 

35. O. lOHN . KOBBS= 1658. 

R. OF . CHISSWICK = I . H. t 

36. O. GYLES . PIERCE = G . P. 

R. OF . CHISWICK = G . P. i 

37. O, WILLIAM . SMEETH = W . E . S. 

R. OF . CHISWICK = W . E . S. \ 



CLAPTON. 
38. O, AT . THE . FLOWER . DE . Lvc = A fleur-dclys. 

R. IN . CLAPTVN . IN . HACKNY = I . I . G. 



CRANFORD. 

39. O. WILLIAM . ALLEN = A CrOSS. 

R. OF . CRANFORD . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . S . A. J 



EALING. 

40. O. IN . GREAT . EALING = lAMES LEWIS. 

R. HIS . HALFE . PENNY = I . A . L. 1 666. 



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8l6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



EDMONTON. 

41. O, lOHN . BROWNE. 1653 = A sugar-loof. 

J?. IN . EDMONTON = I . S . B. \ 

42. O, EDWARD . CLARKE . AT . sovTH = The Fishmongers' Arms. 

jR. STREET . IN . EDMONTON . 68 = HIS HAI:F PENNY. 
E . M . C i 

43. O. RICE . IONES= 1666. 

J^, IN . EDMVNDTON = HIS HALF PENY. i 

44. O, ALEXSANDER . KING = {dctrtted). 

R, OF. EDMVNTON . i66$ = (detrited), \ 

ENFIELD. 

45. O, RICHARD . losEPH . AT . Y" . RED = A lion rampant, 

crowned. 
R, IN . ENFEiLD . HIS . HALFPENY = R . K . L in mono- 
gram, i 

46. O. EDWARD . NEALE = A turkey. 

R, OF . ENFEILD . l668 = E .E.N. \ 

47. O. EDWARD . wiLMOTE = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. OF . ENFIELD . 1656 = E . A . W. \ 

FINCHLEY. 

48. O, WILLIAM . HIDE = A full-faced bust 

R. OF . FINCHLYE . 1665 = W • E • H. \ 

49. O, THOMAS . CRACE . YN = A gamecock. 

R, FINCHLEY. 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

FULHAM. 

50. O John . Fox . Bis . Ilalfe . Feny (in three lines). 

R. IN FYLLHAM . i666 = An anchor. i 

51. O, BENET . HAMON = A wheatsheaf. 

R, IN . FVLLHAM . 1650 = 8 . V . H. \ 

52. O, THIS I WAS I THE | KINOES | ARMES | 1656 (in five lines). 

R. IN . FVLLHAM = F . S . S. 

53. O, MATTHEW . HARWELL . 1N==A man rowing a boat with two 

oars. 

R, FVLLVM . NERE . THE . FERY = M . M . H. \ 

54. O, FRANCIS . STVTSBERRY . AT = The Royal Arms, 

R, IN . FVLLHAM . HIS = HALF PENY. \ 



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MIDDLESEX. 817 



HACKNEY. 

55. O. AT . THE . TAVERN = A COCk. 
H. IN . HEACKNEY . 1651 =T . A . B. 

56. O. lOHN . BRAiNE . AT . Y>^ . GREEN = A savage With a club in 

his hand. 

li, IN . HACKNEY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

57. O. AT . THE . PIE . TAVERNE = A magpie. 

J^. IN . HACKNEY . 1656 = 1 . H . C. 

58. O. lOHN . DAVIS =1667. 
Id, IN . HACKNEY = I . E . D. 

59. O, RICHARD . lENNiNGS . AT = A man Fowing a boat. 

J^, HACKNY . FERRY . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. R.M.I. 

60. O. ANN . NiCKOLLS . AT . Y= . WHITE = A hart lodged, A . N. 

on its back. 

J^. IN . MARE . STREET . IN . HACKNY = HER HALF PENY. 
1668. 

61. ^. AT . THE . MAREMAiD = A mermaid. 

J^. TA VERNE . IN . HACKEN Y = I . M . P. 

62. O, WILLIAM . PERRY = W . L . P. 
J^. OF . HACKNEY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

63. O. WILLIAM . PROCTER . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. HACKNEY . BREWER = A lamb couchant W . S . P. 

64. O. WILLIAM . TWISSELL = W . A . T. 
J^, IN . HAKNEY . CHANLER = 1656. 

HAMMERSMITH. 

65. O. AT . THE . HALFE . MOONE = A cresccnt moon. 

^. IN HAMERSMITH . BAKER = E . S . B. 

66. O. THOMAS. CASSELL . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
J^. IN . HAMERSMITH = T . C. 

67. O, lOHN . ciPPis . IN . HAMMER = The Brcwers' Arms. 

J^. SMITH . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY = I . I . C. 

68. O. WILLIAM . HARDING = Three horseshoes. 

J^. OF . HAMERSMITH . 1 66 7 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . M . H. 

69. O. ALICE. KIRTON . 1 668 = HER HALF PENY. 
J^, IN . HAMERSMITH = A . K. 

70. O. ELIAS . HiRONS . MiLLENER = A hand from a cloud holding 

a dagger. 

J?. IN . HAMERSMITH . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 



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71, O^ faASds - TiT^irr =Tie r-ii^rv Aras. 

72, 0> VZLLUkM - IX^SlLZ'r . AT - T* _ r!C = Ai aadkOT. W . R . IL 

Jt, K-ucicoL^itrrH . E15 . g%:r . FErT=Tlic Weavers' 

73, O- frees . iicHAi^:?f . » = A sdZ. 6Sl 

^. HAKXEJL^YITH . HIS . HALT - PES = I . E . «- J 

74- (7. miLiAM . f : V : ?ci*s = A sdH w . a . s. 

^- or . HAM£i^-XrrH . lto5=HI5 HALT ffJKT. J 

75- (7- RiCHAJtD - TEi5.rT = Tbc Waacrsen's Arms. 

Jl, IS . HAMOLrMrra = e . i . x. J 

76. (7. nL%scis . WATTS = A 53»^er. 

^. or . HAMESiSurra = r . e . w. J 

77. (7. ADAM . WHIGHT . Or . HAMOLSMriH = HIS HALTS PENKT. 
^. HIS . HALFE. PtX3rr . l663 = A. M . W. ^ 

HAMPSTEAD. 

78. O. RICHARD . BAZELL . AT = HIS HALFE PEKY. 167O. 

R . D . Bw 
JL THE . STILL . IS . HAMSTEEDE = A StiiL J 

79. O. Thowtas . Ltdd^U . Bis . Half, Peny. T . B . u (in four 

lines ». 
R, IN . HAMSTEED = Thc Qoecii's head crowned. \ 

80. O. DOROTHY . RIPPIN . AT . THE = A well and bucket. 

R. WELL . IN . HAM5TED = HER HALF PENY. \ 

HAMPTON COURT. 

81. O. John . Drewry , at . thi . Toye (in four lines). 

R, At . Hampton . Court . His . Halfe . Peny. i . D . D. (in 
four lines). {Heart-shape.) \ 

82. O. John , Druree . att .y (in three lines). 

R, Toye . att . Hamton . Coart (in three lines). (Heart- 
shape.) \ 

The house whence these tokens were issued was a faToorite resort of Londoners 
until 1857, when it was pulled down to make room for private houses. Ljrsons 
remarks (" Historical Account of Parishes in Middlesex," p. 75) : •• In the survey 
of 1653 (in the Augmentation Office), mention is made of a piece of pasture- 
ground near the river, called the Toying place, the site, probably, of a well-known 
mn near the bridge, now called the Toy.' 

This is the only instance of the sign of the Toy given in Larwood and Hotten's 
** History of Sign-boards *' (p. 505) ; but they mention a Hoop and Toy in 
Brompton. 

Specimens of the token are no less scarce than those of the sign. 

The Toy continued to be a favourite resort for visitors to Hampton Court Palace 
till the year 1857 ; it was then converted into three dwelling-houses. 



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MIDDLESEX. 



819 



HAMPTON AND HAMPTON WICK. 

83. O. SAM . BRATHERicK . AT . Y" . BEL = The Vintncrs' Arms. 

A, IN . HAMPTON . TOWNE . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

84. O, lOHN . HARRIS . AT . Y= . WHIT = A hart lodgcd. 

R, IN . HAMPTON . WEEKE . HIS . HALF . PENNY. I . A . H. (in 

six lines). {Square,) 



85. O, RICHARD . RANGE = HIS HALF PENY. 
J^. IN . HAMPTON . WEEKE . 66 = R . I . R. 



HARMONDSWORTH. 

S6, O. RICHARD . WATES . IN=?HIS HALFE PENY. 

J^. HARMONDSWORTH . 69 = Three hammers. 



HARROW. 

87- O. lOHN . BLETSOE = HIS HALF PENY. 
iV. IN . HARROW . 1668 = I . B. 

88. O, lOHN . MiLLGATE . OF . HARROW = An anchof. 

E. HILL . HIS . HALFE . PENNY = I . E. M. 

89- O. NATHANiELL . PAGE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. AT . HARROW . ON . Y^ , HILL= N . I . P. 



HENDON. 

90. O. lOHN . ALLIN = I . E . A. 

R, IN . HENDON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

91. O, lOHN . GREENE = 1 666. 

R, IN . HENDON . MALTMAN = I . M . G. 






HESTON. 

92. O, THOMAS . BELINGER = A horse. 
R. IN . HESON . 1657 =T . B. 



HIGHGATE. 

93. O. PHILIP . ALLEN . CHANDLER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. IN . HIGATE . 1667 =P . A . A. ^ 

94. O. THOMAS . CHiLDE = A sugat-loaf. 

R. IN . HIGHGATE .' 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. T . S. C. \ 

95. O. EDWARD . CVTLER . AT . Y^ . GATE = A gateway. 

R. HOVSE . AT . HIGHGATE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



820 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

96. O, WILLIAM . FISHER . AT . THE = An angel. 

J^. ANGELL . IN . HIGHGATE . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
W . S . F. ^ 

97. O. lOHN . HILTON , COACHMAN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. OF . HIGHGATE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENNY. ^ 

A very rare token. The mistake in spelling is curious. 

98. O, WILLIAM . PROCKTER . AT . Y= = A Hon rampant. 

jR, RED . LYON . AT . HIGHGATE = HIS HALFK PENNY. 1668. J 

The Gate-house, the Angel, and the P^ed Lion, are still in repute as inns at 
Highgate. 

HOLLOWAY. 

99. O. John . Backster , at . tke , Mother , Read . Capp . in . Bo//- 

way 1667 (in six lines across the field), 
i?. I.JB.m's, Halfe . Peny. Half-length of Mother Red- 
cap holding a pot of beer. \ 

" Thence to Hollo-well^ Mother redcaps 
In a troupe of Trulls I hap ; 
Whoors of Babylon me impalled, 
And me their Adonis called." 

Bantabee' s Journal. 
" So we rode easily through, and only drinking at Holloway, at the sign of a 
woman with cakes in one hand and a pot of ale in the other, which did give good 
occasion of mirth." — Pepys, September 25, 1 661. 
Formerly the following verses accompanied this sign : 
" Old Mother Rwlcap, according to her tale. 
Lived twenty and a hundred years by drinking this good ale ; 
It was her meat, it was her drink, and medicine beside ; 
And if she still had drank this ale, she never would have died." 

Larwood and Hotten's ** History of Sign-boards," p. 96. 

100. O, NicHO . HOLBROOKE . AT . THE = A Doan with staflf oa 

shoulder, leading two dogs. 

R, GREEN . MAN . IN . HOLLOWAY = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

HOUNSLOW. 

101. O, HENRY . CLEAVER . POST = A Still. 

R. MASTER . IN . HOYNSLOW = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

102. O. MATTHEW . GARNATT . AT . Y^ = A Hon passant gardant. 

R, RED . LYON . IN . HOYNSLOW = HIS HALF PENY. 1668. \ 

HOXTON. 

103. O, MARGAREl' . KING . AT . THE = The SUn. 

R, IN . HOXTON . 1668 = HER HALFE PENY. \ 

104. O, GRACE . PHILLIPS = HER . HALF . PENY. 

R. AT . HOXTON = The Prince of Wales's feathers. {Heart- 
shape,) i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MIDDLESEX, 821 

105. O, E2EK I TANNER | HIS ^ | PENY (in fouT lincs aCFOSS the 

field). 

R, AT I THE I WHIT . HOVSE | IN | HOXTON | 1 668 (in six 

lines across the field). {Diamond-shape,) 
ISLEWORTH. 

106. O, lOHN . BANESTER = I . E . B. 

R. IN . ISLEWORTH = I . E . B. \ 

107. O, lOHN . BENGOVN . AT . Y* . ROSE- A rosc CFOwned. 

R. & . CROWN . IN . ISLEWORTH = HIS HALF PENY. J 

108. O. RICHARD . LANSBORVGH = Two oars. 

R. OF. ISLEWORTH. 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

109. O. RICHARD . LANSBROV = Two OarS. 

R, IN . ISLWORTH = R . F . L. \ 

iio. O. RICHARD . LARCHiN = An angel and child. 

R. IN . ISLEWORTH = R . A . L. \ 

111. O. GEORGE . AND . svsAN . PAGE = The Groceis* Arms. 

R. OF . ISLEWORTH . 1 666 = HIS HALF P£NY. ^ 

112. O. THOMAS . PococK . HIS . HALF . PENY = Three shuttles. 

R. IN . THISELLWORTH . l666 = T . S . P. '^ . \ 

Notice the phonetic spelling on this token and the following one. 

113. O, AT . THE . BELL . 1657 = A bclL 

R. IN . THISTLE . WORTH = L . E . S. \ 

114. O, ABRAHAM . SHEWEL . AT . Y» = H1S H.\LFE PENY. 

R, IN . ISLEWORTH . i666 = A bell. \ 

115. O. SIMON . SYTTON = The Vintners' Arms. 

R, IN . ISLEWORTH . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. S . M . S. J 

ISLINGTON. 

116. O. CHRISTOPHER . BVSBEE . AT = A Hon passant. 

R. WHIT . LYON . IN . ISLINGTON = HIS HALF PENY. 1668. J 
•• Thence to Islington at Lion ; 
Where a juggling I did spy one, 
Nimble wiin his mates consorting, 
Mixing cheating with his sporting." 

Bamabee^ s JoumaL 
The White Lion Inn still exists, and has given its name to the adjoining street. 
It is not situate, as stated in the poem and on the token, in Islington, but in the 
parish of Clerkenwell, not far from the boundary of the two parishes. 

117. O. ROBERT . ECCLESrONE = The sun. 

R, IN . ISLINGTON = R . P . E. \ 

118. O, RICHARD . GAYTON = A horse-shoe. 

R, IN . ISLINGTON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. R . S . G. \ 

vou II. 53 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



822 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

119. O. WILLIAM . GEARING « HIS HALFE PENY. 

/^, AT . Y" . IN . ISLINGTON = An old man with a globe on his 
back, holding a bow and arrow. ^ 

120. O. EDWARD . HOLLINGWORTH = HIS HALF PENY. E . M . H. 
^. AT . Y» . RED . . COW . IN . ISLINGTON = A COW. 

121. O, lOANE . KETTLE = The Salters* Arms. 

^. IN . ISLINGTON . 1667 = HER HALFE PENNY. I . K. ^ 

122. O, ABRAHAM . MEACON . IN = Arms. 

7?. ISLINGTON . HIS . HALFE . PENY = A . I . M. ^ 

123. O, GEORGE . MERRY . IN . i666 = The Pdnce of Wales's 

feathers and coronet. 

/^. ISLINGTON . HIS . HALF . PENNY = G . I . M. § 

124. O. ROBERT . P IN . 1667 = R . M. P. 

jR. ISLINGTON . CONFECTIONER = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

125. O. FRANCES . POTTS . IN = A rosc and crown. 

^. ISLINGTON . 1663 = F . M . P. ^ 

126. O. RALPH . STEENE = A Stag trippant. 

^. IN . ISLINTON = R . E . S. ^ 

127. O, lOHN . VERE . AT . Y"^ . FRYING = A (vying-pSLn. I . M . V. 
^. PAN . IN . ISLINGTON . MEALMAN = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

128. O, ROBERT . WILKINSON . IN = A checkered square. 

jR, ISLINGTON . HIS . HALFE . PENY = R . I . W. J 

KENSINGTON. 

129. O, Randolph . Cobbeit . His . Halfe . Peny (in four lines). 

R. IN . KENSINGTON . i666 = A lion passant gardant. \ 

1 30. O, ROBERT . DAVENPORTE . AT = A plough. GOD SPEED THE 

PLOW. 
R, KINSINGTON . GRAVELL . PITS = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
R . M . D. ^ 

131. O, THOMAS . ROBERTS = A sugarloaf. 

R, OF . KENSINGTON . l664 = T . E . R. \ 

132. O. PETER . SAMMON . AT . Y» . 1667 = A talbot passant. 

R, IN . KINSINGTON . GRAVEL . PITS = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
P . S . S. \ 

KINGSLAND. 

133. O, lOHN . PERRY . IN = Checkers. 

R, KINGSLAND . 1663 = 1 . E . P. X 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MIDDLESEX. 823 



KNIGHTSBRIDGE. 

134. O. RICHARD . LONDON . AT . Y» . GOVLDEN = A HoD rampant. 

^. IN . KNIGHTSBRIDGE . l668»HIS HALFE PENY. R . M . L. 

(Octagonal,) 

LIMEHOUSE. 

135. O. WILLIAM . BANES = A stocking. 

^. IN . LIMEHOVSE = W . E . B. 

136. O. NICHOLAS . BLAY . BAKER . AT = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. LIMEH iVSE . 1663 = HIS HALFE PENY. N . I . B. 

137. O. WILLIAM . BRADSHAW = A wheatsheaf. 

Id. BAKER . IN . LYMHOVSE = W . E . B. 

138. O. EDMOND . DOBSON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 
Jd. AT . LYMEHOVSE . CORNER = E . D. 

139. O. AT . THE . HOOP . TAVERN = A bunch of grapes, in 

hoop. 

Jd. AT . LYMHOYSE . CORNER = I . G . H. 

140. O. ANN . HARLOW . AT = HER HALF PENY. 
Jd. LIME . HOVSE . CORNER = A . H. 

141. O. ISACK . HICKMAN . CHEES = I . E . H. ^. 

jR. MONGER . IN . LIMEHOVSE = A woman churning. 

142. O. SAMVELL . KEiNTON = A wheatsheaf. 

jR. BAKER . IN . LIMHOVS = S . I . K. 

143. O. NICOLAS . LATCH = HIS HALF PENY. 

Jd. IN . LIMEHOVSE = A Hon passant gardant. 

144. O. MARGRET . LVCAS = The Brewers' Arms. 

R. IN . LIMEHOVS . 1663 = M . U 

145. O. THOMAS . MARTIN . AT . Y^=HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. ANKER . IN . LiMHOVSE = An anchor. 

146. O. lOHN . NEWCOMB = A ball. 
R, LIMEHOVS . 1657 = I . T . N. 

147. O. EDWARD . PAGE . AT = A wheatshcaf. 

jR. LIME . HOWSE . CORNER = E . S . P. 

148. O. lOHN . RAiLTON . 1658 = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. BAKER . AT . LYMHOYSE = I . E . R. 

149. O. EDMOND . RIVERS . MEALMAN = HIS HALFE PENY. E . C . R. 

R, AT . DiCKSHORE . LIMEHOVSE = A wheatsheaf with three 
birds on it. 

53—2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



824 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

150. O, DOROTHY . SMART = HER HALF PENY. 

/^, IN . LIMEHOVSE . 1667 = . S. ^ 

151. O. FRANCES . ZACACY = A wheatsheaf. 

J^. BREWER . IN . LIME . HOYS = F . E . Z. ^ 

LONDON. 

152. O. TYPVs . MONETAE . ANGL . iERis = A CFOwn on two sceptres 

in saliire, below three lions passant gardant. 
^. ciTTiE . OF . LONDON = A rose and crown between two 
swords in pale, below 1644. 

There are no tokens of London in general, except this very rare pattern-piece, 
which seems not to have been circulated ; it is the size of the farthings of 
Charles II., issued after the tokens were cried down. It does not belong to this 
series, the date preceding the issue of tradesmens* tokens four years. The obverse has 
also been used for another pattern-piece ; reverse, farthing . toakens ; a rose on 
two sceptres in saltire crowned, in the other angles of the saltire three fleurs-de- 
lys. 

MIMMS. 

153. O. lOHN . COOPER . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . C. 

J^, IN . sovT . MiMS = A blazing star. J 

154. O, RICHARD . HODSDON = The Holy Lamb. 

^. OF . MiMS . 1667 . HIS . HALF . PENY. (Hcart-shape^ \ 

155. O, RICHARD . MASONN . AT . THE = Crossed keys. 

R, IN . MIMS . INKEEPER . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
R . M . M. \ 

NEWINGTON GREEN. 

156. O. AT . THE . GREEN . DRAGON = A dragOn. 

R, AT . NEWINGTON . GREENE = I . M . W. \ 

157. A variety reads on reverse newinton . green = i . m . w. 

NORTHALL. 

158. O, WILLIAM . ASHBY . AT = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. NORTHALL . l666 = W . A . A. ^ 

159. A variety has the reverse north . hall . i668 = w . a . a, 

PADDINGTON. 

160. O, THOMAS . FITTER AT . THE . BELL = A bell. 

R, IN . PADDINGTON . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. T . D . F. \ 

PARSON'S GREEN. 

161. O. William . Kempe . of , Parsons . Greene (in four lines). 
R, Neare . Fulham . His . Haffe . Penny (in four lines). \ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MIDDLESEX, 825 



PINNER. 



162. O. RALPH . PACK . OF . PINNER = A hand holding a bird. 

J^, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1667 = R . I . P. ^ 

PONDER'S END {Paris/i of Enfield). 

163. O, THOMAS . BENNETT = 1 664. 

R. IN . POVNDERS . END = T . B . a \ 

POPLAR. 

164. O. lOHN . BVRDEN . MEALE=rA whcatshcaf. 

R, LIVING . IN . POPLER . 1653 = 1 . S . B. \ 

165. O. THE . FALCON . AND . HORSE = A falcOH. 

R, SHOOE . IN . POPLAR = A horse-shoe. m . s . f. \ 

166. O. THOMAS . HARRiCE = A trumpet (?) 

R, IN . POPLEY . 1666 = T . I . H. \ 

167. O, lOSEPH . HVNT = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R, IN. POPLER. 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

168. O. ELIZABETH . MOREING= 1662. 

R. OF . POPPLAR = E . M. \ 

POTTON. 

169. O, lOHN . HARPER . OF = 1 65 7. 

R. PorroN . in . midlesx = 1 . h. \ 

Thb place is really in Bedfordshire. See Vol. L, p. 12, No. 81. 

SHADWELL. 

170. O, lOHN . annis . IN SHADWELL = A lion passant 

R, NEERE . COALE . STAIRS . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

171. 0> AT . THE . SWAN . WITH . 2 = A swan With two necks. 

R, NECKS . IN . SHADWELL = N . E . B. > 

172. O, AT . THE . WHIT . HART = A hart lodged. 

R, IN . FOXES . LANE . 1650 = W . D . C. 

173. O, GREGORY . COOKE . i666 = A head, to the left. 

R. IN . MIDDLE . SHADWELL = HIS HALF PENY. i 

174. O. THO . COOKE . AT . MOROCKA . HED = A negro's bust. 

R. IN . UPPER . SHADWELL . l665«HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

175. O. THO . COOKE . AT . Y* . GOVLDEN «= A griffin. 

R, AT . LOWER . SHADWELL . 64 = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



826 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

176. O, THO . DARRELL . AT . BELL = A bell. 

J^, WHARFE . IN . SHADWELL = T . M . D. i 

177. O. MATHEW . DODSLEY . AT = M . R . D. 

^. SHADWELL . DOCK . 1658 = A bear with chain. 

178. O. AT. THE . WORLDS . END = Three men holding astrono- 

mical instruments, around a globe. 

J^. AT . SHADWELL . DOCKE = L . S . E. \ 

179. O. lOHN . FALEIN . FOX = I . I . F. 

^. IN . SHADWELL . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. | 

This is a most unnsual instance of an issuer having two Christian names. 

180. O. ELLINOR . CANDOR . IN = HER HALF PENY. 

^. VPPER . SHADWELL . 1667 = A gOOSe. ^ 

181. O. THE . HAND . GVNE = A cannon mounted. 

J^. IN . SHADWELL = G . E . H. J 

182. O. EDWARD . HiLLSYE = The Cooks' Arms. 

J^. IN . VPER . SHADWELL = E . P . H. J 

183. O, lOHN . HOBART . IN = The Haberdashers* Arms. 

^. VPPER . SHADWELL . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . I . H. i 

184. O. WILLIAM . HOBBS . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, LOWER . SHADWELL = Two boat oars crossed. J 

185. O. ELIZ . lELLVS . NEER . BLACK = E . I. 

^. CATT . IN . VPPER . SHADWELL = HER HALF PENY. ^ 

186. O, HESTER . KiLLSBE . AT . THE . 68 = The Kipg's Arms. 

J^, IN . FOXSES . LANE . IN . SHADWELL = HER HALF PENNY. 
H . K. ^ 

187. O. BENiAMiN . MILLER . i666 = A windmill. 

J^. IN . VPPER . SHADWELL = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

188. O. THE . SONNE . TAVERNE = The SUn. 

^. IN . VPPER . SHADWELL . 1657 = E . S . N. 

189. O. AT . THE . CROWN = A CrOWU. 

J^. IN . SHEADWELL . 1 665 =T . F . P. 

190. O. MiCHAELL . PARKES = Noah's ark. 

J^. AT . SHADWELL . DOCK = M . E . P. ^ 

191. O. lOHN . PERKINS . AT . THE = An angel. 

/^, IN . VFPER . SHADWELL = I . T . P. ^ 

192. O, WILLIAM . POWES = A wheatshcaf. 

Id. LIVING . IN . SHADWELL = W . E . P. J 

193. O. lOHN . PLATER . CHEES . GES = A cheese-knife. 

Jd. AT . SHADWELL . DOCKE* HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MIDDLESEX. 827 

194. O. lOHN . PVLLING . By = Coopers* Arms. 

^. SHADWELL . DOCK = I . S . P. 

195. O. I SEPH . RicoRD . 1666 = A French horn. 

I^. IN . VPPER . SHADWELL = HIS HALF PENNY. I . M . R. ^ 

196. O, RICHARD. SELWIN. 1659 = CH D. . . (CHEESE DEALER). 

^ OF . SHADWELL . DOCK » R . A . S. \ 

197. O. I HN . SHACKSPEER . R- AP = Merceis* Arms. 

^. WALK . IN . VPPER . SHADWELL = HIS HALF PENV. \ 

198. O. ED . SK'ULES . AGAINST = E . A . S. 

R. BALIS . WHARF . SHADWE^ = A boar Standing on a fish. \ 

199. O. HENREY . SMITH . 1658 = A Stocking. 

^. IN . VPER . SHADWELL =H . A . S. { 

200. O. SIMON . SNOW . AT . Y» . GREEN . MAN = A wild man and 

a still. 

^. AND . STILL . VPPER . SHADWELL = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

201- O. NiCH . THORY . CHANDLER = A grcyhound. 

R, IN . VPPER . SHADWELL = N . S . T. J 

202. O. ELiAS . VNGLE . IN = A pair of scales. 

R, VPPER . SHADWELL = E . E . V. \ 

203. O, Y= . SPEAKER . FRIGAT = E . E . W. 

R, IN . VPPER . SHADWELL = A ship. \ 

204. O, GEORGE . WASTiLL . AT = Noah*s ark. 

R, SHADWELL . DOCK . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

205. O. ANDREW . WELCH . AT . Y" . SIGN = A breast-plate. 

R, Y^ . PLAT . VPPER . SHADWELL = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 



STAINES. 

206. O, lOHN . BARNiTT = A swan standing, flapping its wings, 

R. IN . STANES . 1653 = 1 . V . B. \ 

207. O. ABRAHAM . BONIFEILD = A . L . B. 

R. IN . STANES . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

208. O, WILLIAM . COOKE . AT . THE = Gcorge and dragon. 

R. GEORGE. INN . IN . STAINES = HIS HALF PENY. W. H . C ^ 

209. O, THOMAS . COLE . AT . THE = A SWan. 

R. SWAN . IN . STAINES . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. T. B. C. \ 

210. O. MARY . KNOWLES . AT = The Prince of Wales's feathers. 

R. Y^ . FETHERS . IN . STANS = M . K. 

211. O. lOHN . PERKINS . AT . THE« A ship. 

R. IN . STAINES . 1667 = 1 . M . P. I 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



828 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



STOKE NEWINGTON. 

212. O. lOHN . BALL . AT . THE . BOARDED = TwO men Saluting. 
J^. HOVSE . NEERE . NEWINGTON . GREEN = HIS PENNY. I 

213. O. LAWRENCE . SHORT = The Fruiterers' Arms. 

J^. NEWINGTON = L . E . S. 
Possibly belonging to Newington in Kent, this town being in the centre of the 
great fruit-growing district in that county. 

TOTTENHAM. 

^ 214. O. NICHOLAS . CVTT . AT= 1666. 

/^, TATINGHAM . HIGH . CROSS = N . C ^ 

215. O. SARAH . HOYLES = A rose and crown, 

J^, IN . TATTNAM . 1665 =S . H. ^ 

2X6. O. EDWARD . MAYCOCK . AT . THE = TwO rabbltS. 

J^, TOTTENHAM . HIGH . CROSS = HIS HALF PENY TOKEN. ^ 

217. O. CHRISTOPHER . MILLER =1666. 

^. IN . TATNAM = C . S . M. J 

TURNHAM GREEN. 

218. O, lOHN . HOLLAND . AT . Y" . PACK = A pack-horse. 

J^, HORS . IN . TVRNAM . GREENE = HIS HALF PENY. 1669. ^ 

219. O, FRANCIS . SMITH = F . M . s and a pair of shears. 

J^, ON . TURNHAM . GREEN = HIS HALF PENY. | 

220. O. lAMES . YORKE . OF = A cock on a bull. 

^. TVRHAM . GREENE = 1669. HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

TWICKENHAM. 

221. O. WILLIAM . EBVRN . i665 = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . TWITTINGHAM = W . M . E. ^ 

22 2. O, HIS HALFE PENNY = ABRA | HAM | SHEAR^ | A . L . S . 

^. OF . TwicKiNHAM . 1669 = The Royal Arms. ^ 

223. O. lOHN . WILLIAMS = The Prince of Wales's feathers. 

J^. IN . TWICKENHAM . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. | 

UXBRIDGE. 

224. O, MiCHAELL . CROSTER . IN = The Ironmongers* Arms. 

^. VXBRIDG . HIS . HALFE . PENY = M . C. J 

225. O. ANNE . ENGELFEiLD = A mill-rind (?) 

J^, IN . VXBRIDGE . l668 = HER HALFE PENY. ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MIDDLESEX. ' 829 

226. O, ANN . ENGELFEiLD = A mill-rind (?) 

R. IN . VXBRIDGE . 1664 = A . E. \ 

227. O, THOMAS . EVENS = A sugar-loaf. 

R. OF . VXBRIDGE ^ T . A . E. \ 

228. O. ZECHARiAH . GODWIN . IN = The Blaclcsmiths* Arms. 

R. IN . WOXBRIDGE . 1667= HIS HALF PENY. Z . I . G. \ 

229. O, WILL . GVNN . AT = Three magpies. 

R. 3 . PVES . IN . VXBRIDGE = W . M . G. \ 

230. A variety has obverse, . william . gvnn . at . y" = Three 

magpies. i 

231. O. lOHN . GVRNEY . 1670 = A chevroD between three mart- 

lets. 

R. AT . VXBRIDGE = HIS HALF PENY. 

232. O. LVKE . IAMES = A hart standing. 

R. OF . VXBRIDGE = L . A.I. i 

233. O. lOHN . REEVE . AT . THE . CHECKER = A checkered 

square. 

R. IN . VOXBREDG . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. I . E . R. J 

** The Chequers is the oldest inn in the place, and may date back to the 
sixteenth, or even as remote as the fifteenth, century. It has some fine and sub- 
stantial timbers in its i;oof and staircases, but much of the inside, as well as of the 
outside, is modernised."— Mr. Walford's " Greater London," p. 233. 

234. O. lOHN . TAYLER . OF . 1 666 = Three swans. 

R, WOXBRIDG . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . D . T. \ 

235. O, THOMAS . TAYLER = T . E . T. 

R. OF . VXBRIDGE = T . E . T. \ 

\ 

236. O. lOHN . TRIPLET . AT . Y» . EAGLE = I . A . T. 

R, AND . CHILD . IN . VXBRIDGE = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

WALHAM GREEN. 

237. O, RICHARD . PROSSER . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, WALLOM . GREEN . CLOTHMAN = R . E . P . 4 



WESTMINSTER. 

In general, vrith a few obscure localities not worth subdivision. Other localities 
of Westminster are joined to those of London ( Vide VoL I.). 

238. O. THE . 3 . TVNNS . AT . THE . ABY = Three tuns. 

R. GATE . IN . WESTMINSTER = E . A. ^ 

239. O. A rose crowned 5 . 9. 

R, IN . I WEST I MINSTER | . p . G (in four lines). \ 



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830 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

240. O. NEHE . ARNOLD . BREW = N . A COnjoincd 

J^, IN . CHAP . STREET . WESTR = N . E . A. J 

241. O. AT . THE . SARASONS . HEAD — A Saraccn's head. 

J^, IN . WESTMINSTER . GROCER -I . M . B. J 

242. O. ROBERT . DANCE . IN . STRVTON = An caglc and child. 

^. GROVND . WESTMINSTER . 67 — HIS HALFE PENNY. 
R . S . D. J 

243. O. ROBERT . FRANCKLiN - The Gfocers' Arms. 

^. OF . WESTMINS . GROCER = R . A . F. J 

244. O. lOHN . FROST . IN . Y" . BOWLiN = An anchor. 

^. ALLY . IN . WESTMINSTER «= I . M . F. A chevroD between 
three faggots. J 

245. O. RALPH . FVLLER . IN . s = A pair of scales. 

. ^. ANS . STREET . WESTMIN = R . F . F. J 

246. O. lOHN . HVDSON . IN . BRVTTS . YARD = The Woolmongers' 

Arms. 

/^, KING . STREET . WESTMINSTER = I . H. J 

247. O. AT . THE . BROKEN . CROSS = A heart 

^. IN . WESTMINSTER . 1659 = F . A . H. J 

248. O. AT . Y» . DOGG . TAVERN . IN- A dog. 

J^, WESTMINSTER . 16 . . =W . A . H. i 

249. O. WILLIAM . NETTLETON . IN = A bull's head. 

J^. KING . STREET . WESTMINSTER -W .K.N. I 

250. O, IN . S . lAMS . STREET-T . M . H. 

^. IN . WESTMINSTER -T . M . H. \ 

251. O. Y" . ROSE . TAVERN = T . M . M. 

/^, IN . WESTMiNsrER»A rose. \ 

252. O. AT . Y" . MITER . TAVERN « A mitre. 

J^, IN . WESTMINSTER . 57 = R . I . P. I 

253. O. ARTHOR . PRYOR . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

J^. IN . WESTMINSTER = A. P. ^ 

254. (9. Mary . Statham . 1664 (in three lines). 

R, IN . CABIDGE . LANE . WESTMINSTER^ A pair of SCaleS. ^ 

255. O. WILLIAM . LONGE . WOOD* ArmS. 

R. MVNGER . WEbTMlNSTER = W . I . L. 1 659. \ 

For another token by the same issuer sec the general tokens of Southwark. 



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MIDDLESEX. 831 



WHETSTONE. 



256. O. lOHN . BOMEN = A sheaf of barley. 

J^. IN . WHET STONE = A HALF PENY. 

257. O, ELIZABETH . HOARE= 1665. 
jR, OF . WHETSTONE = E . H. 



WILLESDEN. 

258. O. NICHOLAS . NECKALL . AT«An anchor and cable. 

R. WILI^DVN . l670 = N . N. 

259. O. HENRY . SANDERSON = A man making candles. 

R, IN . WILLSDEN . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 



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/Ifconmoutbsbire* 

Number of Tokens issued . 20 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 4 

Town Pieces issued None. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

James W. Lloyd, Esq., 

Kington. 



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flDonmoutbebire- 

The tokens of this county are few in number, and are all of late 
date ; the earliest was issued in the year of the Restoration. Snell- 
ing gives the token of William Meredith, of Caerleon, as a town- 
piece, but he was mistaken. 

In the former edition fifteen tokens were described. The following 
list, besides corrections, includes five additional descriptions. 

The county of Monmouth distinguished itself during the Civil 
War by its strong adherence to the cause of the King, due no doubt 
to the influence and example of its most worthy noblemen, the 
Marquis of \^'orccster and his son, whose loyalty and devotion to the 
ro}'al cause cost them so dearly. The tokens of the county bear 
witness to the feelings of its inhabitants by the mottoes and objects 
represented on their obverse and reverse, viz, the King's head, the 
Prince of Wales's plumes, and the portcullis, which was the crest of 
the Marquis of Worcester. 



ABERGAVENNY. 

1. O, WALTER . DAVIDS,. IN . 1661 = ^ in a lozenge. 

R. ABERGEVENVE= w . D . D. in a lozenge. \ 

2. O. Edward \ Lewis . his \ Farthingc (in three lines). 

R. OF . ABERGAVENNY ; 1667= Arms; a fleur-de-lys. \ 

3. O. Phillip , Morgan . His . Halfe . Penny (in four lines). 
R, OF . ABERGAVENY . 1667= The Mercers' Arms. ^ 

4. O, PHILLIP . MORGAN = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, OF . ABERGAVENY = 1 667. \ 

5. O, PHILLIP . MORGAN == The Mercers' Arms. 

R, OF . ABERGAVENY . 1671 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



CAERLEON. 

6. O. WILLIAM. MEREDITH =1668. 

R. OF . CARLINE . MERCER = W . M. COnjoiucd. \ 

7. O, WILLIAM . MEREDITH . i669 = Prince of Wales's feathers. 
R. A . CAERLYON . FARTHING = A man holding a halberd. \ 

The parish register of Caerleon states that William Meredith was buried 
Oct. 19, 1715. 



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836 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTI/RY 

CHEPSTOW. 

8. O. THOMAS . DAVIS = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

J^, OF . CHEAPSTOL . 1671 =1 (st'c) D. | 

9. O. WILL . DAVIS . OF . CHEPSTOW = The MerccFs' Arms. 

J^, MERCER . HIS . FARTHINGE = W . D. 1670. /arg^ \ 

10. O. RiCHARD.MORGAN=^His HALF PENY within an octagon of dots. 
^. OF . CHEPSTOWE= 1670 within an octagon of dots. J 

11. O, SAMVEL . MORGAN . 1670 = 8 . M. 

J^. A . CHEPSTOWE . FARTHING = A portCuUis. \ 

12. O, WALTER . MORGAN . 1670 = W . M. COnjoincd. 

/^, A . CHEPSTOWE . FARTHING = A portCUllis. J 

13. O, WALTER . MORGAN = A portcullis. 

/^. OF . CHEPSTOW . 1672 = HIS . HALF . PENY. J 

MONMOUTH. 

14. O, GOD . SAVE . THE . KING = The King's head. 

Ji, OF . MONMOVTH . 1661 = R . A . B. 

15. O. RICHARD . BALLARD . OF . MON- 

MOTH = HIS HALFE PENY FOR 
NECESARY CHAING. 
J^. GOD . PRESERVE . OVR . GRACIOVS . 

KING = The King's head, c . r. 
crowned. 11°. 1668. ^ 

16. O, EDWARD . BEVAN = A man making candles. 

^. OF . MONMOVTH = HIS HALF PENY. E . E. B. J 

17. O, MicHAELL . BOHEWNE = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. MERCER . IN . MONMOVTH = M . B. J 

18. O, MICHAELL . BOHEWNE = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

J^, MERCER . IN . MONMOTH = M . E . a \ 

'* Whereas Mr. Herbert Jones, attorney-ai-law, in the town of Monmouth, well 
known by being several years together Under-bhenff of the same county, hath of 
late clivers times tobbed the mail coming from that town to London, and taken out 
divers letters and writs, and is now fled from justice, and supposed to have 
sheltered himself in some of the new-raised troops. 

** These are to give notice, that whosoever shall secure the said Herbert Jones, 
so as to be committed, in order to answer these said crimes, may give notice there- 
of to bir Thomas Fowlcs, goldsmith, Temple Bar, London, or to Mr. Michael 
Bohune, mercer, in Monmouih, and shall have a guinea's reward." — Quoted from 
the London Gazette of the period by Andrew Wynter, M.D., in his ** Curiosities 
of Civilization," 1861. 

19. O, THOMAS . EDWARDS . 1671= A portcullis. 

R, MERCER . IN . MONMOVTH — HIS | HALFE | PENY FOR | 
NECESARY | CHANGE. ^ 

20. O, THOMAS . MORGAN . 6o=The Merccrs' Arms. 

R. OF . MONMOTH . MERCER = T . G . M. \ 




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morfolk. 



Number of Tokens issued 358 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 58 

Town Pieces issued in Cley, Diss, Lynn, Norwich, and 
Yarmouth. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

Edward Skinner, Esq., 
8, Hayroarket, 

Norwich. 

VOL. II. 54 

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For many of the notes on issuers of Norfolk and Norwich tokens 
we are greatly indebted to Mr. E. A. Tillett's (privately printed) 
"Norfolk Tokens." We have also to thank the Rev. C. R. Manning 
and other contributors for their valuable assistance. 

The number of seventeenth-century tokens issued in the county of 
Norfolk and city of Norwich was very large — greater, in fact, than any 
other county, excepting Middlesex, Surrey, Kent, and Yorkshire — 
and is just about equal with Suffolk, there being over 350 issues and 
varieties, from upwards of fifty towns and villages. No fancy shapes 
occur, the tokens being round in shape and mostly farthings, only a 
few halfpence and no pence being issued Norwich, with over a 
hundred issuers, produced nothing but farthings. Town-pieces (all 
ferthings) were issued in Norwich (three dates), Yarmouth (two 
dates), Lynn Regis (two dates), and Cley and Diss one each. All of 
these bear the arms of their towns excepting that of Cley, which 
has an anchor and a horseshoe on the obverse and reverse sides 
respectively. 

Many tavern signs are borne upon the tokens of Norfolk, among 
which we find the Anchor, Bell, Bull, Cross Keys, Crown, Cock, 
Dove, Eagle and Child, Feathers, Grapes, George and Dragon, 
Horse, King's Head, Lion, Lamb, Man-in-the-Moon, Rose, Swan, 
Sun, Wounded Hart, etc. ; also showing trade emblems of their 
issuers, as a ship, shuttle, sugarloaf, man dipping candles, jug, scales, 
mortar, stocking, key, woolcomb, trowel, helmet, fleece, crossed 
swords, spade, wheatsheaf, sheaf of arrows, etc. We must not, how- 
ever, accept the symbol upon the token as necessarily showing the 
issuer to be an innkeeper, or that the sign actually represented his 
trade, nearly all traders using a distinctive sign of their own : for 
instance, we have in Asby the haberdashers* arms and a bulFs head 
on the same coin, a Lynn woolcomber has a rose. Cooper of Nor- 
wich has a king's head and a full-blown rose ; L. Goodwyn, confec- 
tioner, lived at the Golden Camel ; and so we have many others. A 
few of these old signs are still in existence. In Norwich we have 
the Golden Key, Grasshopper, and Fleece, still shown as old trade 
signs. 

A few issuers indulged in monogram, and a larger number were 
content with their (and often their wife's) initials only, or, conjointly 
with date, merchant's marks, and curious devices derived from the 
names of the token issuer are also found in limited numbers. 

54—2 

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840 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Many of the arms of the guilds or companies are shown as a device, 
upwards of 180 of the Norfolk tokens being so treated. The arms 
of the Grocers' Company appears in sixty-seven, the Mercers' upon 
twelve, the Bakers' upon five, the Drapers' and Tallowchandlers' four 
each, the Apothecaries' and Merchant Tailors' three each, the Black- 
smiths', Haberdashers', and Ironmongers' two each, and the 
Coopers', Cordwainers', Brewers', Dyers', Fruiterers', Upholsterers', 
and Weavers' one each. The arms of the city of Norwich and of the 
Duke of Norfolk are also shown. Some few use the armorial bear- 
ings of their own families. 

The whole of the large series of Norfolk tokens was issued from 
1650 to 1 67 1, these being the earliest' and latest dates known among 
them. 

We believe the tokens shown on the plate illustrating the issue of 
this county (kindly given by J. J. Colman, Esq., M.P.) have not been 
previously engraved in an> published work. 



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NORFOLK. 841 



ALDBOROUGH. 

1. 0. lOHN . BRIGGS . OF . 1671 = A ship. 
J^, ALBOROVGH . HIS . HALPENY . I . B. 

Briggs is a common name in Norfolk. 

ALDEBY (or ALBY). 

2. 0. PHiLUP . ROBATS = A lion passant guardant and three 

stars. 

J^, OF . ABY . IN . NOFOCKE = P . M . R. 
ASHBY. 

3. 0. HVGH . SHERWOOD = The Groccrs* Arms. 

^. IN . ASHBY . 1656 = H . S. 

4. 0. lOSEPH . SHERWOOD = The Mercers* Arms. 
J^, IN . ASHBY . 1655 = A bull's head. 

These may belong to Lincolnshire. The names do not appear on the register of 
Ashby St. Mary. 

AYLSHAM. 

5. 0. THOMAS . EMPSON . 1 665= The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . AYLSHAM . GROSER = T . A . E. 

6. 0. lAPHERY . FLAXMAN = St. Georgc and the dragon. 

J^. IN . AYLSHAM . 1664 = 1 . A . F. 

7. 0. MicHAELL . HAVKiNS = A weavcr's shuttle. 

J?. IN . ALSHAM . 1666 = M . H. 

8. 0. LANSALET . THEXTON=i666 (in three lines across the 

field). 
J^. GROCER . IN . AYLSHAM = The Grocers* Arms. 
Thcxton*s ancestors appear to have resided in Norwich, for we find in the Liber 
Introit. Civ. the following entry : 

"Lancdott Thezton grocer apprentic' WiPlo. Ketheringham adroissus erat 
Cims xxiiijo. ffebruarij A®. Rne. Eliz xxxix®." 

Henry Thexton, grocer, apprentice of Lancelot Thexton, was admitted to the 
freedom of the dty of Norwich on June 9, in the 7th James I. 

9. 0, WILLIAM . WATTS = A bull. 

-^. IN . AUSHAM = w . M . w. (3 Stars together). 
The Ball Inn still exists in Aylsham. 

9*- A variety with two stars on reverse. 

10. 0. FRANCIS . WESTERMAN = The Mercers' Arms. 

-^. IN . AYLSHAM = F . S . W. 



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842 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



BAWDESWELL. 

11. O. THOMAS . BOWRNE = A ram. 

^. BAVDSWELL . l667=T . E . B. 
The Ram is still an inn here. 

BRANCASTER. 

12. O. WILLIAM . Rix . IN . 1 667 = The Blacksmiths* Arms. 

i?. BRAN . CASTELL . NORFOL^ = W . C . R. 

BURNHAM MARKET. 

13. O. lOHN . TVCKE . IN=A sugar-loaf. 

^. BVRNHAM . MARKET = I . M . T. 

14. O. MARTIN . TVCKE . IN = M . T. 

i?. BVRNHAM . MARKET = The Blacksmiths* Arms. 

In the assessment made in this parish in 1689 for an aid to King William and 
Queen Marv, we find that the amount paid by John Tucke was £i 6s. 3d. ; by 
Thomas Willis, £2 17s. lod., and that Martin Tucke was one of the collectors. 

15. O. THOMAS . WILLIS . OF = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

I^. BVRNHAM . 1659 = T . W. 

CAISTER. 

16. O, WILLIAM . HANSON . OF = A flcur-dc-lys. 

li. CAISTER . HIS . HALF . PENNY. =W . F . H. 1668. 

17. O. lOHN . LATHORP = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . CASTER . 1 668 = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

There are two Caisters in Norfolk. Mr. Simpson, in his Lincolnshire list, 
attributes them to Norfolk. 

CARLTON. 

18. O, lOHN . HANCOCKE . AT . THE = A COCk. 

^. IN . CARLTON . 1 668 = A cock. 

Carlton is a very common name. As there are four Carltons in Norfolk, this 
token probably belongs here. 

CLEY-NEXT-THErSEA. 

19. O, CLAVE . IN . FARTHING = An anchor with cable attached. 
I^, HOVLT . HONORED = A horse-shoe. J 

20. O, RICHARD . SHAWE . OF = A man dipping candles. 

^. CLAY . IN . NORFOLKE . 1667 = R . M . S. J 

21. O. lOHN . wiLCH . AT . THE = St. Georgc and the dragon. 

^. GEORGE . IN . CLAY = I . W. 
The sign of the George is still to be found here. 



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NORFOLK. 84i 



CREAKE, SOUTH. 

22. O. WILL . SWALLOW . 1667= A jUg. 

J?. SOVTH . CREAKE . IN . NORFOLK = W . S. 

This token was found in pulling down old cottages at Sharrington, near Holt. 

The following is extracted from the parish registers : 

" 1669, October* 25. Sarah Swallow was buried. The affidavit, according to the 
Act of Parliament, for burying in Wollen upon the account of Sarah Swallow given 
to me October 31, 1669. 

"August 17. William Swallow was buried. The affidavit, etc., etc., given to 
me August, 1680. 

"John Cleaver, Vicar of South Creak." 

Signed at the bottom of the page for all entries. 



CROMER. 

23. O. RICHARD . BEANEY = A hoFse trotting. 

^. OF . CROMER . 1665 = R . A . R 
Probably Richard Beaney is a misreading of fiennet. 

24. O, RICHARD . BENNET = A liuTi rampant. 

J^. OF . CROMMER . 1665 =R . A . B. 

The Lion is still one of the principal inns. 
The Cromer registers commence in 1689. In 1692 : 

"Gnielmus filus Richard Bennet e* Elz< " was baptized. Other children of 
Richard and Elizabeth Bennet were baptized later on. 

25. O. ROBERT . DRAKE . AT . CROMER = A lion rampant. 

I^. IN . NORFOLK = R . D. 

26. O. MARGRET . MANGLE = A tree. 
J^, OF . CROMER . 1666 = M . M . C. 



DISS. 

27. O. A . DISS . FARTHING . 1 669 (in three lines across the field). 
R, Arms, wavy ; crest, an anchor. /arg^e I 

28. O. THOBiAS . BVRTON . OF = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

^. DISS . IN . NORFELKE = T . B. \ 

28*. A variety, the letters on obverse being larger. 

The Burtons were numerous in Diss in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 
There were two Thomases, distinguished in the registers as " gent. " and " the 
glover." Probably the latter issued the token». 

The following are extracts from the registers : 

** Bapt 1629, June. Thomas, the sonne of Thomas Burton, baptized xxj^ 
day. 

" Bur. i68f , Mar. 23, Thomas Burton the glover. 

"Thomas B. the glover and Mary had a child bapt. 2 Jany., i68^ 

**Tho8. B. marr. E^^ Harrison, Sep. 1654. 

"Thos, B. marr. Eli2»>» Baker, widow, 11 Dec., 1656. 

"Thos. B., gent., and Eliz., had children baptized 1657 to 1676.'' 

One Thomas Burton was a tenant living in **the Gwyiae Hall" in Diss, 16S4. 



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S44 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



DOWNHAM MARKET. 

29. O. WILL . RAY . OF . DOWNHAM = W . A . R. 1666. 

-^. MARKETT . IN . NORFOLK = The Merccrs' Anns. J 

30. O. lo"* . TROTT . IN . DOWNHAM = A horse-shoe. 

^. MARKET . IN . NORFOLK = I . E . T. J 

EAST DEREHAM. 

31. O. PETER . BARKER . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. EAST . DEREHAM . 1656 = ? . M . B. 

32. O. THO . BLYFER . OF . EAST = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^, DEARHAM . DRAPER = T . A . B. 

33. O. HENREY . BODDY . GROCER = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. IN . EAST . DEARHAM =s H . S . B. 

34. O. lOHN . HALCOTT = A bow and arrow. 

I^. IN . EAST . DEAREHAM = I . C . H. 

A dilapidated tombstone in Litcham Churchyard remains, to John Halcott, gent., 
who died at Lynn, March 22, 1678. 

35. O. THOMAS . lESSVP . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, EAST . DEARHAM . l66o = T . I. } 

36. A variety has the word gro on the reverse in place of the 

date. 

37. O. lOHN . MARSHALL . OF = An eagle and child. 

J^. EAST . DEARHAM . [l6]7l = I . E . M. 
This is the latest date on a Norfolk token. 

38. O. FRANCES . WALLER = The Grocers' Arms. 
-/?. IN . DEERHAM = A pair of scales. 

EAST HARLING. 

39. O lOHN. HILTON =1660. 

i?. EAST . HARLING = Three doves. 

EMNETH. 

40. O. GEORGE . WHYTiNG = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . EMNETH . 1660 = G . W. \ 

FAKENHAM. 

41. O. WILLIAM . DiDLESFOLD = The Mercers* Arms. 

J^, OF . FAKHAM . MERCER = W . D. 



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NORFOLK. '84s 

42. O, EDMOND . PECKONER = The Merchant-Tailors' Arms. 

R, IN . FAKENHAM . GROCR= 1667. J 

Edmood Peckover served as' a trooper in the Commonwealth Army under the 
command of General Fleetwood from 1646 to 1655. The certificate he received 
alter his discharge is still in the possession of his descendants ; it is as follows : 

" Tkts are to scrtyfey home it may Concern that Edmund Peckeover GentUlmane 
served as a Solger in the troupe of Will, Collman^ Ma^or: after him Joseph Blisitt 
Casing had and hath still the Comand of the same troupe under the Comand of the 
Right honorabuU Leftennante General Charles Fletewod whom is Colonell in the 
service of the Comomvellth both in Ens[lcutd and Scotland from t/ie yeare of our 
Lord on thouscmd six hundred forty six untill the yeare on thousand six hundred 
fftey and five : duremg which time he behaved him sellveffaithfull ley and honesley 
MS becom a Solger in wiines whareof we have here Uonto set our hands and Seels this 
Sixen of Aguste 1655. 

** Joseph Blissett 
"Hugh Parrye ©*' 

Edmund PeckoTer, after the last-mentioned date, settled at Fakenham, where he 
joined the Society of Friends, and, owing to the persecuting spirit of the times, 
be suffered frequently for his religious principles. 

Some of this family are buried in Norwich at the churches of St. George of 
Colegate and St Martin-at-Palace, where there are tablets to them. Edmond 
Peckover, grocer, son of Matthew Peckover, esquire, was sworn a freeman of 
Norwich in 1654. The house in which the issuer of this token resided is still a 
grocer's shop. 

43. 0. ROBERT . SHELDRAKE = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R, IN . FAKENHAM . 1667 = R . S. 
Robert Sheldrake in 17 19 devised a house to the poor of Fakenham. 

44- 0. WILLIAM . SHILDRACK = W . S. 
R. IN . FACKENHAM= 1657. 

FORDHAM. 

45. O, lOHN . BADCOCK = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . FORDHAM . 1667 = 1 . B. \ 

This token may belong to Cambridgeshire. 

FORNCETT ST. PETER. 

46. 0. ROBERT . PLOWMAN . IN . FON=-HIS HALFE PENY. 1 668. 
R, CIT . PETER . IN . NORFOLKE = R . M . P. \ 

Ralfe Plowman and ffrances Parish were married October 18, 161 5. Robert, 
their son, was baptized October 27, 1616. 

There is no roister of his marriage, but Alice, Mary, and Sarah, daughters of 
Robert and Martha Plowman, were baptized at different dates from 1649 to 1660. 

Robert Plowman was buried in 1706. The family of Plowman appear to have 
been numerous at Forncett up to 1706, when the last entry of the name occurs. 

FOULSHAM. 

47- 0. lOHN . ATTHiLL . OF = The Grocers' Arms. i . m . a. 
R, POVLSHAM . GROCER . IN | NOR | FOLK (in the field in three 
lines). 

The family of Atthill have been landowners for at least four and a half centuries 
m Foulsham and the neighbouring parish of Guestwick. 



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846 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Foulsham Hall and estate were purchased by the family in 1692 of Philip 
Skippon, son of Major-General Skippon, who was an active officer in the Parlia- 
mentary Army, 

48. O, EDWARD . BENN . i668 = The Mercers' Arms. 

-^. OF . FOVLSHAM . MERCER = E . R . B. ^ 

One of Benn's tokens was found a few years since in pulling down the old 
King's Head Inn at Foulsham. 

HARLESTON. 

49. O. STEPHEN . FREEMAN = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. IN . HARLSTON . 1 666 = 3 . F. ^ 

John, son of Stephen Freeman and Frances, his wife, was born September 14, 

and baptized September 15, 1664; Stephen was born July 22, and baptized 

August 3, 1666 ; and Thomas was born July 6, 1671. 

Stephen Freeman, gent., of Redenhall (with Harleston), was buried May 20^ 

1684. 

50. A variety reads steven. 

51. O. CLEARE . SHEWEL = The Gfocers' Arms. 

-/?. IN . HARLSTONE . 1656 = 6 . S. i 

52. A variety reads shewell. 

53. A variety of this has the reverse spelt harlston, and is dated 

1666. 

Cleere Sewell and Jane Westgate were married April 23, 1646. Their children, 
Cleere, Anne, Mary, Elizabeth, and Sarah, were bom 164S to 1652, and all 
baptized April 25, 1664. 

John Sewell, son of Cleere Sewell and Anne, his wife, was bom the eight and 
twentieth day of November, 1665. 

Anne, the wife of Cleere Sewell the elder, was buried July 16, i68a 

Clare Sewell was buried November 24, 1693. 

HILGAY. 

54. O, lOHN . DEY . OF . 1664 = The Grocers' Arms. 

-/?. HELLGAY • IN . NORFOLK = I . D. 

HINGHAM. 

55. O, EDWARD • BALDWIN = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

^. OF . HINGHAM . l668 = E . E . B. J 

A Stephen Baldwin was Churchwarden in 170 1. 

56. O, WILLIAM . Rix. GRosER = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF . HINGHAM . 1659 = W . A . R. 

HOLT. 

57. (9 DANIEL . ROLL = A mortar. 

J^, OF. holt. 1666 = D. R. } 

58. O. FRANCIS . SHAWE . IN = A man making candles. 

i?. HALLT . 1658 = F . P . S. 



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NORFOLK. 847 



LITCHAM. 

59. 0. THOMAS . FELTWELL . IN = T . F. 

J?. LICHAM . AT . Y^ . BVLL = A bull i 

Alice, Frands, Thomas, Robert, and Thomas, children of Thomas Flelwell and 

Alice, his wife, were bom and baptized between February, 1664, and April, 1672. 

Two of these died yoimg. 
The Bull is still the principal inn at Litcham. 

60. 0. WILLIAM . PEARSON = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. GROSER . OF . LITCHAM = W . P. 
Thomas and Charles, sons of William and Dorothy Pearson, were baptized 
respectively November 16, 1633, and November 19, 1635. 



LODDON. 
61. O. HENRY . BVRROVGH . 1667 = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. LODDON . IN . NORFOLK = H . B. 



LONG STRATTON (see Stratton). 



LUDHAM. 
62. 0, ROBERT . WHITE . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. LVDHAM . GROCER =R . W. 



LYNN REGIS. 

63. 0, KINGS . LYN . FARTHING . 1 668 (in three lines), m . m. a 

rose. 
J^, Arms of Lynn ; three conger eels* heads erect, in the mouth 
of each a cross crosslet fitch^e. large J 

64. A variety has, obverse, m . m. a mullet of five points. 

65. Another similar, dated 1669 (smaller). 

From the Town Books of Lynn : 

"November 4th, 1670.— Forasmuch as Mr. Mayor (Henry Bell, Esq.) did ihis 
day present to this House, 2 Letters, the one from Mr. Recorder, and the other 
&wn Mr. Wright, for and about the danger the Town is lyable too for and con- 
caning their putting out Farthings: Mr. Mayor is desired to answer the said 
Letters, and to let them know this House doe desire that they would both 
cffiectoaUy take care to use all means to prevent the Quo-ranto issuing out against 
the Town, and to petition his Majesties pardon, and to doe whatsoever else they shall 
jodge necessary to prevent any trouble that may fall on this Corporation for the 
patting out these farthings, which are out on the corporation account" 

It was two years before the King's pardon was obtained, which is thus noticed 
in the town books : 

** November 2nd, 1672.— Ordered the Town Seal to be fixed to an instrument 
>clnx>wledging his Majesties grace and favour in pardoning the Corporation for 
"ttking of Farthings.**— Richard's ** History of Lynn,'* voL ii., pp. 824-825. 



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848 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

66. O. ROBERT . ALLEN . IN = The Coopcrs' Arms. 

J^. LINN . COOPER . 1668 = R . M . A. ^ 

Allen was a wine-cooper and one of the Common Council. He resided in 

St. Margaret's parish, and was rated at ;(f 16, and £2 for a cellar in Chequer Ward. 
He was buried on the north side of St. Margaret's Church, where is a stone with 

this inscription : 
" Here lieth the body of Mr. Robert Allen, wine cooper, one of the Common 

Council of this Borough, who departed this life the loth day of February i68t, 

aged $6 years." 

67. O, EDWARD . BiLLiNGEs = The Apothecaries* Arms. 

J^, LINN . REGIS . 1656 = E . E . B. J 

68. Another similar, dated 1662. 

69. O. ALEXANDER . BINGHAM = Head of Charlcs II. 

-/?. IN . KINGS . LYNN . [l6]66 = A . B. J 

In 1673 Bingham was rated for a cellar in Chequer Ward at ;^1 los. 

69*. A variety has 68 on obverse. 

70. O. lOSEPH . BRABAN . HOSYER = A Stocking. 
I^. IN . LYNN . REGIS . l666 = I . M . B. 

In 1673 Joseph Brabant was rated for a house in Paradise Ward at ;£'ia 
Theophilius Brabourne was a hosier in Norwich in the nth James I., and John 
Brabourne in the 3rd of Charles I. They were both apprenticed to rfenry 
Brabourne. 

71. O, lOSEPH . BREBON = W . R 

-^. IN . NORFFOLK = E . G. 1657. 
It is not quite certain whether this token is correctly placed, as the name of the 
town does not ap|>ear upon it. The meaning of the initials on either side, is un- 
known. 

72. O, GYLES . BRiDGM AN = The Arms of the Bridgman family, 

nine mullets. 

J^. IN . LYN . REGIS = G . S . B. J 

73. O, GILES . BRIDGMAN = G . S. B. 

^. IN . LINNE . REGIS . 1650 = . S . B. J 

Giles Bridgman was mayor in 1680, and resided in Stonegate Ward, where he 
was rated at ;f 32, and £2 for a coal-yard. He left ;f 100 to l^ paid to the widows 
in the Bede house to augment their weekly pension. 

He was churchwarden of St. Mai^garet's in 1667, and Mayor of Lynn in 1679. 
The date on this token is the earliest of the Norfolk series. 

74. O, HiLEARD . BROWNE = The Groccrs* Arms. 

J^, IN . LINN . 1654 = H . K . B. J 

Hillar Brown was 6ned at the hands of one Captain Brown " for profanely 
swearing seven oaths vij^," which was paid to the churchwardens' account. 

75. O. lOHN . BROWN . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. LYN . GROCER = I . B. i 

76. O. ROBERT . BVLL . AT . THE . BACKRS = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^, ARMS . IN . LEN = R . B . B. 
Bull's house in North End Ward was rated at £6 in 1674. 



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NORFOLK, 849 

77. 0, lOHN . CLAY . 1664 = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

iV. IN . LYN . REGES = I . S . C. 
He lived Id, and was rated at ;f 10, for a house in Trinity Hall Ward. 

78. O, IN . LATH . STREET = E . D. 

R, IN . LYNNE . REGES = 1660. \ 

79. O. IN . LATH . STREETE= 1660. 
R, IN . LYNNE . REGIS = E . D. 

80. 0, THOMAS . DENMAN = The Tallowchandlcrs' Arras. 

R, IN . LYNN . 1665 =T . L D. J 

Zi, 0. ROBERT . FRAVNCES = The Apothecaries* Arms. 

R, IN . LYNN . REGIS = R . F. 
A stODe in St. Margaret's Church was inscribed : 

*'M. S. Exuvise Roberti Frauncis, Pharmacopoloe, qui obiit Maij 16, A^ ^Etat 
46, i€r. Chr., 1686.*' 

82. 0. SETH . GARRARD . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, LINN . GROCER . 1652 = 8 . M . G. 

Scih Gerrard, sen., resided in 1674 in the Chequer Ward, and there rated at £iZ, 
He also occupied a warehouse and chamber in the North End Ward. Seth 
Gerrard, jnn., was rated at £6 for a house in Chequer Ward, and £^ each for two 
warehouses. 

83. O, lOHN . GREENE . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 
R. OF . LYNNE . IN . NORFOLKE = I . G. in monogram. 

He was rated at £% for a house in Sedgeforth Lane Ward in 1673. 

84. 0, THOMAS . HARWicK = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, IN . LIN . REGIS . MERCER = T . H. conjoined. J 

Thomas Harwick was churchwarden of St. Margaret's, and was rated in 1674 at 
;( 12 for house in Sedgeforth Lane Ward. 

Richard Harwick was mayor in 1723 ; he was a bookseller. He gave two folio 
Prayer-books for service at the altar of St. Margaret's Church. 

Charles Harwick was mayor in 1731. 

85. O. WILL . HATFIELD . 1666 = Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

R. IN . LYNN . REGES = W . A . H. 

*'June nth, 1688. William Hatfield, Giles Bridgman, and some others were 
temoTcd from their office of Aldermen by order of the Council at Whitehall." 

He resided in the North End Ward, and was rated at ;^8. He was overseer in 
1674, ^d died on July 18, 1690, in his forty-fourth year, and was buried in 
St Nicholas ChapeL The arms on his gravestone are ermine, on a chevron sable, 
iograiled, three cinquefoils, or. 

86. O, lEREMiAH . HOVELL = A man holding a cross. 

R. OF . LINN . 1666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

For a long period the Hovell family resided at Hillington, near Lynn. There 
was another family of the same name at Walsham and Wetherden, in Suffolk, who 
bore arms, sable, a cross or, which may account for the device on the token. Sir 
Wiffiam Hovell, of Hillington, was M.P. for Lynn in 166 1. Jeremiah Hovell 
Hved iu Trinity Ward in 1674, and was rated there 2X£i2. 

87. 0. lOHN . HOWARD = A hand holding shears. 

R. OF . LYNN . 1660 = 1 . D . H. 



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8so TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

88. O, REBECKAH . HOWLETT = A plumc of feathers. 

li. IN . KINGS . LINN = R . H. * J 

In 1661 a Quaker, named Bartholomew Hewlett, was imprisoned for not attend- 
ing his parish church. One Ruth Hewlett, spinster, of Lynn, in 1694 by her will 
b^ueathed to each of her brothers, Robert and John, los. to buy a ring. 

89. O, ROBERT . LEAK . IN . LINN = A rOSe. 
J^. WOLL . COMER = R . M . L. 

Robert Leak is named in Rushworth's Collection as being on behalf of the town 
at the siege. 

He resided in the Jewes* Lane Ward, and was rated at £2 10?. 

90. O. BRYAN . MiDLETVN . IN = The Merchant-TailoFs' Arms. 

li. LYN . REGIS . NORFOLK = B . M. M. J 

"March 26th, 1646. — Churchwardens' accounts. Levied upon a stranger for 
travelling on a fast day, 5s. ; to Brian Middleton, informer, I2d." 
He was rated at £$ for a house in Chequer Ward. 

91. O, WILLIAM . PRESTON = The Upholsterers* Arms. 

J^. VPHOLSTER . IN . LIN = W . B . P. J 

He lived in Trinity Hall Ward, and was rated at £S.' 

92. O. EDMOND. QV ASH = An anchor. 

J^. IN . LYNN . 1667 — E . Q. 

93. O. MATTHEW . RicHERS . GROC=The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. ER . OF . LYNN . REGIS . 1665 =M . A.- R. 

94. O. MATHEW . RICHERS = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. IN . LIN . 1667 = M . A . R. 
He was rated at ;f 10 in Chequer Ward. 

95. O. lOHN . RiNGSTEAD . i658=A chandler. 

J^. OF . LINN . CHANDLER = I . F . R. J 

Ringstead was rated in 1673 ^^ £^^ for house and premises in North End 
Ward. 

96. O. RICHARD . ROBERTS =1660 (in field). 

^. IN . LiNN=R . G. E . (in field). 

97. O. SAMVEL . ROBINSON = Three stags* heads. 

J^. IN . LYN . l66o = S . R. 

98. O, lOHN . SALTER . IN , LYNN. 

J^, BAKER . 1666 = 1 . S . S. i 

99. O. WILLIAM . SHARPE=The Bakers* Arras. 

J^, IN . LYNN . REGIS . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

In 1674 William Sharpe was rated for a chamber in North End Ward at £2 tos. ; 
for a house in Trinity Hall Ward at £S ; and for a garden in Sedgeforth Lane 
Ward at ;^i. 

100. O. ROBERT . THETFORD=The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. GROCER . IN . LINN [l6]67 = R • M . T. 
Robert Thetford resided in Trinity Hall Ward, and was rated at £7, 



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NORFOLK, 851 

Thomas Thetford was Mayor in 1677, and to him and others was g^nted a 
Acuity for erecting the organ in St Margaret's Church by Anthony, then Bishop of 
Nunrich. 

There are monuments to varions members of the family in 1663, 1677, and 1723. 
The arms are : arg. three mountain cats, pass. arg. 

loi. O, EDWARD . TiLSON=«The BakcTs' Arms. 

^. OF . KINGS . LYNE=l668. J 

Edward llllson resided, and was rated at ;f 16, in Trinity Hall Ward. 

102. O. OF . LIN . REGES = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . NORFOLKE = N . R . W. J 

102*. A variety struck from different dies. 

103. 0, RICHARD . WOLTERTON = A shuttlc. 

J^. IN . LYNN . 1656 = R . W. J 

MARS HAM. 

104. O. MiCHAELL . HAWK = A man making candles. 

i?. IN . MASHAM . 1666 = M . H. 
This token has been placed to Masham, in Yorkshire, but as it is similar to the 
one issued by Havkins, of Aylsham, I have claimed it for the above village, which 
is near Aylsham. The token issued by Charles Clarke, of Movsham, probably 
betongs to Moulsham, in Essex, and not to Marsham, as stated in Boyne's former 
edition. 

MASSINGHAM. 

105. O, THO . CHILDERHOVSE=l657. 
J^. OF . MASSINGGAM [l6]57 - T . C. 

MENDHAM. 

106. O, THOMAS. GOODWIN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . MENDHAM . l664 = T . G. 
Part of this parish is in Suffolk. 

METHWOLD. 
A token of Thomas Poston, of Methwold, is mentioned by Mr. Boyne. One 
iaioed by Thomas Postle, of Southwold, has doubtless been misread. 

MILEHAM. 

107. O. FRANCIS . LADLY . OF = FL conjoined. 

H. MILEHAM . 1666 = F . C. L. 

NARBOROUGH. 

108. O. lOHN . ROBINSON = A ship. 

J^. IN . NARBOROVGH = HIS HALF PENNY. 1667. ^ 

This token is ascribed by some to Narborough in Leicestershire. The sign of 
the Ship still exists at Narborough in Norfolk^ The name of Robinson exists in 
the parish. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



852 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



NEW BUCKENHAM. 
109. O. FRANCIS . WATTS . 1 65 7 = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, OF . NEWBVCKENHAM = F . W. 
" Francis, y" sonne of Francis Watt and Elizabete his wife, born May 25, 1657." 

no. O. THO . YOVNGMAN . GROCER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. IN . NEW . BVCKENHAM . 1 667 =T . Y. 

NORTHWOLD. 

111. O, WILLIAM . RVSSELL . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

-^. NORTHWOLD . GROSER = W . R . R. 

NORWICH. 

112. O. lOHN . ATWOOD = I . K . A. 
J^, IN . NORWICH = I . K . A. 

Mint-mark, a mullet. 



113. A variety with a star for a mint-mark. 

114. Another variety, struck from different dies. 



Atwood resided in St. Michael at Plea from 1659 to 1668, but appears to have 
subsequently removed into St. George, Tom bland : see Blomefields "History of 
Norwich," p. 745. He was admitted to the freedom of the city on May 3, 1047, 
and was a haberdasher by trade. His tokens are the worst executed of the Nor- 
wich series, and are rarely found in good condition. A John Atwood was buried at 
St. Peter Mancroft in 1695. 

1*6. 

115. O. lAMES . AVBREE = g» 

J^, IN . NORWICH = I . M . A. 

"Jacobus Arborey Dyer filius Thome Arborey ad missus est ciuis I7**ffeb., 1646,** 
O.S. He afterwards resided in St. Clement's parish. Thomas Turner, an appren- 
tice of "James Arbree," was sworn a freeman in 1662. 

116. O. MICHAELL . BAKER =1667. 
J^, OF . NORWICH = M . A . B. 

"Michaell Baker Taylor filius Joh'nis Baker admissus est Civis 6° Sept., 1645." 
He resided in St. Michael-at-Plea, and was overseer there in 1667-68. 

117. O, I AMES . BARTON = The Fruiterers' Arms. 

Ji, IN . NORWICH . 1667 = 1 . E . B. 

As the arms of the Fruiterers' Company are the tree of Paradise, environed with 
the serpent between Adam and Eve, it is possible that the device upon this token 
was intended to represent the sign of the Adam and Eve, which was to be found 
in Norwich in the seventeenth century, and not the Fruiterers* arms. James 
Barton, clockmaker, was admitted a freeman in 1629, and James Barton, fringe- 
maker, in 1648. 

118. O, VIOLET . BENTON = A key. 

^. IN . NORWICH . 1664 = V . R . 
"Violett Benton Cordyn* Appr'nt Tho. Semer admissus est Ciuis 210 die 



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NORFOLK. 853 

Jannarij, 1632," O.S. He resided in St. Peter Mancroft, where he was married 
to Rebecca Maryall on September 26, 1632. He was buried there in 1670, and 
she in 1672. 

ug, O. NICHOLAS . BiLHAM = The Grocers* Arms. 

I^. OF . NORWICH = N . B. 

Nicholas Bilham, grocer, was admitted to the freedom of the city in 1660. He 
leaded in St. John's Maddermarket, and was buried there in 1662. 

120. O. lOHN . BLAND = A Stocking (above it a small r). 

I^. IN . NORWICH = I . M . B. 

121. A variety difiering in the obverse die. 

The small letter R on the obverse is the initial of Thomas Rawlings, who was 
chief engraver of the Mint under Charles I. During the Commonwealth he fell 
into poverty, and took to engraving dies for tokens. "Joh'es Blankes," woollen 
dnper, was admitted a freeman in 1648, and as no John Bland occurs in the 
*'Lib. Introit Civ." in the middle of the seventeenth century, he was probably the 
issuer. 

122. O. PEETER . BLOFELD = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, IN . NORWICH = P . B. 

He resided in St. Michael at Plea, and was buried there in 1676. A Peter 
fibwfild, worsted-weaver, was sworn a freeman in 1631. 

123. O, AVGVSTINE . BRIDGS = A COCt 
I^. IN . NORWICH . GROCER = A . B. 

Engraved in "Norfolk Archaeology," vol. v., p. 241. 

124. A variety differing in both dies. 

The family of Briggs had long been settled in Norfolk, and originally resided at 
Sail, near Reepham. As there were two Augustine Briggs, father and son, living 
in St. Peter Mancroft, Norwich, at this time, we cannot positively say which was 
the issuer. The father, who was born in 161 7, was a strenuous supporter of King 
Charles, was Sheriff in 1660, Mayor in 1670, and M.P. in 1677. He died in 1684, 
and was buried in St. Peter Mancroft Church, where his monument, which hajs 
heen engraved by Blomefield, remains. He was admitted to the freedom of the 
dty, as a grocer, in 1644. The son, who was sworn a freeman in 1674, was 
Slififf m 1685, Mayor in 1695, and was buried at St. Peter's in 1704. He married 
Elitabeth Cock, which may account for the device upon the token, but the dates 
would point to the father as the issuer. For a pedigree of, and much information 
relative to the family, see Blomefield's •* History of Norwich," p. 640. Briggs 
Street probably takes its name from this family. 

125. O, lAMES . BROCKDEN = A CaStle. 
J^. IN . NORWICH . 1664 = 1 . R . B. 

James Brockden, " Spurryer," was admitted to the freedom of the city in 1636. 
He resided in Mancroft, and was churchwarden in 1652. We find that several 
apprentices, as well as sons, of James Brockden, were admitted as mercers ; leading 
one to infer that there were two of that name, the one a spurrier, the other a 
nercer, but this needs confirmation. He was Sheriff in 1679, and died in i68a 
His widow, Rebecca, died in 1686. Both were buried in St. Peter Mancroft. 
The castle on the token is triple towered, like that in the city arms, to which the 
^erice on the token probably alludes, although it may be that Brockden lived at 
l^ sign of the Castle, which was common in Norwich in the seventeenth 
ceatury. 

VOL IL 55 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



854 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

126. O. ROBERT . BROWN = The Mcrchant-Tailors' Arms. 

J^. IN . NORWICH bR . a . B. 

Engraved in "Norfolk Archaeology," vol v., p. 241. 

Robert Brown, tailor, apprentice of Robert firown, was admitted a citizen in 
1636 ; and Robert Browne, hosier, apprentice to Henry Watts, Esq., in 1657. The 
former was probably the issuer. 

127. O. lOHN . BROWNE = A swan. 

J^. IN • NORWICH . 1657 = I . S . B. 
This issuer's name is too common to identify. The Swan, one of the most 
ancient inns in Norwich, was situate in St. Peter Mancroft, and was only closed a 
few years since. 

128. O, EDWARD . BVXTON = The Groccrs* Arms. 

Ji. OF . NORWICH . 1653 = E . A . B. 

" Edwardus Bvxton Grocer app*ntic Robto Baret admissus est Civis 25^ Sept. 
1648." He resided in St. Andrew s, and was churchwarden in i659-6a He died 
in 1665, and was buried in the south aisle of the church of that parish, in which in 
Blometield's time there was a stone to the memory of Elizabeth, daughter of 
Edward and Ann Buxton, Edward their son, and Mr. Edward Buxton. 

129. O. EDMVND . CAMOND = The Groccrs' Arms. 

Ji. OF . NORWICH . GROCER = E . C. 

** Edmondus Camon Grocer app'ntic Margar' Baley admissus est Civis 25^ Sept. 
1648.*' He lived in St John Maddermarket from 1643 to 1658, and was overseer 
there in 1651. This name appears several times in the churchwardens* books, but 
not at all in the roisters. 

130. O, lAMES . CASTiLL = A wool-comb. 

Ji. IN . NORWICH . 1664 = 1 . I . C 

Engraved in " Norfolk Archaeology," vol. v., p. 241. 

We do not find James Castill's admission to the freedom of the city. John 
Castle, a worsted-weaver, was sworn a freeman in . 1656. In 1664 Mr. Tames 
Castell, and also Mrs. Jane Castell, widow, were rated in St Saviour's parish. 

131. O, lAMES . CASTLE = 1662. 
Ji. IN . NORWICH = I . I . C 

Probably issued by the same person as the preceding, as the wife's initial is the 
same. James Castle was rated in St. Martin at Oak and St. Augustine in 1659, 
and in the latter parish in several subsequent years. 

132. O. ROBERT . CLAYTON . IN = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J^» NORWICH. IRONMONGER =1663. 

Engraved in " Norfolk Archaeology," voL v., p. 241. 

•* Robert Claiton Iron munger,'* apprentice to John Salter, Esq., was admitted 
to the freedom of the city on March 26, 166 1. He was rated in no less than six 
parishes, viz., St. Andrew, St. Paul, St. Michael Coslany, St. Stephen, St. Julian, 
and St. Peter Mancroft In 1664 he purchased the house in St. Julian's in which he 
then resided. It was situate in St. Ann's Lane, on the south side, at the back of 
the premises called " Middaies," and had orchards and eardens running down to 
the river. He was Sheriff of the city in 1672, in which year he died, and was 
buried at St. Peter Mancroft. 

133. O, WILLIAM . COOPER . OF = The King's head crowned. 
Ji. IN . NORWICH . 1662 = A full-blown rose. 

The King's Head was one of the principal inns in Norwich. It was situate in 
the Market-place, and was pulled down in 18 12, when Davey Place was made. A 
William Cooper was buried at St. Peter Mancroft in 1666. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



NORFOLK. 855 

134. 0, ISAAC . cowPER . BRICK = A trowel 

J^. LAYER . IN . NORWICH-I . E . C 

Isaac Cowper, rough mason, apprentice of Stephen Cowper, was admitted to 
the freedom of the city on September 21, 1656. Richard Rocke, an apprentice of 
his, was sworn a freeman in 1668. Stephen Cowper was rated in St. Giles. 

135. O. PEETER. DEALE« A helmet 

I^. IN . NORWICH . 1664 = P , A . D. 

Peter Deale was an armourer by trade, and was admitted to the freedom of the ci^ 
on May 3, 1654. He lived in St. Peter Mancroft, in the books of which parish his 
name continually occurs from 1650 till 1665, in which latter year he died and was 
boried on July 14. His wife, Amy, by whom he had several children, survived him, 
and we find a few years afterwards that Anne Dale, widow, was buried there. 
Anne was probably a mistake for Amy. 

136. O. ABRAHAM. DERRIX = A fleCCe. 
J^, IN . NORWICH . 1665 = A . I . D. 

137. A variety slightly differing in the reverse die. 

The device upon this token has been supposed to be a pineapple, but it is no 
doubt a fleece. Abraham Derricke, worsted-weaver, son of Abraham Derricke, 
was sworn a freeman on December 27, 165 1. He lived in St. Lawrence's parish. 
Abraham Derricke, the father, was a hosier, and was admitted to the freedom of 
the city in 1615. 

138. O. lAMES . DOVER =1667. 
J^. IN . NORWICH = I . D. 

"James Dover of S' Michael of Coslany vpon his paym< of 20* to y« Hamper 
is Dispensed with for beareinge the office of Constable for one yeare next follow- 
inge."— Mayoralty Court Book, June 28, 1671. 

One Daniel Dover was a hosier in Norwich in 1635, ^ ^^ Samuel Dover in 
1653. 

139. O, ROBERT . DVGLAS = Two swords cTossed. 

J^. CVTTLER . OF . NORWICH = R . D . D. 

Engraved in " Norfolk Archaeology,*' vol. v., p. 241. 

"Rob'tus Duglas Cvtler app'ntic Joh'is Browne admissus est Ciuis 7® Sept. 
1642." In 1646 he resided in St. John Maddermarket, in which year his son 
Robert was baptized there. He appears to have removed to Mancroft about 1650, 
and was one of the overseers of that parish in 1656 ; he continued to live in that 
parish till his death, in 1664. His wife, Dorothy, survived him, and was buried 
there in 1688. Christopher Harsant, haberdasher of small wares, and an apprentice 
of Duglas, was admitted a freeman in 1662. 

140. O. FRANCIS . ELMER = Three foxes. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1667 = F . G . E, 
Francis Elmer, worsted -weaver, was admitted a citizen March 22, 1643 ; and 
Fnuids Ailmer, wool-comber, on April 28, 1663. Either may have been the 
issaer, as the two ways of spelling the surname are used indiscriminately. One of 
them resided in St. Gregory, and was churchwarden there in 1663 ; the other Uved 
in Sl Geoi^'s Tombland, filled the same office there in 1664, and was buried in 
the south aisle of the parish church in 1686. He bore arms: argent on a cross en- 
grailed sab. between four Cornish choughs proper, five bezants, impaling Frett^. 

141. O. ROBERT . EMPEROR = A sword crect. 

J^. OF . NORWICH = R . E . E. 
He was rated in St. Michael at Coslany and St. Saviour, and was overseer of the 

55—2 



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«56 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

former parish in 1664, and of the latter in 1665. A Robert Emperor, hosier, son 
of Francis Emperor, was sworn a freeman in 1679. Robert Emperor was one of 
the Common Council placed in the room of those rejected by James II. 

142. O. THOMAS . FERRiER = A heart on the shank of an anchor. 

-^. IN . NORWICH . 1664 = T . F. 
Thomas fferrior, grocer, apprentice to John Osborne, Esq., was admitted a free- 
man on August 21, 1665. He resided in St. Peter Mancroft. In the church- 
wardens* book he is mentioned as " Mr. fferreyheare. " 

143. O. THOMAS . FLATMAN= 1 664. 
R. OF . NORWICH = T . F. 

Thomas Flatman, tallow-chandler, was sworn a freeman on February 25, 1666, 
and was rated in St. Martin at Oak and St. Augustine. He had several appren- 
tices, all of whom were admitted as grocers. He was a Dissenter, and his name 
occurs in the books of St. Mary's Baptist Chapel. 

144. O. RICHARD . FREEMAN = A dove with an olive branch. 

J^. OF . NORWICH . 1657 = R . F. 
Richard Freeman, vintner, son of Mr. John Freeman, Sheriflf in 1636, was sworn 
a freeman on April 7, 1660. He resided at the sign of the Dove, in St. John 
Maddermarket, of which parish he was overseer in 1656, and churchwarden in 
1662. He was buried there in 1693. The Dove was pulled down about forty- 
five years ago, on an extension of Messrs. Chamberlin's premises. 

145. O. IN . NORWICH . CONFECTIONER = L . GOODWY. 
Ji. AT . THE . GOLDEN . CAMELL . l66o = A Camcl. 

Engraved in ** Norfolk Archaeology," vol. v., p. 241. 

Lawrence Goodwyn was an apprentice of Mr. John Lawrence, and was ad* 
mitted to the freedom of the city in 1661. It will be observed that his name occurs, 
with that of Mr. Lawrence, upon another Norwich token. Goodwyn was Sheriff 
in 1682, and Mayor in 1697. In 1687 he was one of the Aldermen of this city, 
and was ejected by James II. He died in 1725, at the age of ninety-two, and was 
buried in the nave of St. Andrew's Church, to which parish he gave a large offer- 
ing-dish, and also two flagons, the inscriptions upon which are given in Blomefield, 
in his account of St. Andrew's parish. 

146. O. THOMAS . GREENE . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. NORWICH . 1658 = T . S . G. 

Thomas Greene, grocer, apprentice to Benjamin Baker, was admitted to the free- 
dom of the city August 13, 1652. He resided in St. Peter Mancroft, of which 
parish he was churchwarden in 1665. He died, and was buried there, in 1683. 
His son, Thomas, was Bishop of Norwich in 1721-23. We find the following 
entry in the Mayoralty Court Book, under date November 14, 1674: 

" Tha Greene of Corp" X^ Coll. in Cambridge vpon the Petition of Mr. Tho. 
Greene Grocer his father, hath a pension of 40* ^ ann* granted him as is men- 
tioned and for such time as is directed in y® donation of l^th. Parker late ArchbP 
of Canterbury." 

Another Thomas Greene, who died of the plague, was buried at Mancroft in 
1666. 

147. O. BENiAMEN . GREENWOOD = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1667 = B .E.G. 
Benjamin, the son of Miles Greenwood, was sworn a freeman March 14, 1662. 
He resided in St. Mary Coslany. 

148. O. ELIZ . HALFKNIGHT = The DyCFS* Afins. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1667 = E . H conjoincd. 
The " Wid. Halfeknights " was rated in St. Peter Hungate and St Edmund. 



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NORFOLK. 857 

149. 0. GEORGE . HALL (iti two lines acToss the field). 
J^. IN . NORWICH . 1 664 = The Grocers* Anns. 

The following entry occurs in the Mayoralty Court Book : 

" I George Hall of y* City of Norwich Grocer doe p'mise to take the oath 
of 1 ffreeman of y* said City the next Assembly, wittness my hand this 18^ day 
of July, 1668. Geo. HaU.''^ 

150. O. THOMAS . HANSE . 0F = An anchor. 

J^, NORWICH . 1664 = T . E . H. 

We do not find the name of Ifanse in any of the corporate records. The follow- 
ing entry, dated May 26, 1677, occurs in the Mayoralty Court Book : 

"The officers of Taylors humblie prayed the leave of M"^ Maior & y« Court that 
the7 may agree with Tha Hawes for his offences ag' a by law of thier Booke in 
settiDge journeyman on worke without leave which is asented to so as they doe pay 
w* is due by y« by lawes to whome it is due." 

Roger Hawes was Mayor in 1668. 

151. O, EDWARD . HARDING = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, IN . NORWICH . GROCER = E . A . H. 
He lived in All Saints' parish from 1659 to 1662, in which year his name 
disappears from the rate-books. Edward Harding, tc^oTy was sworn a freeman in 
1624. 

152. O, BLYTH . HATTON = A full-blown fOSe. 
R, IN . NORWICH = B . H. 

Blyth Hatton, widow, was rated in St Peter Mancroft and in St. Peter per 
Moontergate. She was buried in the former parish in 1670. 

153. O. HENRY . HOLBEY . NEAR = A hand holding a sword. 

1659. 

R, REDWELL . IN . NORWICH = H . G . H. 
Holbey was a " Habbidasher of smales wares," having previously been an 
apprentice of Robert Duglasi. In 1657 he was admitted to the freedom of the 
city, and resided in St. Andrew's till 1665, about which year he appears to have 
removed to St. Peter Mancroft, where he was overseer in 1669. He was buried 
there in 167a The red well was in the centre of Gumey's Bank Plain, and was 
filled up in the early part of the present century. 

154. O, NATHANAELL . HOWLET = The arms of Norwich city. 

R. WOS^ . WEAVER . IN . NORWICH = A 
This token may be considered one of the most interesting of the Norwich series. 
It is the only trader's token that has the city arms upon it, and is one of three 
that have merchants* marks. Nathaniel Howlet, apprentice to Samuel Tabor, 
was sworn a freeman in 1660, and was a worsted-weaver by trade. He was rated 
in the parishes of St. George Colegate and St. Michael Coslany. 

155. O. lOHN . HVTTON = The three legs of the Isle of Man. 

R, IN . NORWICH . 1657 = 1 . E . H. . 

156. A variety differing slightly in the reverse, the mint-mark being 

immediately above the letter h in the field, whereas in 
the former it is slightly to the left of it. 
A John Hutton, worsted-weaver, was admitted a freeman in 1618, but this date 
is prolnbly too early for the admission of the issuer. Giles Hutton, haberdasher, 
>nd Nicholas Bickerdike, haberdasher of small wares, and apprentices of John 
Hatton, were respectively admitted in 1638 and 1662. The " wid. Heaster Hutton " 
wai rated in St Andrew s from 1659 to 1664, and Giles Hutton, who was the son 
of the issuer, for many years afterwards. 



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858 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

157. O. EDWARD . HYRNE = The GroccFS* Arms. 

J^. OF . NORWICH . GROCER « E . M . H. 

Edward Hyme, grocer, son of John Hyme, was admitted a freeman on 
August 25, 1655. He was buried in the south aisle of St. Andrew's Church in 
1658. 

158. O, AT . Y« . POST . OFFICE = 1661. 
J^. IN . NORWICH = A leg, A . L. 

No person whose initials were A • L, except Ann Leverington, widow, was rated 
in Norwich between 1659 and 1667. It has been supposed by some that the leg 
upon the reverse was a punning device upon the issuer s name ; but there was no 
family of the name of Legge in Norwich at this period. Under date of 
November 25, 1668, the following entry is to be found in the Mayoralty Court 
Book: 

** Mr. Robert Lullman did acquaint the Court that he did intend to keepe the 
poast office at Mr. Dicelyes at the Kings armes for y« future." 

Lulman is ebewhere called Captain Lulman. In 1786 the Post-office was in 
the Jack of Newbury Yard, now cedled Old Post-office Yard, in Pottergate Street. 

159. O. IN . s . ANDREWES . PARRicH = T . D . L. Mint * mark, a 

lozenge. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1653 = T . D . L. 

160. A variety has mint-mark, a star on both sides. 

161. A variety differing in the obverse die, the letters being larger. 
Thomas Linstead and Thomas Leasingham, either of whom may have been the 

issuer of these two last-mentioned tokens, were rated in St. Andrew's for many 
successive years at this period. In 1672 Leasingham was discharged from bearing 
all offices in the city on payment of ;f 60. 

162. O. THOMAS . LACEY = Cross keys. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1667 =T . S . L. 
Lacey was rated in the parish of St. George Tombland, and was overseer in 
1665-66. We, however, find the Cross Keys in Ber Street in 1656, and an inn, 
which has the appearance of being an old one, still bears that sign in Magdalen 
Street. 

163. O, WILLIAM . LAMBERT = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. GROCER . IN . NORWICH = w . A . L, three cloves. 
William Lambert, grocer, was admitted to the freedom of the citv on 
December 3, 1659, in which year he was rated in St. Peter Mancroft. A William 
Lambert, merchant, was sworn a freeman in 1667. 

164. O. lOHN . LAWRENCE . 1658 = Seven stars. 

J^. L . GOODWIN . IN . NORWICH = J ' ^ 

L . G. 

This is the only Norwich token upon which two issuers' names occur. Goodwin 
issued another token. John Lawrence, grocer, apprentice of Thomas Wilson, was 
admitted a citizen August 17, 1632, and was for many years rated in St. Peter 
Mancroft He was Sheriff in 1659, and Mayor in 1669. In the Mayoralty Court 
Book we find this entry : 

*• 4 January, 1672, Mr. Robt. Thurrold's bond of 60" due to y« city y* first of y* 
month was taken out of y* Treasury by the clauors, and deliuered to Jo. Laurence 
Esq' to receive y® monie due therupon in full of the salt provisions prouided by 
him and Mr. Laurence Goodwyn vpon thier Ma»y» treate here." 



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NORFOLK. 859 

165. O. lOHN . LEVERINGTON = I . V . L. 
^. IN . NORWICH = I . V . L. 

John Leverington, the issuer, resided in SS. Simon and Jude from 1659 to i662» 
when he remov^ to St. Peter Mancroft. Urith, his wife, the daughter of Thomas 
Reeve, D.D., was buried in the church of the former parish in 1600. See Blome- 
field, voL iL, p. 74a The name of Leverington was common in Norwich about 
this time. John Leverington, worsted- weaver, was sworn a freeman in 1646 ; 
another of that name, an ironmonger, in 1657 ; and John Leverington, goldsmith, 
was elected Sheriff August 27, 1672. John Leverington was one of the Aldermen 
placed in the room of those rejected by James II. 

166. O. THOMAS . LiNSTEAD . AT = The Grocers* Arms. 
^. NORWICH . GROSER = TL conjoined. 1659. 

He was apprentice to Adrian Parmenter, and was admitted to the freedom of the 
dty on June 18, 1649. ^^ resided in St. Andrew's parish, and was buried in the 
DOfth aisle of the diurch there in 1676. He bore arms, sab. a saltire between 
km arrows arg. Crest, two single bows in salrire sab. 

167. O. THOMAS . LONG = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF . NORWICH . 1657 = T . A . L. 
"Thomas Longe grocer Sonne of Rich Longe was swome a freeman the 
31^ of May 165 1." The name being very common, we cannot identify the 



168. O. lOHN . MAYES = A man making candles. 

A IN . NORWICH . 1667 = 1 . E . M. 
He resided in St. Michael at Plea, and was overseer there in 1663-64. The 
name of Mayes frequently occurs in the registers of that parish in the latter half 
of the seventeenth century. John Mayes was searcher for the Grocers' Company 
in 1671. 

169. O. ANTHO . MiNGAY (in two lines across the field). 
-^. IN . NORWICH = A man leading a camel. 

The Mingay iamilv was of considerable respectability, and had long been settled 
at Arminghall, having a city house, now the Mitre Tavern, in St. Stephen's. 
Anthony was the son of Roger Mingay, who was Sheriff in 1653, and Mayor in 

1658. He was a grocer by trade, was admitted to the freedom of the city in 166 1, 
and resided in St. Peter Mancroft from 1659 to 1667, but subsequently lived in 
Sl Stephen's, in the church of which parish there are several monuments and 
brasses in memory of various members of the Mingay family. 

170. O. WILL . MONY . LION . LAN« = A lion rampant 

jR, IN . NORWICH = W . E . M. 

Engraved in " Norfolk Archaeology," voL v., p. 241. 

Mony appears to have resided in St. Peter Mancroft, which parish he left in 

1659, having been overseer in 1656. ** William Money from St. Gregories" was 
hdrKd there in March, 1665. 

171. A slight variety of die. 

172. 0. RICHARD . MORANT-A neck whisk and two picca- 

dillies (?). 

J^. IN . NORWICH = R . M. 

The above description of the device upon this token has been hitherto adopted, 
tod we caimot suggest a better, but the two so-called piccadillies are clearly 
shuttles. This is confirmed by the fact that Richard Morant was a worsted- weaver. 



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86o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

He was admitted a freeman in 1653, and resided in St Peter Mancroft. He, his 
wife, and four other members of his family, died of the plague in one week in Julj, 
1666, and were buried in the above parish. 

173. O, FRACis . MORLY = The Groccrs* Arms. 

J^. OF . NORWICH = F . M. 

Francis, son of Matthew Morley, was admitted a freeman January 7, 1628, and 
was buried at St. Peter Mancroft in September, 1658. Thomas Warren and 
William Witherley, who issued tokens, were both apprenticed to him. Henry 
Morley, his son, was a grocer in Norwich in 1671. Another Francis Morley was 
rated in SS. Simon and Jude in 1667. 

174. O. ANN . MVNFORD = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^, IN . NORWICH = A . M. 

174 . A variety differing slightly in the obverse die. 
The widow Munford was rated in St. Peter Mancroft from 1659 to 1664. She 
was buried there in 1681. 

175. O. GEORGE . MVNFORD = A merchant's mark. 
J^, OF . NORWICH . 1657 = The Grocers' Arms. 

Engraved in *• Norfolk Archaeology," vol. v., p. 241. 

George, the son of Richard Munford, was admitted to the freedom of the city 
February 8, 1653. He resided in St. Peter Mancroft, and was overseer in 
1659. 

176. O. THOMAS . NEWMAN = The Grocers* Arms. 

jR, IN . NORWICH = T . N. 
Thomas, son of William Newman, was sworn a freeman November 22, 1660^ 
and was rated in St. Michael Coslany in 1661. 

177. O. ELI AS . NORGATS = A demi-man holding a sceptre termi- 

nating in a crescent. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1660 = E .E.N. 

He was a pinmaker by trade, and was sworn a freeman December 12, 1656. 
He resided in St. Peter Mancroft, and was buried there October 20, 1661. 
Elias, the son of Elias Norgate and Ellin his wife, was also buried there in 1670. 
An Elias Norgate, milliner, was admitted to the freedom of the city in 1670. 
Elias Norgate was one of the Common Councilmen ejected by the mandate of 
James H. 

178. O, lOHN . OSBORN . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^, NORWICH . GROCER = 0. 

John, the son of Robert Osborne, grocer, was sworn a freeman December 5, 1627, 
and was subsequently rated in the parishes of St. Peter Mancroft and All Saints*. 
He was Sheriff in 1640, and Mayor in 1661. He died in or about 1665, as after 
that date **Mrs, Thomazine Osborne widd" is several times mentioned in the 
Mancroft books. 

179. O, lOHN . PARKER = A sheep. 

J^. OF . NORWICH . 1665 = I . E . P. 
"Mr. Parker by y^ Lambe " is mentioned in the churchwardens* account-book 
of St. Peter Mancroft in 1665. A John Parker resided in, and was overseer of, 
St. John Timherhill in 1659 ; and one John Parker, mercer, son of John Parker, 
was sworn a freeman on April 8, 1665. 



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NORFOLK. 86i 

iSo. O, WILLIAM . PARMENTER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, IN . NORWICH . l654 = W . s . p. 

Pannenter was admitted a freeman January 27, 1653. He lived in St. John 
Unberbill; was overseer in 1660, churchwarden in 1665. He was Sheriff in 
1676. 

181. O, ISAAC . PEARCiVALE = A tree. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1667 = I . I . P. 

Isaac, the son of Richard Persivall, was sworn a freeman July 1 1, i66a He yna 
t worsted-weaver by trade, and resided in St. Martin at Oak, which probably 
iccoonts for an oak being the device on the obverse of his token. 

182. O. WILL . PLAYFORD = W . A . P. 
J^. OF . NORWICH = W . A . P. 

"^W^'ns Playford Drap* filius RoVti Playford admissus est civis 10 Dec 1645.*' 
He lived in Pockthorpe, and was overseer there in 1667-68. In the Mayoralty 
Court Book the following entry occurs, dated July 7, 1665 : 

**It is ordered and agreed that ffrancis Sheppard & Will'm Playford shall have 
the liberty of pitchinge & buildinge of boothes in and aboute the Castle dikes & 
hills w^in the County of this Citty during the time of thelse next assizes as formerly 
hath bene vsed to be done & they are to paye for the same to the Chamberlyn of 
this Citty thirty shillings w***in one weeke after the assizes & no other to vse the 
same grownde." 

183. O. WILLIAM . PRICE = W . S . P. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1662 =W . S . P. 

William Price or Prike was a potter by trade, and resided in St. Peter Man- 
croft. He was admitted to the freedom of the city on February 24, 1658. 
Elizabeth, daughter of William and Sarah Prike, was buried at Mancroft in 
1663. 

184. O. DANiELL . PYCROFT = The Giocers* Arms. 

I^. IN . NORWICH = D . P. 

He was an apprentice of John Osbom (vide No. 178), and was sworn a freeman 
October 16, 1668. He was rated in All Saints* parish, was overseer in 1663, and 
diurchwarden in 1667. We find this entry, dated June 22, 1667, in the Mayoralty 
Court Book: 

•* This day Daniel Pycroft grocer beinge required to take vp his Freedome the 
next assembly and not giueinge a positive answer whether he would or not It is 
ordered that he be presently sued m the Chamberlyn's name.** 

185. O, THOMAS . RANDOLL = The Bakers* Arms. 

J^. IN . NORWICH = T . E . R. 

Engraved in "Norfolk Archaeology,** vol. v., p. 241. 

We do not find in the books of the Bakers' Company of Norwich the name of any 
token-issuer, excepting that of Randoll. He was admitted a member of the com- 
pany June 10, 1663, and resided in St Gregory's parish. Thomas Randoll, the 
younger, was admitted to the Company of Bakers in 1678. 

186. 0. AGVSTiNE . RAYLEY=The Grocers' Arms. 

-^. IN . NORWICH =1662. 

Augustine, the son of John Rayley, Esq., was admitted to the freedom of the 
city March 18, 1662. He was rated in St. Andrew's, and was overseer there in 
1667. His &ther was Mayor in 1649. 

187. 0, THOMOS . RAYNER=The Groccrs* Arms. 

J^, OF . NORWICH . 1653 = T . R. 



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862 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

i88. A variety dated 1655. 

Thomas Rayner, apprentice to John Toft, was sworn a freeman August 22, 1651. 
He resided in St. George's Tombland, and was churchwarden there in 1660 and 
1661. He was head man of the Grocers' Company in 167 1. His son, Walter 
Rayner, grocer, was sworn a freeman in 1684. 

NOR 

189. O, CHARLES . REEVE . 1 664 . 0F = 

WICH. 
NOR 
J^, CHARLES . REEVE . 1 664 . 0F = 

WICH. 
Charles, the son of George Reeve, was sworn a freeman January 10, 1662, 
and was a cordwainer by trade. One of his tokens was found amongst a number 
of skeletons at Lakenham (a hamlet of Norwich) in 1796 ; it is supposed that they 
were the remains of people who had died of the plague. — '* Norwich in Miniature, ' 
p. 29. 

190. O. GEORGE . REEVE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

I^. IN . NORWICH = G . R . R. 

191. A variety, differing in the obverse, having no circle of dots 

round the field. 

He was the son of George Reeve, grocer, and was admitted a freeman August 20, 
1640. The father was sworn a freeman in 1616. 

192. A variety differing in mint-mark and both dies. 

193. A variety differing in size of shield and mint-mark on obverse 

die, and in position of letters. 

194. O. WILL . ROBINSON = The man in the moon. 

J^, IN . NORWITCH . 1662 =W . E . R. 
This is the only seventeenth-century token upon which the name of the ci^ is 
wrongly spelt. Robinson lived in St Andrew's, and was overseer in 1661. William 
Robinson, linen-draper, was sworn a freeman in 1667. 

195. O. lOHN . SHEPPARD = i . s in monogram. 
J^. IN . NORWICH . 1659 = 1 . s in monogram. 

196. A variety differing in the reverse die. Amongst other differ- 

ences two o precede the mint-mark. 

John Shephard, cooper, was sworn a freeman July 28, 1648, and John Shephard, 
haberdasher, apprentice to John Hutton, on March 9, 1657. One of them for 
many years resided in St. John's Timberhill, and was churchwarden in 1661 ; the 
other lived in St. Margaret's parish. A Jo. Sheppard was buried at St. Michael at 
Plea April 28, 1660. 

197. O, HENRY . siDNOR-s A grcyhound, running. 

^. IN . NORWICH . 1659 = H . I . S. 

198. A variety differing in the reverse die, the figures being much 

further apart. 

199. O. HENRY . siDNOR = The Tallowchandlcrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1667 = H . I . S. 
This token is engraved in ** Norfolk Archaeology,*' voL v., p. 241. 



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NORFOLK. 863 

"Hcnricus Sydnor Grocer App*ntic* Adrian Parmenter admissus est Ciuis 18° 
Octobr* 1624.*' He resided in St. Stephen's, and was SheriflF in 1661. His will, 
dated 1677, was proved by his son Henry in 1678. In it he mentions his wife 
"Jean," and directs that his body should be buried at Brunstead, in Norfolk. 
In the Mayoralty Court Book, June 3, 1668, is the following entry : 

" Hen Sydnor gent, informed upon oath that y" present day he did heare John 
Salman mason pro£uiely sweare by the name of God severall tymes & being 
reproofed for the same sayd he would sweare for all him and a warr< is to bsue ag' 
him." 

The Greyhound, in 1783, was in Surrey Street ; the house now bears the sign of 
the Boar's Head. 

200. O. lONATHAN . SNOWDEN = The Groceis* Arms. 

Ji. IN . NORWICH . 1660 = 1 . E . S. 

201. Similar to the last, but differing in both dies. 

Jonathan, the son of William Snowden, was admitted to the freedom of the city 
CD October 16, 1658. He lived in St. Michael Coslany, and was churchwarden 
in 1664. 

IN 

202. O. MATHEW . SOVLTER»NOR 

WICH. 
J^. OATMEALE . MAKER = M . B . S. 

Matthew Salter resided in St. Etheldred's parish. His name occurs in the over- 
seers' book from 1666 to 1683. On the south side of the font there is a stone, now 
nearly illegible, to the memory of Bridget his wife, who had by him twenty-two 
diildren. She died in 1670, aged forty- two. The quaint verses given by Blome- 
field, p. 541, cannot now be read. We Hnd the following entry in the Mayoralty 
Court Book: 

*• 19 May, 1666. It is ordered that y° Oatcmeale house of Math : Salter in S' 
Etheldreds parrishe shall be shutt vp by the Overseers of y^ s^ Parrishe, and the 
Constable to assist them." 

The above entry has reference to the increase of the plague in this city. 

203. O. « SPENDLOVE . 1667 (in two lines across the field;=»A 

merchant's mark. 
J^. GROCER . IN . NORWICH = The Grocers' Arms. 

Engraved in " Norfolk Archaeology," vol. v., p. 241. 

John Spendlove, grocer, apprentice to Daniel Toft {vide No. 209), was sworn a 
freeman June 19, 1654. He was rated in SS. Simon and Jude, and was church- 
varden in 1659 and 1666. Robert Warren, an apprentice of Spendlove, was 
sworn a freeman in 1672. 

204. O. SAMVELL . STARLiN=- Three rabbits. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1664 = 8 . S. 
Mr. Ewing, in his "Norfolk Lists," gives the date of this token 1662, but 
we have never met with a variety so dated. Samuel Starling, "Skiner," 
apprentice to Richard Harman, was sworn a freeman September 3, 1649. He 
leaded for many years in St. George's Tombland parish, and was overseer in 
1659. 

205. O. lOHN . TABOR = A spade. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1663 = 1 . M . T. 

John Tabor was a gardener by trade, and was sworn a freeman on Januaiy 4, 

1659, in which year he was churchwarden of St. Martin at Oak. A curious 

entry m the parish register relative to his bringing an oak from Ranworth Hall, 

near Homing feny, and planting it in the churchyard, is given by Blomefield, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^ TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

206. O. ROBERT . THARROLD = The Groccrs* Arms. 

^. GROCER . IN . NORWICH = R . T. 

Robert Tharold, apprentice to Isaac Leman, was admitted a (reeman September 
25, 1648. He resided in Golden Dog Lane in St. Saviour's parish, was church- 
warden in 1666 and 1667, and was buried there in 1674. The following entry 
occurs in the Mayoralty Court Book : 

"July 20, 1672. It is agreed that if M' Rob* Thurrold doe pay or secure to be 
p<* to the Clauors of this City the sum of Eighty poundes viz' sixty pounds vpon 
the first of Januarie next and ye other twenty pounds within three months next 
after the death of the sayd Robt Thurrold he shall be discharged of bearinge the 
office of Sheriffe and all other offices in this City without his asent if the asembly 
shall consent there vnta*' 

For a further notice of Tharrold's bond, see note to Na 164. 

207. A variety differing slightly in obverse die. 

208. O. WILLIAM . THVRTON=l665. 
J^, OF . NORWICH = W . M . T. 

William, son of Richard Thurton, was sworn a freeman on October 20, 1652, 
and was a domick-weaver by trade. He was rated in St. Peter Mancroft and 
St John Sepulchre, and was churchwarden of the latter parish in 166 1. Dornix 
was a kind of cloth, probably made from hemp or flax, and it is said was first 
manufactured at Dordrecht, in Flanders. 

209. O, BENiAMiN . TOFT = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. IN . NORWICH . 1664 = 3 . E . T. 
He was the son of Daniel Toft (the issuer of the next-described token), and was 
admitted a freenu^n on January 7, 1661. The Toft family was long settled in 
St. Clement's parish, and are said to have lived in a house facing the east end of the 
church. 

210. 0» DANEL . TOFT . GROCER = D . E . T. 
R. IN . NORWICH . 1653 = . E . T. 

*• Daniell Tofte Grocer filius Thome Tofte Ciuis and .\ld'ri admissus est Ciuis22<» 
Nov. 1645." He resided in St Clement's parish, was overseer in 1659, and 
churchwarden in 1660. In the Mayoralty Court Book, under date of June 6, 
1660, we find the following : 

** This day Robt Burton of Clay gent Stephen Adcocke of Norw** Tailor Robert 
Cooke worsted weu* Briant Lewis worsted weu' Edward Ward of Bixly in y« County 
of Norff. Esq' S' Richard Barney of Parke Hall in Reedham in y« County of Norff 
Baronet Thomas Morse of the Citty of Norw^ gent Daniell Toft of Norwich 
Grocer John Potter of Hempnall in y« County of NorfF. Clerke did opinly in the 
Court eu'y of them seu'allv declare by writing under their hands and scales seu'ally 
that they doe thankefully lay hold vpon his mat's grace & favour holden forth in his 
declarac'on given at his Court at Breda in Holland & that they & eu'y of them will 
allwaies readely & heartily yeild to his ma'tie all loyalty & obedience." 

Daniel Toft died in 1660, aged forty-seven, and was buried in St. Clement's 
Church. There is a small stone to his memory on the south wall. He bore arg. a 
chevron between three text ^' sab. — Blomefield, vol ii., p. 818. 

211. O, ROBERT . TOMPSON = A portCUllis. 
R. IN . NORWICH . 1652 = R . T. 

None of the Norwich tokens known to exist have an earlier date than this one, 
which is very scarce. " Robtus Tompson grocer apprentic' m'ri Adrian! 
Parmenter Aldermani admissus est Ciuis vltimo die Aprilis 1638." He was buried 
at St. Peter Mancroft on January 20, 1653. 

212. O, lERiMY . VYN . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, NORWICH . ANNO . 1657 = 1 . VYN. 



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NORFOLK. 865 

213. A variety differing in obverse die. 

214. O. lERiMY . IVYN OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. NORWICH . ANNO . 1657 = IVYN. 

The last-described token is without doubt an error on the part of the die-sinker. 
Jeremy Vynn, apprentice to Thomas Garret, was sworn a freeman Seotember 22, 
16561 He resided in St. Peter Mancroft, and was overseer there in 16^5. He was 
Sheriff in 1677, Mayor in 1690, and died on December I, 1705, aged 73. He is 
buried in a vault at the entrance to St. Luke's Chapel in the cathedral. He appears 
to have had three wives, Priscilla, Elizabeth, and Susan ; the two former were buried 
at St Peter Mancroft, and the latter, who survived him, was buried with him in 
St. Lake's Chapel. 

215. O. lOHN . WARD . iN = A woolpack. 

J^, NORWICH . 1667 = 1 . E . W. 

There were two of this name, father and son, in Norwich at this period, and both 
were wool-combers. The father was admitted to the freedom of the city on June I, 
1638, and the son on April 6, 1661. One of them resided in St Andrew's, and 
was churchwarden in 1667 ; the other lived in St. Michael Coslany. In the latter 
parish ** Mrs Ellin Ward wid " was at one time rated. John Ward was Sheriff in 
1687, and Mayor in 1694. 

216. O. THOMAS . WARNE= 1662. 
^. IN . NORWICH = T . I . W. 

The reverse of this token, and that of Thomas Wormall, were probably struck 
from the same die ; there is also a great similarity in the obverses. Thomas 
Wames, "worstwi sherman," not apprenticed, was sworn a freeman on May 3, 
1636. From 1659 to 1662 he was rated in St. Martin at Palace. 

217. O, THOMAS . WARREN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . NORWICH = ^* 

He was an apprentice of Francis Morley (vide No. 173), and was admitted to 
the freedom of tne city on September 21; 1649. Thomas Warren was rated at 
nrkius dates between 1659 and 1669 in the parishes of St. Lawrence, St. Michael 
at Coslany, and St Stephen. 

218. 0. THO . WELD . HATTER = T . C . W. 
I^, OF , NORWICH = 1657. 

Thomas Weld resided in St Peter Mancroft from 1659 to 1666. We subsequently 
find the name in St. Augustine's. In 1685 a Thomas Weld was buried at St. Michael 
at Plea. K grocer of the name was admitted to the freedom of the city in 1640, 
and a wonted-weaver in 1656. A Thomas Weld was one of the members for 
the county of Norfolk in the Long Parliament. 

219. 0. WILLIAM . wiTHERLEY = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF . NORWICH = W . W. 

He was an apprentice of Francis Morley {vide No. 173), was sworn a freeman 
Tone 20, 1659, and was rated in that and subsequent years in St. Peter Mancroft. 
In 1660 and 166 1 he) was also rated in St. George Tombland. He was overseer of 
the former parish in 1660. In 1676 George Wilcox, apprentice to William 
Witherley, was sworn a freeman. 

220. O. NICHOLAS . WITHERS = N . F . W. 
R, OF . NORWICH . 1650 = N . F . W. 



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S66 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

221. A variety differing in the obverse die, having a mullet on each 

side of the letter w in the field, the former having a o. 
From 1659 to 1663 Nicholas Withers was rated in St. Andrew's, and was over- 
seer in the former year. In 1667 he resided in SS. Simon and Jude's. In the 
August of that year Nicholas Withers, wool-comber, was bound over to app^ at 
the next sessions of the peace for abusing his office as an overseer of SS. Simon 
and Jude, John Spendlove and others being bound over to give evidence. The 
proceedings were subsequently removed by certiorari, &t the instance of Withers, 
into the Court of King's Bench. He appears to have afterwards removed into 
St. Clement's, for in 1672 a license was granted to Martin Finch to be a Congre- 
gational teacher in the house of Nicholas Withers in St. Clement's parish in 
Norwich. Withers's house was also licensed at the same time. 

222. O. EDWARD . wooDYARD . 0F = A sugar-loaf and two cloves. 

J^, NORWICH . GROG . 1656 = E . M . W. 

Engraved in ** Norfolk Archaeoli^y," vol. v., p. 241. 

** Ed'r'us Woodyard Grocer appn'tic* Mathei Lynsey admissus est Ciuis 30P die 
Augusti 163a" He lived in St. Peter Mancroft, and was buried in the north 
aisle of the church there on August 3, 1677. His wife, Margaret, and several 
of their children, were also buried there. In the Norfolk and Norwich Museum is 
a jug of Lambeth ware, upon which is the date 1649 and the Grocers' arms between 

the initials E . ^ * M. This jug in all probability belonged to the family. 

The large wine-jar of which a representation is here given was evidently made 
for Edward and Margaret Woodyard. Two specimens are in existence, both 
exhumed at Norwich ; one is in the museum there, and the other in the possession 




of Mr. J. E. Hodgkin, F.S.A. ^The smaller jars of the same shape, made like 
those at Lambeth, and marked Claret, Sack, and Whit (whit), are well known 
and highly valued. It is very seldom that thev bear initials, but most of them are 
dated, the dates ranging between 1643 ^^^ i^* 



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NORFOLK. 867 

223. O. THOMAS . WORMALL» 1662. 
I^. IN . NORWICH = T . I . W. 

Thomas Wannell, grocer, apprentice to Robert Tharrold {vide No. 206), was 
admitted^to the freedom of the city oa January 7, 1661. The reverse of this token 
is similar to that of Thomas Warne. 

224. O. WILL . YOVNGEST = A wool-comb. 

jR, IN . NORWICH = W . Y. 
The name of "Youngs," or **Younges," was very common in Norwich at the 
period of the issue of the seventeenth-century tokens, but we have not met with the 
oame "Youngest." 

The above are all the Norwich traders* tokens now known to exist. There is an 
entry in the Mayoralty Court Books under date of November, 1668, which shows 
that Thomas Allen, a worsted-weaver, was bound over to appear at the next 
sessions "for putting out halfe pennyes of brasse w^ y* Cityes Armes on them," 
but no specimen of Allen's tokens has come to our hands. 

There is also another token which may belong to Norwich, but which has been 
placed to Derbyshire. It was issued by John I^we, butcher, Hiegham, in 1669, 
and is heart-shaped, A Thomas Lowe was a butcher in Hiegham-next-Norwich 
from 1654 to 1^7 ; and a John Lowe was rated in St. Benedict's, the adjoining 
parish, in Norwich. The token, however, being heart-shaped, of which shape 
there are no Norfolk tokens, and later in date than any Norwich token, I have not 
thought the evidence sufficiently strong to place it in the Norwich list. 

The earliest reference to the tokens in the Corporation records is as follows : 

"2i«»day of July 1666. 

*• It is ordered the Belman doe forthwith proclayme in y« Markett and all publiq' 
pUu» through this City that noe tradesman or shopkeep' do refuse to take any 
arthings that are of their owne stampe vpon the penalty to be proceeded ag' ac- 
cording to Law.**— Mayoralty Court Book, 

225. O. A . NORWICH . FARTHING . 1 667 (in four lincs). 

J^. The arms of the city of Norwich : gules, a castle triple- 
towered argent, in base a lion of England. 
Engraved in "Norfolk Archaeology," vol. v., p. 241. 

226. Similar to the last, dated 1668. 

227. A variety of No. 226, the letter a on the obverse being 

exactly above the letter w in the word Norwich, where, 
as in the preceding token, the a is partly over the R and 
partly over the w, thus : 

A A 



NORWICH 


NORWICH 


FARTHING 


FARTHING 


1668. 


1668. 



228. Similar, dated 1670. 

229. Another token which may belong to Norwich reads : 

O. S . AVGVSTINES = S . A. 

J?. PARISH. 1654=1654. 

No tradesmen's tokens were issued, so far as is known, except that of Allen's, 

tbore alluded to, after the first of these city tokens made its appearance in 1667. 

The first entry in the books of the Corporation of Norwich, relative to the issue of 

the above-mentioned civic tokens, is dated September 28, 1667. We learn from it 



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868 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

that Christopher Jay, Esq., M.P., was desired when next in London to advise 
about coining farthines with the city arms on one side and Civitas Norwici on the 
other. It may here be observed that no specimen reading Civitas Norwici is now 
known ; all the civic tokens which have been banded down to us, and they are 
excessively numerous, reading ** A Norwich Farthing." The Corporation appear 
to have soon made up their minds as to the desirability of issuing farthings, for on 
November 14 following, only six weeks after the date of the above-mentioned 
order, Mr. Jay is requested to send for two hundredweight of farthings mere, and 
also to " take care y' y* stamp of y« said farthings be sent down ; and S' Joseph 
Paine have promised to give order to his man W Tho. ffreeman at M' Adkins an 
Apothecary nere Quene's head Taveme in Bishupgate street to pay 54^^ 10^ to him 
for ye same." They appear to have arrived by November 29, for on that date we 
6nd the following entry : 

** It is ordered that Mr. Thomas Cock, Chamberlin, shall forthwith distribute the 
city ffarthings to such p'sons as shall come to him for them for the value in silver. 
And it is resolved that noe publication thereof be made by y« bellman." 

On December 4 following the bellman was ordered to give notice that, in the 
event of the farthings being called in ** by y" publique authority of this nation, 
that the Chamberlin of this City shall take them to the extent of ;f 100 at the 
same rate they are now put out, the loss to be borne by y« city." 

In 1668 we find the following entries, which, for the most part, explain them- 

" Eighth day of Aprill 1668. 

" Upon a motion made that there is a want of fiarthings and that ther be more 
sent for It is agreed that a wrighting be drawne to take y^ subscriptions of all such 
p'sons as are willing to have any and what quantity they will have & take againe 
whensoever they shalbe put downe by the authority of the nation after the City have 
first taken in one hundred pounds according to their ingagement." 

" 20tt' daie of June 1668. 

" That M' Towneclerke doe write to M' Jay about Tobbings lease and 400 wayte 
of Farthings." 

** 290 Junij 1668. 

**It is ordered that Edwin Bensly the vnder chamberlyn doe dispose the 200 
waite of Farthings y^ came last Satterday from M' Jay at London and pay the monie 
to M' Aid. Manser." 

" 8* daie of Julie 1668. 

** It is ordered that M' Townclerk doe wright to M' Aid. Jay at London to send 
downe 400 weight of Farthings hither by the first opportunity." 

** 23'** day of September 1668. 

*• This day Edwjrn Bensljni Vnderchamberlyn of y« city brought in 5** 6* bdnge y« 
remayne of the last $0^ in farthings which was put into y* Hamp." 

" ZC^ day of Sept' 1668. 

"This day M' Maior paid 5" 3« 4^ to M' Aid. Jav for the charge of all Farthings 
sent from London which monie was pd out of the 5" 6* pd by Edwyn Bensly into y* 
Hamp. y« 23*** of this Instant September." 

" The third day of October 1668. 

*' That Edwin Bensly have twenty shillinges for his paines in telling & paying 
away the ffarthings." 

*' 2ith day of November 1668. 

*'That M' Dearing be sent to to get 100'* of farthings new stamped and that he 
goe to M' Jay for y^ Stamp." 

" 23^ day of lobr 1668. 

** That M' Townclarke doe write to M' Deeringe y« Post to send downe the 
(quantity of Farthings formerly wrot for of p*fect copper and noe difference or dis- 
tmction w^soever only wheras in y« former ther y« yeare of our L<* is 1667 in theise 
is to be 1668 and to be sent downe p'sently." 

We find no further entries till September, 1670. Norwich, like many other 
places, appears to have fallen into considerable disgrace for having encroached 
upon the royal prerogative in coining money ; but, unlike some other cities, 
escaped without a fine. The following entries show the manner in which the 
royal favour was obtained : 



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NORFOLK, 869 

" The third day of September 1670. 

"This day was reade a Tre from M^ Dereinge solicitor to y« city direct to M' 
Maior conceminge the order in Council about Farthings & M' Townclarke is 
desired to answer the s^ Tre by y* next post." 
" Y« 10^ dale of September 167a 

"That M' Townclarke doe draw a Tre to be sent to y« Right Ho"« y« L^ 
Townshend about y« order in Council concerninge Farthinges." 
"The 14th day of September 1670. 

" This day was read y« answer of y« Right Ho"* the Lord Lieu' of Norff. to y^ 
letter y* was sent to his Lop y« 12'*' Instant about y« order of his Ma*y« in Council 
conceminge farthinges and M' Townclerke is ordered to write to his Lop by this 
post, to pray his Lop further assistance." 
" Y« 24* day of Sept 1670. 

" The day was read a Tre from y« Right Ho^'« y« Lord Lieu' of NorfF. direct to 
M' Maior to be comunicated to his Bretheren wherein his Lop signified his Ma»y 
was graciously pleased to pardon this city for causeing Farthings to be made and 
vended. And M' Towneclarke is ordered to drawe a Tre to be subscribed by M' 
Maior and his Bretheren direct to his Lop acknowledginge his Lop* great Fauor to 
y" Qty in presenting thier Petition to his Ma'y.'* 

The next entry, dated the same day, requests the Town Clerk to write to Sir 
Robert Southwell, one of the Clerks of the Council, and return him the thanks of 
the oily for his great civilities and kindness concerning the pardon. 
** The first day of October 1670. 

"That M' Towneclerke doe write to M' Dereinge to give all possible dispatch to 
y« Pardon about farthings and to give him the thankes of y« Court for his care and 
diligence herein." 
" Y« 12* day of October 167a 

" It is ordered that M' Town clerk doe draw a letter to the L^ L' of Norflf. to 
piay his Lop^ advice conceminge the calleinge in of Farthinges.*' 

The following entry shows how necessary these tokens were : 

" The 26''» day of Oct 167a 

'* It is ordered that M' Towne clarke wright to M' Dearing to weight upon 
S* Robt Southwell to drawe a petition to be deliu*ed to the King in Councell 
setting forth the absolute necessity of the continuing of the ffarthings put forth 
by y« Citie till his Ma*"® p'vide some publique remedy. And that when y« 
petition be drawne M' Dearing weight vpon my Lord Townshend to desire him 
to p'scnt the same and that M' Townclerke wright to y« Lord Townshend about 
y* same." 

"Yejddayof io*»' 167a 

"lliat M' Townclerke doe write to M' Deringe by the next post y' care will be 
taken suddainely to supply him with monie." 

On the 9th of December we find the following entries in the ** Assembly Books," 
the last relative to the issue of tokens ; those which follow only showing the 
manner in which the bulk was disposed of : 

" M' Maior also delivered to the Clavors M' Thomas Safre his bond for So"' to 
be discharged of all offices." 

"And Ae said So"* is ordered to be paid to the Chamberlin and M' Deerings 
65S 7» 6^ for the charge of passing his Mat*^' pardon to this City vnder the Great 
Seale of England for vending & exchangeing of farthings is to be paid out of that 
mony & the residue thereof as the Court of Aldermen shall with the Assent of this 
house order and appoint" 

" That this Assembly doth not countenance the passing of Norwich ffirthings for 
the fixture." 

The Pardon itself is dated at Westminster the 8th November, 22nd Charles II. 
(1670), and recites that amongst other marks of majesty and the dignities and pre- 
rogatives of empire, the right of striking and coining money was not of the least 
importance, and that any exercising such right without grant or license should be 
^leedily punished ; further recites that the Mayors, Sheriffs, Aldermen, and com- 

VOL. II. 56 



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870 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

monalty of the city of Norwich, not lone since struck, or caused to be struck and 
fabricated, certain "Obulos (Anglic^ halfe penney),*' and also certain **Quad- 
rantes (Anglic^ farthings)," made of brass or copper, and ordered the same to be 
put forth in divers payments by the subjects dwelling within the aforesaid dty, 
whereby the said dty misht not only have incurred the forfeiture of its charters, 
liberties, and franchises, but also many and great penalties, and that the Mayors, 
Sheriffs, Aldermen, and commonalty of the said city were penitent, and had caused 
all halfpennies and farthings to be called in. The operative portion of the pardoo 
then follows. 

The following entries are the latest we have been able to find amongst the 
munidpal records relative to these farthings : 

From the ** Assembly Book." 
" 21 Sept' 1672. 

" It is agreed That whereas vpon the publishing of a comon iiarthing by his 
Ma**« Proclamac*on the ffarthings called Norwich narthings are no longer current. 
This Assembly takeing into consideration the honor of this City doe assent that 
Proclamac'on be made in the open Market vpon Satterday the 28^ of this instant 
September about 12 at noon that such persons as shall bring in to the Assembly 
Chamber in the Guildhall of ihb City any of the said ffarthings called Norwich 
fiarthings & pay the same to M' Thomas Cock Chamberlyn of this City or to 
Edwyn Benslyn Vnder Chamberlyn and have a receipt under their or any of their 
hands for what sume they shall so pay every p*8on haveing such recdpt shall re- 
ceive silver for them as soon as possible the Common Councel shall raise mony to 
that purpose and the tyme lymited for the bringing in such farthings is from Mon- 
day the last of this instant September by 8 in the morning to Siatterday after beii^ 
the 5th October next till 5 afternoone. And that Richard Baylie one of M' 
Maior's Officers be added to the Chamberlyn and Vnderchamberlyn as an Assistant 
herein and they shall have allowed amongst them 2<* p' pound for their diligence 
and paines therein and keeping the Accounts exact and faire written and they are 
to acquaint M' Maior and the Court when they have rec^ to the value of 200^ and 
that not above the value of 30o'* shall be received." 

From the " Mayoralty Court Book." 
" Y« 25th day of September 1672. 

'* It is ordered tluit Richard Bayliffe, one of the Maiors officers at the mace doe 
publish the Act of Assembly for the takeinge in of Farthings at the tyme mentioned 
m the sayd act and this to be done vpon Satterday next at y* market crosse 
betweene the howres of 11 & 12 in the foomoone." 

*«The28t»»dayof7b'i672. 

" It is ordered that M' Chamberlyn & his asistants doe in y« exchange of 
Farthings not exceed s^ in silver nor take above I2<^ in farthings of any one 
person." 

From the «* Assembly Book." 
"ii«»Oct., 1672. 

*' The making the best advantage of the Copper of the Norwich ffarthings is 
referred to the <&spose of the Court of Maioralty. 

From the ** Mayoralty Court Book." 
" 280 9»* 72. 

" M' To Mdchior promised to give ii** a pound for such Norwich Farthings as 
are wholy copper & 10^ a pound for such as are mixt mettall & y^ chamberlyn ft 
Edwyn Benslyn are to see them wayed vp and deliured to him to-morrow and to 
give an account thereof y^ next court day. And he is trusted to give an ac<^ what 
quantity are whole copper & w* not." 

« Y« 4*** day of io»» 1672. 
** Upon a Report by y« Chamberlyn that he & Edwyn Benslyn had wayed vp & 
^ delivered to M' John Melchior accordinge to y« above mentioned agreem^ tenn 
.ihondred a Quarter & twenty pounds of Norwich Farthings at eleven pence p* 
^)Hmde the s^ agrem' is confirmed by y« Court" 



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NORFOLK. 871 

"Y«7*dayof io»» 1672. 

"M' Towne clarke is ordered to write to M' Francis Tyler y« next post concern- 
mge y* Bargaine formerly made with M*^ Ramage* by M' Jay about y« Norwich 
Farthings and p'ticalarly w^ aereem^ was made in case y^ farthings made by him 
dKmld be retomed w* he should allow by y« pound for y« mettall. 
" Y« 8* day of January 1672. 

** It is agreed that M' Melchior shall have y« mixt mettall of y« Farthings 
at 9r* p' pound & y* whole mettall at 1 1^ p* pound and that y^ odd money being 
r S^ be given him towards his charges of separatinge them so y' he is to pay but 
48'." 

" ¥• i8»*» day of Jany 1672. 

" Also that the Clavors doe receive of M' Cbamberlyn M' Melchiors 48" io» for 
f ^rthings And that the Clavors to pay vnto y^ Chamberlyn 153" 8* 10^ q to 
atisfy such p'sons as brought in Norwicne Farthinges vpon 3^ order of 3^ Comon 
council 8c also 25^ 6^ being allowed by Act of Asembly for their paynes y' received 
J* s* Farthings And y« the s«* 153" 8» i<y* q be forthwith p<* to such p'sons as 
broo^t in thier farthings.'* 

The late Mr. Wodderspoon, to whose paper on the Norwich Traders* and City 
Tokens issued in the Seventeenth Century we are much indebted, was in error 
when he stated that Melchior was " a Jew dealer in metals." On the contrary, 
the Melchior family were Christian, and appear to have been of considerable 
respectability. They resided in St. John Maddermarket and St. Stephen, in the 
churches of which parishes will be found inscriptions to various members of the 
faunily. In the former parish, if not in the latter, they appear to have taken an 
interest in parish matters, having filled on more than one occasion the office of 
chnrchwarden. 

23a O. A . NORWICH . FARTHING = 1667 (aS No. 225). 

I^. CAROLUS . A . CAROLO = Bust of Charles II. i 

This piece, of which only one specimen is known, is in pewter, and has been 
considered by several eminent numismatists to be one of the numerous patterns 
stnick before the issue of the royal farthings in 1672. The late Mr. Bum, the 
anther of the catalogue of the Beaufoy Collection, in the possession of the Corpor- 
ation of London, considered it to be that of Elias Palmer, who submitted his 
patton shortly after 1665. The reverse, though similar to the obverse of the regal 
BTthmg, is not the same, but somewhat ruder in execution. 

In concluding these notes on the Norwich corporate tokens, it may be stated 
that some years since two leaden pieces were found in the river Thames ; both 
have the Norwich arms on the obverse. One has a portcullis crowned on the 
rereise, the other has letters, but they are illegible. See " Norfolk Archaeology," 
vol ill, page 19a Probably they belonged to the earlier leaden series of trades- 
men's tokens ; if so, they are, we believe, the only specimens of that series which 
can be positively appropriated to Norfolk. 



OUTWELL. 
231. O. WILLIAM . BAYLEY = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. IN . OVTWELL . 1667 = W . K . B. J 

* In the "Calendar of State Papers—Domestic," 1661, is the following refer- 
ence to Ramage: 

1660, 1 Petition— Sir Wm. Parkhurst & Sir Anthony St. Le^er, Wardens of the 
Nor. j Mint. That sundry coining tools made for money trials, which failed, by 
David Ramadge and now in his hands, and others made by Peter Blundel 
(Blondeau), a Frenchman, who had a license from Cromwell to make 
such instruments, may be seiz^ and brought into the Mint before making 
the new moneys, as they afford facilities for coining, which has lately been 
practised more than ever. 

56—2 



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872 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

232. O. FRANCES . BOYCE = A pair of scales. 

J^. IN . OVTWELL . 1664 = F . M . R J 

233. O. STEPHEN . CLARKE . AT = A bell. 

^. OVTWELL . IN . NORFOLK = S . M . C. J 

A small part of Outwell is in Cambridgeshire. 

PULHAM MARKET. 

234. O. THOMAS. FLATMAN=l664. 

J^. OF . PVLHAM . MARKET = T . F. J 

This token very much resembles that of Thomas Flatnum of Norwich. 

235. O, HEN . THEOBALD . DRAPER = A hart woundcd with an 

arrow. 

jR, IN . PVLHAM . MARKETT = H . T. J 

RUDHAM. 

236. 0» lOHN . PEARSON = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. OF . RVDHAM . 1667 = 1 . P. i 

SHIPDHAM. 

237. O. NICHOLAS . GOLDING = A ship. 

J^, OF . SHIPDHAM . NORFOLK = N . S . G. i 



SNETTISHAM. 

238. O, FRANCIS . CASTING = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN SMETTESHAM . [l6]64 = F . C \ 

No such place as " Smettesham " is known ; we have therefore placed this 
token to Snettisham. 

SOUTHTOWN. See YARMOUTH. 

STOKE. 

239. O, lOHN . HVBBARD . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

-^. STOAKE . GROCER . NORF = I . E . H. J 

Mr. Boyne formerly placed this token to Stoke in Kent ; the reverse, however, 
clearly reads " norf." 

STOWBRIDGE. 

24a O. THO . CASE . OF . STOWBRIDGE . IN = CrOSS kcyS. 

jR. NORFOLK . HIS . HALFE . PENY . 69 = A bridge of fOUr 

arches, t . c. J 

Thos. Case was churchwarden in 166 1. 
Thos., the son of Thos. Case and Ursvla, was baptized July 2, 1663. 



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NORFOLK. 873 

John, soQ of John Case, was baptized March 23, 1663. 
oha Case vras churchwarden in 1663. 

241. O. lOHN . PRATT . 0F = A bridge of four arches. 

I^. STOW. BRIDGE. l668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

Snan, wife of I. Pratt, boried 1666, August 29. 

STRATTON. 

242. O. ROBERT . BAYLY . IN = R . E . B. 

J^. LONG . STRATTON . DRAPER = 1 654. J 

The name of Baily is still found here. 

243. O. lOHN . CANN = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^, OF . STRATTON . 1652 = 1 . C J 

Cann's token was placed by Mr. Boyne to Stratton in Wiltshire. There 
are two Strattons in Norfolk, and the name of Cann is also found in the county. 

SWAFFHAM. 

244. 0. THOMAS . CANNON = The arms of the Cannon family ; on 

a bend cotised a pellet Crest, a cannon mounted on 
a carriage. 

J^. IN . SWAFFHAM . l658 = T . M . C. J 

The above arms were granted to the Cannons of Pembrokeshire in 1614. 

245. A variety dated 1667. 

246. 0, EDWARD . CASE = A Virginian smoking, with a roll of 

tobacco under his arm. 

J^, IN . SWAFFHAM = E . E . C \ 

247. O, THOMAS . DAWSON = Cross keys. 

^. IN . SWAFHAM . l659 = T . S . D. \ 

248. 0. ROBERT . DENTON . 0F = A Stick of CaudlcS (?). 

J^. SWAFHAM . 1660 = R . A . D. J 

It u very doubtful whether the device on the obverse of this token represents a 
itidc of candles; but being unable to say what it really b intended for, we have 
fjuftn the description hitherto adopted. Above each supposed candle, and on the 
other side of the stick, there appears to be a ring, and on close inspection the five 
drops are not the shape of candles. 

The names of Case and Dawson are still found in S waff ham. 

249. 0. lOHN . HOOKER = I . H. 

^. OF . SWAFHAM = I . H. \ 

250. O. lOHN . HOOKER . IN . 1 667 = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. SWAFFHAM . IN . N0RF0L'^ = I . H. J 

SWANTON ABBOT. 

251. O, WILLIAM . COOPER . OF = The King's head crowned. 

J^. SWANTON . ABBOTT = A fuU-blown rose. i 

The token strikingly resembles that of William Cooper of Norwich. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



874 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

There are numerous entries of the Cooper fiunily down to 1760 in the parish 
registers. 

A William Cooper was buried September 30, 1675 ; Wm., John, Thomas, and 
Mary, children of Wm. Cooper and Susan his wife, baptized between 1670 and 
1680. 

Wm. Cooper (who probably issued the token) was buried May 13, 1707, and a 
Wm. Cooper, probably his son, was buried, aged ninety-six, on January 11, 176a 



SVVANTON NOVERS. 

252. O. lAMES . NAILER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R, OF . SWANTON . 1667 = 1 .A.N. J 

253. O. lAMES . NAYLOR . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 

-^. SWANTON . NOVERS . 1671 = I . A . N. J 

No later date than this occurs on a Norfolk token ; it is only to be found on one 
other, that of Marshall of East Dereham (No. 37). 



THETFORD. 

254. O, WILLIAM. FLANNER=l669. 

i?. OF . THETFORD = W . M . F. J 

He was Mayor in 1657. 

255. O. woRMLY . HETHERSET=:The Groccrs' Arms. 

li, OF . THETFORD . NORFV = W . H. J 

Wormly Hetherset was Mayor of Thetford in 167 1 and 1675, and again in 1693 
and 1698. 

256. O, FRANCIS . HOWLETT = A WOOlpack. 

J^. OF . THETTFORD= 1 668. J 

Francis Howlett the elder, of Thetford, wool-comber, by his will dated 1670, 
devised his messuage in Thetford to his wife Frances for life, and after her decease 
to his son Thomas, to whom he also gave ;^ioo. He gave to his sons John and 
Francis los. each, to his sod Henry ;^20, and to each of his daughters, Anne 
and Elizabeth, ;f 100. He gave the residue of his property to his wife Frances, 
whom he appointed his executrix. 

257. O. EDWARD . MOORE . IN = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

I^. THETFORD . l668 = E . F . M. J 

He was Mayor in 1679. 

258. O. lOHN . WAYMOND . OF = The Gfocers' Arms. 

/^. THETFORD . 1659 = 1 . W. J 

The above Thetford tokens, except Hetherset's, are engraved in Martin's " His- 
tory of Thetford." 

THORNHAM. 

259. O, STEPHEN . TVCKE . IN . 1667= A CrOSS. 

i?. THORNUM . HIS . HALFE . PENY = S . M . T. i 



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NORFOLK. 87s 

UPWELL. 

260. O. WILLIAM . BoycE = Three doves. The Tallowchandlers' 

Arms. 

-^. IN . VPWELL . l664 = W . S . B. J 

261. a lAMES . BROONLES=The Biewers' Arms. 

^. IN . vpwell". 1664=1 . B. i 

262. 0, lAMKs . BROMLES-The Biewers' Arms. 

I^. IN . VPWELL . 1664=1 . I . a i 

263. O. THOMAS . NVRISH = A CrOWD. 

/^. IN . VPWELL . 1664-T .A.N. J 

264. Os THOMAS . ROBINSON = Cross keys. 

jR. IN . VPWELL . 1 668 -HIS HALF PENY. T . A . R. i 

265. O. SAMVELL . viNCENT=The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . VPWELL . 1664-S . V. J 

Upwell is partly in Cambridgeshire. 

The popalation of Upwell in the Norfolk part of the parish was in 188 1 2,082, 
and in Gunbridgeshire 1,357. 

WALSHAM (NORTH). 

266. O. lOHN . COOKE . OF -The Mercers' Arms. 

-^. NORTH . WALSHAM -I . M . C. J 

267. O. THOMAS . MOORE = The Grocers' Arms. 

-^. IN . NORTH . WALSHAM -T . M. J 

268. O. PETER . RICHARDSON -The arms of the Duke of Norfolk ; 

a bend between six cross crosslets. 

I^, IN . NOR . WALSHAM . [l6]57-P . M . R. J 

269. O. THOMAS . RVDDOCKE=The Drapers' Arms. 

i?. IN . NORTH . WALSHAM = T . R. i 

270. O. lOSEPH . WASEY-The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. NOR . WALSHAM = I . W. i 

The names of Cooke, Moore, and Richardson are still found here. 

WALSINGHAM. 

271. O. BENIAMIN . RVDKIN . BRAZIER = ANNO . DOM. 1669. 

J^. IN . WALLSINGHAM . HIS . HALPENY = B . S . R. J 

272. O, WILL . PRAMINGHAM = A rOSe. 

^. LITTLE . WALSINGHAM = W . F. i 

273. O. lOHN . PARTINGTON = The Haberdashers* Arms. 

i?. LITTLE . WALSINGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. J 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



876 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

274. O, lOHN . PARTINGTON = The HaberdashcTs' Arms. 

J^, LirrLE . WALSINGHAM = I . P . NORFOLK. \ 

275. O. lOHN . PARTINGTON = A pair of scales. 

^. IN . WALSINGHAM . 1 668 = I . P. J 

WATTON. 

276. O. CHRISTOPHER . HEY = The Mercers' Arms. 

-^. OF . WATTON . MERCER = C . M . H. \ 

Hey built the clock-house at Watton at his own expense, and was buried in 1682. 
— ** Norfolk Archaeology,** iii. 403. 

In the Norwich Alayoralty Court Book, under date July 15, 1674, is the 
following : 

'* Mr. Chr. Hey & severall others of the Inhabitants of Watton came to y^ Court 
and gave their humble & hearty thanks to y^ Court for promotinge the charitable 
benevolence of y*» Inhabitants of 3^* City towards the releife of the poore of that 
towne who suffered by a great fyre lately there." 

WELLS. 

277. O, RICHARD . MANSVAR = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^, WELLES . IN . NORFOLK^ = R . M. i 



WILTON. 

Mr. Bo3me in his 6rst book placed these tokens to Wiltshire, but the extracts 
from registers of Wilton in Norfolk show they should be placed to the latter 
county. 

278. O. THOMAS . CLARK = The Weavers' Arms. 

/^, OF . WILTON . 1664 = T . C. J 

Thomas Clarke and Ann Beast were married November y*' 3'** 1664. 

Thos. Clarke signs the register as churchwarden at the end of the years 1685- 
1686. 

Clark, Elizabeth, wife of Thos. Bur. Aug. 18, 1698. 

Clark, Thomas, bur. September 5, 1706. 

The register of Hockwold (-cum- Wilton) has the following: "Clarke, Ann 
ye wife of Thomas, buri. 21 December 1676.** From which it appears Thomas 
was twice married, but as no entry of his second marriage appears on either of 
the above registers, he probably went further away for his wife. 

279. O. IN . WILTON . 1666 = G . H. 

/^. HIS. HALFE. PENNY =s Two swords ctossed in saltire, a 
fleur-de-lys in each quarter. ^ 

28Q. O, WILLIAM . NEWMAN . IN = A pail of sheats. 

/^. WILTON . HIS . HALFE. PENy = W . N. 1667. | 

281. O. FRANCIS . WAGE . OF = Two swords crossed. 

^. WILTON. 1658 = The Drapers' Arms. J 

Extract from the register of Wilton, Norfolk : 

** flfrancis y« sonne of ffrancis Wace and Ann his wife was Bapt<* March y« 29, 
1655. 



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NORFOLK, 877 

"ffiands 7« sonne of flfrancis Wacc was buried March y« 24, 1656. 
"John the sonne of ffrands Wace and Ann his wife was bapt<* Aprill y* 17, 
1657. 
^'firands y« son of ffrancis Wace and Ann his wife was bapt** November 

"Edward the Son of ffrancis Wace and Ann his wife was bapt^ April ye I7» 
1662. 
"Elizabeth y^ daughter of firancis Wace and Ann his wife was bapt March 

"AnnoCaroli 2^ 190 1667 : 

"Wasc — Mary y« danght' of ffrancis Wase was baptized y* 22 of July. 

" Anno Caroli 22<» 1670 : 

" Wace—John y^ sonne of ffrancis and Ann — bapt** 19 June. 

" Anno Caroli 250. Ab Annunt 1673 : 

" "Wace — W", y« son of ffrancis Wace and Ann bapt May 10. 

" (Anno Caroh 25«. Ab Annunt 1673 : 

"Tyrrell— Robert Tyrrell Esq : buried March 19.) 

"Anno Caroli 27^. Ab Annuntiatione 1675 — ad Annuntiationem 1676 : 

"Wace — Mr. Thomas Wace and Mrs. ffrancis Tyrrel married 17 June. 

** Anno Caroli 2^ 30°, Ab Annuntiat. 1678 ad Annuntiationen. 1679. 

*' 1678. Wace— flBrands Wace, bur. 21 September." 



WYMONDHAM. 

282. O. lOHN . BVRRELL = The Drapers' Arms, 

^. IN . WINDHAM = I . E . B. J 

283. O, ANTHONY . LOCK . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

I^. WINDHAM . IN . NORFOLK = A . L. J 

The name of Lock is still found here. 

YARMOUTH. 

284. 0. GREAT . YARMOVTH . 1 667 = The arms of the borough of 

Yarmouth ; per pale three demi-lions passant gardant, 
conjoined in pale with as many demi-herrings. 
R. FOR . THE . VSE . OF . THE . POORE = The Same arms. 
Mint-mark, a full-blown rose. I 

285. Another, without Eat the end of POOR Mint-mark, a rose, large I 
There are at least ten slight varieties. 

286. Another, siihilar, dated 1669, without e at the end of poor. 

A fleur-de-lys for mint-mark. /arge J 

There are five or more slight variations of this. 

Extracts from the Town l^oks of Yarmouth : 

"June 6, 1667. At this assembly it is approved of, what the overseers have done 
in getting a stamp for farthings, for payment of the poor ; and that the overseers 
mm time to time shall give for those farthings the value in silver, to any that 
shall bring the same unto them to be changed.** 

"October lo, 167a It is ordered at this assembly, that Mr. Deering, the 
solUdtor for the city of Norwich, be employed on behalf of our corporation, to 
petition his majesty by the lord Townshend, for his gracious pardon for coyning 
ow towne farthings.*' 

"April 14, 1671. At this assembly Mr. Deering's letter and bill of charges 



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878 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

about passing the pardon for coyneing the towne farthings amounting to Sojf, 
which this house do order shall be paid him by the chamberlyns, and likewise lO;^ 
for paines." 

"August 31, 1672. Ordered that the bellman goe about and give notice, that 
whosoever bring in any of the towne farthings before Wednesday night next shall 
have the value in silver, from the money gathered for the relief of the poor." 

** Feby. 14, 1673. It is ordered that Mr. Crow make sale of the town farthings, 
which he hath now in his hands, to the best advantage." 

287. O, lOHN . AMES = A man making candles. 

I^, IN . YARMOVTH . 1652 = 1 . 1 . A. Mint-mark, a rose. J 

288. A variety ; mint-mark, a star above man's head. ^ 

289. A variety with mint-mark, a star to the left of head I 

290. A variety differing in both dies. i 

291. O, lOHN . ARNOLD . iN = A bunch of grapes. 

J^, NORTH . YARMOVTH == I . M . A. \ 

John Arnold was Bailiff of Yarmouth in 1652. He was buried in St. Nicholas' 
Church. 

292. O. BENIAMIN . BARKER = 1662. 

I^. OF . YARMOVTH = B . B. } 

293. A variety from larger dies, the letters b . b on the reverse 

being much larger. \ 

294. O, WILLIAM . BATCH = A wheatsheaf. 

/^. IN . YARMOVTH = W . B. J 

295. A variety differing in the mint-mark of reverse. J 

296. A variety differing in obverse die. 

Mr. T. C. Palmer, in his continuation of Manship's " History of Great Yar- 
mouth, mentiohs that there is amongst Mr. Dawson Turner's illustrations to 
Blomfield's " History of Norfolk " a drawing of a token of William Batch, dated 
1656, with a merchant's mark thereon. Possibly one of William Bateman's has 
been incorrectly drawn. 

297. O. WILLIAM . BATEMAN = A merchant's mark. 

£, IN . YARMOVTH . 1656 = A bugle hom. w . B. J 

298. A variety differing in the reverse die, the date being nearer 

the mint-mark. \ 

299. Another variety similar, dated 1667. { 
William Bateman was Bailiff of Yarmouth in 1665. 

300. O, EDMVND . BEDDiNGFiLD = A sheaf of arrows tied. 

jR. IN . YARMOVTH = E . M . R J 

301. O. THOMAS . BRADFORD . IN = Seven stars. 

I^. GREAT . YARMOVTH = T . B. { 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



NORFOLK. 879 

302. O. THOMAS . BRADFORD « Scvcn stars. 

R. OF . YARMOVTH . 1655=! . R \ 

Thomas Bradford was Bailiff of Yarmouth in 1675, and Mayor in 1685. He 
died m 1703, and was buried in the north transept of St Nicholas Church. 

303. O, WILLIAM . BRATiN . IN = A wheatshcaf. 

R. YARMOVTH . BAKER = W . R . B. \ 

304. O. WILLIAM . BRETTON = A wheatsheaf. 

R, OF . YARMOVTH . BAKER = W . R . B. \ 

305. O. lOHN . CONDLEY . IN = A merchant's mark. 

R, YARMOVTH . MARCHANT = I . M . C. \ 

306. O. lOSEPH . COOPER . OF = I . F . C 

R. YARMOVTH . MARCHANT= 1656. \ 

307. A variety, mint-mark a star. \ 

308. O. CHRIST^ . COZENS . IN . GRET = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, YARMOVTH . GROCER = C . A . C. \ 

309. A variety differing in reverse die. J 

310. O. CHRiST° . coziNS . IN . GRET = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. YARMOVTH . GROCER = C . A . C. J 

311. O. CHRIST . COZENS . IN . GREAT = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. YARMOVTH . GROCER = C . A . C. \ 

312. O. RICHARD . CRAFFORD = A tCaSCl. 

R, IN . YEARMOVTH . [l6]59 = R . D . C \ 

The device upon this token has been supposed by some to represent Yarmouth 
market-place, and by others a dock for the ^&ir of ships. On close examination 
it will be seen to be a flower with a stalk. The teasel, or fuller's thistle, is a plant 
the heads or burrs of which are employed in dressing woollen cloth. 

313. O, THOMAS . CRANE . 1665 = A crane. 

R. IN . NORTH . YARMOTH = T . I . C. \ 

Thomas Crane was Bailiff of Yarmouth in 1633 and 1643. 

314. O, lOHN . cvRTis . OF = Two men saluting or curtsying. 

R, YARMOTH . BAKER = I . C. 1 662. \ 

315. O. THOMAS . DAWSON = A hand holding compasses. 

R, IN . YARMOVTH . 1667 = T . M . D. \ 

316. O. lOHN . EMPEROR . IN = I . E. 

R, GREAT . YARMOVTH = 1664. J 

317. A variety di£fering in both dies. \ 

318. A variety with two stars on the reverse legend. \ 

319. O, RICHARD . FLAXMAN . OF = Three goats' heads, erased. 

R. NORTH . YARMOVTH . 57 = R . M . F. \ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



88o TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

320. O. THOMAS . GOD FRAY . IN = A griffin. 
^. GREAT yARMOVTH=T . G. 

Thomas Godfrey was Bailiff in 1683 and 1696, and in 1684 held the office of 
Town Clerk by deputy. He was one of the Common Councilmen removed from the 
Corporation by mandate of James II. in 1687. He died in 1704* aged 63. 

321. O, WILLIAM . HARVEY = A dcvicc OS & in field. 

^. IN . SOVTHTOWNE = W . E . H. 

Southtown is in Suffolk, but for many purposes is incorporated with Great 
Yarmouth. 

322. O. THOMAS . HERiNG . iN = Two holdfasts CFOSSed. 

J^. NORTH . YARMOVTH = T . H. 

323. A variety reading thovmas. 

324. O. lOHN . hooke = A roll of tobacco. 

J^, IN . YARMOVTH = I . I . H. 

325. O, WILLIAM. LiNCOLNE=The Grocers* Arms. 

/^. IN . YARMVTH . 1652 = W . I . L. 

326. A variety differing in reverse die. 

327. O. SAMVELL . MANTHORP = Three sugar-loaves (?). 

/^. IN . NORTH . YERMOVTH = S . I . M. 

328. O. THOMAS . MOVLTON= 1667. 
J^. IN . YARMOVTH = T . H . M. 

329. O, REBEKKA . MVRRiL = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. IN . YARMOVTH = R . M. 

330. O. lONAS . NEAVE = An anchor, and a cable attached. 

J^, IN . YARMOVTH . 1659 = 1 . E . N. 

331. O, lONAS . NEAVE. iN = A dolphin. 

^. YARMOVTH . 1661 = 1 .E.N. 

332. O. EDWARD . OWNER = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. GROCER . OF . YARMOVTH = E . O. 

333. A variety differing in obverse die. 

Edward Owner was bom in 1576, and was member for Yarmouth in 1620^ 
1625, 1639, and 1640, and he was returned with Miles Corbet, the regicide, during 
the Long Parliament He was Bailiff in 1625 and 1634. In Parliament he warmly 
opposed the '*ship money," and was one of those who voted it illegal. On the 
breaking out of the Civil War, he actively exerted himself to place the town in a 
state of defence, towards which he contributed in plate and money. He laboured 
for the social good of the town, and it was mainly through his exertions that the 
Children's Hospital School was established, himself endowing it with £i,Soo. He 
died in 1650, and was buried in the north aisle of St. Nichoks' Church. In 1823 
his grave was opened, and his bones scattered for the interment of another. The 
issuer was probably a son of the above. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



NORFOLK, 88i 

334- 0, EDWARD . PETERSON = A face in a blazing sun. 

R, OP . GREAT . YARMOVTH = E . M . P. \ 

l^e foDowing entry appears in the Norwich Freemen's list : 
"Ed'rus Peterson vintn non app'ntic* admissus est civis 14^ die Augusti 1634." 

335- 0, HENRY . POTTER . IN = A griffin. 

R. NORTH . YARMOVTH . [l6]67 = H . S . P. \ 

336. 0. THOMAS . RICHMOND = T . R. 

R IN . YARMOVTH = 1 654. J 

337. 0, FRANC . SHiPDHAM = A dolphin. 

R, IN . GRET . YARMOVTH = F . S. \ 

338. 0, GEORGE . SPILMAN = A man-atarms. 

R, IN . NORTH . YARMOVTH = G . E . S. \ 

**He married EUing, the daughter of Nicholas Cutting, by whom he had eleven 
sons and three daughters. He died in 1668, and is buried in Yarmouth Church." — 
Palmer's " History of Yarmouth." 

339. 0. MiCHALL . TiLLES . i666 = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . NORTH . YARMOVTH = M . A . T. \ 

He was Bailiff in 1667. Michael Tilles, of Yarmouth, widower, was married to 
Ann Daniel at St. John's Maddermarket, in Norwich, in 1638. 

340. 0, si-EPHEN . TRACEY = A lion rampant. 

R. OF . YARMOVTH = S . A . T. \ 

The mmt-mark, a star, is immediately above the lion's head. 

341- A variety, with mint-mark at tip of lion's tail. \ 

342. A variety differing in the obverse die, the mint-mark being 
immediately above the letter e in the word tracey. \ 

343- 0. CLEMENT . TROTTER = A ship. 

R. IN . YARMOVTH .1653 = . S . T. \ 

344- 0, BENIAMIN . WALLER = 1658. 

A IN . YEARMOVTH = B . A . W. \ 

345- A variety differing in obverse die. \ 
346. 0. BENIAMIN . WALTON = An anchor. 

•S. IN . YARMOVTH . 1654 = 6 . A . W. \ 

347« A variety dated 1666. \ 

348- 0, RcxjER . WATERS = The arms of the Waters family, per 
pale a saltire charged with another wavy. 

^' IN . YARMOVTH = R . W. \ 

349' 0, THOMAS . WATERS = A Stocking. 

R' OF . YARMOVTH . 1656 = T . E . W. \ 

35^ 0, GABRiELL . wooDRiFE = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . NORTH . YARMOVTH = G . W. 1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



882 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

351. A variety reads wooDROOFFE. i 

Gabriell Woodroff was chosen Bailiff in 1669, and, refusing to serve, was fined 
/'40, which was mitigated to ;^io, he having shown sufficient reason for his 
refusal. 

352. O, WILLIAM . wooRTS . IN = A dove with olive-branch. 

^. YARMOVTH . HOSYER = W . D . W. i 

Many of these tokens are engraved in Mr. Palmer's continuation of Manship's 
" Yarmouth." 

Mr. Palmer mentions tokens said to have been issued by Benjamin Blake aad 
Robert Tothaker, but gives no description of them. 

There is in the British Museum a copper piece, about the size and thickness of 
a halfpenny token, reading : 

3S3« O, CAROLUS . II . D . G . MAG . BR . FR . & HI . REX = C . R. 

twice, vis-a-vis, 
R, YARMOVTH . M . D . T = Two tridcnts in saltire, 1665 in 
the quarters. ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Plate XIII. 




Ayuham. 




Aldeby. 




CSOMKR. 



/^.E^% 




King's Lyws. 




H INGHAM. 




King's Lynn. 





Norwich. 



Norwich. 




Norwich. 




Norwich. 




Ufwux. 




Walsingham. 



This Plate of Norfolk 
J. J. CoLMAN. Esq., M.P.. 

RCSPCCTFULLY DEDICATED VS 




Tokens presented by 

OF Carrow. NORWICHi 
TO HIM BY THE EDITOR 



'h^^<^ 



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Bortbamptonsbire- 

Number of Tokens issued 179 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 44 

Town Pieces issued at King's Cliffe, Northampton, 
OxjNDLB, and Peterborough. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

C. Dack, Esq., 

Nene View, 

Peterborough. 



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flortbamptonebire. 

To the places named by Boyne as issuing tokens the following two 
additional places have been added, /.^., Bowden and Whittlebury ; 
while the token attributed to Deene has been removed. 

Of varieties and new tokens, thirty-nine have been added, bringing 
up the number from 138 to 179. 

The token of Welford is heart-shaped, and also the one of 
Thingden ; while the two town-pieces of Peterborough and Herron*s 
token of Towcester are octagonal. The remainder are of the usual 
round shape. All are halfpence or farthings ; there are no pennies. 

The tokens issued by the " chamberlaine " in Northampton are of 
peculiar interest, and in Peterborough a town-piece was issued by the 
overseers, and changed by the town bailiff according to the inscrip- 
tion. 

It has been interesting to find in the records of Peterborough the 
original entry relating to the issue of these very overseers' tokens. 

Nothing can be more absurd than the varieties of spelling adopted 
by the Peterborough tokeners, and particular notice in this respect is 
directed to No. 137. The use of the word "Ob.," or "Obolus," 
which app>ears as the slang term on No. 146, is of very rare occur- 
rence. 

Nos. 166 and 167 were evidently the work of the same engraver, 
the st}'le and character of the two tokens being exactly similar. 

The notes connect very many of the issuers with the local histor}', 
and are of particular value to the local historian and topographer. 

Editor. 



ASHLEY. 
O. lOHN . GRANGER = Three awls (?) 

R, OF . ASHLEY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 



AYNHOK 

2. O. THOMAS . NORRIS . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, AYNYHO . vpoN . THE . HILL = A Hon rampant. \ 

Thomas Norrey was buried February 20, 1687. 

The lion is probably allusive to the arms of a former lord of the manor, Shakerly 
Marmion, Esq., who sold the manor, in 1615, to Richard Cartwright, Esq., whose 
descendant is the present proprietor. 

57 



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886 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

3. O. PETER . PRVCE . AT . THE . BEL = A bcU, and P.M.?. 

^^ AT . AYNO . ON . THE . HILL = HIS HALF PENY. 1668. J 

There is no Bell Ion, nor are the names of Norris and Pruce now to be found in 

the parish. 

There is an affidarit in existence made of Peter Pnice's burial by Margaret 

Butler before Thomas Harris, Vicar of Newbottle, November 9, 1682.— Per 

Retr. M. Hutton, Vicar. 

BARNWELL ST. ANDREWS. 

4. O, SAMVELL . WRIGHT . OF = A dovC. S . S . W. 

J^. BARNWELL . ST . ANDREW = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667. | 



BOWDEN. 

5. O. RICHARD . BRONSON = R . B. 

J^. IN . BOWDEN . 1658 = A horse. 
The registers were burnt in 1729. 

BOZEAT. 

6. O. WILLIAM . GLOVER = W . G. 

J^, OF . BOZEAT. 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. 



BRACKLEY. 

7. O. BARTHOLOMEW . ATTON = A bell 

J^. IN . BRACKLEY . DRAPER = B . A. J 

This borough returned two members to Parliament, until disfranchised by the 
Reform Bill. It was incorporated by Henry III. Its dignities, at the period of 
the issue of these tokens, were sustained in a very undignified manner, as thus de- 
scribed in Bamab/s " Itinerary '* : 

** From thence to Brackley, as did beseeme one. 
The May'r I saw, a wond'rous mean one, 
Sitting, thatching and bestowing 
On a wind-blown house a strowing. 
On me, called he, and did charme mee. 
Drink less, eat more, I doe warne thee.** 
The issuer of this token was bom at Buckingham, which is only seven miles 
distant from Brackley, and was a member of the local guild of mercers in that town 
in 1675. He was a celebrated bell founder. 

Vide Buckingham (Bucks), No. 31, and appendix to that county for other 
information, kindly supplied by Mr. A. Heneage Cocks. 

8. O. CONNOWAY . RANDS = A SUgOT-loaf. 

^. OF . BRACKLEY . 1671=0 . R. J. ^ 

9. O. CON AWAY . RANDS = A Hon rampant. 

I^, OF . BRACKLEY = C . R. ^ 

10. O, MARY . SKILDEN . AT . THE . SVN = The SUn. 

I^. IN . BRACKLEY . 1665 = HER HALFE PENY. J 



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NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 887 

11. 0. lOHN . STOAKES = Three cloves. 

^. OF . BRACKLEY . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. I . S. ^ 

12. 0, ROBERT . wiLKiNS . OF = Head of Chailcs II. 

J^. BRACKLY . HIS . HALF. PENY = R . E . W. J 

13. O, WILLIAM . wiLUAMS = A HoD rampant 

J^. HIS . HALFE . PENY = BRACKLEY. 1670. ^ 

The name of Williams is still to be found at Brackley, but all the others have 
<&appcared. There are two inns, called the White and Red Lions, also the King's 
Head, which may be inferred by the head of Charles II. 

BRIGSTOCK. 

14. 0. THOMAS . ALLEN . CHANDLER = The Grocers' Arras. 

R, OF . BRIDGSTOCK = T . A. J 

BULWICK. 

15. 0. WILUAM . WATTS = HIS HALF PENY. W . M . W. 

R. OF . BVLwiCK . 1669 = A swan. \ 

CORBY. 

16. 0. THOMAS . COLLINGWOOD . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. CORBY . HIS . HALF . PENY . 1667 =T . K . C i 

'* Corby, in Northamptonshire, is now the largest parish of that name. It vras 
and is the Hundred Town of a large and important ciistrict of that county ; there 
b still preserved there a charter granted in the time of Edward I. for destroying 
wolves. A curious custom is still practised once in twenty years, of stopping aU 
persons passing through the parish, and demanding a toll, which, if not complied 
with, subjected them to the unpleasant necessity of being placed in the stocks, and 
carried on a pole round the parish. On this celebrated day the boundaries of the 
village are also beaten. The name of Colling wood is not found in the parish at 
the present day, but is in the adjoining parish of Cottingham." — Rev. John H. 
Hill, Rector of Cranse, parish of Cottingham. 

The registers do not go beyond 1684. 

DAVENTRY. 

17. 0. EDWARD . ARNOLD = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF . DAYNTREE . 1 667 = E . A. \ 

18. 0, BASSET = (detrited). 

R. OF . DAiNTRY = The Grocers' Anns. 

19. 0, RICHARD . FARMOR = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . DAiNTREE = A man Standing. \ 

Richard Farmer, of Daventry, gent., 1662, gave an annuity of £y> a year for 
«*er. whereof ;f 20 to the minister, and ;f 10 to be distributed to the poor by the 
bailiff and three senior burgesses at Michaelmas and Lady Day yearly. 

20. A variety from a diflferent die, a tree near the man. \ 

57—2 



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888 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

21. O, ZACHEVS . FREEMAN . BOOK = Abook closped. 

i?. SELLER . IN . DAVENTRY = Z . F. ^ 

22. O. THOMAS . GRVBB = i I i 

J^, IN . DAVENTREE =111 J 

23. O. WILLIAM . HEALY . IN = Adam and Eve. 

J^. DAVENTRY . HIS . HALF . PENY = A lOSC and CTOWn. J 

DUDDINGTON. 

24. O. RICHARD . NiN = A pair of scales, i**. 

I^. OF . DVDINGTON = R . N. J 

The name is not to be found in the parish register. 

FINEDON, see THINGDEN. 

GEDDINGTON. 

25. O, lONATH . ROWLETT = I . R. 

J^, OF . GEDINGTON=l654. ^ 

26. Another similar, dated 1657. \ 

27. A variety dated 1664. 

28. O. THOMAS . WALLis = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . GEDiNGTON = A sugar-loat I 

GRENDON. 

29. O. THOMAS . GAWTHERNE = T .E.G. 

I^. IN . GRENDON = The Cordwainers' Arms. 

John, the son of Thomas and Susanna Gawtheme, was baptized July 12, 1679. 
Elizabeth, daughter of &ame, was baptized February 12, 1080. 
The registers do not go beyond 1680. 

HADDON, WEST. 

30. O, ELiSHA . ALMEY = The Gfoccrs' Arms. 

^. OF . WEST . HADDEN= HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

31. A variety reads h addon. 

The registers give the following entries : 

1 66 1. Elisha Almey, son of Elisha Almey and his wife Alice, baptized in 
August. 

1662. Another son, William, baptized. 

1664. Ruth, a daughter of the same, in November. 
167 1. Alice, another daughter, January. 

1673. Mary, another daughter, in August. 

1674. Alice, another daughter, in January. 
1677. Rebecca, another daughter, in May. 

No trace of marriages or burials, and the name is now unknown in the parish. 



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NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 889 



HARRINGWORTH. 

32. O. THO . BEARLY . HARINWORTH = HIS HALF PENY. T . A . R 

jR. THE . PACK . SADLE . A . CARRIER = A pack-SaddlC J 

33. A variety reading " the . pack . sadel . a . caror." J 

HARTWELL. 

34. 0. WILLIAM . chvrch . of=» A pair of scales. 

jR, HARTWELL . HIS . HALF . PENY = W , A . C. 1 666. l 



HIGHAM FERRERS. 

35. 0. lOHN . CHETLE . OF = A stick of candlcs. 

^. HIGHAM . FERRIS . 1 667= HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

John Chettle, a Beddaman, was buried March 6, 1701. 

36. O. HENRY. CHETTL£= A stick of candles. 

^. HIGHAM . FERRERS = H . C. J 

Henry dettle, was buried May y« 28, 1725. 

37. 0. THOMAS . IVDD . IN = The Butchers* Arms. 56. 

Ji. HIGHAM . FERRERS = T . H . L J 

38. O, GILBERT . NEGvs . 1669 = The Blacksmiths' Anns. 

H, IN . HIGHAM . FERRERS = HIS HALF PENY. G.E.N. J 

39. A variety reads ferers. 

From the registers we read : 

Gilbert Negus> 1684, Sepultns est Decembris Octavo. 

Elisabeth Negus, widow of M'. Gilbert Negus, some time Mayor of the Corpont* 
tioo, buried Feby. y« 17, 1715. 

40. 0. SYM . PAN . ALE = Unknown Arms. 

J^, IN . HIGHAM LE = S . M . P. J 

41. 0. TWYFORD . woRTHiNGTON = A goat (thc Worthington 

Crest). 

^^ OF . HIGHAM . FERRERS =± 1656. ^ 

42. A variety is dated 1666. 

There is an agreement of marriage between Thomas Richards, <^ Keysoe, gent, 
in y* coimty of Bedford, and Elizabeth Worthington, of this parish, spinster, y* 
^tighter of Twiford Worthington, gent., etc., July 30, 1635. 

Mr. Worthington appears to have officiated several times at marriages in the 
Market Place, m the time of Cromwell, and was, therefore, probably Mayor. 

On May 17, 1639, Elizabeth Worthington, daughter of Twiford and Elizabeth, 
christened. 

IXWORTH. 

43. 0. GARDENER . ISHAM . IN = Grocers' Arms. 

R IXWORTH . GROCER . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. i 



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890 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



KETTERING. 

44. O, lOHN . FOX . 1664 = The Grocers' Anns. 

J^. IN . KEATRING = I . F. J 

45. O, lOHN . LADDS . OF . KET = 1 664. 

J^, TERING . NORTHAMSH = I . A . L, J 

46. O. THOMAS . WEBB . MERCER = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

I^, OF . KETTERING = T . W. \ 

KILSBY. 

47. O. lOHN . BVRGIS . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . KILSBEY . 1670 = 1 . M . B. J 

KING'S CLIFFE. 

48. O, KINGS . CUFFE . HALF . PENY = A CrOWn. 

^. CHAINGED . BY . Y« . OVERSEERS = A flcur-de-lyS. J 

49. O. lANE . BROWNE . l66o = I . B, 

J?. IN . KINGS . CLIFF = HER HALFE PENY. i 

50. O, lANE . BROWNE =1660. 

J^. IN . KINGS . CLIFE = I . B. i 

51. O. lANE . BROWN . IN = I . B. 

J^. KINGS . CLIFF . l66o = HER HALFE PENY. ^ 

52. A variety has the date 1668. 

Mrs. Brown was a large issuer of tokens, and must have made a good profit by 
them. No doubt the earlier tokens bad been lost by her customers, otherwise 
there would have been no need of new issues. 

53. O, THOMAS . LAW = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . CLIFE . 1659 = A pair of scales. I 

54. O. THOMAS. LAW =1665. 

J^. IN . CLIFFE. 1659 = T . L. J 

This is curious from having two dates on it The family name of Law is still 
found at King's Cliffe. 

55. A variety reads clife. 

LAMPORT. 

56. O. lOHN . WEECH = The Mercers* Arms. 

i?. IN . LAMPORT = I . W. J 

57. O. lOHN . BROWNING = St. George and the Dragon. 

jR. IN . LAMPORT = I . M . B. 

58. A variety has the Haberdashers' Anns in obverse. 

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NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. S91 



LOWICK. 



59. 0. LEWIS . SVLCH . IN . 1 666 = A hart. 

R. LVKWIK . ALIS . LOWICK = HIS HALF PENY. | 

Tlie name does not appear in the parish raster. 

LUTTON. 

60. 0. MATHEW . GOSTON = A pack-horsc. 

R. OF . LVTTON . [l6]49 = M . M . G. \ 

If this date is correctly given, it is the earliest of the Northamptonshire tokens. 
The name does not appear in the parish register. 

61. O, MATHEW . GOSTON = A pack-horse. 

R, OF . I^VTTON . L . O = M . M . G. \ 

MOULTON. 

62. O, lOHN . PERYN . MOVLTON = A pair of scalcs. 

R. NORTHAMPTONSHER = I . P. \ 

63. O. Another, differing in size and arrangement of the letters. 

NORTHAMPTON. 

64. 0. RICHARD . ALCOVE . AT . V" . ONE = A pigeOn. R . M . A. 
R. PIGEON . IN . NORTHAMPTON = HIS HALF PENY. 166 . . J 

65. A variety is spelt alcovt, and dated 1667. 

66. Another variety reads alcovlt. 

67. O. EDWARD . COOPER . OF = A rose. 

R, NORTHAMPTON . 1654 = E . E . C. \ 

68. O, THOMAS . COOPER . IN = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R, NORTHAMPTON . l652=T . E . C. i 

He was Town Bailiff in 1647. The name is still common in Northampton. 

69. Another, similar, dated 1668. \ 

In a subsidy, 8th Jac. I., Thomas Cooper, sen., has goods assessed ;^3, and 
Thomas Cooper, Jan., land at £i. 

In i8th Car. I., Mr. Edward Cooper paid 5s., and a Mrs. Cowper (Cooper), 
both of the Chequer Ward, los. ; and in the hearth tax of Car. II., Mr. Thomas 
Cooper was assessed for 6s. 



70. O, AT . THE . WHIT . HIND = A hind statant. 

R. IN . NORTHAMPTON = G . E . E. \ 

Jl. O. lOHN . LABRAM . IN . THE = A SUgar-loaf. 

R, DRAPERE . NORTHAMPTON = I . S . L. { 

72. A variety is halfpenny size. 

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892 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

73. O, SAMVEL . pooEL = The paschal Iamb. 

H. IN . NORTHAMPTON = S . P. \ 

Samuel Poole was Town Bailiff in 1654, and paid 3s. 6d. in the subsidy cf i8th 

Car. I., levied on the inhabitants of the town, he being then a resident of the 

Chequer Ward ; and David Poole, of the East Ward, was assessed for three hearths 

in the tax of Car. II. 

74. O, S . R . IN . NORTHATON = A CaStlc 

^. {No legend.) Two lions passant gardant \ 

75. O. I . S . IN . NORTHAMPTON = A castle. 

R, {No legend.) Two lions passant gardant. \ 

76. A variety reads NORTHHATON = GATEWAY. \ 

77. A variety reads northamton. 

78. A variety reads NORTHHAMTON = GATEWAY. \ 

John Spicer, Mayor, 1656. ( by one of these persons. 

79. O. IN . BIRD . STREETE = A pair of scales. 

R. NORTHAMPTON . 1651 = W . D . S. \ 

Bird Street is a corruption of Bridge Street ; a street of the same name in Lich- 
Held is now vulgarly called Bird Street. 

80. A variety reads bird . streete . in = i . d . s. 

81. Another, in . bird . streete . in = i . d . s. 

82. Also a variety from another die. 

In the subsidy 3rd and 4th Car. I., John Smyth, inn-holder, Northampton, had 
land assessed at 20s., who may have been this issuer. 

83. O. AT . THE . GEORGE . iN = St. Gcorge and the Dragon. 

R. NORTHAMPTON . 1650 = 1 .M.S. i 

The George is now the principal inn at Northampton. 

Amongst the freeholders who were assessed in respect to property in this town 
in the subsidy of i8th Car. I., is that of a Mr. Wandly, who paid 4s. for the 
George. 

84. O. I . T . IN . NORTHAMPTON = A Castle. 

R. CHAMBERLAiNE . i66o = Two Hons passant gardant J 

These initials are no doubt those of John Twigden, who was Mayor in 1666. 
He was committed to the custody of the Sergeant-at-arms, and detained several 
dajrs, which cost him £2 per day, for making a false return of members to serve in 
Parliament. For his private business he issued the following token : 

85. O. lOHN . TWIGDEN . IN = A glove. 

R. NORTHAMPTON . i666 = "Crede sed cave." J 

A unicjue specimen in silver of this token is in the Northampton Museum. It 
was |>ossibIy a pattern. 

This token is remarkable for the legend : " Believe, but take care,** as if to 
piy, you may believe, or be sure this coin is genuine, but take care of others ; or 
it may mean, ** Give credit, but observe caution in doing so.** 



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NORTH A MPTONSHIRE. 



893 



1661. Mr. Twigden, gent., elected Major, August 2, i66a — Coldwell MS, 

Subsidy 3rd and 4th Car. L, John Twigden assessed £7, for goods. 

In that made I3tb, and collected i6th, Car. I., land atji^i. 

In a subsidy, 13th Car. I., John Twigden, in South Ward, paid 4s. 

86. 0, ANCHOR . wiLLDiNGE . IN = An anchor. 

R, NORTHAMPTON . MERCER = A . A . W. 

87. A variety has the letters and anchor larger. 



sa 


0. 
R. 


89. 


0. 
R. 


90. 


0. 
R. 


9»- 


0. 
R. 


92. 


0. 
R. 


93- 


0. 
R. 


94- 


0. 
R. 


95- 


0. 
R. 


96. 


0. 
R. 


97- 


0. 
R. 


98. 


0. 
R. 


99- 


0. 
R 


loa 0. 
R. 


101 


. 0. 
R. 



OUNDLE. 

OVNDLE . HALF . PENY . TO = A talbot. 

BE . CHANGED . BY . Y= . FEEFEES = A griffin. \ 

AN . OVNDLE . HALF . PENY . 1669 = A talbot. 

FOR . THE . VSE , OF . THE . POOR = A talbot. \ 

lOHN . AVDLEY . TOBACCONIST = HIS HALF PENY. 

IN . OWNDLE . i669 = StilL i 

MATHEW . AVSTiN = A flcur-de-lys. 

IN . OWNDELL = M . A. 

NATH . BROWING . IN = Lamb couchant. 

OVNDELL . CHANDLER = N . B. 1659. 

HENRY . COLDWEL . IN = The Haberdashers* Arms. 

OWNDLE . HABADASHER = H . E . C. 

lOHN . EATON = The Grocers' Arms. 

OF . OVNDELL = I . E. 

WILL . FiLBRiGG . LINEN = Arms ; a lion rampant 

DRAPER . OF . OVNDLE = W . F. 1 65 8. 

LAWRENCE . HAVTON = A man making candles. 

IN . OVNDLE . l664 = L . H. 

WILLIAM . HVLL = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

IN . OVNDLE == W . H. 

MATHEW . HVNT = M . H. 
IN . OWNDLE =1657. 

WILLIAM . lAMES . OF = Three cloves; the Grocers* Arms. 

OVNDLE . CHANDLER = W . L 1 663. 
DANIEL . MAVLEY . 1657 = ArmS ', six cloVCS. D . M. 

. IN . OVNDLE . CHANDLE = A dovc with an olive branch. 

lOHN . PASHLER . IN= 1668. 

OVNDLE . CHANDLER = A dove; the Tallowchandlers' 
device. 



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894 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1 02. O. RICH . STEVENSON . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. OVNDLE . CHANDLER = R . S. J 

103. O, WILLIAM . TERREWRST = The Merchant-Tailors' Arms. 

J^. IN . OVNDELL = W . K . T. \ 

PETERBOROUGH. 

In the Town Book is the entry : 

" 1668. Ordered that the sum of ;^io be laid out for a stamp and coinage of the 
public halfpenny with the town arms, and the improvement thereof (to wit) for the 
putting out poor and fatherless children apprentices or other charitable uses." 

104. O. The I Overseers \ half , petty . of\ Peterbrough \ 1666 (in 

five lines). 
R, {No legend.) Two swords in saltire, between four crosses^ 
patt^ fitchde. {Octagonal.) ^ 

105. O. Peierburgh \ halfe . penny \ to . be . changed \ by • the . 

Town I Bailiff \ 1670 (in six lines): 
R. {No legend^ Arms of Peterborough, same as the last. 
{Octagonal.) \ 

106. A variety reads towne . Bailife. 

107. Another variety reads towne and peterbvrg. 

108. O. ROBERT . andrewes = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. IN . PETERBROVGH = R . A. \ 

A Robert Andrews is still carrying on the trade of a baker in Peterborough, and 
is a Nonconformist In the registers are these entries : 

1665. Robert, son of Robert Andrewes, buried December I, at the pest-house ; he 
died of the plague. 

1669. Robert Andrewe buried March 2. 

1677. Robert, son of Robert Andrews, baptized July 3. 

1604. Robert, son of Matt. Andrews, baptized September 30. 

1604. Robert, son of Robert Andrews, buried September 3 **in wooUen.'* 

The Andrews were an old Nonconformist family. 

109. O. IN . PETERBOROVGH . AT . Y= = A clasped book. R . B. 
R. FEARE . GOD . HONOR . THE = KING. \ 

no. O. lOHN . BLVDwicK = Three cloves. 

R. OF . PETERBVRROW = I . B. \ 

The following various entries are from the parish register : 
1658. John Bludwick married Elizabeth King, March 15. 
1690. John Bludwick buried November 9 ** in woollen." 

111. O. RICHARD . BVRTON . OF-=The Mcrcers* Arms. 

R. PETERBOROVGH. l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

112. O. lOHN . BVTLER . 1 664 = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . PETERBOROGH = I . E . B. 

113. O. ROBART . CARVER = A pelican feeding its young. 

R. OF . PETERBROVGH = R . C. \ 

1668. Thomas Carrier, son of Robert Carrier and Judue Coll, married October 8. 



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NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 89S 

114. A variety reads carier. 

115. O. lOHN . CAWTHORNE = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. IN . PETERBOROVGH = I . C. 

1 a subsidy (mutilated) late in the reign of James I., a John Cauthorne wa» 
assessed £^ for goods. 

116. 0. ROBERT . DANYELL = The Groccrs* Arms. R . d. 

jR. OF . PETERBOROW . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

i6Sa Robert, son of Robert Daniel, buried August 19, 1680. 

17. 0, THO . DILLINGHAM = T . D. 
J^. IN . PEETERBOROVGH = A roll Of tobaCCO. J 

18. A variety reads peterborrow. 

19. O. lOHN . FRENCH . DRAPER = The Drapers' Arms. 

Ji. IN . PEETERBOROVGH = I . F . F. \ 

662. John French and Francis Wyldbore married January ii. 

20. A variety from a different die. 
2T. A variety with date 1667. | 

22. 0, GEORGE . HAMERTON = The Groccrs' Arms, g . m . h. 

^. OF . PETERBOROVGH = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

23. 0. GEORGE . HAMERTON = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF . PETERBOROW = G . M . H. ^ 

24. O. NICHOLAS . HARDY = Two pipes and roll of tobacco. 

-^. IN . PETERBOROVGH = N . H. J 

665. Nicholas Hardy and Elizabeth Collier married Tune 26. 
680. Nicholas Hardy buried March 9, "in woollen." 

25. O. ALCE . HARVEY . A^ . THE = A claSped boOt 
J^. IN . PETERBROVGH=l659. 

26. O. MARGRET. KEMPE=l664. 
I^. IN . PETERBOROVGH = M . K. J 

Margaret Kempe buried December 20, 1684, '* in woollen." 

27. A variety reads peeterbrovgh. 

128. O. MATTHEW . KNOWLES = A portcullis. 

I^. IN . PEETERB0R0W = M . K. J 

1666. Matthew Knowles buried June 19. 

i68a Matthew Knowles, son of above, buried March 18 " in woollen." He was 
cfanrchwarden in 1668. 

29. A variety reads mathew. 

30. O. lONE . MANISTY . l668 = HER HALFE PENY. 
J^. OF . PEETERBOROVGH = I . M. ^ 

Mis. Joan Manisty, widow, buried November ii, 1673. 
Margaret Joan Manisty buried December 9, 1695, '* in woollen." 



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«96 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

131. O, FRANCIS . MORTIMER = A Stocking. 
jR, IN . p(et)erborow = f . m. 

1695*96. John, son of Mr. ffrancis Mortimer, baptized February la 

132. O. THOMAS . SECHELL = The Groccrs' Arms. 

jR, IN . PETERBVRROW = T . A . S. J 

Thomas Seachell buried April 14, 167a 

133. O. THOMAS . SHINN . 1667 = The Grocers' Anns. 

JR. OF . PETERBOROWGH = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

134. A variety reads peterborovgh. 

135. O. THO . SHiNNE . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

jR. peter . borovgh = t . s. J 

1663-64. February 5, Mr. Tliomas Shine the elder buried. 

136. O. GEO . SLYE . OF = The Bakers' Arms. 

/^, PETERBOROWGH = G . S. { 

George, son of Thonws Sly, jun., buried October 18, 1683, **in woollen." 

137. O. lAMES . TALER . OF . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

jR. PEETERBOVROWGH {sic) = The Cordwainers' Arms. J 

The cobbler must have exercised great ingenuity in devising a new mode of writing 
Peterborough ; it is an excellent specimen of the gross blunders which are so fre- 
quently found on the tokens of this period ; the most illiterate persons must have 
executed them. In this list Peterborough is spelled thirteen differeiit ways ; the 
issuer's name was, doubtless, Taylor. 

James, son of William Tailor, baptized March 12, 1665. 

138. O, RICHARD. TOMPSON = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. IN . PETERBROYGH . 1 663 = An ornameD ted knot between 

R. T. i 

Richard Tompson buried February 14, 1658. 

139. O, WILLIAM . WELLS = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. IN . PETERBOROVGH = W . W. J 

William Wells buried December 7, 1668. 

The names of Andrews, Colls, French, Hardy, and the common one of Thomp- 
son are still to be found at Peterborough. . 



POTTERSPURY. 

140. O. THOMAS . RATCLiF . 0F = A pair of scales. 

/^. PATERS . PERY . l666 = T . E . R. 

141. O, THOMAS . SAVL . i668 = A falcoH. 

/^. OF . POTTERS . PERRY = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

Alice Saul, widow, was buried December 28, 1686. 
Christopher Saul was buried May 3, 1690. 



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NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 897 



ROCKINGHAM. 
142. 0. SAMVEL . PEARE = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . ROCKINGHAM . l666 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

A Samuel Peake was living in Rockingham about the middle of the seventeenth 
ceniory, and probably the R was struck Instead of K. In the registers we read : 
Samnel, son of Thomas Peake, baptized November 15, 1623. 
Samuel Peake and Bridget Sly were married June 19, 1655. 
Ambrose, son of above, was bom April 26, and baptized April 30, 1657. 
Bridget, wife of Samuel Peake, buried September 5, 1676. 
Samuel Peake buried November 14, 1680. 



ROTHWELL. 

143. O, THOMAS . BEBEE . IN = A wheatshcaf. 

^. ROELL . BAKER = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

144. 0, lOHN . COLLIER = Three cloves. 

^. IN . ROELL . 1658 = 1 . M . C. ^ 

145. O. WILLIAM . DODSON . i666 = The Mercers' Arms. 

/^. OF . ROELL . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . D. J 

146. O. lOHN . PONDER . OF . ROWEL = I . D . P. 

/^. A . HALF . PENNY . 1664 = OB. (an abbreviation of obolus, 
or halfpenny). | 

147. O. lOHN . PONDER = A Stick of candles. 

^. OF . ROWELL . 1665 = I . D . p. J 

The family of Beeby is still found at Roth well ; the Dodsons are no more. 
A widow of a Thomas Ponder was buried in 1832. 
The registers ol Roth well only go back to 1708. 

RUSHDEN. 

148. 0. GEORGE . CARTER . OF . RVSDEN = St Gcofge and the 

Dragon. 

J^, HIS . HALF . PENY . l666 = G . E . C ^ 

Roger Carter was baptized April 25, 1669 ; son of George and Hannah Carter. 
Roger Carter and Elizabeth MuUer were married 1670. 



STAMFORD BARON. 
149. 0. MILES . HODGSON = A falcon. 

^. STAMFORD . BARON = A WOOlpack. M . H. \ 

150- A variety is without baron, and has the date [i6]67. 

The borough of Stamford is in Lincolnshire, whilst Stamford Baron is in 
^wthamptonshire ; they are only separated by the river Welland. The Stamford 
tokens are numerous. (See the Lincolnshire series.) 



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S98 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



SUTTON (KING'S). 

151. O. EDMVND . CHANDLER = HIS HALF PENY. 
jR. IN . KINGS . SVTTON = E . E . C. 1 666. 



THINGDEN. 

152. O. AMERICA . BAGERLEY = An oak-tree. 

J^. IN . THiNDON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. {Heart-shapt.) \ 

This Christian name is very remarkable, and also the one named below. 
Bagger] ey, Thomas C. John, son of Amisist Baggerley and Mary, his vrife, 
was t^ptized March 15, 1668. — William Vincent and Thomas James, church- 

wfirdens. 

153. O. lOHN. nighti(ng)ale = A hart passant, i . n. 

R. OF. TH(IN)D0N . 1666. HIS HALF PENY. \ 



THRAPSTON. 

154. O. iOHN . HVNT = A man making candles. 

R^ OF . THROPSTON = I . H. \ 

155. 0. EDMOND . PALMER . BAKR = The BakCFS' AtTOS. 

R^ IN . THRAPSTON . [l6]68 = E . P. \ 

156. O, WILLIAM . W1LLM0T = A SWaiL 

R, OF . THRAPSTON . l666 = W . W. \ 

The name of Willmot is still found at Thrapston, as well as the Swan Inn. 



TOWCESTER. 

** Thence to Tosseter on Tuesday, 
Where an artful Bachelor choos'd I 
To consort with ; we ne'er bridged, 
But to Bacchus Revels trudged ; 
All the night long sate we at it, 
Till we both grew heavy pated." 

Bamabee* 5 Journal. 

157. O, WILLIAM . BELL = The Dyers' Arms. 

R. OF . TOWCESTER . DIER = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

J 58. A vanety reads towseter. 

J 5 9, O. THOMAS . CLARKE = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. [N . TOWCESTER. 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

160. O. THOMAS . CLARKE = The Drapers* Arms, not in a shield. 

R. OF . TOVCESTER = T . A . C. \ 



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NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 899 

161. 0, THOMAS . CLARKE = The Drapers' Arms. 

^. OF . TOUCESTER ^. T . A . C. i 

Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Qarke and Phily, his wife, was bora December 30, 

1666; baptiied January 8, 1667. 
]ohn, son of Thomas Clarke and Phillis, his wife, was bom August 7, and 

baptized August 12, 1670. 
Sarah, daughter of Thomas Clarke and Philiz, his wife, was bora August 7, and 

baptized August 12, 167a 

162. 0. RICHARD . FARMER = A talbot possant. 

R IN . TOSSISTER = R . E . F. ^ 

163. 0, CHARLES . GORE = Arms ; three bulls' heads and crest. 

^. IN . TOWCESTER. 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. | 

164. 0. THOMAS . HARRIS = A basket T . M . H. 

R. IN . TOWCESTER . l668 = HIS HALF PENV. J 

Katherine, daughter of Thomas Harris and Jane, his wife, baptized 1668 (month 
illegible). 
Tliomas, son of Thomas Harris, bora June 8 ; baptized August if, 167a 

165. 0, Pattrickt . Herron , of , Towcester (in three lines). 

R. HIS . HALF . PENY . p . H. = Arms ; two lions combatant 
{Octagonal.) ^ 

James, son of Patrick Heron and Elizabeth, his wife, baptized July 25, 1669. 

166. 0. WILL . HOWES . OF . TOWCESTER . MERCER = A fleur- 

de-lys. 

R. WILL . HOWES . OF . TOWCESTER . MERCER = W . H. 
1670. \ 

167. 0. lOHN . KINGSTON . OF . TOWCESTER . MERCER = A pair of 

scales. 

R. lOHN . KINGSTON . OF . TOWCESTER . MERCER = I . K. 
1666. I 

i^^. 0. lOHN . KINGSTON . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. TOSSETER . MERCER = I . G . K. J 

169. 0. GEORGE . WAPLE . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. TOWCESTER . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

In Towcester the name of Clark is common, also Harris. 



WEEDON. 

" Thence to Wedon, where I tarry'd, 
In a waggon to be carried. 
Carriers there are to be found -a 
Who will drink till the world turns round-a ; 
Pay, good fellows, I'll pay naught here ; 
I have left more than I brought here. 
My queasy stomach making bold 
To give them that it could not hold." 

Bamabeis foumal, 

170. 0. THOMAS . MARRIOTT = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. OF . WEEDEN . 1657 =T . F . M. 



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900 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

171. O. MARTIN . PARKER = The Grocers* Arms. 

jR. IN . WEEDEN . 1652 = M . M . P. \ 

Neither of these names are to be found in the parish registers. 
Weedon is reputed to be the most central part of England. 

WELDON. 

172. O. WILLIAM . RESBY = A man making candles. 

/^. IN . WELDEN . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

1691. Ann, wife of William Rorsby, was buried August 28, and affidavit thereof 
made according to law. 

1693. William Reisby, tallow-chandler, was buried June 10, and affidavit thereof 
made according to law. 

An old woman was in 1886 living in Weldon in her eighty-sixth year. Her 
maiden name was Reesby, and she is the last of the family living at Weldon. Her 
name is Bellamy ; her father died about 1804, and was a baker, as was his (ather 
before him. She may probably be the great-granddaughter of the issuer. 

VVANSFORD. 

173. O, GEORGE . BOSEMAN = A sugar-loaf. 1666. 

J^. IN . WANSFORD = G . B. { 

The comic rhymes in Bamabte's Journal will ever render this place famous : 
** On a haycock sleeping soundly, 
Th* river rose and tooke me roundly 
Down the current ; people cryed, 
Sleeping, down the stream I hyed ; 
Where away^ quoth they t/rom Greenland f 
No ; from Wansforth brigs in England" 
This tale is still preserved at Wansford, where there was an inn called the Hay- 
cock, and a painting of Barnaby floating on a haycock, for a sign. 

The sign of the Haycock was taken down at Wansford in 1889, and the inn 
being the property of the Duke of Bedford, the sign was removed to Wobum 
Abbey. 

The horrors of the plague in 1643 at this place, only twenty years before the 
issue of this token, are thus given : 

** Seeing there, as did become me. 
Written, LORD HAVE MERCY ON ME, 
On the portels, I departed, 
Lest I should have sorer smarted ; 
Though from death none may be spared 
I to dye was scarce prepared." 

WELFORD. 

174. O, WILL . wicKES . HIS . HAL . PENY = St Gcorge and the 

Dragon. 

R, IN I WELFORD | IN | NOR | THAMP | TON | SHEER = 69 (in 

seven lines across the field). {Heart-shape.) \ 

WELLINGBOROUGH. 

175. O, RICHARD . MANINGTON = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. OF . WELLINGBOROW . [l6]65 = R . M . M. \ 



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NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 901 

176. O, WILLIAM . SEER . IN = A pair of scales. 

Ji, WELLINGBORROW . 1665= W. E . S. { 

177. O. HENRY . SMITH . IN = Three cloves and a bell. 

J^. WELLINGBOROVGH = H . S. i 

178. O. lOHN . WORTHINGTON . OF = The SUn. 

J^, WELLINGBOROVGH . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. A Cres- 

cent. i 

The Seers family is still there, and the Smiths, of course. 



WHITTLEBURY. 

179. O. HENRY . DOLTON . 0F = A shovel. H . M . D. 
/^. WHITELBVRY . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY* 



5« 

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IKlortbumberlan^ 

Number of Tokens issued lo 

Number of Places issuing Tokens i 

Town Pieces issued None 



58—2 

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flortbumbcrlan^ 

There are only ten farthing tokens of this county, all of them circulated 
at Newcastle. Northumberland, with its northern neighbours, Cum- 
berland and Westmoreland, issued very few tokens ; the neighbour- 
hood of Scotland seems not to have been propitious to them, though 
they must have been as much needed there as in the south. 



NEWCASTLE. 

1. 0, CHARLES . BARKER = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R, GABRIEL . FVLTHORP=IN NEWCASTELL. \ 

Charles Barker, son of Francis Barker, of Topcliff Manor, co. York, and Gabriel 
FoUthorp, were apprenticed to Alderman Mark Milbank ; they were both made 
free of the Newcastle Mercers' Company in i66a 

2. 0, WILLIAM . BLACKETT = Arms of the Blackett family; on a 

chevron between three mullets pierced, as many 
escallops. 
A MARCHANT . IN . NEWCASTLE = The Metchant-Adventurers' 
Arms. \ 

William Blackett was of a good Northumberland family, which he farther 
•^▼anccd by the great wealth he gained by judgment and industry in trade, and the 
prodace of his mines of lead and coal. In i66o he was appointed Sheriflf, and 
afterwards Alderman of Newcastle, of which he was Mayor in i666. He was 
dcded Member for Newcastle in 1673, and the same year advanced to the 
<%nityofbaroneL He died in 1680, and was buried in St. Nicholas' Church, 
Newcastle. 

Of his three surviving sons, Edward succeeded him in the baronetcy ; his second 
iOD, Michael, to the business ; and his third son, William, also a Newcastle mer- 
chant, was chosen Mayor in 1683 and 1698 ; he represented Newcastle in Parlia- 
pient from 1685 ^^ ^ decease in 1705. He was advanced to the dignity of baronet 
ID 16S4, and High Sheriff of Northumberland in 1689. 

The estimation ii> which the Blacketts were at this time held, and the success 
^b which their undertakings were crowned, became almost proverbial. The 
^^jice that a kind master gave to his favourite apprentice, and the utmost wish 
that a father could have for his darling son was, that he could be through life 
*-William Blackett. 

3- 0, ANTHONY . DOBSON = A . D, 

R. OF . NEWCASTLE = A . D. \ 

Anthony Dobson vras the son of a substantial feltmaker of Newcastle. He 
y«ars to have been an obstinate man, in frequent trouble with the authorities. 
He espoused the popular side during the Civil Wars. 



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906 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

4. O. lOHN . GAVSTELL = A fleecc. 

-^. IN . NEWCASTLE = I . I . G. J 

5. O. WILLIAM . HVTCHINSON = A Castlc. 

^. OF . NEWCASTLE . i66o = A merchant's mark, composed of 
w . H and 4. { 

William Hutchinson was of the Merchant- Ad venturers' Company. In 1688 he 
was appointed Alderman of Newcastle, with others, by mandamus of James II., to 
the exclusion of those elected by the burgesses ; October i he was chosen Mayor, 
but on November 5 following he was displaced by Nicholas Ridley, elected under 
the new charter, by which all the Uberties of the town were restored. Hutchinson 
was a Dissenter. 

6. O, WILL . LONDON . IN . NEW = Arms of the town of Newcastle ; 

three castles, two and one. 

JR. CASTLE . VPON . TYNE = W . L. J 

He was one of the Protector's " four-and-twenty " for Gateshead. 

7. O. HENRY . SLINGER= 1664. 

jR. OF . NEWCASTLE = H . S. J 

8. O. EDWARD . SPENCER = The Mercers' Arms. 

jR, IN . NEW . CASTELL = E . P . S. ^ 

9. 0. HENRY . TOMPSON = A castle. 

/?. IN . NEWCASTELL = H . E . T. J 

10. O. lOHN. THOMAS . 59 = Three figures standing. 

/^. IN . NEWCASTLE . 16 = I . M . T. | 

The Three Indian Kings, on the Quayside. The present name arose from the 
custom of giving the three kings of Cologne an Eastern or swarthy hue. 



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IRotttngbamsbire. 



Number of Tokens issued 121 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 14 

Town Piece issued at Nottingham. 



^b-EdUor and Collaborattur : 
Vide Preface, 



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Vlottfttdbamebfre. 

of the late John Toplis, of Grimsby Villa, Nottingham, 
specially remembered in connection with the following pages, 
especially was due the interest which has been excited in 
mnty for the collection of its traders* tokens, 
devoted very much time and great attention to the study, and 
:ompilation of the ensuing list was almost entirely his work. He 
eager to supplement the descriptions by notes as to the issuers, 
had commenced a careful search of parochial and town records 
the purpose, when his career — so useful to his native town and so 
luable to his large family — was untimely cut short. As a tribute of 
'espect to the memory of a dear and valued friend the list is presented 
he left it, no further efforts being made to obtain notes where his 
memory lingers over all the work. For much kindly aid and sympathy, 
and for very thoughtful help, the Editor is greatly indebted to him, 
and in making this inadequate reference to one whose removal has 
been so painful a loss, the Editor is impelled to express his thankful- 
ness for having known for so many years a man so well worth know- 
ing, and whom to know was to respect 
May he rest in peace ! 

These tokens are principally halfpennies. Some of them are of 
inferior workmanship, and of a size between halfpennies and farthings ; 
the following are examples : Henry Carier, of Blyth and Nottingham ; 
tokens of Berridge, Burrowes, Cockinge, Dodsley, Farwoorth, Hodges, 
yd Smith. The only town piece is that of Nottingham. — John 
Toplis. 



BINGHAM. 

'• 0. EDWARD . BANBVRV . IN = E . B. 

^' Bingham \ his . halfe \ penny (in three lines). {Script) 

2* 0. THOMAS I MARKHAM | CHANDLER | 1669 (in foUr lines). 
^' IN I BINGHAM | HIS HALFE | PENY (in four lines). 



BLYTH. 

3- 0. THOMAS . BVCKE . MERCER . IN = A Stag lodged. 
^' BLYTH . HIS . HALF . PENV . l666 = T . A . B. 

4- 0, HENRY . CARIER . OF . BLYTH = An eagle displayed, 

^- HERCER . IN . NOTINGHAMSHIR= = H . R . C 



i 



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910 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



BRINSLEY. 
5. O. ROBERT . HORESLEY . BLACK = The Blacksmiths'V^niis, 

jR. SMITH . IN . BRINSLEY . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENnV 



COLLINGHAM. 

6. O, THOMAS . RIDGE . HIS . HALF . PEN Y = The Grocers' \\nns. 
jR, OF . COLLINQHAM . MERCER . 1664 = The Merccrs'V Aims. 

T . k. \ ^ 

7. O. MARY . SCRIMSHAW . OF . NORH (t and H conjoined) =4The 

Mercers' Arms. 1 

JR. COLINGHAM . IN . NOTING**SH = HER HALF PENY. I \ 



COSSALL. 

8. O. AMBROSE . covpER = A . c in a bow of ribbon. 

jR. OF . COSELL . MERCER = 1657 J^. Sma// i 

9. O, lOHN . DiGBY . OF = A fleuF-de-lys. 

JR, CORSALL . GROCER = I . D. 



LANEHAM. 

10. O, Mary \ Adlington \ In (in three lines). {Script) 

JR. Laneham \ her . halfe \ Penny (in three lines). (Script) 
(Octagonal,) J 



MANSFIELD. 

11. O. PEETER . BROWNE = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . MANSFEILD . 1664 = The Blacksmiths' Arms. J 

1 2. O. ROBERT . CLEGGE = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

JR, IN . MANSFEILD . 1659 = R . A . C. \ 

13. O, SAMVELL . HAVLTON = A pair of scales hanging from chief 

wavy, part of the Bakers' Arms. 

JR, OF. MANSFEILD . 1 664 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

14. O. HENRY . HEATH . AT . THE = A hoimd (talbot). 

JR, IN . MANSFEILD . 1671= HIS HALF PENY. \ 

15. O, WILLIAM . HVRST . 1 667 = A pack-horse. 

R. IN . MANSFEILD . CARIER = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

16. O, WILLIAM . POYZOR = W . K . P. 

R. IN . MANSFEILD . 1659 = A swan on land, wings erect } 



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NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 9i i 

*7- 0. WILLUM . POYZOR = HIS HALF PENY. 

^' IN . MANSFEiLD . 1671 = A swaii on land, wings erect. ^ 
• ^ variety reads poyzer. 
'^* ^- GREGORY . SYLVESTER = The Mercers' Arms. 

^* OF. MANSFEILD . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

^' ^' EDWARD . sovTHWORTH = The Ironmongers* Arms. 

^* h I Mansfeiid \ his . halfe \ penny (in four lines). {Script.) \ 

' j^' ^ohn . wiLLD . 1 666 = The Grocers' Arms. 

• '^ . MANSFEILD = I . A . W. ^ 

^^ yP. f^*^N . WILDE . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

^ANSFEILD . 1666 = I . A . W. J 

2} ^* ^lUNcis . WILSON = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

i?. IN . MANSFIELD . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

24. O. FRANCIS . WILSON = The Tallowchandlcrs* Arms. 

\ ^. IN . MANSFIELD . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. h 

^ \ 25. 0. FRANCIS . WILSON = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

^. IN . MANSFIELD . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

26' 0. ROBERT . WILLD . 1667 = A hat and feather. 

^' IN . MANSFEILD = HIS HALF PENY. i 



MANSFIELD WOODHOUSE. 
^7- 0. RICHARD . BREWiTT = A man on horseback. 

^- MANSFEILD . WOODHOVS = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

• 0. RICHARD . LEWIS . OF = A horse saddled and bridled. 

^' MANSFEILD . WOODHOVS = HIS HALF PENY. R . L. J 

NEWARK. 

? ^ATHEw . ALVEY . MERCER . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. KEv^y^RK . HIS . HALF . PENY . 1 664 = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

M. A. i 

30- 0. christo . BVRNETT . 68 = The Saddlers' Arms. 

^' ^AlDLER . IN . NEWARKE = HIS HALF PENY. C . a J 

^' n* ^^NRY . CAM . APOTHECARY = The Apothecaries* Arms. 

^^ I halfepeny \ in Newarke \ 1666 | h . c (in five lines). 
{Script.) \ 

3i« V. losHVA . CLARKE . MERCER . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 
^- Newark . his . half . peny . 1666 = The Mercers' Arms. 
I.e. \ 



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912 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

33. O, DENIS . COOLING . AN . APOTHECARY = The Apothecarics' 

Arms. 
-^. /lis I halfepeny \ in Newarke | 1666 | DC. (in five lines). 

34. O. lOHN . FEATLEY . OF = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. NEWARKE . 1658 = 1 . F. 

35. O, lOHN . GERTON = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R, OF . NEWARKE . 1659 = 1 .E.G. 

36. O, WILL . GLOVER . CHANDLER . IN = The Tallowchandlers' 

Arms. 

R, NEWARK . HIS . HALF . PENY . l664 = W . A . G. \ 

37. O. THO . GODDARD . BLACKSMITH = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1669^ 
R, AT . Y« . GOLDEN [^sh^] 'N . NEWARK = A horse-shoC. 

38. O, WILLIAM . GRANT = The Merccrs' Arras. 

R, OF . NEWARKE . 1657 = W . G. 

39. O, NOE . WANT . WHERE . THESE . ARE = HENRY LAMBE. 
R, IN. NEWARKE. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

40. O, MATHEW . NEWHAM = The Mercers' Arms. 

Rn IN . NEWARKE . 1657 = M . N. 

41. O, RICHARD . SHiPMAN . MERcaR = The Merccrs' Arms. 
R, In I Newarke \ his halfe \ peny (in four lines). {Script) 

42. O. FRANCES . WHiTON = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R, OF . NEWARKE . 1659 = F . W. 

43. O. WILLIAM . WHiTTON . i668 = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R. IRON . MONGER . IN . NEWARK = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

44. O. BENiAMiN . WILSON = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, OF . NEWARKE . 1657 = B . W. 

45. O, BENiMAN . WILSON = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R. OF . NEWARKE . 1657 = B . W. 

46. O, CHRISTOPHER . WILSON = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. OF . NEWARKE . 1659 = . W. 

47. O, losEPH . WILSON = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. OF . NEWARKE . 1657 = 1 . W. 

48. O. ROBERT . wiLLSON = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, MERCER . IN . NEWARKE = R . E . W. 

49. O. ROBERT . WILSON . IN = The Merccrs' Arms. 

R, NEWARKE. MERCER. 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

50. (9. William \ Wilson \ his halfe \ /V«y (in four lines). (Script. 
R, IN . NEWARKE . MERCER = The Mercers' Arms, w . w. 



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NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 913 



NOTTINGHAM. 

51. 0. Nottingham \ halfepenny \ Chainged by ye \ Chamberlains \ 

1669 (in five lines). {Script.) 
R, {No legend.) Arms of the town of Nottingham : two 
staves ragul^e, one in pale, surmounted with another 
in fesse, between two ducal coronets in chief, the 
bottom part of the staff entiled with a coronet. 

52. 0. lOHN . BERRiDGE . IN = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. NOTTINGHAM . APOTHECARY = I . a Small ^ 

53. 0. lOHN . BERRIDGE . IN = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. NOTTINGHAM . APOTHECARY = I . B. \ 

54. 0. lOHN . BLVNT . AT . THE . WEEKE = A man on horseback 

with panniers. 

R. DERROSS . OF . NOTINGHAM . BAKER = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

55. 0. lOHN . BLVNT . AT . THE . WEEKE = A man on horseback 

with panniers. 
R. day \ Cross of\ Nottingham \ Baker his \ halfpeny (in five 
lines). {Script) \ 

56. 0. SAMVELL . BLACKWELL = A lion rampant. 

R. IN . NOTINGHAM . 1667 = HIS . HALFE PENNY. \ 

57. A variety is dated 1668. 

58. 0. THOMAS . BVRROWES = A rose with sun above. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM = A CaStle. \ 

59- 0. THOMAS . BVRROWES = A rosc with sun above. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM = A CaStle. \ 

This token is from a difTerent die to the previous one, being much coarser work. 

60. 0. THOMAS . BARROWES = A rose with sun above. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM = A CaStle. \ 

61. 0. THOMAS avRROWES = A rose with sun above. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM = A CaStle. \ 

62. 0, THOMAS . BVRROWES = A wild boar. 

R, IN . NOTTINGHAM . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

63. 0. GEORGE . BORZOWES . 1669 = IN NOTT ING HAM. 

R. SALATHYELL . GROVES = ^ Under three goats* heads. \ 

64. 0. THO . cocKiNGE . CHANDLER = Three doves, each with a 

branch in its beak. 

R^ IN NOTTINGHAM = T . C. \ 

65. 0. ROBERT . CRAMTON = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. IN . NOn INGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



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914 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

66. O, THOMAS . DODSLEY = A whcatsheaf. 

^. IN . NOTTINGHAM = T. S . D. ^ 

67. O. THOMAS . DODSLEY = A wheatsheaf. 

Id, IN . NOTTINGHAM = T . S . D. i 

This token is from a different die to the previous one, being much coarser. 

68. O, lOSHVA . ELLISON = (dctrited). 

^. IN . NOTTINGHAM . i666 = A homed sheep, and sword. J 

69. O. THO . FRANCE . IN . NOTTINGHAM = (detritcd). 

^. SAMVEL . BLACKWELL. i666 = Plain shield. No arms. J 

70. O. THOMAS . FRANCE = T . T . F. 

/^, OF . NOTiNGHAM . cvTLER = The Armourcrs* Arms. J 

71. O, HVGH . FARNWORTH = A wheatsheaf. 

^. IN . NOTTINGHAM = H . I . F. ^ 

72. O. HVGH . FARNWORTH = A wheatsheaf. 

J^. IN . NOTTINGHAM = H . I . F. J 

This token is from a different die to the previous one, being much coarser. 

73. O, STE . GARNER . TOVL . MAN = HIS HALF HPENY {stc), 

R, AT . NOTTINGHAM . BRiDG = The Town Arms. i 

This is curious. See another toll-keeper's token, Hunts, No. 68. 

74. O, SAM . GARNER . APOTHECARY = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. OF . NOTTINGHAM = S . G. \ 

75. O. STEVEN . GARNER . OF = A rhinOCtfOS. 

R, NOTTINGHAM . APOTHECARY = S . G. \ 

76. O. THOMAS . GREATON . IN = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. NOTTiNGAME . BREWER = Three barrels (tuns). \ 

77. A variety reads penny. 

78. O. THO . GREENE . AT . THE , BLACK = The Ironmongers' 

Arms. 

R, HORSE . IN . NOTTINGHAM = T . M . G. \ 

79. O, WILLIAM . GREENE . SHOOMAKER = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM . 1669 = A shoemaker's knife. \ 

80. O, CHRISTOPHER . HALL = C . S . H. 

R, IN . NOTTINGHAM = C . S . H. \ 

81. O. lOHN . HALL . IN . NOTTINGHAM = Unknown Arms. 

R, & . C . B . HARRISON . THEIR . HALFPENY = UnknOWH ArmS. 
This token is in very poor state, and hardly decipherable. 

82. O, lOHN . HART . CHANDLER = A heart. I . E . H. 

iV. IN . NOTTINGHAM . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 



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NO fTINGHA MSHIRE, 9 * 5 

83. 0. John I Hart \ Chandler in \ Nottingham \ his halfe \ ptny 

(in six lines). (Script,) 

R, TAKE . THESE . THAT . WIL . ILE . CHAING . THEM . STI^ = A 

heart, i . e . h. {Octagonal,) J 

A rhyming token of considerable rarity. 

84. 0, ROGER . HAWKSLY . i666 = The Merchant-Tailors' Arms. 

R, IN . NOTITNGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

85. 0. WILLIAM . HEBB . IN = The Tallowchandlcrs' Arms. 

R, NOTTINGHAM . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

86. 0. lOSHYA . HILL . 1667 = A unicorn. 

R, IN . NOTTINGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

87. O. lOHN . HODGES . HIS . ^ PENY = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

A IN . NOTTINGHAM = I . E . H. ^ 

88. 0, lOHN . HOViTT . 1667 = A swan walking. 

R. IN . NOITINGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

89. 0, loSEPH . INNOCENT =^ The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. OF. NOTTINGHAM. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

90. 0. lOHN . MiCHELL . IN . NOTINGHAM = The Tallowchandlers* 

Arms. 

R. ROB . HARRYSON . THEIR . HALF . PENY = The Distlllcrs' 

Arms. ^ 

91. 0. MEALE . AND . SALT = An angel between w . n. 

R. OF . NOTTINGHAM . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

92. 0. lOHN . PARKER = The Apothccaries' Arms. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM = I . M . P. \ 

93. O, JOHN . PARKER = The Apothecarics' Arms. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM = I . M . P. J 

94- 0. BENiAMiN . RiCKARDS = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R, IN . NOITINGHAM = B . R. ^ 

95. O, ROBERT . ROTHERHAM = The Salters' Arms. 

R. IN . NOTTINGHAM . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

96. 0, lONATHAN . SIMPSON = The Saddlers' Arms. 

R, SADLER . IN NOTTINGHAM = I . M . S. \ 

97- 0, SAM . SMITH . APOTHECARY =^ The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. OF . NOTTINGHAM = S . S. ^ 

98. 0, SAMVEL . SMITH . APOTHECA = A rhinoceros. 

R, His , half\ Penny . in \ Nottingham \ 1667 (in lour lines). 
{Script.) \ 

99- O, SAMVEL . SMITH = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

-A. IN . NOTTINGHAM . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



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9i6 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
loo. O, SAMVEL . SMITH = The Apothccaries' Arms. 

J^, IN . NOTTINGHAM = S . S. J 

loi. O, THOMAS . TOPLADY = The Drapers* Arms. 

J^. DRAPER . IN . NOTTINGHAM = T . S . T. 1 67 1. J 

102. O. HENRY . TRVMAN = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

I^, IN . NOTTINGHAM . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. | 

103. O. lOHN . TREWMAN . OF = Three crowns in royal oak. 

^. NOITINGHAM . 1669 = HIS [cuiw] i- i 

104. O. RICHARD . TVRPiN . CHAN = Three doves, each with a 

branch in its beak, under a ragged staff. 

-^. DLER . IN . NOTTINGHAM = R . T. | 

105. O, ED . WHITE . NOTTINGHAM . i666 = A goat's head. 

^. FOR . NECESSARY . CHAING = HIS HALF PENY. J 

106. O, ROBERT . WINTER . CHANDL^" = A chandler. R . W. 

J^, IN . NOTTINGHAM . 1667 = Three geese in shield between 
R . w. I 

107. O, EDWARD . WRIGHT . IN . 67 = A flcur-de-lys. 

J^. NOTINGHAM . MILLINER = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

108. O, lOSEPH . WRIGHT = Three bells (two and one). 

^. IN . NOTTINGHAM = I . W. | 

109. O. GERVAS . WYLDE = A chevron between three bucks' heads. 

J^. IN . NOTTINGHAM = G . F . W. i 

110. O. GARVAS . WYLDE = G . F . W. 

^. IN . NOTTINGHAM = G . F . W. i 



RETFORD. 

111. O. PETER. BOOTH = A falcon. 

-A*. IN . RETFORD = A devlce, probably a merchant's mark. | 

112. O. lOHN . CHATMAN . OF . RETFORD = I . C 

iV. HIS . HALF . PENY . i666 = The Mercers' Arms. J 

113. O, WILLIAM . HALL = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. OF . RETTFORDE . l668 = W . A . H. ^ 

114. O, WILLIAM . MOODY . BAKER = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

^. IN . RETFORD . l666 = W. A.M. | 

115. a William \ Smith . of\ East . Ret \ford (in four lines). 

(Script,) 
R, Milliner \ his .< halfe \ Penny | w . e . s. (in four lines). 
{Script.) {Heart-shape,) \ 



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NOTTINGHAMSHIRE, 917 



SOUTHWELL. 



116. 0. GREGORY . SILVESTER = SOVTH | WELL (in tWO Hnes). 

I^. WILLIAM . LEAVER . 1664 = . S. | W . L. (in tWO linCS). J 



TUXFORD. 

117. O. WILLIAM . READE . SHOOMAKR = The Cordwaincrs* Arms. 

^. IN . TVXFORD . HIS . HALF . PENEV = W . A . R. ^ 

118. O. FRAN . STRVTT . OF . TVXFORD = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^, MERCER .HIS . HALF . PENY= 1669. The Mercers' 
Arms. J 

WORKSOP. 

119. O. lOSEPH . FLECHER . IN = The Apothecarics' Arms. 

jR. WORKSOP . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . K . F. | 

120. O. THOMAS . LEE . i666 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . WOVRKSOP = T . F . L. | 

121. O, RICH . RVTTER . HIS . HALF . PEN^ = The Mercers* Arms. 

^. IN . WORKSOP . 1664 = R . A . R. i 



VOL. IL 59 

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©fforbsbire- 



Number of Tokens issued 254 

Number of Places issuing Tokens ,^1 

Town Pieces issued at Burford, Henley-on-Thames, and 
Oxford. 



59—2 

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The Editor has in this county also to bewail the loss of assistance 
which he had hoped to have received. A correspondent who had 
commenced to collate the tokens of the county, and had done good 
work at the Bodleian, was suddenly called to Africa, and in the hurry 
of departure the manuscript, with the collation and notes, dis- 
appeared 

The entire work has occupied so many years in compilation, that 
the Editor cannot venture to keep his subscribers waiting longer, and 
is therefore, with much regret, obliged to leave noting this county as 
a heritage for future collectors. He has found very few collectors 
much interested in Oxfordshire coinage, and repeated letters in the 
various county journals have elicited no response. The collation 
will, he trusts, be found accurate ; and he believes the list newly made 
includes all the known tokens of the county. 

The special feature of the series is the presence of unusual mer- 
chant-marks upon several of the tokens. The two Witney issuers 
were probably concerned in the staple trade of the place, that of 
wool and blankets, and the woolpack, associated with special trade- 
marks for denoting their own goods, appears on the tokens. Trade- 
marks also appear on tokens of Oxford, Henley, and Burford. A token 
of Thomas Appleby, of Oxford, affords us a mystery, the strange words 
" Mallia Cadreene " are a crux to all token-collectors, and the mystery 
still awaits solution at the hand of some local investigator. The 
issuer was evidently a man of some note, who bears proudly on his 
tokens his family achievement 

There are town-pieces struck at Burford, Henley-on-Thames, and 
Oxford, and those of the two former places are decidedly marks of 
some merit above the average character. North Leigh gives us a 
token issued jointly by William and Ann Mason, probably partners as 
well in trade as in home life. 

Two tokens of Bicester, clearly designed by the same artist, are 
heart-shaped, and a token of Chipping Norton, and the one of 
Barford, are of the same unusual and interesting shape. 

In Oxford itself we have tokens issued at the Pestle and Mortar, 
the Cock, the Gilt Looking-Glass, the Bush, the Sugar-loaf, the 
Kacket and Ball, the Three Kings, the Three Salmons, the Fox and 
Ooose, the Mermaid, the Three Blackbirds, the Golden Key, the 
Crown, the Salmon, the Angel, the Bird and Hand, and the Spectacles, 
all these signs, which form a goodly list, being specifically named ; 

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922 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

while many others are implied by device. There is a peculiarity 
of the Oxford tokens which gives them a family relationship in 
design, and may betray the hand of a common designer, and that is 
the presence on so many of the name of the issuer's trade. 

We find tokens issued by the following trades : Chandler, watch- 
maker, cutler, milliner, vintner, mercer, brewer, baker, glover, rug- 
maker, clockmaker, hosier, fishmonger, apothecar)', goldsmith, 
skinner, ironmonger, draper and clothier, hatter, and silk-weaver — 
milliners especially occurring frequently. It is decidedly uncommon 
to have the trades so emphatically mentioned as they are on these of 
Oxford, and the fact is an important feature of the series. We find 
reference made on the tokens to the North Gate and the Turle Gate, 
and to the East Gate. One issuer gives the Tennis Court as his 
place of residence ; but the only mention of the colleges is on 
No. 167, where Lawrence Short tells us he lived "neare New 
Colledg." 

Four of the issuers in Oxford were women, Ann Turton, Ann 
Pierson, Alice Lant, Olive Hind issuing tokens. 

The two tokens of Dunstew are very interesting, as their issuer was 
a carrier, a trade very rarely mentioned on tokens. This man, 
Thomas Barrett, issued his two tokens — halfpenny and farthing — and 
delineates his basket-pannier on the tokens. There are many guild 
arms represented in this county, those of the apothecaries, fruiterers, 
mercers, pewterers, grocers, drapers, weavers, bakers, barbers, 
surgeons, leathersellers, vintners, goldsmiths, tallowchandlers, 
upholsterers, cordwainers. turners, ironmongers, brewers, and cloth- 
workers, the pewterers and turners being of rare occurrence. 

A token of Chipping Norton, and another of Henley-on-Thames, 
bear the arms of the City of Oxford, but whether out of compliment 
to Oxford, or as denoting any affiliation of corporate existence, is not 
very clear. The circumstance itself merits recognition. 

Punning devices occur on the tokens of Fawler in Chipping 
Norton, as he bears a falcon volant ; also of Groves, with the device 
of a wild man in a grove. 

The places issuing tokens have been increased in this county by 
four not named by Boyne, i.e., Dorchester, Ewelme, Stokenchurch, 
and Shipton-under-Witchwood ; while forty new tokens or varieties 
have been added. 

The City of Oxford boasts of an unusually large number of tokens 
for one place, its record being 188. 

The series, as a whole, awaits more adequate treatment at the hands 
of some county collector. 

The gold token of Thame occupies an unique position in the 
whole series of tokens of the seventeenth century. It is the only 
instance of an issuer going to the expense of striking z. proof oi his 
token in gold. It is mentioned in the " History of the Church of 
St. Mary, Thame," by the Rev. F. G. Lee, of All Saints', Lambeth 
(1883), and had been seen by Mr. Lee when in Mr. Lupton's 
possession. It is not known where it is at present. 



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OXFORDSHIRE. 923 



ADDERBURY. 

1. 0. THO . AVSTiN . ATTHERED = A lion rampant. 

Ji, LYON . IN . ATTERBERY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. T . M . A. 

2. 0. HENRY . HVNT . IN = A CTOWn. 

H. ADDERBERY . 1656 = H . E . H. i 

BAMPTON-IN-THE-BUSH. 

3. O. SIMON . BASSET . OF = HIS HALF PENY. S . E . B. 

IL BAMTON . THE . BVSH . 1699 = A phoenix in the flames. ^ 

4. 0, WALTER . LARDNER . OF = A man making candles. 

-^. BAMTON . OF . THE . BVSH = HIS HALF PENY. W . M . L. ^ 

5. 0. lOHN . TVLL . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

E. BAMTON . 1656 = 1 . R . T. 

BANBURY. 

6. 0. lOHN . ALLINGTON . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

-^. APOTHECARY . IN . BANBVRY = The Apothccaries' Arms. i . a. J 

7. 0. MATHEW . ANSLEY = A SUgaT-loaf. 

-^. IN . BANBVRY = M . A. I 

8. 0. THOMAS . DERELL = A horse-shoe. 

a. IN . BANBVRY = T . E . D. i 

9. 0. lOHN . HALL . IN = A double-headed eagle displayed. 

-^. BANBVRY . 1666 = 1 . E . H. i 

10. O. BENiAMEN . HiBBERDiNE = The Apothecarfes* Arms. 

J?. APOTHECARY . IN . BANBVRY = B . A . H. i 

11. 0. BEN . HIBBERDINE . IN = The Apothccaries' Arms. 

H. BANBURY . APOTHECARY = B . A . H. 

12. 0. WILLIAM . MANDER = A man making candles. 

^. IN . BANBVRY . 1656 = W . E . M. i 

13. O. HIS . HALFE . PENNY = T . I . P. 

Ji. OF . BANBARY . MERCER = A foll of cloth. ^ 

14* 0. MANASLES . PLVMTON = The Fruiterers' Arms. 

H. IN . BANBVRY . 1653 = M . B . P. i 

15- O, THOMAS . PYM . MERCER = A TOll of cloth. 

-^. IN . BANBVRY . 1664 = T . I . P. ^ 



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924 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
1 6- 0, GEORGE . ROBINS . MERCER = The Merccrs' Arms. 

R, IN . BANBVRY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

i;. A. variety of No. i6 reads banbery. 

rS. O, AT . the . vnicorne = A unicorn. 
R, IN . banbery . 1650 = w . I . s. 

ig» O. HENRY . SMITH . IRONMONGR = The Ironmongers* Arms. 

/?. IN . BANBVRY . l668= HIS HALF PENY. 

20. O. HENRY . SMITH . IN = H . M . S. 
R. BANBVRY . IRONMONGER =1656. 

2K O. MATHEW . SMITH . GARDNER = HIS HALFE PENY. M . M . S. 

R. IN . BANBERY . 1 669 = The Fruitcrers' Arms. 

22. A variety with field reversed 

23. O, THOMAS . svTTON . AT . THE= A deer trippant. t . s . s. 

R. RAINDEAR . IN . BANBVRY = HIS HALF PENY. 1 666. 

24. O, lOHN . viVERS = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, OF . BANBVRYE . 1652 = 1 . E . V. 

2$. 0, NATHANIEL . vivERS = The Fruiterers' Arms. 

R. IN . BANBVRY . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

36. 0. lAMES . WAGSTAFE = A fleur-de-lys. 

R. IN . BANBVRY . 1651 =1 . M . W. 

27. O. lOHN . WAGSTAFFE = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, IN . BANBVRY = I . A . W. 

aS* 0. WILLIAM . WAGSTAFFE . OF = A flcur-de-lys. 

R, BANBVRY . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . M . W. 

29. 0. lOHN . WEIGHTMAN . IN = The Apothecarics' Arms. 

R, BANBVRY . APOTHECARY = I . M . W. 1 663. 

50. A variety reads welchman. 

31, Another reads Welshman. 

32. O. nathaniell. WHEATLY = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. IN . BANBVRY . 1664 = N . M . W. 



BARFORD. 

^^. 0. RICHARD . BARTHOLOMEW = R . F . R 
R, IN . BARFORD . 1669= R . F . a 

34, O. lOHN . HVSE . IN . BARFORD = A pair of scissors. 

J^, IN . OXFORDSHIRE . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. {Heart- 

shape,) \ 



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OXFORDSHIRE, 925 



35. 0, lOHN . KNIGHT = An eagle and child. 

R. IN . BVRFORD . l666 = I . S . K. 

36. 0, LEONARD . MILLS . AT = A WaggOn. 

R, BARFORD . WAGGONER = L . M. 1 669. 



BICESTER. 

37. O. lOHN . BORROWS . IRON = I . B. 
R. MONGER . IN . BISTER = I . B. 

38. O, THOMAS . BVRGES = The Pewterers' Arms. 

R, OF . BISTER . 1665 =T . M . B. \ 

39. O. GABRIEL . BVRROws . IN = Unknown Arms (detrited). 

R, BISSETER . IRONMONGER = G . B. 

40. O, THOMAS . CLEMENE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R, OF . BISSITOR . DRAPER = T . C. * \ 

41. O, THOMAS . CLEMENTS = The Drapers* Arms. 

R. OF . BISSITOR . DRAPER = T . C \ 

42. 0, WILL . HVDSON . OF . BISTER = Two axes crossed. 

R. IN . OXFORDSHEIRE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. W . S . H. \ 

43. 0, WILL . STEVENS . OF . BISTER = Three crowns. 1669. 

R, IN . OXFORDSHEIRE . HIS . HALF . PENNY . W . F . S (in 

seven lines). {Heart-shape,) ^ 

44. 0, FRANCES . WALL . IN . BISTER = F . W . B. 

R. HIS . HALFPENY . 1669 = Three pipes. {Octagonal,) 
45- 0, lOHN . WARRY . OF . BISTER = Three pipes. 1668. 

R. IN . OXFORDSHEIRE . HIS . HALF . PENNY . I . M . W (in six 

lines). {Heart shape^ 



BURFORD. 

46. 0, A . BVRFORD . TOKEN . 1 669 (in four Hnes across the 

field). 
R* B, B . [Borough of Barford.] = A lion rampant, as on the 
Borough Seal. \ 

47. 0. AT . THE . 3 . SHVGER . LOVES = Three sugar-loaves. 

R* IN . BVRFORT . 1653 = E . C \ 

4B. 0. THOMAS . MATHEWES . AT = A bear with chain. 

R* THE . BEARE . IN . BVRFORD = T . E . M. J 



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92& TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

49, O. LEONARD . MILLS . AT = A hoFSC and waggOD. 

J^. BVRFORD . WAGONNER = L . M. 1669. 

Thh man issued also a token, identical in character, at Barford, see Na 36. It 
iSf however, possible both tokens may refer to one place, and the error of one 
leiter be due to the die-sinker. The two tokens exist, and each reads as de- 

50, O. lOHN . PAYTON = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. OF . BVRFORD . 1669 = 1 . p and a merchant's mark. 

51, 0, lOHN . PAYTON . CLOTHYER = A dog passanL 

^. IN . BVRFORD . 1666 = I . S . P. 

52, O. lOHN . siNDRiY = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . BVRFORD . 1653 = I . E . S. 

53, O, AT . THE . GEORGE = St. Georgc and the Dragon. 

J^, IN . BVRFORD = R . A . V. 

54, O, CHARLES . YATE = Three gates. 

jR. OF . BVRFORD . 1664 = . H . Y. 



CHINNOR. 
$$. O, THO . BECKLY . OF . CHENER = The Weavers' Arms. 

^. IN . OXFORD . SHIERE = T . S . B. 

56. O, WILLIAM . GOLDFINCH = Arms ; a bend. 

^. IN . CHINNER . 1662 = W .E.G. 



CHIPPING NORTON. 

57. O, lOH . CORNISH . CHiPPiN . NOR = Arms of the City 
Oxford. 

jR, TON . FOR . OXFORDSHEERE = I . K . C. 

5S. O, lOH . CORNISH . CHiPiN = Arms of the City of Oxford. 

jR. NORTON . COM . OXFORD = I . K . C. 

59. O. MicHAELL . CORNISH = Arms ; a fesse between three birds. 

jR, IN . CHIPPING . NORTON = M . E . C. ' 

60. O. lOSEPH . DAVIS . IN = A roll of tobacco. 

jR, CHIPPING . NORTON = I . E . D. 

61. O. WILLIAM . DisTON . AT . Y= . WHIT = A hart lodged. 1666. 

E. IN . CHIPPINORTON . HIS . J . PENY = W . M . D. 

62. O. WILLIAM . DISTON . AT . Y= = A hart lodged. 

jR, IN . CHIPPINORTON . l666 = W . M . D. 
Diston's Lane is a street in the place, probably deriving its name from this 
issuer. It leads out of New Street into the churchyard. The White Haxt, which 
is still the principal inn, stands close by, and the back premises open into Dis- 
tQo's L^ne. 



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\ 

\ 



OXFORDSHIRE, 927 

63. 0, DAVID . DIX . IN . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. CHIPPING . NORTON = D . S . D. J 

64. 0. SAMVEL . FARMER . IN = The Apothccaries* Arms. 

J^. CHIPPING . NORTON = S . E . F. J 

65. 0. HENRY . FAWLER . IN = A falcon volant. 

^. CHIPPING . NORTON . l669 = H . H . F. J. J 

66. 0. HENRY . FAWLER . IN = A fulcon with bclls and jesses. 

^. CHIPPING . NORTON = H . H . F. J 

67. 0. MATHIAS . FROVT . OF = A fish. 
^. CHIPPING . NORTON = M A T. 

68. 0. RICHARD . GROVES . 1659 = A wild man in a grove. 

jR. OF . CHIPPING . NORTON = R . E . G. J 

69. A variety dated 1663. 

70. O. E . D . R= A roll of tobacco, a hand holding a chopper 

over a tobacco-leaf, and two pipes crossed. 

jR. OF . CHIPPING . NORTON . l668 = HIS HALFEPENY. i^Hcart- 

shape ^ \ 

71. 0. EDMOND . ROWBRIGHT = E . D . R. 

R, OF . CHIPPING . NORTON = A Hon rampant. \ 

72. 0. PHILUPP . WISDOME = HIS HALF PENY. 1670. 

R. OF . CHIPING . NORTON = P . K . W. \ 



CORNWELL. 

73. O, IN . COJINWELL = T . R. 

R, MERCER. 1667 = Mercers' Arms. \ 

74. O, THOMAS . WORTH = Arms ; a double-headed eagle. 

R, IN . CORNWELL . 1665 =T . W. \ 



CROPREDY. 
75. 0. MARGRET . KING = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . CROPREADY . l664 = M . K. 



CULHAM. 

76. O, I . AM . MATHEW . HARWELL = A SWan. 
R, CVLLVM . NERE . THE . FERY = M . M . H. 

77. 0, lOHN . WELLS . AT . THE= A horse-shoe. 

R, HORS . SHOE . IN . CVLVM = I . W. \ 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



^2S TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



DEDDINGTON. 
7S. O^ SAMVELL . BELCHER . 1668 = The Apothccaries* Arms- 

A. IN . DEDINGTON = HIS HALF PENY. S . B . R 

79. O. lOHN . ELKiNGTON = A flying horsc. 

J^. IN . DEDINGTON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 
So. CI MICHAEL . ELKINTON . AT . YE = HIS HALFEPENY. 166S. 

jV, vnicorne . IN . DEDINGTON = A unicom. 
81. 0. ANN . MAKEPACE . IN = An eagle and child. 

J^, DADINGTON . MERCER = A . M. ' 

S2. O. THOMAS . NVTT . OF = T . N. 
^. DADINGTON . MERCER =1653. 



DORCHESTER. 

S;^ O. WILLIAM . BROCK = The Grocers' Arms. 
/(*. OF . DORCHESTER = I c (con joined). 

84. 0. FOR . WILLIAM . BROCK = W . M . B. 
J?, AND . ROBERT . COVLDRY = R . C. 



DUNSTEW. 

85. O. THOMAS . BARRETT . CARRIER = A basket pannier. 

J?. IN . DVNSTY . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

86, O. THO . BARRET . CARRER = A basket pannier. 

A\ IN . DVNSTY . OXFORDSH = T . M . B. 



EWELME. 

87. CK WILLIAM . lONES . IN . 1669 = A CrOWH. 

A\ EWELME . IN . OXFORDSHEIRE = HIS HALF PENY. 



FINSTOCK. 
88p O. EDWARD . GARDNER = A hart lodged. 

A\ IN . FINSTOCK . 1666 = E . K . G. 



GREAT TEW. 
Sg. 0. lOHN . ALLEXANDER . IN = The Bakers* Arms. 

J?, GREAT . TWO . BAKER = I . A . A. ^ 

90. A variety reads tow. j 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OXFORDSHIRE, 919 



HENLEY-ON-THAMES. 

91. O, THE. CORPORATION = A ducal coronet ; above it a cloud 

emitting rays ; below, H[enley]. 

J^. OF . HENLY . VPON . THAMES = THEIR HALFE PENNY. J 

92. O. THE . CORPORATION . OF = A coronet, cloud, and h. 

J^. HENLY . VPON . THAMES = Arms ; wavy ; above, an anchor. \ 

93. O. WILL . ATKINS . OF = A Catherine wheel. 

J^. HENDLY . ON . THAMES = W . M . A. 
94- O, GEORGE . DAMSELL . IN = G . A . D. 

^. HENLY . ON . THAMES . 68 = The Drapers' Arms. \ 

95. O. RICHARD. FOWLER . 1668 (in three lines). 

^. AT . HENLY . ONE . THAMES = A CUiraSS (?) J 

96. O, AMBROS . FREEMAN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . HENLY . ON . THAMES = A . F. J 

97. O. lOHN . HATHAWAY . i668 = A man driving a carriage and 

two horses. 

J^, AT . HENLEY . ON . THAMES = HIS HALFE PENY. 

98. O. lOHN . HODGSHENS = A pair of shears. 

^. IN . HENLEY . ON . THAMES = I . K . H. 

99. O. ROBERT . RAINSFORD = A pOt of lilies. 

^. OF . HENLIY . ON . THAMS = R . A . R. J 

100. O. wiLUAM . ROBINSON . 1 668 = A dolphin. 

^ OF . HENLY . FISHMONGER = HIS HALF PENY. W . R. ^ 

101. O. SETH . SMITH . IN = Arms of the City of Oxford. 

jR. HENLY . ON . THAMES = S . I . S. J 

102. O. EDWARD . STEAVENS . OF = The Barber-Surgeons* Arms. 

^. HENLY . VPON . THAMES = E . S. \ 

103. O, ROBERT . SVRY . AT= A hart lodged. 

R. HENLY . ONE . THAMES = R . E . S. J 

104- O. THOMAS . wicKiNs . IN = A stick of caudlcs. 

/^. HENLY . ON . THAMS = T . F . W. J 



HOOK NORTON. 

105. O. JAMES . BEALE . 0F = A roll of cloth. 
^. HOOKE . NORTON . MERCER = I . M . B. 

106. O. lAMES . BEALE . MERCER = A roll Of cloth. I . M . B* 

Ji. IV . HOOKE . NORTON . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



930 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

107, O, RICHARD . PARCKS . OF . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 
jR, HOOKE . NORTON . IREMONGER = R . E . P. 



NETTLEBED. 

T08. O. DAVIDE . GASQVON . AT . Y» = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

jR, BVLL . IN . NETTLEBED = A bulL i 

109. O. TIMOTHY . HOLDING . AT . Y^ . WHIT = A hart lodgCCL 

jR. HART . IN . NETTLEBED . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

NORTH LEIGH. 

1 10. O, WILLIAM . AND . ANN = w .A.M. The three letters in a 

heart. 

jR. MASON . IN . NORTHLY = THEIR HALF PENY. J 

OXFORD. 

111. O, THE . MAYOR . 0F = Arms of the City of Oxford ; an ox 

passing a ford. 
jR, OXFORD . TOKEN = c . o. 1652. And a small r, the 
initial of Rawlins, the engraver. J 

112. There are two varieties of this token from dififerent dies, 

differing very slightly one from the other. J 

1 13. O. EDWARD . APPLEBEE . TAL=E . I . A. 

jR. LOW . CHANDLER . IN . OXON = HIS FARTHING. \ 

1 14* O. THO . APPLEBEE . OXFORD = Arms of the Appleby family ; 
six martlets ; 3, 2, and i. 

jR, MALLIA . CADREENE = T . S . A. J 

What is the meaning of ** Mallia Cadreene " ? It has puzzled all who have 
see^ it, 

1 15. O. WILLIAM . APPLEBEE = A man making candles. 

/^. IN . OXFORD . 1666 = W . A . A. J 

116. O. WILLIAM . BALEY . OF . OXON = A mortar and two pestles. 

jR, AT . THE . MORTER . AND . PEST = W . B. \ 

117. O, lOHN . BARRETT = The moon and seven stars. 

jR. IN . OXON . 1666 = 1 . F . B. \ 

H8. O, lOHN . BETTS . TAYLOR = A Star. 

R. NEER . EAST . GATE . OXON = I . E . B. \ 

119. O. MICHAEL . BIRD . HIS . HALF . PENY = A COClc. 

^. OXFORD . WATCHMAKER = M . B. 1 668. ^ 

120. O, GEORGE . BISHOP = An elephant's head and two swords 

crossed ; part of the Cutlers* Arms ; and crest. 

^. CVTLER . IN . OXON . l668 = G . S . B. J 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OXFORDSHIRE. 931 

121. O. lOH . BISHOP . AT . Y* . GviLT = A squoTC looking-glass. 

R. OF . OXON . 1657 = 1 . B. 

123. A variety dated 1663. 

123. 0. lOH . BISHOP . MiLENER = A looking-glass. 

R, LOOKING . GLAS . IN . OXON = I . B. 1 669. 

124. 0. HVMPHRY . BODicoTT = A vintner's bush (?). 
R, viNTENER . IM . OXON = Three tuns. 

125. 0. lOHN . BOWELL . MERCER = I . B. 1657. 

R. SVGAR . LOFE . IN . OXON = A sugar-loaf. 

126. 0. THOMAS . BVRNHAM . AT = A tcnnis-bat. 

R. Y« . TENIS . COVRT . IN . OXON = T . I . B. 

127. 0. THOMAS . BUTLER . AT . Y= = A tennis-bat and ball 

R. RACKIT . & . BALL . IN . OXON = T . M . B. 

128. 0. RICHARD . CARTER = Two tDcn Carrying a barrel 

R. BRVER . IN . OXON = R . C. 

129. 0. THOMAS . COMBES . NEARE = The Groccrs* Arms. 

R, THE . EAST . GATE . IN . OXON = T . C. 

13a 0, RICHARD . CONY . AT = HIS HALF PENY. 
R. ST . MARY . IN . OXON = R . M . C. 

131. O. WILLIAM . CORNISH . AT = The Merccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . OXON . MERCER . 1658 = W . E . C. 

132. O, NICHOLAS . DANiELL = A pair of scalcs. 

R, BAKER . IN . OXON . 1657 = N. 

133. 0. THOMAS . DENNIS . AT . THE = Three kings. 

R, 3 . KINGS . IN . OXON . 1652 =T . A . D. 

134. 0, RICHARD . ELY . AT . THE = Three salmoH fretted ii 

triangle. 

R, 3 . SAMMONS . IN . OXON = R . A . E. 

135. 0, lOHN . FOX . AT . THE . FOX = A fox Carrying off a goose. 

R. AND . GOOSE . IN . OXFORD = I . S . F. 

136. 0. RICH . GOODE . CHANDLR = A man making candles. 

R, IN . OXFORD . 1670 = R . G. 

137. 0, ANTHONY . HALL . AT . THE = A mermaid. A . H. 

R, IN . OXON . VINTNER = A . A . H. 

138. 0. lOSEPH . HANSON . GLOVER . IN . OXON . 1670 (in five 

lines). 
R. Arms and crest of the Leathersellers' Company. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^^ TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
J 39* O, THOMAS . HARRISON = IN OXON. T . A . H, 

Jd. FOR . NECESARY . CHANG = Thrcc caglcs displayed 

140. A variety reads cheng. 

141. O. THO . HiGGS. MERCER . AT = Three birds. 

/l?. 3 . BLACK . BIRDS . IN . OXON = T . M . H. 

142. 0^ OLiFFE . HIND . MERC* = The Mercers* Arms. 

^, IN . OXFORD . 1657 = . H. 

143. A variety dated 1666. 

144. 0. LEWIS . HiNE = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. IN . OXON . 1666 = L . H. 

145. O, THOMAS . HVNSDON = The Weavers' Arms. 

/f, IN . OXON . 1666 = T . H. 

146. O. EDWARD. HVNT = IN OXON. 

i?. AT . THE . TVRLE . GATE= E . H. 

147* O. WILL . HVNTLEY . RVG = A WOOlpack. 
H. MAKER . IN . OXON . 1670 = W . H. 

148. O. SETH . IRELAND . AT . THE = A key. 

J?. GOVLDiNG . KEY . IN . OXON =^ s . I and a heart. 

149. O. lOHN . iOHNSON = A pot of lilics. 

^. IN . OXON . 1666 = 1 . M . L 

150. O, LAWRANCE . KING = L . K. 

^, GLOVER . IN . OXON = A glove. 

151. O, Joseph . Knibb . Clockmaker . in . Oxon (in four lines). 
R. I . K = A clock face and hands. 

152. O, HVGH . LAMBE . IN = A StOcking. 
R. OXFORD . HOSIER = H . L. 1668. 

155. O. ALCE . LANT . IN = A laSt. 
R, OXFORD . 1667 = A . L. 

154. 0, ARTHUR . MADLE . l666 = HIS FARTHING. 
R, IN . OXON . CHANDLER = A . S . M. 

155. O, ARTHER . MADEL . 1667 = A . S . M. 
R, HIS . FARTHING . OF = OXON. 

156. O^ WILL . MORRELL . AT . Y* = A CrOWn. 
R, CROWNE . IN . OXFORD = W . A . M. 

157. O, NicH . ORVM . IN . OXON = A lobster. 

R, FISHMONGER . l657 = N . O. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OXFORDSHIRE. 



933 



158b A variety dated 1659. 

159. O. ANN . PEiRSON = A pair of scissors. 

jR. IN . OXFORD = 1669. 

160. 0. RICHARD . PONT = The VintncTS* Arms. 
^. IN . OXON . i668 = R . E . p. 

161. 0. WILLIAM . POTTER = The Apothecarics* Arms. 

i?. APOTHECARY . IN . OXON =» W . A . P. 

162. O. DANiELL . PRINCE = The Duke of York's bust, d . y. 
jR. IN . OXON . 1667 = A staff. D . K . p. 

163. 0, EDWARD . PRINCE = A man making candles. 

jR, CHANDLER . IN . OXON =» E . E . P. 

164. 0. SAMSON . RAVLLINS = A fish. 
I^. AT . THE . SALMON . IN . OXON = S . M . R. 

165. 0. WILL . ROBINSON . i668 = The Goldsmiths' Arms. 

i?. GOVLDSMITH . IN . OXON = W . M . R. 

166. 0. lOHN . RYLAND = A baker's peel. 

jR, IN . OXON . 1659 = 1 . A . R. 

167. O. LAWRENCE. SHORT. NEARE^A hand holding a coffee 

pot 

i?. NEW . COLLEDG . IN . OXON = L . E . S. 

168. 0. lOHN . SOVCH . MILLINER = A fan. 
J^. IN . OXFORD . 1657 = 1 . S. 

169. 0. RICHARD . SOVCH = A hen and chickens. 

jR, IN . OXON . MILLINER = R . S. 

170. 0. EDWARD . SPENCER = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

jR. OF . OXON . CHANDLER = E . S. 

171. 0. THOMAS . STEVENSON =s The Upholsterers* Arms. 

jR, IN . OXON . l664 = T . A . s. 

172. 0, lOHN . TEY . AT . THE = An angel. 

jR. ANGELL . IN . OXFORD = I . T. 

173. 0, lOHN . TOLDERVEY . AT=s Arms ; a unicorn rampant. 

^. OXON . MILLINER = I . T, 1660. 

174- 0, WILLIAM . TONGE = W . I . T. 
H, SKINER . IN . OXON = 1657. 

175- 0, WILLIAM . TONGVE = The Cordwaiuers' Arms. 

-^. IN . OXFORD . 1661 = W . G . T. 

176. A variety reads tongvr, and crest the Cordwainers' Arms 
177- 0. WILL . TVRNER = St. Gcorge and the dragon. 

J^. IN . OXFORD = W . E . T. 
VOL II. 60 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



914 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

178. O. ANN . TVRTON = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

jR. OF . OXFORD . 1657 «= A . T. 

179. O. RICH . TVRTON = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

/^. IN . OXON . l668 = R . M . T. 

180. O. WILL . WALKER . AT . THE» A hand holding a bird. 

/^. BVRD . AND . HAND . IN . OXON = W . W. 

181. O. WILLIAM . WALKER >■ A hand holding a bhrd. 

jR. MERCER . IN . OXFORD = W . W. 

182. O. SAMVELL . WALLis = A roll of tobacco. 

jR. IN . OXON = S . A. W. 

183. O. ROBERT . WHITE . SILKE^ A shuttle. 
jR. WEAVER . IN . OXFORD = R . W. 1657. 

184. A variety reads silkweaver. 

185. O. THO . WILLIAMS . AT . Y«= A pair of spectacles. 

jR. spectacles . IN . OXON = T . W. 

186. O. ROBERT . WILSON = A trade-mark. 

jR. OF . OXON . BREWER = The Brewers' Arms. 

187. O. THOMAS . WOOD = A tennis bat 

jr. vintner . in . oxon . 1652 =t . m . w. 

t88. O. edmvnd . wrigglvsworth = i652. 
jr. at . north . gate . in . oxon = e . w. 



STOKENCHURCH. 

189. O. GEORGE . CVBBIDGE . AT = HIS HALF PENY. G . A . C. 

jR. STOKENCHVRCH . 1669 = A pair of shears. 

SHIPTON UNDER WITCHWOOD. 

190. O. lOHN . WELLS . OF . SHIPTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. VNDER . WITCHWOOD «=! . D . W. 



THAMK 

191. O. RICHARD . ADKiN = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^, OF . THAME . 1669 = R . S . A. J 

192. O. WILLIAM . ADKENS . OF . THAME = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. THE . BLACKE . LION . 1 669 = A Uon rampant. ^ 

To a William Adkens, possibly grandfather to above and servant to Lord 
Williams, and to his heirs for ever, were bequeathed certain lands, rents, and 
reversions under his lordship's will. 

193. O. RVTH . AERES = R . A. 

^. OF . THAME = R . A. ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OXFORDSHIRE. 935 

194. 0, DOROTHY . BVRGis . IN . THAME = A lioo rampant. 

R. HER . HALFE . PENNY = -D. B. 1 669. J 

195. 0, lOHN . BVRGES = A unicora 

R. IN . THAME . 1653 = I . B. \ 

196. O, WILL . COPE . GROCER . IN = W . C 

R. TAME . IN . OXFORDSHIR = I . A . C. (w). J 

197. O, ROBERT . CREWBS = A Stick of candles. 

R, OF . THAME . 1668 = R . F . C \ 

198. O. lOHN . DANIELS . HATER = A hat 

R. IN . TAME . 1669 = 1 . R. D. J 

199. 0. lOHN . GVRDON= 1657. 

R, IN . THAME .57 = 1.0. i 

200. 0. lOHN . HARRIS . AT . THE = A lion rampant. 

R. READ . LYON . IN . THAME = I . H. \ 

201. 0, RICHARD . HEARNE = The Drapers* Arms. 

R, OF . THAME . 1669 = R . H. \ 

A gold token weighing twenty-three grains with this inscription was found in 
digging a well at Mifton, and beaime the property of a Mr. Harry Lupton, Surgeon 
of Thame, author of the " History of Thame and its Hamlete^' (i860). Within 
Mr. Lopton's memory some of the family of Hearne resided at Milton. 

202. 0, HVGH . HESTER = The Groccrs* Arms. 

R. IN . THAME . 1657 = H. H. \ 

203. 0, wiLLiAMiEMET = A cavalier's hat. 

R, OF . THAME . 1669 = W .1.1. 

204. O. EDWARD . LEAVER = The Merchant Tailors' Arms. 

R, OF . THAME = E . I . L. 

205. 0, RICHARD . RASTELL = The Merccrs* Arms. 

R. IN . THAME = R . R. \ 

206. 0, WILLIAM . TRIPP = A Stick of candles. 

R. IN . THAME . CHANDLER = W . E . T. \ 

207. 0. MATHEW . WALTERS = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. OF . THAME . MERCER = M . W. \ 

208. 0. ISAAC . WEEKES . 1 667 = A tree. 

R. GARDENER . IN . THAME = HIS HALFE PENNY. i 

WARDINGTON. 

209. 0, RICHARD . SHORT . IN . WARDENTON = The Grocers' 

Arms. 

R. IN . y* . COVNTY . OF. OXON . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

210. 0, R . SHORT . IN . WARDENTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, COVNTY . OF . OXFORD = R . S. 

60 — 2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



g3fi TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



WATLINGTON. 
2 11. O, lOHN . cocKEE = An anchor. 

^. IN WATTLETON = I .E.G. 1 664. 

a I a. O. ROBERT . COGELL . 1669 = A horseshoc. 

/^. IN . WATLENTON = HIS HALF PENY. 

213. O. lOHN . COCKY = I . E . C. 1663. 

^, IN . WATTLETON = I . E . C. 1 663. 

214* 0, MARY . GREENDOWN = The King*s head crowned. 

N. IN . WATLINGTON . 67 = M . G. 

215. 0* THO . GREENDOWN . HIS . HALF = A bush. 

^. PENY . OF . WATLENTON . 1664 = A SUgar-loaf. 

a 1 6, O. THOMAS . GREENDOWNE = A sugar-loaf. 
^. OF . WATLETON . 1659 = A maypolc. 

a 1 7. O, RICHARD . HAINES = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . WATLINGTON = R . M . H. 

St 8. <?. RICHARD . HARRIS = A TOU of tobaCCO. 
iV, IN . WATLINGTON = R . E . H. 

219. O. ROBERT . HAYNES . 1 664 = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

Ji. IN . WATLINGTON = R . D . H. 

220. O, NICHOLAS . LANKFORD = A knife and cleaver. 

/*. OF . WATLINGTON = N . G . L. 
aai. O. MARY . NASH . IN = HER HALFE PENY. M . N. 

J^. WATLINGTON. 1669 = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

222, 0, RICHARD . SEELEY = A rose crowned. 

^. OF . WATLINGTON = R . A . S. 

WHATELEY. 

223. O, THOMAS . TEMPLE = A pcstle and mortar. 

if. IN . WHVTELEY = T . E . T. 

WITNEY. 
aa4, O. RICHARD . ashfield = A fleece. 

M. CLOTHIER . OF . WITNEY = R . M . A. 

225, O. THOMAS . BRICE . OF = A shutlle. 

A\ WITTNEY . HIS . HALF . PENY = T . I . B. 

aa6. 0. WILLIAM . CHAMBERLIN = his half PENY. 
Jl. IN . WITNEY . 1666 = W . I . C. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OXFORDSHIRE. 937 

«;. 0. THo . COLLIER . iN= A fleccc. 

^. wiTTNY . CLOTHIER = T . c conjoined i 

22S. O. RICHARD . DVTTON . OF = HIS HALF PENY. R . D. 

J^. WITTNY . CLOTHIER . 68 = The Clothworkcrs' Arms. J 

229. O. THOMAS . DVTTON = A merchant's mark ; an anchor, the 
upper part terminating with the figure 4. 
/^. IN . wiTTNEY.= A woolpack. 

23a O, WILLIAM. FITCHETT=HIS HALF PENY. 

R. OF . WITNEY . i . 167I = W . E . F. ^ 

231. O. lOHN . GARDINER . IN . WITTNY = TwO shuttles. 

R. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1669 = 1 .E.G. | 

232. O. LEONARD . GOOaE = L . I . G. 

R. OF . WITNEY . 1657 = The Bakers* Arms. \ 

233. 0, THO . GREGORY . CHANDLER = The Tallowchaudlers* 

Arms. 

R. IN . WITNEY . l664 = T . I . G. J 

234. 0. WILLIAM . HEARN . AT . THE = A SWan. 

JR. WHITE . SWAN . IN . WITNEY = W . I . H. J 

235. 0. WILLIAM . HEARN . AT . Y* = A SWan. 

R. SWAN . IN . WITNEY = W . I . H. 1668. J 

236. 0. ANDREW . HOLLAWAY = A hand holding a glove. 

R. OF . WITTNY . CLOTHYER = A . H. 1 659. J 

237. A variety is dated 1666. J 

238. 0, 10 . lORDEN . OF . WITNEY = A merchant's mark. 

R. IN . THE . COVNTY . OXON = I . G . L J 

239. 0. PETER . KATTE . AT . THE . 3 = Three leopards* faces. 

P . A . K. 
R. UBBETS . HEADS . IN . WITNEY = HIS HALF PENY. 
1670. J 

240. 0. lOHN . PALMER = A woolpack. 

R. IN . WITNEY . 1656 = I . A . P. i 

241- 0. WILLIAM . AND . MARY = W .M.S. 

R. SANDERS . IN . WITNEY = THEIR HALF PENY. J 

242. 0. PAVL . SMITH . DRAPER = Part of the Drapers' Arms. 

^. IN . WITTNEY . 1656 = P . S . S. 

243- 0, THOMAS . WARD . AT . Y^ = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

^. IN . WITNY . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

^44- 0, RALPH . WERGE = The Mercers' Arms. 

R' OF . WITTNEY . 1653 = R . M . W. J 



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938 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

245. O. ANDREW . WHITE . OF = A . M . W. 

/^, WITNEY . SENIOR . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

246. O, ROBERT . WILLY . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 

/^, WITNEY . SENIOR = R . F . w on a woolpack. 

247. O, lOHN . YOVNG = A man making candles. 

J^. OF . WITNEY . 1655 = I . A . Y. J 

WOODSTOCK. 
348. O. ALEXANDER . lOHNSONS = The Grocers* Arms. 

/^. OF . WOODSTOCKE . 1652 = A . I . L { 

149. O. AT . THE . 3 . cvpps . IN = Three covered cups. 

/^, WOODSTOCK . 1653 =T .P. J 

250. O THOMAS . SPARROW = T . A . S. 

J^. IN . WOODSTOCKE = 1 654, J 

351. O, THOMAS . wooDARD . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. WOODSTOCK . GROCER = T . W. \ 

352. O. THOMAS . WOODWARD = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. IN . WOODSTOCKE = T . W. J 

WOOTTON. 

353. O. EDWARD . WALLiNGTON = The Mercers' Arms. 

i?. MERCER . IN . WOOnON = E . S . W. J 



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IRutlanb. 



Number of Tokens issued 17 

Number of Places issuing Tokens .... 5 
Town Pieces issued None 



Sulh Editor and Collaborateur : 

Justin Simpson, Esq., 

St. Martin's, 

Stamford. 



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The seventeen tokens of this county are but proportionate to the 
diminutive size of the county, and not more than would be expected 
from so quiet a county, possessing so few towns of even medium 
size. The series present no special feature. One token of Upping- 
ham, No. lo, is heart-shaped and of considerable rarity. It would 
almost be imagined from the series that the men of greatest prosperity 
in the county were the tallowchandlers, as no less than five out of 
seventeen bear the device of a chandler or the arms of the company. 
Potterill of Oakham and Butler of Uppingham bear their family 
arms on their tokens, and were evidently members of good famiUes 
engaged in trade. Three tokens are those of halfpence, the remainder 
being farthings. 
The notes will be found to be of unusual interest and importance. 



LANGHAM. 

1. O, lOHN . HOMES . OF ..LANGHA = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

I^. IN . COVNTV . OF . RVTLAND = I . H. 1 658. i 

LIDDINGTON. 

2. O. HENRY . SEWELL . OF = H . S. 1 669. 

^. LIDDINGTON . RVTLANDSHIRE = HIS HALF PENV. 



NORTH LUFFENHAM. 
3. O. THOMAS . GOODMAN . OF = Man making candles. 

J^. NORTH . LVFFENHAM . 57 =T . G. 

Tht Goodman family had long before the issue of the token been settled in 
North Luffenham. A Robert Gwdman, yeoman, was here 13 Henry VIII. 
The parish r^;ister, commencing 1565, supplies the following : 

Baptisms. 1633. Thomas fill Herauld Goodman, 12 May. 

„ 1636. Mary, dau. of Harrauld Goodman & loane, July 3 ; bur. 

July 21, 1638. 

In a subsidy 13 and 39 Elizabeth (Queen's Exch. Remembrancer, R.O.), 
Symon Goodman's land in this place was assessed at 20s. annual value. 

The Goodman family is found both in the mimidpal and parochial records of 
Stamford. 



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942 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Richard Goodman was bound apprentice to John Atton, mercer, June 17, 1616 
took up his freedom Apl. 5, i Car. I. ; was one of the constables 2 and 3 Car. I. 
Overseer of Highways for the parish of St. Michael, 1633, 1655, *°<i '^5^ 
Collector of the Poor, 1635 ; Searcher of the Markets, 1636-37 ; and elected a 
capital burgess in the room of John Royce, dec., Aug. 28, 1645 ; and bur. as Mr. 
Richard Goodman at St. Michael's, Sept. 11, 1661. 

In the accounts of the churchwarden (Fras. Dalby) for this parish are the two 
following entries : 

" Received of Rich. Goodman for the closes w«N)ut Paules' gates, the first of 
May, 1649, 02" io« oo^." 

'* Received of Rich. Goodman for halfe a yeare's rent, Octob' 3rd, 1649, 
01" io« oc/*.*' 

Leonard Goodman, " tallowe chandler,** took up his freedom 7 Apl., 1628 ; also 
Henry Goodman, shoemaker, 16 Aug., 8 Car. I. ; and a Richard Goodman, gent., 
elected a capital burgess July 20, 1674 ; dec in 1679, as on Aug. 27 in that year 
John Palmer, jun., was elected in his room. 

Mr. John Goodman paid £s July 16, 1696, and took up his freedom. 

4. O. THOMAS . HVNTT . 0F = A fleur-dc-lys. 

Ji. NORTH . LVFFENHAM = T . H Conjoined. J 

5. O. THOMAS . HVNTT = A fleur-dc-lys. 

J^. IN . LVFFVINHAM = T . H COnjolncd. J 

The village of North Lufienham was for a long period the residence of the 
Digby family, whose arms are azure, a fleurde-lys argent ; probably the issuer of 
this token was mine host of the Fluer-de-lys public-house, or had the device by 
way of compliment. 

In the parochial registers of this parish are found the following entries 
relative to the name : 

Baptisms. 1621. Mary, fil. Edmundi Hunt, xxv March. 

„ 1622. Barbara, fil. Edmundi Hunt, viij July. 

„ 1624. Mary, fil. Edmundi Hunt, xij Dec. 

„ 1626-7. Samuell, fil. Edmundi Hunt, xxviij Jan. 

„ 1632. John, f. Edmundi Hunt, 22 June. 

„ 1642. Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Hunt and Elizabeth, June 5. 

„ 1644. William, son of Thomas Hunt and Elizabeth, April 14. 

„ 1652. Samuel, son of Samuel Hunt, May 12. 

„ 1660. Susanna, daughter of Samuel Hunt, Dec. 23. 

„ 1668. Hannah, daughter of Thomas Hunt, April 2a 

„ i669-7a Thomas, son of Thomas Hunt, Jan. 23. 

Marriage. 1648. Mr. Nathaniel Capel, of London, and Mrs. Audrey Hunt, 
married Dec. 26. 

Burials. 1572-3. Susy Hunt, v Feb. 

,, 15^5. Alice Hunte, ix April 

„ 1591. Thomas Hunt, of Bamesli<>, ij Aug. 

,, 1626-7. Margaret Hunt, 14 March. 

„ 1630. Bezaliel Hunt, i Oct. 

„ 1648. Elizabeth Parratt, wife of Mr. Parratt, of London, and daug^iter 
of Mr. Hunt, Dec. 31. 

Burials. 1649. Joane, y* wife of Thos. Hunt, at y* townes ende, April i. 

„ 1649. Thomas Hunt deceased July 26, bur. 27. 

„ 1666. Audry, wife of Mr. Edm. Hunt, April 27. 

„ 1666. Mr. Edm. Hunt, Oct. 18. 

„ 1674. Thomas Hunt, June 17. 

„ 1674. Hanah Hunt, daughter of Thomas Hunt, burnt, w**» house, 
October 30, was bur. Nov. 24 ; Elizabeth, daughter of the same, Nov. 2 ; Nov. 27, 
Thomas, son of Widdow Hunt, after fire, being burnt. 



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RUTLAND. 943 

Buiials. 1686. John Hunt, clerk, Aug. 25. 

„ 1698. Susana, y^' wife of Samuel Hunt, Oct 27. 

„ 1708. Hanna, wife of Mr. Samuel Hunt, in woollen only, Aug. 9. 

„ 171a Mr. Samuel Hunt, bur. in woollen, Oct. 18. 
On the fly-page of the oldest register-book is this entry : 

"The registers of this parish were copied by Johann Hunt in 1599 from an older 
book during the time the Rectorv was held by Archdeacon Johnson. The entries 
were made before Mr. fiarington s time.*' 

The entries as copied certainly do Johann Hunt credit, being well written. 
In the registers of South Luffenham, a village about a mile to the south of 
Noith Luffenham, I found the following entries : 

171a John Hunt, bur. May y« la 

1717. Isaac Hunt, bur. July y* 16. 

The Samuel Hunt, whose burial is recorded with others of the family at North 
Lnffenham, made his will Feb. 4, 1709-10, proved by sole executor Jan. 29, 
1717-18, in P.CC. (Reg. Tenison 11). by which he settled and assured all such 
(arts of the messuages, cottages, and lands as were not before assured by deed 
dated Jan. 5, 29 Car. II., that is to say, *'all that messuap^e or tenement with the 
appurtenances lying and being in North Luffenham, wherem I now dwell, and one 
William Stanger, and those several closes of land or pasture, called Huimans closes 
and Bracken-bock closes and the Ash close, containing by estimation 26 acres ; 
alio other pieces or closes in North and South Luffenham, containing by estima- 
tion 150 acres, known as Crip farm, now or late in the tenure of William Stanger ; 
cottage in North Luffenham, in the tenure of Richard Fowler ; and all other lands 
and tenements in North and South Luffenham, left power to Samuel Hunt the 
elder, his heirs and assigns, to revoke and alter the said recited deeds, or his heirs 
by Susana, his late wife, deceased, and expresses his dissatisfaction with the same. 
He acknowledges receiving of his son-in-law, Charles Ray, of Stamford, apothe- 
cary, ^350, which is applied for the use and benefit of his other children and 
grandchildren, revokes the deeds, and leaves all that he can in law or equity to his 
daughter, Susannah Ray, her heirs and assigns, she paying thereout to my grand- 
daughter, Susanah Hunt, ^icx> if she lives to attain the age of twenty-one years ; 
and in case of her death to revert to daughter, Susanah Ray. To my grandson, 
Gilbert Hunt, of Ridlington, gent., ;^20 per annum ; residue of personal estate to 
my son-in-law, Charles Ray, who is appointed sole executor. Witnesses, John 
Fleming, and John and Matthew Stanger.** 

Charles Ray, in an assessment made April 22, 1690, for the relief of the poor of 
the parish of St. Michael, Stamford, had to pay 6s. In 1693 he was overseer of 
the poor ; and in August, 1721, he lived at Stamford, as I have seen a bill of his 
dated August 5. He was buried at North Luffenham September 18, 1741 ; as was 
also his widow. May 12, 1742. 

The Hunt family is also found both in the municipal and parochial records. 

William Hunt, carpenter, paid ^i 6s. 8d. and took up his freedom October 5, 
19 Car. L 

William Hunt, probably his son, was elected a capital burgess July 20, 1674 ; 
chamberlain, 1679-80; and deceased in 1681, as on May 12 in that year one 
Richard Buck was elected to fill the vacant seat. William, in 1658 and i66iy 
laved the office of overseer of the highways ; overseer of the poor, 1654 ; and 
churchwarden for the parish of St. Michael 1665 ; and a John Hunt was also 
chnrchwarden 1690, and overseer of highways for the same parish in 1691. 

Eosebins Hunt, mercer, paid ;^io to John Wright, chamberlain, and admitted to 
freedom May 12, 1698. 

Thomas Hunt took up his freedom March 10, 1694-95 * constable for the parish 
<rf St John's 1696-97 ; elected a capital burgess in the room of John Griffin, 
deceased, October 20, 1711 ; deceased in 1746, as on August 28 in that year 
John Chamberlain, mercer, was elected to fill the vacant seat. 

Thomas Hunt, jun., as freebom, was freely admitted to his freedom April 8, 
1704. 

Most probably the Stamford and Rutland fomilies were of kin, as the two 
Lofienhams are five miles only from Stamford. 



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944 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



OAKHAM. 

6. O, lOSHVA . CHARLSW0RTH = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

i?. OKEHAM . IN . RVTLAND = I . A . C \ 

7. O. lONATHAN . FISHER . 0F = A man making candles. 

J^. OKEHAM . IN . RVTLAND = I . S . F. i 

8. O. RICH . MATHEw . AND . iOHN = Arms on a bend ; three fleur- 

de-lis. 

^. POTTERILL . OF . OAKEHAM = THEIR J. J 

The will of John Potterill, apothecary, dated March i, 1652, and admitted to 

Srobate November 2, 1652, contains a schedule of certain property given to his 
aughter Mabel, amongst which are the following pieces of plate, viz. : The long 
bowl, maudling cup, seven silver spoons, of which three are commonly used in the 
house (or "worn," says testator), three others plain, and one with a knob not gilt ; 
two silver salts ; also pewter dishes, etc., linen, household furniture, etc., etc It 
also bequeaths : To mv sons, Edward and William, each ;f 10. The former he 
remits the £$ borrowed money. Whereas my son Humphrey b bound apprentice 
unto me for seven years, and hath served two years and more, and after my decease 
my son John shall take him for the term unexpired, and when he is out to have 
j^6a Whereas John St. John, Esq., owes me ;(25o upon bond, and above ;f8o on 
the forbearance, I will that within twenty-one days after my executor receives the 
same, he shall pay my daughter ;f 80 more, and my two sons each £40 more. To 
my sister, Frances Potterell, 20s. All my lands, etc,- to my son John, and sole 
executor. To my good friend, Eliz. Presgrave, a double ducket of gold. To my 
brother Potterell and his wife a piece of eold each. 

The books of the hall of Stamford inform us that Humphrey Potterell, apothe- 
cary, was, at a common hall, August 27, 1657, abated ** flforty shillings of his ffyne 
^ch ^^^25 imposed on him for his freedome *' (the regulation fine at this period was 
j^2o). In 1659-60 he was one of the capital constables for the parish of St 
Michael, overseer of the poor 1659-60, churchwarden 1669-70, pursuant to royal 
commission, August 29, 1662, elected a capital burgess, or a common councilman, 
and served the oflSce of chamberlain 1681-72. 

Thomas Potterill, his son, also an " apothecarye, paid six pounds thirteen shil- 
lings and ffour pence," June 1 1, 1685, and ^t 00k up his freedom. We find his name 
in the list of capital burgesses in October,' 1687, but not in that of October, 1688. 
Mr. Thomas Potterill resided in the parish of St. John*s, was overseer of the poor 
1686-87, sidesman 1690-91, and churchwarden 1692-93. 

The will of Thomas's father, dated August 24, 27th Car. II., in which he 
designates himself as Humfrey Potterell, of Stamford, in the county of Lincoln, 
apothecary : To son Thomas Potterell, £$0 to be paid within sbc months after his 
apprenticeship has expired. To my daughters, Abigail and Mary, ;^6o each on 
attaining the age of twenty-one, or day 01 marriage, which shall first happen, and 
during minority my executrix to educate them ; and in case of either of them 
d3ring under age, her portion, so dying, to be divided amongst the survivor. And 
touching that part of the money owing by Mr. St. John, and bequeathed unto me 
by the will of my father, I do will the same, and desire my loving brother, Mr. 
Thomas Potterell, this executor, after the recovery thereof, to pay the same equally 
to my children, be supervisor of this my will, and assist my executrix in the 
management of her afiairs. The residue of my estate to my wife Elizabeth, and 
appoints her sole executrix. Witnesses to his signature, etc, George Hill 
and William Lord. 
The following extracts are from the Stamford parish registers : 

St. Michael's. 
1675. Mr. Humphrey Potterell, apothycarie, bur. 30 Oct. 
1660. John Potterell, son of Humphrey, bapt. Nov. 22. 



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RUTLAND, 945 

St. John's. 
Lost I634-63-64. 

1687. Humphrey, y« son of Thomas Potterell and Mary, bapt 20, bur. 23 
Aug. 
1693. &Iary, dan. of the same, bapt. 14 April. 

All Saints*. 
1728. James Potterell, a bedesman, bur. 22 Nov. 
1741-42. Hannah Pottrill, bur. 12 Mch. 

St. Michael's. 

1657-58. Elizabeth, daughter of Humph. Potterell and Elizabeth his wife, borne 
Feb. 4, bapt. 14*. 

1658. William, son of Humphrey Potterrell and Elizabeth, borne Oct. 26, bur. 
21 Dec, 1659, 

i66a John Potterll, son of Humphrey Potterell, bapt. Nov. 22. 

1662. Abigaile, daughter of Humphrey Potterell and Eliz., bapt. July 8. 

i667-7a Humphrey, son of Humphrey Potterell and Eliz., bapt. Apl. 23, and 
bflr. 29th. 

1671. Elizabeth, dau. of Humphrey Potterell and Elizabeth, bapt. June 8, bur. 

1667. John, son of Humphrey Potterell and Elizabeth, bapt. June 24, bur. 25*. 
1658. Edward Harrison, as lawful administrator to the effects of Mabel Har- 
rison, alias Potterell, late of Oakham, dec. 22 Oct. (P.C.C) 
1662-3. John Potterill, Gt., of Oakham, was assessed for land, 15 C. II. 

9. 0. SAMVELL . REEVE . AT = A bcll. 

jR. THE . BELL . IN . OKEHAM = A stick of candlcs. i 



UPPINGHAM. 
10. O. PETER . BARRiFFE . OF . i668 = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^, VPPINGHAM . IN . RVTLAND . HIS . HALF . PENY (in fivC 

lines). {Heart-shape^ 

Ashwell parish register : 

1669. Cvuy Cole, jr., and Lettice Barriffe, mar. Oct. 19 

Castle Bytham parish register : 

1659. Mr. Farbecke, vicar (?), bur. 10 Sept. 

Robert Bariffe, of Uppingham, had land assessed in the subsidy of 15th C. II. 
the amount unknown, as the roll is mutilated and the ink faded. 

In the will of Elizabeth Farmer, of Uppingham, widow, dated January 2, 1633- 
34t>nd proved April 14, 1634, testatrix appoints "my servant, Robt. Beriffe, 
joint admor, together with my loving friends, John Wildbore, parson of Tynwell, 
and Thos. Orme, the elder, of Uppingham, mercer, for the best use and behoof of 
my said exors. for i year, and then the said Robert Beriffe to yield and render to 
them an acc^ of his said dealing, and I give him £}fi for his pains therein." 

The following notes have also been found as to this family : 

The will of the issuer of this token, dated March 26, 167 1, proved August 4, 
1679, is in the P.C.C register. King 104, "Gives to sbter Alice Bariffe ^20, to 
be paid within 6 months after my decease, or in default to receive £^ per annum 
for life, to be paid her quarterly, either as thought most fit by my loving brother, 
Mr. Matthew Johnson. To my other two sisters at London, and the one at 



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946 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Lowick, 55. apiece. All the rest of my goods, etc., to my wife, Elizabeth, whom 
I make executrix, and brother, Mr. Matthew Johnson, assistant and overseer." 

In a subsidy for this county, i8th Car. I. (1644), a Peter BarriflTe, of Morcott, 
paid 7s. 6d. for his land. 

II. O. THOMAS . BVTLER = Arms of the Butler family, three demi- 
lions rampant on a chief, three covered cups. 

J^. OF . VPPINGHAM = T . R \ 

In Ridlington parish register I found the following entries : 
Baptisms. 1608. Noell, 17 ApL 

„ 161 1. Dorothy, 7 Dec 

„ 161 5. Elizabeth, 10 Apl 

„ 1616. Mary, 7 July. 

„ 1617. AUefrank (adau.), 26 0ct. 

„ 1619. Charles, 12 Oct. 

„ 1621. John, 3 Apl. 

„ 1622. Buckingham, 7 Nov. 

Children of Mr. Geo. Butler. 

Burials. 1631-32. Mr. Harrington, b. 25 Jan. 

„ 1635. Mr. George, s. of Mr. Geo. and Anne, b. 30 June. 
„ 1645. ^1^* Buckingham, b. 13 June. 
„ 165 1. Mr. George, b. i June. 
Marriages. 1598. Mathias Butler and Anne Walesman, mar. 10 Oct. 
„ 1619. Anthony Jackson and Fr. Bateler, Dec 21. 

„ 1631. Mr. George Carter and Mrs. Dorothy Butler, June 6- 

„ 1638. Mr. Godfrey Madewell and Mrs. Eliz. Butler, July 17. 

„ 1640. Mr. Richard White and Mrs. Mary Butler, May 7. 

„ 1659-60. Edwish Fish and Mrs. Jane Butler, Feb. 2. 

The name is variously spelt thus : Butler, Boteler, Botelar. 

Eklw. Harbottle (second son of Robert Harbottle, of Basingthorpe, trounty Lin- 
coln, and Emme, his wife, daughter and heir of William Fowler, of Hambleton, 
Rutland), of Egleton, Rutland, married Joane, daughter of Thomas Gray, of Bar- 
well, county Leicester. Their eldest daughter, Elizabeth, was the wife of John 
Butler, of Oakham. 

The arms of Harbottle are: Quarterly of 6-1. Az., 3 icicles bend ways or 
{.Harbottle) ; 2 Ar., 3 escallops gu. i^Wehvick) ; 3 Arg., 3 water-pots covered gu. 
\Mounbotuher) ; 4 Per pale az. and gu. 3 chevrons charged with as many conped 
and counterchanged {ay) ; 5 Gu., 5 fusils conjoined in fesse, each charged with 
an escallop sa. {^Cheney) : 6 Or., a chief gu., over all on a bend engr. az. an annu- 
let of the field {Harrington), Crest, a dexter arm embowed, vested az., the cuff 
arg., holding in the hand ppr. a club or. — Visit, of Rutland, 1618-19. 

In Braunston parish register I found this entry : 

1621. John Butler, son of Mr. George Butler, bur. 18 May ; and in Easton, the 
bur. of Mr. Edw. Butler, . . Dec, 1658. 

Edward Boteler, of Alexton, county Leicester, gent., made his will July 19, and 
proved in P.C.C. November 2, 1639 : To brother, Mr. Geoi^e Butler, my best 
nag or mare, which he shall chuse, and I also forgive him the £$ which I paid for 
him to John Boame. To my sister, his wife, 40s. ; and to his four unmarried 
daughters, Lucy, Jane, Mary, and Allefrancke, 40s. each. To my nieces, Francis 
Jackson, and Dorothy Carter, 20s. each. To Charles and Buckingham Butler, my 
nephews, 20s. each. To my nieces, Elizabeth Pilkington, 20s., Jane and Mary 
Haslewood, 40s. each. To my sister, Mrs. Mary Butler, 406. ; and to her two 
daughters, my nieces, Hannah and Rachell, 40s. each. To my four nephews, Ed- 
ward, John, William, and Noel Butler, 20s. each. To my niece Meadwell, and to 
Susan Boam, each 20s. for to buy a ring. To the poor of Alexton, 20s. To my 
friend, John Boam, of Alexton, ^20, which he hath already of mine in his hands, 
also all my wearing apparel, both linen and woollen, with all other things of mine 



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RUTLAND. 947 

BDder his roof, and the remainder of my estate, being assured that he will see this 
my last will performed, and appoint my brother, Noel Butler, executor. 

In the will of Bartine Burton, of Okeham, county Rutland, gent, (councillor 
of Uw), made November 19, 1612, proved February 6, 1612-13 (married Abigail, 
daughter of John ChoUnley, £sq.)» appoints i.a. my coz (a degree of relationship 
somewhat difficult to *<tack" on to pedigrees, oftentimes found in old wills), 
Mr. John *Butler (of Okeham) ; and as residuary le^tees, brothers Sir Henry 
(^holii&ley, Knt., and Augustine Burton (of Braunston, Rutland). | 

Elizabeth Oliver, of Oakham, widow, by will made September 27, 1612, proved 
April 29, 16 1 3, bequeathed £s ^^ J^^^ Butler, gent. 

George Boteler, gent., in i8ih Car. I., was assessed £3 for land in Leigh Forest, 
coDoty Rutland. 

Ardideacon Robert Johnson bequeathed, by will dated April 2, 1625, to Mr. 
John Butler, of Okum, Five marks per annum for his paynes in gathering upp the 
revennewes of the schools and hospitals, appoints my trusty and well-beloved 
friend, John Butler, of Okeham, gent., one of his executors, and gives John Butler 
five marks per annum for five yeares next after my decease. 

In subsidies c^ 39th Eliz., 17th Jac I., and 23rd Jac. I. (delivered in 1st Car. I.), 
John Butler, gent, of Oakham, had his land assessed each time 40s. 

12. O. HENRY . CLiPSAM = The Groccrs* Arms. 

i?. AT . VPPINGHAM .j657 = H.M.C. J 

13. O. EDMOND . FARBECKE^ A roll of tobaCCO. 
J?. OF . VPPINGHAM = E . F. 

This issuer was probabljr a son of Thos. Farbec, Vicar of Ketton, in this county, 
who May 6, 1614, mamed (at Hambleton) Mary Wright, May 24, 1619. In 
December, 1648, his was under the ban of sequestration. In the State Papers, 
Dom. Sor. of Charles L (R.O.) is a petition from Thos. Farbeck, Clerk, Vicar of 
Ketton, Rutland, to Ardibishop Laud, dated May 29, 1638. It sets forth that 
the church of Tixover, two miles distant, is united to his vicarage, and by an 
aodent composition the vicar is to find a curate resident to officiate at Tixover. 
Kichard Bullingham is farmer for three lives at a small rent of the rectory of 
Ketton, being the corps of a prebend in the cathedral church of Lincoln, and 
receives out of the rectory j^300 clear, per annum, while the vicarage is not worth 
above £26 per annum, and one moiety of that is allowed to the curate of Tixover. 
There is reserved to the diocesan full power to augment the stipend as by an 
aodent composition in the church of Lincoln, hereunto annexed. Prays that the 
Archbishop would command that some order may be taken for the augmentation 
of petitioner's poor living. Underwritten, I desire Sir Jno. Lamb to consider of 
this petition, and if there be any way left for the churches' just relief I shall be very 
irilling to ^ve my best assistance.— W. Cant., May 29, 1638. 

Widi this petition is an extract in Latin from the roll of the time of Oliver 
Sotton, Bishop of Lincoln (12S0-99), in which are set forth the profits at that time 
of the vicarage of Ketton with the chapel of Tixover, to which is added a state- 
loent of the various sums received by the petitioner since his coming to the 
▼icarage in 1614, which to say the least was bare enough to serve a cure. Peti- 
tiooer, designating himself as Thos. F., Vicar of Ketton, co. Rutland, in the 
jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln, again in 1640 petitions the 
primate. He says your Grace's Vicar- General, in the first metropolitical visitation, 
did, under the seal of the court, enjoin all the inhabitants of the pari^ of Ketton 
to come up to the chancels of the Lord's table to receive the Sacrament, and in the 
visitation of the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln the churchwardens were commanded 
to present all such as refused so to draw near as being delinquents against the orders 
of Holy Church. All the inhabitants of the parish, according to their duty, obey 
these injunctions of their ordinary, except Mr. Armin, J. P., and Cicely, his wife, 
vho have for these four years refused to communicate in their parish church, be- 
cause petitioner would not against his conscience and oath of canonical obedience 
Kcede firom the injunction of his superior and come forth of the chancel, to the 
great scandal of all his other parishioners and the abetting of them in their 



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948 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

refractory dispositions. For this cause a bill of indictment was {deferred by a late 
servant of Mr. A. against petitioner and returned, Mia vera^ by the grand jury, so 
that petitioner, not being able by reason of his extreme poverty to traverse it, 
must be forced to submit as a delinquent to the laws of the kingdom, unless by your 
gracious favour he be vindicated from the potency of his adversaries. Pra3rs your 
grace to take his cause into your consideration, and to relieve him in such manner 
as shall seem best to your wisdom. Underneath is written : Referred to Sir John 
Lambe and Dr. Duck to consider of this petition, and at their next leisure to give 
me an account of their suggestions. — W. Cant, May 9, 164a 

14. O. ELIZABETH . GOODWIN = A spinning-whcel. 

R. IN . VPINGHAM . 1666 = E . G. \ 

15. O, GEORGE . GREENE = A pair of scissors. 

R, IN . VPPINGHAM . 1666 = G . G. \ 

16. O. lOHN. HVLL. OF. 1 666 = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

R, VPINGHAM . CHANDLER = I . M . H. \ 

The will of the issuei: of this token, dated November 14, 1691, proved February 
12, 1691-9, by executor, is in the P.C.C. register (Fane 29). Testator designates 
himself as John Hull, of Uppinham, co. Rutland, grocer. Bequeaths to son 
Richard and daughter Frances Hull all my copyhold lands and tenements vdiich I 
hold of the lord of the manor of the rectory of Uppingham, so that the same may 
be sold and the proceeds equally divided. To my daughter Frances for life a free- 
hold tenement and shop thereunto adjoining, late in the tenure of Henry Frisby. 
Should son Richard die without issue it was to revert to my daughter Frances. 
To the three children of my daughter, Eliz. Freeman, viz., Maiy, Thomas, and 
John, each 6s. 8d. Item to my son Richard, two coats, one waistcoat, silver 
tobacco-box, and all my wearing shifts. To my daughter Frances one silver cup 
and two silver spoons. The residue of my estate, etc., to my wife Anne, whom I 
constitute sole executrix. 

The parish registers of St. Michael's, Stamford, records the burial on February 
9, 1675-6, of a Mr. Robt. Hull, woollen draper. 

The corporate and parochial books supply the following particulars, which evi- 
dently show that he was not a "native " : 

At a common hall, April 5, 1658, Robt. Hull, woollen draper, was admitted to 
freedom, whereupon ** he payes down to Humph. Reinolds, Qiamberlain, tenne 
poundes for his freedome ; and his landlord Willm. Larrett and Robert Blackboume, 
mercer, are to be bound in flfourty pounds to secure the towne from his charges." 

At a former meeting of the hall, March 26, 1657, he was directed to pay ^10 
before taking up his freedome, for which Mr. Robt. Cammock hath promised to 
pay before night In 1659-60 he was one of the overseers of the poor, and cburdi- 
warden in 1^69 ; and in the accounts of the churchwardens of this parish 
for Easter (John Yokes and Thos. Porter), presented to the parishioners "in 
vestry assembled,'* April 21, 1663, credit is given for 3s. 4d. for the burial of 
Mr. Hull's child in the church. 

" 1668. Aug. 6. At this Hall, Robert Hull one of ye capitall burgesses of this 
corporacon before he would obey ye constituson of a hall heretofore made did 
freely resigne his place as a capitall burgesse and desyred to be dismissed from 
ye same wh<* b ordered accordingly." 

At a common hall, February 21, 1668-9, Robert Hull was elected "agayne 
into his place as one of ye capitall burgesses of this borough and swome." 

He served the office of chamberlain for the year 1609-70, promoted to the 
rank of an alderman in 1674, when he refused to take the customary oath. 
The minute-book of the hall thus records the fact : 

" 1674. July 20. Thos. Pilkington, Gent., Mayor. At this hall, Mr. Hull, lately 
elected Alderman in the place of Mr. Daniel Thorogood (bur. at St. Michael's, 
10 March, 1673-4), dec, was sent for by ve Mayor and Aldermen to take his 
oath, but he refused the same though tendered to him. He was therefore dis- 
missed from the Council Chamber." 



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RUTLAND. 949 

I have no direct evidence to connect him with the Uppingham token-issuer, 
bat the foct of that town being aboat twelve miles Stamford, which was at this 
period and some time previously the capital of South Lincolnshire, affords strong 
pRsamptive reasons that they were of lun, perhaps brothers. 

When Harrod wrote "The Antiquities and Present State of Stamford and 
St Martin's, 1785," the following inscription was on a brass plate on the floor 
in the middle usle of old St Mlwaers Church. It disappearea when the present 
one was rebuilt in its place in 1837, as it is not now to be seen : 

" Heere lyeth bvried the body of Robert Hvll Woolin Draper, who departed 
this life Febnrary the 8, 1675, iEtatis suae 42." 

The registers of this parish supply the following entries : 

1642. Robert Trig and Anna Hull, mar. June 19. 

1646. Thomas Hull, bur. August 2S, 

1662. Widow Hull, bur. December 31. — Elaston parish register. 

A Richard Hull, clerk, was instituted to Lyndon Rectory, June 14, 1662. 

1662. Robert, son of Robt. Hull and Anne, bapt. ist, bur. 25th November. 

1663-64. Anne, dau. of Robt. Hull and Anne, bur. January 21. 

1669. Elizabeth, dau. of Robt. and Anne Hull, bapt. December 20. 

1669^ Mary, dau. of Mr. Robt. Hull, bur. June 12. 

1671. Rebeccah, dan. of Robt. and Anne Hnll, bapt. May 9. 

17. O. RICHARD . MVNTVN = A flcur-dc-lys. 

jR. AT . VPINGAME = R . M. 1 



VOL. II 61 

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^■^^w%/v 


«.v«i »%/♦ 




Token issued . . . . 




OSK 


Puce issuing Tokens 




. f)NK 



6i— 2 • I 

i 



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Scotlanb- 

Of this kingdom there is but the one token described ; and this is 
very surprising, as the large cities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Pertli, 
Aberdeen, etc., must have needed small change, and there seems lo 
have been no special law in Scotland against their issue, any more 
than in England and Ireland. The Black Money of the Scottish 
Kings, and the patent farthings of James I. and Charles I., seem, 
however, to have met the requirements of the trade of that period. 

0, GEO . COMBES . FARTHING (in three lines across the field). \ 
R. DYNBAR . 1668 (in two lines across the field). 



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Sbropsbire* 



Number of Tokens issued 107 

NuMBER OF Places issuing Tokens ..... 20 
Town Piece issued at Bridgenorth. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

Jas. W. Lloyd, Esq., 
Kington. 



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Sbropsbire- 

The bulk of the tokens of this county are halfpennies and farthings, 
but there are as many as thirteen pennies, an unusual proportion, 
surpassed, however, by the adjoining border county of Chester, which 
boasts of twenty-four or more. 

Bridgenorth was the only town in the county that issued tokens in 
a corporate capacity. 

In the former edition eighty tokens were described — of these four 
have been withdrawn, as they belong to other counties, and the 
present list enumerates a total of ninety-nine. 

BISHOP'S CASTLE. 

1. O, lEREMY . AMBLER . IN = Arms of the Ambler family, or, a 

fesse between three crescents gu. 

R. BISHOPS . CASTELL = I . A. 

2. O. RICHARD . AMBLER . APOTHC . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1670 (in 

six lines). 
R. IN . BISHOPS . CASTLE . SQVARE . DEALING (in four lines). 
(Square^ \ 

3. O. WILLIAM . MALL = A lion rampant. 

R, OF . BISHOPS . CASTLE = W . L . M. \ 

4. O. THOMAS . MASON . HIS . HALFPENY (in four liucs). 

R, OF . BISHOPS . CASTLE . 1670 (in four lines). {Heart- shape,) \ 

5. O, EDWARD . woLLASTON . ivNiOR = Arms of the Wollaston 

family : arg. three mullets, 2 and i, sa., pierced of the 
first impaling — ermine on a canton a fleur-de-lys. 

R. IN . BISHOPS . CASLLE . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

6. O, EDWARD . WOLLASTON = E . W. 

R, OF . BISHOPS . CASTELL = A castle. i 

BRIDGENORTH. 

7. O. THE . CHAMBERLINS . OF . BRIDG = A CaStle. 

R, NORTH . THEIR . HALFE . PENNY = 1 665. \ 

8. O. THE . CHAMBERLAYNES = A CaStle. 

R, OF . BRIDGNORTH = A portCUlUs. \ 

9. A variety from different dies. 



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958 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

10. O. SYMON . BEAVCHAMP = The Drapers* Arms. 

^. IN . BRIDG . NORTH = S . B CODJolnecL \ 

11. O, lOHN . HiGGiNS . OF = The GroccTs' Arms. 

J^. BRIDGNORTH = I . C . H. i 

12. O. THO . WHEELER . OF = The Merccrs' Arms. 

^. BRIDGE . NORTH = T . M . W. i 

BROSELEY. 

13. O, RICHARD . CROMPTON = HIS HALF PENY. 

/^. IN . BROSLEY=l664. I 

14. O. WILLIAM . OKES . OF . 1669 = Three crowns on the Royal 

Oak. 

^. BROSLEY. IN . SHROPSHIRE = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

CHURCH STRETTON. 

15. O. lOHN . PHILLIPS . IN = I . A . P. 

R. CHVRCH . STRETTON = I . A . P. J 

DRAYTON. 

16. O, DRAYTON . IN . HALES = The Mcrchant-Tailors* Arms. 

/^, IN . SHROPSHIRE =1664. J 

17. O. DRAYTON . IN . HALES = The Mcrchant-Tailors* Anns. 

-A*. IN . SHROPSHEERE= 1 664. i 

18. O, lOHN . COX . OF . DRAYTON = HIS HALF PENY. 

/^. IN . SHROPSHIRE . 1 668 = I . I . C ^ 

19. O, THOMAS . NiCHOLL = The Apothecarics' Arms. 

I^, OF . DRAYTON . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. } 

Thomas NichoU was on the jury of the Court Leete 1687-96. (This court con- 
t in u«s still to be held.) 

In the parish registers there are several entries relating to his family. The last 
rends as follows : 

Thomas NichoU de Drayton, Pharmocop, Sepult. November 2, 1699. 

ao. O. MATTHIAS | THVRSTON ] RICHARD | CHAMBER [ LYN j 1 669) 

(in six lines). 

I^, DRAYTON . IN . SHROPSHIRE = THEIR HALFE PENNY. ^ 

1670, September 22, Baptized Elizabetha Chamberlin filia RicardL 

ELLESMERE. 

21. O. THOMAS . COOKE = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . ELSMEARE . 1666 = T . M . C | 

22. O, EDWARD . RENOLDS . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

J?. IN . ELIZMEERE = E . R ^ 



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SHROPSHIRE. 959 



HODNET. 
2$. 0, THOMAS . ANNKER = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

^. OF. HODNITT . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

LUDLOW. 

24. O. RICHARD . BEBB . IRON = A man smoking. 

J^. MONGER . IN . LVDLOW = R . B. ^ 

25. O. lOHN . BOWDLER . MERCER = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J^. IN . LVDLOW . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

John Bowdler was Bailiff of Ludlow in 1670 and 1684. 

26. O. lOHN . BRIGHT . MERCER = IN LVDLOW. Three cloVCS. 

J^. His I halfe \ penny \ 1669 | (in four lines). \ 

Mayor in 1687 — King James II., who visited I^udlow in that year, having 
granted a new charter to the borough, making it a mayoral Corporation. 

27. O. EDWARD . DA VIES . 1 669 = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R, APOTHECARY . IN . LVDLOW = HIS HALF PENY. E . . . . D. \ 

28. O, TAMBERLAiNE . DAViES = The Merccrs' Arms, t . d. 

R. MERCER . IN . LVDLOW . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

29. O. TAMBERLAYN . DAviES = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, OF . LVDLOW = T . M . D. \ 

Tamberlayne Davies was Bailiff in 1668. 

30. O, BLANCH . HACKLViT = A goat's head and axe. 

R, IN. LVDLOW. 1669 = HER HALF PENY. \ 

A Ralph Hacklnit was Bailiff in 1636. 

31. O. GEORGE . HAVOHTON = A Castle. 

R, IN . LVDLOW . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

32. O. GEORGE . HAVGHTON . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R, IN . LVDLOV . 1669 = An uncertain object. \ 

Bafliffin 1684. 

33. (7. WALTER . lONES = The Mercers' Arms without shield. 

R IN . LVDLOE = W . M . L \ 

Bailiffm 1665. 

34. O, EDWARD . MIELS = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. IN . LVDLOW . 1663 = E . M . M. \ 

35. O. EDWARD . MIELS = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R, IN . LVDLOW . 1665 = E . M . M. \ 

36. O. lOHN . PEARCE = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R. OF . LVDLOWE= 1 65 6. \ 

Bailiff ini666 and 1681. 
37- 0. WILL . RICHARDS = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R, OF . LVDLOWE= 1656. \ 



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96o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

38. O, RALPH . SHARETT«The Bakcrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . LVDLOW = R . M . S. J 

39. O. CHARLES . VALLE:^ Three crowns on the royal oak. 

J?. IN I LVDLOW I HIS . HALF | PENNY | 1669 | C . E . V (in six 

lines). {Octagonal,) J 

MADELEY MARKET. 

40. O. lOHN . HOLLAND . OF . MADELY = A pickaxe. 

^. IN . SHROPSHIRE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. | 

41. O. EDWARD . LEWIS . OF . MADELY . IN . SHROPSHIRE « HIS 

HALF PENY. 1669. 

^. (Badly preserved ; the only part of the legend which h 
legible is Shropshire, and in the field his ... . same 
as the obverse. It was apparently struck at a later 
time, from an old corroded die, on a large blank, the 
size of a modern halfpenny.) J 

42. O. EDWARD LEWIS . OF . MADELY . IN . SHROPSHER « HIS 

HALF PENY. 1 669. 
^. MADELY . WOOD . YEILDS . COLE . THATS . GOOD = A Collier's 

pick between two roses. J 

43. O. LAWRENCE . WELLINGTON . IN = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

^. MADLY . IN . Y« . COVNTY . OF . SALOP = HIS HALF PENY. 
1669. i 

MUCH WENLOCK. 

44. O, HENRY . BLAKE . AND -THEIR HALF PENY. 

^. WILLIAM . EVANS . OF = WEN | LOCK | MAG | NA. i 

45. O. THOMAS . OWSLEY . MERC = The Merccrs' Arms. 

^. IN . MVCH . WENLOCK = T . O. { 

NEWPORT. 

46. O. THOMAS . CHALONER = T . M . C. 

^. IN. NEWPORT. 1 664 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

47. O. SAMVELL . CLARKE = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. IN . NEWPORT . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

48. O. SAMVELL . DOWNTON . OF . 1 669 = HIS HALFE PENY. S . D. 

^. NEWPORT . IN . SHROPSHIRE = The Mcrcers' Arms. J 

49. O. ROBERT . HVDDELL = A bird. R . M . H. 

^. IN . NEWPORT . t666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

50. O. ARTHER . LEGG . i656«The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . NEWPORT = A . I . L. i 

51. O, ARTHVR . ROWE = A . E . R. 

J^. IN . NEWPORT . 1658 = Arms of the Rowe fiamily ; a bee- 
hive surrounded by bees. ^ 



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SHROPSHIRE, 961 

52. (7. lOHN . THORNTON = A thorn-tree. 

Ji. IN . NEWPORT = l . E . T. \ 

53. 0. THOMAS . YOVNGE = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J^, IVNIER . IN . NEWPORTE = HIS FARTH | INGE. ^ 

This token is as large as the usual halfpennies. 

54. O. As S3. 

J^. PINNER . IN . NEWPORTE (evidently from a blundered die). 

OLDBURY. 

55. 0, OLIVER . ROVND = St. George and the Dragon. 

J^. IN . OLDBVRY . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

This token has been claimed for Worcestershire, as Oldbury is novr in that 
county, but at the time of the issue of the token the town belonged to this county, 
and consequently Shropshire has the prior and best claim. 

OSWESTRY. 

HVGH . EDWARDS . 0F = A shoe. 1^ 

OSWALSTREY . 1669 = HIS PENY. I 

RICHARD . EDWARDS = A WOOl-bag. 

OF . OSWALSTREY . 1 668 = HIS PENNY. I 

PHILLIP . ELLiCE = A roll of tobacco. 

IN . OWESTRY = P . E. \ 

lOHN . lONES = A sword and pistol fesswise. 

IN . OSWESTRE . 1666 = 1^. I 

RICHARD . PAYNE . OF = R . M . P. 

OSWALDSTRE . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

RICHARD . PAYNE . 1667 = A mortar and pestle. 

IN . OSWALDSTRY= 1^. I 

ARTI'E'' 
IN . OSWESTRIE . 1 668= ^^j^j^ 

IN . SHROPSHEiRE = A pheon. 1^. I 

POSTON. 

63. O. John I Braffeyof\ Pofton his \ halfe peny, 

R. Arms of Brassey=A fess engrailed on a canton, a teal. 
(OctagonaL) ^ 

It is doubtful if this token is correctly assigned to Shropshire, Poston being only 
a small hamlet in the rural parish of Mun^ow, and the name is not to be found 
on the parish registers. 

FREES. 

64. O, RICHARD . MADELEY = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. IN . PREESE . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

SHIFFNAL. 

65. O. ARTHVR . MANWARiNG = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. IN . SHIFNALL. 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



56. 


0. 
R. 


57- 


0. 
R. 


58- 


0. 
R. 


59- 


0. 
R. 


60. 


0. 
R. 


61. 


0. 
R. 


63. 


0. 




R. 



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962 ' TRADER'S TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

SHREWSBURY. 

Nearly all the following tokens are engraved in Owen and Blake way's '* Histoiy 
of Shrewsbury." 

66. O, THOMAS . ACHELLEY . 7 1 = A whcatshcaf. T . A. 1^. 

Id. IN . SALOP . 1670 = A fleur-de-lys. t . a. {Octagonal,) i 

67. A variety reads sallop, and is dated 1671. 

68. O, PETER I BAKER I DISTILER | AND | GROCER (in fivC linCS). 

H IN . SALOP . p . E . B. i^ = A lion passant gardant. (Heart- 
shape,) \ 

69. O. loSEPH . BENYON . IN = A wheatshcaf. i . e . b, 

R. SALLOP . HIS . PENY=i669 = A pair of scales. 
{Octagonal.) 1^. i 

70. O, lOSEPH . BENYON . IN = A pair of scales. 

H. SALLOP . HIS . HALF . PENY = A wheatsheat \ 

The following extracts from the Shrewsbury Rent Roll of 1657 relate to this 
family : 
Feefarm. 

Charles Benyon gent for a corner house on ye Wild Copp 
late ye land of Richard Powell Esq. ... -"£0 02 00 

The High Streft, 
The heyres of Edward Bennion Corvisor for the comer 
house over against the Sharman's hall late the lands of 
Richard Mar^all in the tenure of James Woodall ... o qq 06 
Charles Benyon gent for one tenement there late the lands 
of Richard Powell Esq. ... ... ... ... o 00 03 

Charles Bennion gent for an incroachment at his (?) there at 
the corner of grope lane late the lands of Rich. Powell 
Esq. in the possession of Rowland Midleton Mercer ... o 01 00 

71. O, lOHN . BRiGDELL . 1667= The Tallowchandlcrs' Arms. 

R, IN . SALLOP . CHANDLER = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

72. O. EDMOND . CLARKE = Arras of Shrewsbury; three leopards' 

faces. 
R, IN . SALOPP == E . a \ 

73. O, SAMVELL . CONEY . iNKEEPER = A Star with eight rays. 

R, OF. SALOP. 1669 = HIS PENNY. I 

74. O, ROBERT . DAViES = The Mercers' Arms. 

A*. IN SALOPP = R . D. \ 

75. O, WILLIAM . HARRISON = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. OF . SALOPE . 1666 = The Stationers' Arms. h 

76. O. BENiAMiN . HIND = The Arms of Shrewsbury. 

R, IN . SAL0P = B . H. \ 

77. O, lOHN . HOLLiER . i668 = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, MERCER . IN . SALLOP = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

78. O, SAMVELL . MACHEN = A whcatshcaf. S . H . M. 

R, BAKER. IN . SALOPP = HIS HALF PENY. J 



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SHROPSHIRE. 963 

79. O. PETAR . MACHEN . BAKER = A whcatshcaf. 

^. IN . SALOP . 1669 = HIS PENY. {OctagOfloI.) I 

80. O, THOMAS . MEYRiCHE = The Vintncrs' Arms. 

R. IN . SALOPP . 1663 = T M. conjoined. \ 

81. O, THO. MEYRiCKE=The Vintncrs' Arms. 

R. IN . SALOPP . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

The Shrewsbury Rent Roll states as follows : 

New Takings, 1667. 
Thomas Meyrick gent for encroaching in Pighall lane by enclosing a 
passage out of toe lane into his owne howse there ... "£0 00 06 

82. O, lOHN . MiLLiNGTON = The Bakers' Arms. 1 . m . m. 

R, OF . SHREWSBVRY . T 664== HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

John Mellington, sen., baker, for encroaching by erecting a bulke to 
his Shop in Shopp-lace (now called ** Shop- latch ") on the towne*s 
ground ... ... ... ... ... ... ...jfo 02 06 

John MiUington, if not a Quaker himself, was friendly to the cause of this 
pwsecuted sect. Richard Davis, the Welshpool Quaker (see Wales), says in his 
autobiography : 

" A little after this I came to hear that some of the people that were called 
Quakers were at Shrewsbury, in the county of Salop, being distant from the place 
<rf my abode about eighteen miles. When the time called Christmas came, my 
master's work being somewhat over for a while, I got leave to go so far. I went 
first to the house of John Milling'ton, where many friends resorted.*' 

In 1661 Davies was taken prisoner at Wem, with about twenty-five more, and 
committed to Shrewsbury Gaol, where they suffered much hardship ; but after some 
da^ John Millington interceded with the gaoler, who .was prevailed upon to let 
them all go, taking their word for their appearance at the next Assizes. 

83. O, lOHN. MILWARD. i667 = AstilL 

R. DISTILLER . IN . S.\LOP = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

In a Shrewsbury Rent Roll of 1657 the residences of this and the following 
issuer are shown to be in *' Mardall," or, as now spelt, Mardol, viz. : 
Aodeley Bowdler gent, for a tenement there in tenure of Con. 
Overton ... ... ... ... ... ... -" £0 01 00 

Roger Warter Clothier for a tenement and garden there in ye tenure 

of Rich**. Warter, Corvisor, and J no. Mill ward Distiller ... o 00 08 

John Millward Distiller for encroaching by building even with ye jetty . 
of his house 18 inches broad and 8 yards one foot long nere the 
Welsh bridge ... ... ... ... ... ... o 01 00 

flfeeffarm. 

John Mil ward Distiller for his tenements there late ye 
lands of Henry Hughes Corvisor in tenure of Edward 
Manuel, dier and others ... ... ... ... o 03 04 

New Takings^ 1667. 
John Milward Distiller for encroaching by erecting a bulke 

at his Shopp in Mardall on ye townes ground ... o 00 06 

Bye-GoneSf June, 1885, PP* 247 and 248. 

84. 0. CONSTANTINE . OVERTON = The Cordwaincrs' Arms. 

R. IN . SALOPP . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

The Shrewsbury Rent Roll reads : 
Constantine Overton Corvisor for encroaching by erecting an outcast 
window and overgetting into the Street at his house nere the Cross ;^o 00 06 



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964 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

85. O, SAMVELL . RiDGEW AY « The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. IN . SALOP . 1671= HIS HALF PENY. 

86. O. OWEN . ROBERTS ^ A wheatsheaf. o . r. 

^. IN . SALOPP . 1 666 » HIS HALF PENY. 

87. O. lOB . SELBY . DISTILLER « HIS HALF PENY. 
J^. IN . SALLOP . 1667 = I . S. 

88. O. THOMAS . Sl'VDLEY = HIS PENY. 
^. OF . SHREWSBVRY = T . E . S. 

89. (2 lOHN . THOMAS . i66o = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. OF . SALOP . MERCER = I . T. 

90. O. WILLIAM . THOMAS . MERCER = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. OF . SALOP . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

91. O. MiCHAELL . WILDING = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

I^. IN . SALOP . 1664=* HIS HALF PENY. 

92. O. MICHAELL . wiLDiNGE = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J?. MERCER . IN SALOP = M . I . W. 
In the Rent Roll quoted above occurs : 
In Shoplach and St. John's Hill, Michell Wilding mercer for 2 seats at 
his house over against the Gullet ... ... ... ... £0 00 03 

Bye- Cones ^ June, 1885, p. 250. 

93. O. lOSHVA . WILLIS = The Arms of Shrewsbury. 

R, IN . SALLOP . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY. 

94. 0» lOSHVA . WILLIS . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, SALOP . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . W. 
This token is of brass with copper centre. 

WELLINGTON. 

95. O, ANDREW . socKETi' . i666 = The Mercers' Arms without 

shield. 

R. MERCER . IN . WELLINGTON <= HIS HALF PENY. 
A specimen of this token is in Shrewsbury Museum. 

96. O* STEPHEN . WRIGHT . MERCER = A greyhound running. 

R. IN . WELLINGTON . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

For other tokens of Wellington, see Somersetshire, some of which probably 
belong to this, the larger town. 

The following entry in the parish registers of Wellington, Salop^ verify the 
insertion of the latter token in ttiis Ibt : 

" Will, the Sonne of Mr. Stephen Wright and Dorothy, his wife, was born the 
5th day of April, 1660." 

WEM. 

97. O, WILLIAM . ALANSON » Arms ; a fesse between three boars* 

heads. 

R. OF. WEM . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



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SHROPSHIRE. 965 

98. O, lOHN . CHETTWOOD . MERCER = The Drapers' Arms. 

-^. OF . WEM . HIS . HALF PENY = i . c, with an interlaced 
flower between. J 

99. O. THOMAS . lEBB = The Mcrcers' Arms without shield 

/(. OF . WEM = I . T. (sic). J 

100. 0. SAMVELL . ROYCROFT = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J^. IN . WEM . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

loi. O. lOHN . SHENTON . i666 = Arms. Two bars charged with 
seven escallops (?), four and three, 

^. OF . WEM . MERCER = HIS . HALF PENY. | 

102. O. SAMVEL . SMITH . MERCER = Three greyhounds running, 

fess-wise. 

J^. IN . WEM . HIS . FARTHIN = S . S. { 

103. O. SAMVEL. SMITH . MERCER = Three greyhounds running, 

fess-wise. 

-ff. IN . WEM . HIS . HALF . PENY = S . S. i 



WHITCHURCH. 

104. O. lOHN . BATHOE . OF = The Tallowchaudlers' Arms. 

/^. WHIVe . CHVRCH . 66 = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

105. O. PHILIP . AND . MARY . BROOK = St Gcorge and the Dragon. 

J^. IN . WHITCHVRCH = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

106. O, EDW I NEWTON | HVMPHRY | ROWLY. 

^. IN . WHIT . CHVRCH = The Mercers' Arms. J 

107. O. HVMPHREY . ROWLEY = A ship. 

/^. IN . WHITCHVRCH . 1669 = HIS PENNY. H . R. COUJoiued. 

(Octagonal,) i 



vou IL 62 

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Somerset 



Number of Tokens issued 344 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 6& 

Town Pieces issued at Bath, Bridgwater, Bruton^ 
Chard, Frome, Ilchester, Ilminster, Langport, 
Minehead, Taunton, Wellington, Wells, and 
Yeovil. 



Smb-Editor and Collaborateur : 

William Bidgood, Esq., 

Taunton Castle. 



62—2 

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Somerset 

In the Somerset series of tokens we find that the devices are not only 
numerous, but very varied in character, and may be classed under the 
following divisions : 

I. Town Pieces and Arms of Private Families. — Farthings were 
issued by the local authorities of the following towns : Bath, Bridg- 
water, Bruton, Chard, Frome, Ilchester, Ilminster, Langport, Mine- 
head, Taunton, Wellington, Wells, and Yeovil— a very large number, 
compared with other counties. The family coats are : Fisher, of 
Bath ; Rogers, of Bridgwater ; Able, of Chard ; Grenway, of Crew- 
keme ; Curie, of Freshford ; Webb, of Ilminster ; Foster, of Kilmers- 
don ; and Wintar, of South Petherton. 

II. Arms of the Trade Corporations of the City of London, — These 
arms were used by persons of the same trade throughout the country, 
and in Somerset we find the following : Clothworkers^ — Bath, Spax- 
ton,* Taunton. Cordwainers^ — Bath. Z>r<i/<?r^— Bath, Bridgwater- 
Goldsmith^ — Bath. Grocer^— ^viXxya^ Frome, Henstridge, Taunton, 
Wellington; three cloves only are sometimes used— Chard, Crew- 
keme, Ilchester, Yeovil; and also three sugar-loaves — South Petherton. 
Haberdashers^ — Beckington, Crewkerne, Frome, Langport. Mercers^ 
—Bath, Batheaston, Chard, Frome, Glastonbury, Ilchester, Lydeard 
Sl Lawrence, Minehead, Nunney, Taunton, Wells. Salter^ — Bridg- 
water, Mells. Tallowchandiers^—BdLthy North Petherton ; one dove 
only — ^West Pennard, YeoviL JVeavers^^—BsLth, Croscombe, Taunton. 

III. Merchants' Marks, — ^Walters, of Bath ; Giles, of Beckington ; 
Haviland, of Bridgwater ; Turner, of Frome ; Bradford, of LuUington ; 
Brown and Byrtt, of Shepton Mallet 

^ A chevron ermine, between two babies in chief, and a teazle in base. 

' A chevron between three goats' heads, erased. 

' Three triple crowns resting on clouds, radiated in base. 

* Quarterly, first and fourth a leopard's face, second and third a covered cup, in 
diief three buckles. 

• A chevron between nine cloves — three, three, and three. 
' Barry nebul^ on a bend a lion passant guardanL 

' A demi- virgin couped below the shoulders, issuing from clouds, crowned, hair 
dishevelled, all within an oriole of clouds. (The clouds are usually omitted on the 
tokens.) 

' Per chevron three covered cups sprinkling salt. 

* Per fesse and per pale, three doves, each holding an olive bianch. 
*• On a chevron between three leopards' faces, as many roses. 

• On one of the bench ends in the church at Spaxton is carved a representation 
of a man at work on a piece of cloth—the Fullers* Panel. See " Proceedings," 
Somerset Archaeolo^cal Society, voL viL 



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970 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

IV. Tavern and Shop Signs,— Ax\gt\ Three Swans, White Hart, 
Mermaid, Rose and Crown, Bell, Crown, Harp, Nag's Head, Seven 
Stars, Globe, Catherine Wheel Lamb and Flag, Checkers, Half 
Moon, Fountain, Ship, St. George and Dragon, Castle, Fleur-de-Lys, 
Eagle, White Ball, Three Widows, Lion, Half Moon, Unicom, 
Soldier. 

V. Implements, Articles of Trade^ Domestic Use^ and Dress. — 
Many of the following were probably shop signs : Croppers* shears, 
scythe, woolcomb, scissors, curry comb, spade, mortar and pestle, 
hammer and pincers, scales, teazle brush, cord, axe, shuttle, cloth 
brush, cauldron, tailors' pressing-iron, woolpack, madder bag, hand 
holding a pen, stick of candles, pipes and roll of tobacco, barrel, roll of 
bread, stocking, hat and feather, book. 

VL Animals and Plants. — Pegasus, birds, talbot with chain, dog 
and hare, stag, unicorn, cock, greyhound, squirrel, rose, Glastonbury 
thorn, bunch of grapes. 

Vn. LoycU Mottoes and Emblems, — Beckington ("Glory be unto 
the King ") ; Chard (" Receive the Crown in every Town ") ; Glas- 
tonbury (royal arms), South Cadbury (King's head), Weston (Prince's 
feathers). The Crown, and Rose and Crown, frequently occur. 

VHL Punning. — Swalbw, Bath ; Bishop, Glastonbury (bust of a 
Bishop, mitred) ; Churchey Somerton (a church) ; Hancock, Weston 
(a hand and a cock). 

The earliest date on a Somerset token is 165 1, and the latest, 
1671. 

The frequent occurrence of the woolcomb, croppers' shears, wool- 
pack, and other implements connected with the woollen manufacture, 
would tend to prove that cloth making was a flourishing industry in 
Somerset at that period. It still lingers at two or three places in 
the eastern part of the county, whilst serges and other woollen goods 
, are made extensively at the present time at Wellingtoa 



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SOMERSET. 197 

ASHCOTT. 

1. O. RICHARD . MiLLES = A doublc-headed eagle displayed. 

-^. OF . ASHCOTE . l666 = R . M. i 

AXBRIDGE. 

2. 0. WILLIAM . HOPKINS = A fleuF-de-lys. 

J^. OF . AXBRIDGE . 1656 = W. H. \ 

3. 0. lOHN . TVTHILL . 1669 = 1 . D . T. 

I^. OF . AXBRIDGE . AT . Y^ = An angel. i 

BATCOMBE. 

4. 0, STEPHEN . PARSONS . HOSiR = A Stocking. 

i?. IN . BATCOMBE . SVMERSET = S . I . P. J 

BATH. 

5. (?. A . BATHE . FARTHING = C . B | 1659. 

^. THE . ARMES , OF . BATHE = Arms of Bath : per fesse em- 
battled, a wall with loopholes, in chief two lines wavy, 
over all a sword erect. iarge j 

6. Another reads farthinge, and is dated 1670. large J 

7. 0. RICHARD . ABBOTT = The Mercers' Arms. 

i?. IN . BATH . MERCER = R . A. i 

8. 0. BENiAMiN . BABER = The Drapers* Arms. 

JP. IN . BATH = B . E . B. i 

8*. A variety is dated on reverse 1669. 

9. 0, GEORGE . BAKER . Y» = The Clothworkcrs' Arms. 

i?. IN . BATH . 1669 = . E . B. J 

10. 0, RICHARD . BiGGES = The Mercers' Arms. 

/^. MERCER . IN . BATH « R . H . B. J 

11. 0, lAMES . BVRT0M=The Mercers' Arms. 

J?. IN . BATH = I . B. • i 

12. O. lOHN . BVSH . MERCER = The Merccrs* Arms. 

J^. IN . BATH . 1656 = 1 . A . B. J 

13. O. HENERY . CHAPMAN = The sun in splendour. 

-^. QVONDAM . ESQVIRE = H . C. . i 

14. Another with the name spelt henry, and esq''. i 
In Warner's " History of Bath " this token is engraved, with others of that 



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972 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

15. O, WALTER . CHAPMAN = The Mcrccrs' Anns. 

I^. IN . BATHE . MERCER = W . A . C. 

16. O. lOHN . CLARKE . MERCER = The Mercers' Anns. 

I^. IN . BATH . 1655 = I . A . a 

17. O, Richard \ Collins | c | r . e. 

R. A I Clothier \ in . Bathe \ 1669. 

18. O, lOHN . FISHER = Arms : three fishes in pale. 

R. IN . BATH = I . F . F. 

19. O, ROBERT . FISHER = R . E . F. 
R MERCER . IN « BATH = 1652. 

20. O, lOHN . FOORDE = The Cordwainers* Arms. 

R. IN . BATHE . 1666 = 1 , O . F. 

21. O, PRisciLLA . HECKES . AT . Y= = Three swans. 

R. 3 . SWANS . IN . BATH . 1665 = P . H. 

22. O, RICHARD . HORLER = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

R. IN . BATH . 1664= R . S . H. 

23. O. William \ Landicke | l | w . a. 

R, IN .BATH . 1 669 = Three tuns (one and two). 
Probably derived from the arms of the Company of Brewers. 

24. O. WILLIAM . MARDEN = The Weavers* Arms. 

R, OF . BATH . SILK . WEAVER = W . A . M. 

25. O, lOHN . MASTERS . AT . WHIT = A hart Standing. 

R, IN . THE . CIITY . OF . BATH = I . E . M. 

26. O, lOHN . PEARCE . MERCER = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. IN . BATHE . 1652 = 1 . I . P. 

27. Another reads merce for Mercer. 

28. O. ROBERT . PENNY = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. MERCER . IN . BATH = R . I . P. 

29. O. RICHARD . PITCHER = A hat with a feather in it 

R. IN . BATH . 1667 = R . A . P. 

30. O. FRANCIS . RANCE = A mermaid. 

R. OF . BATHE . 1659 = F . E . R. 

31. O, lOHN . REED = A mermaid. 

R, OF . BATH . 1656 = 1 . B . R. 

32. O, GEO . REVE . GOLDSMITH = The Goldsmiths' Arms. 

R. IN . BATH . 1658 = . M . R. 

33. O. THOMAS . SALMON = A clasped book. 

R, IN . BATH . 1667 = A clasped book between t . s. 



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SOMERSET. 973 

34. 0. WILLIAM . SMITH = A pair of croppers' shears. 

i?. IN . BATHE . l666 = W . I . S. J 

35. 0. lOHN . SWALLOW . Y« = A SWalloW. 

iP. IN . BATH . 1669 = I . S . S. i 

36. a EDWARD . WHITE = The Merccrs' Arms, 

J^. MERCER . IN . BATH . 1655 = E . I . W. J 



BATHEASTON. 

37. O. RICHARD . HARFORD = A mermaid. 

J^. IN . BATHESTON . 1667 = R . I . H. } 

38. O. lAMES . PEARCE . MERCER = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^, IN . BATHESTONE= I . I . P. I 

39. 0. ELDAD . WALTERS = A merchant's mark between e . w. 

i?. IN . BATH . EASTONE = E . M . W. i 



BECKINGTON. 

40. 0. IN . BEKINGTON = RICH | GILES. 

i?. IN . SVMMERSET . i666 = A merchant's mark between 
R . G. i 

41. Another dated . 66. J 

42. O. lOHN . HORLER => The Haberdashers' Arms. 

JP. IN . BECKINGTON = I . H. J 

43. O, NIC . THRING . CLOTHIER = A rose. 

I^. IN . BECKINGTON . 1658 = N . T. J 

This and the following were probably issued by the same individual — the device 
and initials being alike. 

44. (7. IN . BECKINGTON . l670 = N.. T. 

i?. GLORY . BE . VNTO . THE . KING = A rOSC. i 



BISHOPS HULL. 

45. O. WILLIAM • BARBER = W . F . B. 
A OF . HILL . BESHOPPS = W . F . B. 



BRADFORD. 

46. O. WILL . SERLE . OF . BRADFORD = W . E . S. 
i?. NEARE . TANTON=» 1659. 



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974 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



BRENT. 

47. O, SIMON . SHIPARD . OF . BRENT = Two scythes CTOSSed. 
^. HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1669 = A roU of bread (?) 



BRIDGWATER, 

48. O, A. BRIDGWATER . FARTHING = 1 666. 

^. THE . ARMES . OF . BRIDGWATER = A castlc on a bridge of 
five arches. la^ff^ i 

49. A variety of the above, from different dies, having flags on the 

outer towers of the castle. 

50. O. BRiDG I WATER (in two Hnes across the field). 

li. {No legend.) A castle on a bridge of six arches (much 
smaller than the last). i 

51. O. ALEXANDER . ATKINS = A . A . A. 

J^, IN . BRIDGWATER = 1 654. \ 

52. O. ALEXAND . ATK1N^ = A . A . A. 

/^, OF . bridgewate'^=i656. i 

53. O. lOHN , BONE . OF = A hand holding a woolcpmb. 

i?. BRIDGEWATER . l666 = I. B. J 

54. O, lOHN . CRAPP=l659. 

J^, OF . BRIDGEWATER = I . I . C i 

55. O. WILLIAM . CRAPP= 1670. 

/i, IN . BRIDGWATER = W . M . C. large J 

56. O. ED . DAWES . BRASIER= 1657. 

J^, IN . BRIDGWATER = E . A . D. J 

57. O, lOSEPH . FRANKLIN. IVN* = A WOOlcomb. 

I^. IN . BRIDGWATER . l666 = I . F. \ 

58. O, WILLIAM . GOODRIDGE = W , I . G. 

I^, OF . BRIDGWATER . 1669 = A ship. lofge \ 

\ 59. O, ROBERT . HAViLAND = A merchant's mark. 

I^, IN . BRIDG . WATER = R . L . H. J 

60. A variety of the above is dated 1652 on reverse. { 

61. O, lOHN . HVNT . IN = I . S . H. 

J^. BRIDG . WATER =165 1. J 

62. O. JOHN . LINTON = The Salters' Arms. 

A IN . BRIDGWATBR = I . E . L. J 



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SOMERSET, 975 

63. O, lOHN . LINTON . OF = The Saltcfs' Arms. 

J^. BRIDGWATER . 1656 = 1 . E . L. 

64. Another, dated 1658, 

65. Another, dated 1659. 

66. 0, WILL . PAGE . OF . BRIDGWATER = 1 669. 
Ji. IN SVMMERSET . SHEIRE = W . E . P. /af^e 

67. O. lOHN . PALMER . 1664 = The Drapers' Arms. 

jR. IN . BRIDGWATER = I . A . P. 

68. 0, EDMOND . PETTITT = E . I . P. 
I^. OF . BRIDGEWATER=l654. 

69. 0. CHRISTOPHER . ROBERTS -A COVercd CUp 
I^, IN . BRIDGWATER . 1664 = . F . R. 

7a 0, lOHN . ROGERS . AGAINST . THE«=Arms : a sword ereci 
between a pair of wings conjoined erect 

i?. HIGH . CROSS . IN . BRIDGWATER = I . T . R. | 1 669. /argf 

71. 0, lAMES . SAFFORDE = I . E . S. 
jR. IN . BRIDG . WATER . 1652 = I . E . S. 

72. 0. WILLIAM . SEALY = W . S. 
^. OF . BRIDG . WATER =1652. 

73. Another reads bridgewater, and is dated 1654. 

74. 0. WILLIAM . SERLLAND = W . S. 
JL OF. BRIDGEWATER =1654. 

BRUTON. 

75. O, NECESSARY . CHAiNGE . FOR = B and a tun, 1669 under. 

Ji. THE . TOWNE . OF . BREWTON = An embattled bridge of five 
arches. /ar;g€ ' 

76. O. lAMES . BRAYNE=l659. 
-^. OF . BRVTON = I . E . B. 

77. O. ROBERT LVDWELL = The Groccrs' Arms. 

i?. MERCER . IN . BREWTON = R . L. COnjoined. 

CANNINGTON. 

78. O, EDWARD . coALES = A double-headed eagle displayed. 
J^. IN . CANiNGTON = E . M . c. conjoined. 

CAREY LAND. 

79. 0. WILLIAM . IRELAND = The lamb and flag. 

If. IN . CAREY . LAND . l66o = W .K.I. 

This token has been assigned by numismatists to Somerset, on account of the 

«nularity of the name to Castle Gary. The name ** Carey Land," however, seems 



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976 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

to be unknown at the present time in the neighbourhood of that town. ^ As many 
tokens show some whim or fancy of the issuer, may we venture to surmise that the 
issuer of the above token, aiming at a wider field than either Castle Gary or 
Babcary, included the country adjoining, watered by the small river which rises at 
Castle Cary, and which, in the first ten or twelve miles of its course, gives the 
name of " Cary " to many places on its banks? " Cary Land *' would, therefore, 
be a very natural designation for such a district. We have numerous instances of 
the affix " land " applied to farms, districts, and even countries ; while " Taunton 
Deane " furnishes us with two tokens referring to the district around, and not to 
the town itself. In a " Roll of the Tenths and Fifteenths of all the Hundreds in 
the County of Somerset," probably of the time of Henry VIII., appears the woid 
<* Castelcarilond, ix"." 

CASTLE CARY. 

80. O, EDWARD . RVSE=l666. 

^. IN . CASTELL . CARY = E . M . R. i 

81. A variety reads rvsse. 

CHARD. 

82. O, THE BVRROVGH . OF . CHARD . MADE = A plant betWCCn tWO 

birds. (Same as Borough seal.) 

R, BY . Y" . PORTRIFF . FOR . Y= POORE = C . B. | 1 669. 

large ' 

83. O, A . CHARD . FARTHINGE=l67I. 
^. IN . SVMERSET . SHBIR = I . H. 

84. O. HVMPHRY . ABLE . IN . CHARD = H . M . A. 

J^, A . BRASSE . HALFE . PENNY = Arms : a chevTon party per 

chevron counter changed and or, between three 

garbs. 

S5. O, GEORGE . BARTLY = A roll of bread. 

I^, IN . CHARD = G . A . R 

86. O, WILLIAM . ByRRiDG = A pair of scissors. 

/^. IN . CHARD . 1665 = W . A . B. 

87. O, JOHN . CHAPMAN . FO^ = Three cloves. 
/^, NECESSARY . CHANG = Three cloves. 

Although no town is mentioned, this token and the following one have been 
assigned to Chard, as many of them have been found there, and it also appears 
that a John Chapman was Mayor of Chard in 1657. 

88. O. JOHN , CHAPMAN = Dcvice not ascertained. 
J^. HALF . PENNY = Pair of scales. 

89. O. p . I . OF . CHARD = A rose crowned. 

J^. RECEIVE . THE . CROWN = IN | EVERY | TOWN. 

go. O, lOHN . LEGG = A pair of shears. 

J^, IN . CHARD . 1660 = 1 . A . L. 

91. O, ROGER . LOCK . IN = Three cloves. 

-^. CHARD . SOMERSET = R . A , U 



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SOMERSET. 977 

92. O. ABRAHAM . MASON . IN = An Open book. 

J^. CHARD . BOOKSELLER = A . E . M. \ 

93. O. HENRY . MILLS . l668 = A PcgOSUS. 

I^. IN . CHARD . SADLER= H . H . M. i 

94. O, WILLIAM . SAYER = A WOOlpack. 

-^. IN . CHARD = W . S . S. i 

95. A variety of the above is dated on reverse 1660. J 

96. O. HENRY . SELDRED . IN = A WOOlcomb. 

A*. CHARDE . SVMERSETT = H . I . S. J 

97. O. ROBERT . SWEET = The Merccrs' Arms. 

-^, OF . CHARD . 1667 =R . S . S. i 

98. O. lOHN . WAY= A hat with feather. 

J^. IN . CHARD= I . W. J 

99. O, PETER . WAY = A full-blown rose on a stalk. 

R, IN . CHARD = P . S . W. J 

100. O. THOMAS . WILLIAMS = St. George and the Dragon. 

^. IN . CHARD . l656 = T . M . W. J 



CHEDDAR. 
Id. O, lOHN . GARDNER = A man making candles. 

I^. OF . CHEDDER . 1652 = 1.1.0. 



CHEDDON. 
102. O. GEORGE . woRRALL . 0F = A crown | 1 666. 

I^. CHEDDON . NEAR . TAVNTON = G . K . W. 



CREECH. 

103. O. ROBERT . BOBBETT = A Spade. 
J^. IN . CREECH . 60 = R . B. 



CREWKERNE. 

104. O. ANNE . ADKiNS = Three cloves. 

^. FOR . NECESARY . CHAN^ = Three cloves. i 

This token has frequently been found at Crewkerae. 

105. O. WILLIAM . BENNET = A lion rampant. 

J^. OF . CROOKHORNE . l666 = W . B. J 



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978 TRADERS' TOKENS OE THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1 06. O, ROGER . BREWER . 0F = A llon rampant 

^. CROOKEHORNE . l663 = R . R . B. 

107. O. EDWARD . cossENES = The Haberdashers' Arms. 
I^. OF . CREwcovRNE . 1670 = A floral knot between £ . c. 

108. O, WILL . cosENS = A bird on the top of a pair of scales 

below a skull, w . c 

I^. OF . CROOKHORNE = W. M . C. 

109. O. lOHN . GRENWAY = Arms : ermine, on a canton a cres- 

cent. 

Ji. OF . CREWKERNE = 1.1.0. 

no. O, lOHN . lAMEs . 1666 = A mortar and pestle. 

I^. IN . CREWKERNE = I . T . I. 

III. O. lOHN . SHIRE = A mortar and pestle. 

R. IN . CROOKHORNE . l666 = I . A . S. 



CROSCOMBE. 

112. O. GEORGE . BLINDMAN . OF = G . B. 

I^, CROSCOMBE . IN . SOMERS^ = G . B. | 1 668. 

TI3. O. GEORGE . BLINMAN = G . B. 

J^. IN . CROSCOMB . 1656 = . B. 

114. O, lAMES . cvTTiNG . OF = The Weavers* Arms. 

Ji. CROSCOMB . IN . SOM* = I . I . C 

115. O. lAMES . GEORGE. iN = St. George and the Dragon. 

J^ CRASCOMBE . l666 = I . I . G. 

ri6. O. ONESiPHORVs . LVFFE = A rose crowned. 

^. IN CRASCOMBE . 1 666 = . L. 

117. O, ANTHONY . PLiMTON = A talbot With chain. 

I^. IN . CROSCOMB . 1656 = A . P. 



CROWCOMBE. 

118. O, CROCOMB . IN . SOMERSET = F . H. 

^. {No legend.) Arms : an eagle displayed. 



DOULTING. 
1 19. O. THOMAS . HODGES = A hammer and pincers, crossed. 

^. OF . DAVLTING . 1665 =T . A . H. 



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SOMERSET. 979 



DULVERTON. 

1 20. O. NICH . CRAS£ . OF . DELVERTON = HIS | HALF | PENY. 

^. MERCER . IN . SVMMERS£TSHIR = N . C. | 1669. ^ 

121. O. THOMAS . HEARNE = A pair of scales. 

-^, IN . DELVERTON . 1664 = T . H. \ 

EAST COKER. 

122. O. lOHN . GYLES = A dog pursuing a hare. 

I^, OF . EAST . COKER« 1 . G, i 



EVERCREECH. 
123. O. ROBERT . HAYES . HOSIER = A Stocking. 

^. IN . EVERCRICH . SVMERSET = R . H. 



FRESHFORD. 

124. O. lOHN . CVRLE . SENIOR = A bell. 

^. IN . FRESHFORD . 1663 = 1 . I . C. J 

125. O. lOHN . CVRLE . iVNiOR = Anns: a chevron or, between 

three fleurs-de-lys. 

^. IN . FRESHFORD . l666 = I . C J 

126. O. PEETER . FISHER . 1669 = A Hon rampant 

i?. OF . FRESHFORD = P . F. J 

This is daimed for Kilkenny, but is retained here, as Freshford is near Bath, 
where the name Fisher occurs on two tokens ; whereas throughout the whole of 
IreUnd the name does not once occur. 

FROME. 

127. O, IN . THE . COVNTY = A | FROOMB. 

^. OF SOMERSET . l670 = FARTH | INGE. large J 

127* A variety reads froome. 

128. O. RICHARD . BVRLTON=:The Haberdashers' Arms. 

jR. IN . FROOME=R . B. J 

129. O. HENRY . MARCHANT = H . M. 

-^. OF . FROOME = 1654. I 

13a Another, dated 1661. J 

131. Another, dated 1664. ^ 

132. O. WILL . PAINE . MERCER = The Merccrs' Arms. 

I^, IN . FROOME . 1669 = W. P. J 



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98o TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

133. O. lOHN . SANDERS . OF . FROVME = A Stocking. 

/^, IN . SVMERSET . SHEIRE . 167I = A | FARTH | INa large 

134. O. THOMAS . TVRNER . 0F = A merchant's mark. 

^. FROOME . IN . SVMERSETS'^ = T . M . T. 

135. O. ROBART . wHiTCHVRCH = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . FROOME . 165I = R . W. 

136. A variety reads frwmbl 

137. O. SAMVEL . wHiTCHVRCH = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. IN . FROOME = S . W. 

138. O. WILLIAM . wHiTCHVRCH = The Grocers' Arms. 
li, IN . FROOME . 165 1 = Monogram, ww. 



GLASTONBURY. 

139. O. William \ Allwoode \ Senior, {Script) 
R. IN . GLASTONBVRY = A Stocking between w . a. 

140. O, WILLIAM . TRICKY . BISHOP = A full-faced bust of a bishop, 

mitred 

R. IN . GLASTONBVRY= 1656 | W . T. 

141. O, GEORGE . GARY . OF = A Stocking. 

R, GLASTCN . HOSIER . 68 = G . A . C. 

142. O. WILLIAM . COOPER = HIS | HALF | PENY. 

R, IN GLOSTONBVRY . i666 = The front of a house. 

143. O, WILLIAM . COOPER = G within an ornamental knot 

R, IN . GLOSTONBVRY . 1 668 = The front of a house, lar^ 

144. O, MARY . DAY . IN = The Royal Arms. 

R, GLASTON . 1668 = M . D. 

145. O, THOMAS . DENHAM . AT . Y"=^ A CrOWn. 
R. IN . GLASTON . l666 = T . D. 

146. O, RICHARD . EDWELL . 0F = A shlp. 
R. GLASTONBVRY . l668 = R . A . E. 

147. C?. HENRY . GVTCH . MERCER = The Glastonbury Thorn. 

R, IN . GLASTONBVRY . l666 = H . A . G. 

148. Another, dated 1653. 

The device on this token is no doubt intended for the '* Glastonbury Thorn." 
The traditional story, that St. Joseph of Arimathea stuck his Making-staff into 
the ground on Wearyall Hill, that it took root^ and ever after budded and bloomed 
on Christmas Day, is still cherished in the neighbourhood. A local ballad says : 
" The staff het budded and het grew. 
And at Christmas bloom'd the whole da droo ; 
And still het blooms at Christmas bright, 
But best tha say at dork midnight.*' 



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SOMERSET. 981 

The original Glastonbury Thorn had two trunks, one of which was cut down in 
be time of Elizabeth by a Puritan, and the other remained till the Civil War, 
vben some fanatic destroyed it. 

In Dugdale's ** Monasticon ** is a view of Glastonbury, taken from Compton 
Hill, about three miles to the south, showing a tree growing on Wearvall rlill, 
aarked as *• Sacra spina." An offshoot grew in the grounds of the Abbey, and 
the Thorn has of late years been pretty freely propagated in the neighbourhood. 
A stooe let into the ground on Wearyall Hill marks the spot where the original 
^reegrcw. 

In all probability Henry Gutch witnessed the destruction of the Sacred Thorn, 
as it appears to have been cut down not many years tiefore the date on his token ; 
and he very naturally adopted it as his sign. Tlie Blossoms was a favourite sign for 
inns ; referring, it appears, to the blossoms of the Holy Thorn of Glastonbury. 

See a paper on " The Holy Thorn of Glastonbury," by Mr. E. Chisholm- 
Batten, in voL xxvl, p. 117, of the Proceedings of the Somerset Archseological 
Society. 

149. O. siDRiCKE . hanccx:ke = Twenty dots for checkers. 

I^. IN GLASSENBVRY = S . M . H. i 

15a O, lAMics . HOPKINS . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. GLASTONBVRY . 1656 = 1 . H. J 

151. Another, dated 1666. \ 

152. O. NICHOLAS . HOPKINS = N . H. 

i?. OF . GLASTONBVRY . DRA* = N . H. i 

C53. O, HENRY . MABSON . 1 666 = A Stocking. 

J^. OF . GLASTON . HOSIER = H . M . M. \ 

154. 0. THOMAS . ROODE . 0F = A hart lodged. 

i?. GLASTONBVRY . l668 = T . F . R. J 

155. 0. CHRISTOPHER . svMMER = A Stocking. 

J^, HOSIER . IN . GLASTON = C . S. J 

156. O. PETER . WEST . OF = A hand. 

/^. GLASTONBVRY . DRAPER = P . M . W. J 

Vide p. 995 for another token. 

HENSTRIDGE. 

157. 0, RICH . HVSON . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

Ji. HENSTRIDG . MERCER = R . M . H. I 

HOLTON. 

158. O. WILLIAM . I ARM AN . OF = A mermaid. 

^. HOLTON . HIS . FARTHING = W . D . L i 



ILCHESTER. 

159. 0, THE . ARMES . OF . fVELCHESTE* = A blazing Star within a 
crescent 

-^. BY . Y« . BAYUFF . OF . Y« . BVRROV = G . R J 

VOL. IL 63 






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982 TRADERS* TOKENS OP THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

1 60. O, lOHN . LOCKIER . OF = 1657. 

I^. IVELCHESTER . MERCER = I . L. \ 

161. O. lOHN . LOCKYER = A Star and crescent 

li. OF . ILCHESTER . 1658-I . M . L. { 

162. O. SAMVELL . SCOT = Three cloves. 

^. OF . EVELL . CESTOR = S . D . S | 1668. i 

163. O, GEORGE . SMITH . 1 668= The Mercers* Arms. 

^. OF . IVELCHESTER = G . S. J 



ILMINSTER. 

164. O. A. iLLMisTER . FARi)iNG = Two swords crossed between 

T . p. 
J^. A . ILLMISTER . FARDiNG = A Stocking between t . s. 

large \ 

165. O, THOMAS . CARTER = A pair of shears. 

J^, OF . ILM1STER = T . M . C. J 

166. O, WILLIAM . CROSSE = A hart trippant. 

Jd, IN . ILMISTER=:W . C. \ 

167. O, WILLIAM . CROSSE = W . I . C. 

J^, IN . ILMNSTER=l6 . 58. J 

168. O, ROBERT . HOR WOOD = A pair of scales. 

Jd. IN . ILMISTER . CHANDLE*=R . M . H. J 

169. A variety reads itmister. i 

170. O, ALICE . ROW . OF = A . R. 

/^. iLEMESTER . 1 664= St George and the Dragon. \ 

171. O. ABRAHAM . RICE = A . R. 

I^. IN . 1LEM1STER=I668. i 

172. O. NATHANIEL . WEBB . OF . ILMISTER = Arms : on a fesse, two 

bezants between four others (three and one). 

J^. HIS . BRASSE . HALFE . PENNY = N . H . W | ^. i 



KILMERSDON. 

173. O, WILLIAM . FOSTER . OF = Arms of Foster ; a chevron be- 
tween three bugle horns. 

R, KILMERSDON . IN . SOMER>=SET [ SHIRE | 1669. \ 



KILVE. 

174. O. CHARLLS . MICHELL = C. M. 

J^, IN . KILVE . 1670 = M . E. large J 



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SOMERSET. 983 



LANGPORT. 

175. O. A . LANGPORT . FARTHING = L . £ | 1667. 

A MADE . BY . THE . PORTREEVE = A portcullis between 
I . M. large \ 

**!.£** stands for Laogport Eastover ; and the letters *' i . m " are the initials 
of J(dm Michell, the then Portreeve. 

176. O. lOHN . BVSH=l667. 

J?. OF . LANGPORT = I . M . B. ^ 

177. O, lOHN . WEECH = The Haberdashers' Anns. 

Ji, IN LAMPORT = I . W. I 



LULLINGTON. 

178. 0. lAMES . BRADFORD . OF = i . B and a merchant's mark, 

composed of the issuer's initials and some extra 
strokes. 

J^. LVLLINTON . C . SOMERSET = I . M . B. \ 

LYDEARD ST. LAWRENCE. 

179. 0, lOHN . DAW . OF = The Mercers* Arms. 

I^. LAWRANCE. LYDIARD=l67I. J 

MARTOCK. 

l8a 0. HVMPHRY . ELLIOTT = 1664. 

^. OF . MARTOCK = H . E. i 



MELLS. 

181. 0. WILLIAM . CORNISH . OF = The Salters' Arms. 

Ji, MELLS . MERCER . 1651 = W . C J 

182. 0, lOHN . GviNG . IN = A coclc, and a hand under it. 

^. MELLS . IN . svMERSET = Ahand between i . g. J 

183. 0. EDWARD . OBORNE = A heart. 

^. OF . MELLS . 1667 = E . O. j 

MILBORNE PORT. 

A token in existence, of which the full description is not known, 
reads: 

184. 0. ROBERT . PLUCKNETT . 0F = 
^. MILBORNE . PORT = 

63—2 



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984 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



MILVERTON. 

185. O. GILES . KING = A pair of croppers* shears. 

J^. OF . MILVERTON = A clothmaker's teazle brush. 

186. O. lOHN . NEWTON . OF = A mortar and pestle. 

^, MILVERTON . MERCER = I .M.N. 



MINEHEAD. 

187. O. THE . POORES . FARTHiNGE = A ship in fiiU Sail. 

^. OF . MYNEHEADE . l668 = A WOOlpack. 

188. O, lOHN . BERRY . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

i?. MINEHEAD . 1651 =1 . A . B. 

189. O. RICHARD . CROCKFORD = A sWp with tWO tlcfS of gUnS. 
J^. IN . MYNEHEAD = R . E . C 

190. O. SAM VEL . CROCKFORD = A pair of scales. 
^. OF . MINEHEAD . 1654 = A pair of scales. 

191. O. lOHN . STREETE = An axe. 

^. OF . MINEHEAD . l666 = I .M.S. 

192. O. ROBERT . VGDEN . AT . Y* = A double-headed hammer. 

^. IN . MINEHEAD . l666sR . M . V. 

193. O. ROBERT . VGDEN = A double-headcd hammer. 

^. OF . MINEHEAD = R . M . V. 



MONTACUTE. 

194. O. lANE . BLATCHFORD = A mortar and two pestles. 
^. OF . MOVNTOGEW = I . H . B conjoined. 

195. O. lOHN . CLOTHER . OF = A unicom (?). 

^. MOVNTAGEW . 1655 = I . M . C. 

196. O. lOHN . CLOTHIER = A harp. 

J^, OF . MOVNTAGEW = I . D . C. 



NETHER S TOWEY. 

197. O. lOHN . HOOPPER = A mortar and two pestles. 

^. OF . NETHERSTOY = I . G . H. 

198. O. WILLIAM. PATEY = A fleur-de-lys. 

^. OF . NETHERSTOY = W . A . P. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



SOMERSET. 985 



NORTH PETHERTON. 

199. O. THO . HOOPER . AT . l668 = T . M . H. 

J^. NORTH . PETHERTON = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

200. O. EDMVND . iEFERis»A mail making candles. 

J?. IN . NORTH . PETHERTON = E . M . I. 

201. 0. THO . LOVEDER . OF==T . A . L | 1657. 
J?. NORTH . PETHERTON = T . A . L. 



NUNNEY. 

202. 0. GEORGE . ASHE = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. OF . NVNNEY . 1652 = . A. 

PETHERTON. 

203. 0. WILL . CHAPPEL . OF . PETH = A WOOlcomb. 
/^. ERTON . IN . SOMERSETT = W . I . C 

ROAD. 

204. 0. DAVID . IEFRES = A barrel. 

i?. IN . ROAD . l664 = D . I. 

205. O. RICHARD . i-vcKER = A hat with feather. 
Ji. OF . ROAD . 1670 = A wreath. 

206. 0, WILLIAM . WHITCHVRCH = A WOOlpack. 
J^. IN . ROAD . 1668 = W . S . W. 



SHEPTON MALLET. 

207. 0, RICHARD . BARNARD = R . M . a 

J^. OF . SHEPTON . MALLETT = R . M . R 

208. 0. WILL . BROWNE . HOSIER = A merchant's mark. 

/^, IN . SHIPTON . MALLETT = W . B. 

209. 0. lOHN . BYRTT . iN = A merchant's mark. 

J^, SHIPTON . MALLETT = I . M . B | 1 665. 

210. 0. WILLIAM . IAMES»W . I . L 

J^. IN . SHIPTON . MALLET = W . I . I | 1667. 

211. O. THO . PARFiT . CHANDLER = A man making candles. 

^. OF . SHIPTON . MALLET- 1652. 

212. 0, THOMAS . WESTLY=»T . E . W. 
^. OF . SHEPEN . MALLET=l664. 



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986 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



SOMERTON. 

213. O, lEROM . CHVRCHEY=A church. 

i?. IN . SOMERTON . 165201 . M . C. } 

214. O. THOMAS. HARBIN=l658. 

i?. IN . SOMERTON = T . A . H. } 

215. O. lAMES . PATEY . 63 = A nag's head. 

i?. IN . SOMMERTON=J . S . P. , } 

SOUTH CADBURY. 

216. O, SAMVELL . WILLS = The King's head crowned. 

^. OF . SOVTH . CADBVRY = S . I . W | 1666. J 

SOUTH PETHERTON. 

217. O, EDMOND . ANSTiE . i668=A crcscent moon. 

J^, OF . SOVTH . PETHERTON -E . A . A. \ 

218. O, lOHN . WILLY . IN -Three sugar-loaves. 

J^. SOVTH . PETHERTON = I . D . W. { 

219. O. WILLIAM . wiNTAR . iN-Arms : quarterly — i, a hand 

erect ; 2, two animals like pigs ; 3, a curved implement ; 
4, three pellets (two and one) — ^a coat which the issuer 
probably himself invented. 

I^, SOVTH . PETHARTON-W . E . W. 

The above is very similar to a device sometimes used by brash-makers. The 
curved implement, something like a flattened horse-shoe, is probably intended for 
the "bit-stock " used for boring holes in wood ; while the pig and three pellets 
or bundles have reference to the bristles used for brashes. These arms are still 
borae by an Essex family, but they now read : quarterly — i, the Ulster hand ; 2, 
two Lions passant ; 3, a crescent moon ; 4, three besants — and form quite an 
aristocratic coat, of which we see the origen above ! 

SPAXTON. 

220. O, lOHN . CHICK . IN . svM-The Clothworkers' Arms. 

jR, MERSET . SPACKSTON = I . E . C. J 

See the Fuller's Panel in Spaxton Church, ** Proc. S. A. N. H. S.," vol viii. 
p. 8. 

STAPI.EGROVE. 

221. O. lOHN . VICKRY . 1664-HIS I HALFE | PENNY. 

J^. IN . STAPLE . GROVE -A WOOlcomb. J 

222. Another, similar, with the woolcomb more correctly drawn. ^ 

STOGURSEY. 

223. O. THOMAS . ECLESTONE = T . E . E. 

i?. OF . STOGVRSY . 1 665 = A tailor's pressing iron (?) J 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SOMERSET. 987 

224. 0, WILLIAM . EXON . OF = A pair of scissors. 

J^. STOGVSSEY . l664 = W . M . E. J 

225. O. RICH . wiCKHAM = An axc. 

J^. OF . STOGVRSAY = R . G . W. J 

TAUNTON. 

226. O. TAVNTON = A castle with a drawbridge (?) 

-^. (No legend,) A tun, filling the field. large \ 

O, A . TAVNTON . FARTHING = Rcbus : a T and a tun. 
R, BY . THE . CONSTABLES . 1677 = A castle. large \ 

There are four distinct varieties of this token : 

227. a. Over the T a small quatrefoil or rose between two dots. 

228. b. „ „ three dots. 

229. c, „ „ two dots. 

230. d, „ „ no dots. 

231. Another, octagonal, and thicker. 

Among the hundred and more English town-pieces struck for the various 
officials, this is the only instance of one being issued " By the Constables ;" and 
the tokens appear to have had a very wide circulation, having been found at the 
eastern part of the county, and far into Devonshire. 

232. O. THOMAS . ANDREWS = A WOOlpack. 
R. IN . TAVNTON =T . I . A. 

233. O. THOMAS . ANDROSSE = A WOOlpack. 
R, OF . TAWNTON . l666 = HIS — HALFE | PENNY. 

234. O, THOMAS . ASH . 1664 = Three trees. 

J?. OF . TAVNTON = T . L . A. 

235. O. lOHN . BARTON = Rose and Crown. 

R, OF . TAVNTON . l666 = I . M . B. 

236. O, SAMVE . BiNDEN . IN = A pair of scales. 

R, TAVNTON . S0MMERSET = S . S . B. 

The name of Samuel Bindon occurs as one of the capital burgesses under the 
charter of incorporation granted to Taunton by Charles II. in 1677. 

237. O, lOHN . BOBBETT . IN = A madder-bag, corded. 

R. TAVNTON . CARVER = I . A . B. 

238. Another, reading carrier. 

239. O. THOMAS . carpenter = A soldier. 

R, OF . TAVNTON = T . A . C 

24a O. wiLUAM . CHACE = A unicom, to the right. 

R, IN . TANTON . 1662 = W .E.G. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



988 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

241. O, WILLIAM . CHACE» A unicorn, to the left 

^. IN . TANTON = W . E . C 

242. O. CHRISTOPHER . COOKE = A bunch of grapes. 

J^. IN . TANTON . 1667 =C . R . C 

243. O, WILLIAM . CORICKE = A shuttle. 
J^. IN . TAVNTON . 1655 = W • I • C. 

244. Another, dated 1657. 

245. O. lOHN . CORNISH = A unicom. 

Ji. IN . TAVNTON . 1655 = I . D . C. 

246. O. ABRAHAM . CROCKER . OF . TAVNTON = The WeaVCTS* 

Arms. 

i?. FOR . NESSESARY . CHANGE . l666 = A . P . C | J. large 
The above is in copper, having a mullet on each side of the J. 

247. Another in brass, without the mullets, and thinner. 

248. O. EDWARD . DAWLEY = A WOOlCOmb. 
Ji, IN . TANTON . IAMES = E . T . D. 




249. O. HENRY . DVNSCOMBE = A hand holding a "card." 

i?. IN . TANTON . 1654 = H . A . D. { 

The implement here represented is no doubt the ** card,** formerly used foe 
bringing wool into a condition fit for the spinner, called '* carding." It has long 
been superseded by machinery. The word is in all probabihty derived from 
" carduus," a thistle or teazle, which was probably the first natural implement 
used for the above purpose ; the teazle is still used in the finishing process of doth 
making. 

250. O. ROGER . GALE . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. TAVNTON . 1652 = R . E . G. i 

Roger Gale was the first Mayor under the second Corjwration charter, and is 
described as a merchant. He belonged to a good family, whose descendants 
resided at Obridge, Heydon, and Bishops Hull. Henry Gale, who died at Tauntoo 
in 1742, and possessed a good property in Taunton Deane, was an antiquarian, 
being not distantly related to the celebrated Gales, of Scruton, Yorkshire. 

251. O. MATTHEW . GAYLARD = A hand holding a woolcomb, 

between i 666. 

J^, OF . TAVNTON . l666 = M . A . G. { 

252. O. lOHN . CLYDE = Seven stars. 

/^. OF . TAVNTON = I . M . G. J 

253. O, HUGH . GRAVE = A WOOlpack. 

i?. OF . TAVNTON . l666-=H . A . G. i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SOMERSET. 989 

254. O. ROBART . GRAY = A CaldrOD. 

i?. IN . TAVNTON . l659 = R . K . G. i 

255. O, ROBERT . GRAY = A woman making candles. 

I^, IN . TAVNTON = R . K . G. i 

256. O, ANDREW . GREGGORY = A globc. 

H. IN . TAVNTON . 1655 = A • M . G. i 

257. O. lEFFERY . GROVE . IN = The Clothworkers' Arms. 

J^. TANTON . DEANE . 1664 = 1 . R . G. ^ 

258. O, MARTIN. HOSSHAM = A Catherine-wheel. 

iP. IN . TAVNTON . 1655 = M . I . H. \ 

A tablet in the Church of St Mary Magdalene, Taunton, records : 
"John Hossham son of Martin Hossham of this town : he was buried Tune 21st, 
1670.*' 

A "Thomas" Hossham was one of the capital burgesses in the Corporation of 
1677. 

259. O. ROGER . HOW . OF = R . C . H. 

J^, TAVNTVN . 1653 = R . C . H. J 

A Roger Howe was one of the inferior burgesses in the Corporation of 1677. 

260. O. THOMAS . LOVDELL = A COck. 

i?. IN . TANTON . MERCER = T . L. \ 

261. A variety reads iovdell. { 

262. O, THOMAS . lowdell . of = A cock. 

^. TANTON . mercer . 1658 = T . I . L. i 

263. O. ioseph . MABER = The Clothworkers' Arms. 

i?. IN . TAVNTON . 1664 = 1 . M . M. J 

Some of Joseph Mabers* tokens are of brass, and others of white metaL 

264. O. lOHN . MEREDITH . l666 = FOR | NECES | SARY | CHENG. 

^. A castle, with tanton below. \ 

265. O, lOHN . MERiDETH . MERCER = The Mercers* Arms. 

I^. IN . TAWNTON = I . A . M. » J 

^ The name of John Meredith occurs as one of the two Aldermen in the Corpora- 
tion of 1677. 

A tablet in the Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Taunton, after recording the 
\nnah of several daughters " of John Meredith, Taunton, mercer," states : 

"Also the above-said John Meredith, who departed nth October, in the 
Jtu of our Lord God, 1667. Also Agnes, widow of the above John Meredith, 
^H»o draarted this life Dec. 3rd, 1701, aged 79 years." 

It wdl be observed that the initials on the token correspond with the names of 
4e above John and Agnes Meredith. 

John Itoedith, by his will dated in September, i6rr, gave to the poor of the 
puish of Taunton St. Mary Magdalene the sum of £400 to be laid out in the 
pvchase of some lands of that vsdue, the yearly produce of which should be taken 
Of the Constables of the borough, for the time bein^, and by them, between 
Micfaadmas and St. Thomas's Day, yearly, laid out in cloth and making garments 
*» the poor. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



990 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

266. O. ROBERT . MIDLETONbA CTOWa 

J^. IN . TANTON . MAGDALEN = R . E . M . \ 

267. O. MATHEW . MVNDAY = A WOOlCOmb. 

H. IN . TAVNTON = M . W . M. \ 

In the parish register of Taunton St. James the following entry appears under 
marriages in the year 1649 : 

** I2th Augt. Mathew Monday and Welthin [Welthian] Metlebury [Mattle- 
bury]." 

It will be seen by referring to the same register that marriages in this parish 
during the Commonwealth usually took place in the presence of either Mathew 
Munday or William Bidgood, two of the Aldermen of the borough of Taunton. 

A Mathew Monday was one of the inferior burgesses in the Corporation of 
1677. It will be seen that the initials on the token correspond with the names of 
the parties married on August 12, 1649, as given above. 




268. O, THOMAS . MVNDEN = Rebus : a T and a tun. 

J^. IN . TAVNTON = T . E . M. 

269. O. TOBIAS . OSBORNE = A fountain. 

jR. IN TAVNTON . l666 = T . S. O. 

270. O. PETER . PARRY . 0F = A hart sejant 

jR, TANTON . CLOTHWORK = P . P. | 1 654. 

271. O, THO . PEARCE . AT . v= . WHITE = A Uou rampant 

-/?. LYON . IN . TAVNTON . l664 = T . E . P. 

The White Lion Inn stood in East Street, and the site b still caUed " White Lion 
Court." 

272. O, ANDREW . pirrs . IN . TANTON = A ToU of tobacco. 

^. IN . SOMERSETSHIRE . l652 = A . A . P. 

273. Another reads somrset . shir. 

274. O. lAMES . PITTS . 1661= A pair of shears. 

J^, IN . TANNTON = I . A . P. 

275. O. lAMES . PITTS . 63 = A pair of shears. 

Ji. IN . TANNTON = I . A . P. 

276. O. lOHN powEL . AT . THE = A lion rampant 

i?. RED . LYON . IN . TAVNTON = I . D . P. 
The name of a " Mr. George Powell " appears upon the Lay Subsidy Roll 
W-^)* 18 Charies I., A.D. 1642, under " Hundred de Taunton," as "Maior." 

277. O. lOHN . RADFORD = A hand holding a pen. 

jR, IN . TAONTON . 1653 = I . E . R. 

378. O. ANTHNEY . REYNOLDS = A bclL 
I^. IN . TAVNTON . 1652 = A . A . R. 



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SOMERSET. 991 

279. O. lOHN . SATCHELL = A CaStlc. 

I^. IN . TAVNTON . 165$ = I . M . S. 

28a O. ROBERT . SMITH = A pair of shears. 

J^. IN . TANTON . 1665 = R . E . S. 

"Bernard" and ''John" Smith are among the names in the Corporation of 
1677. 

281. a RICHARD. SNOW = A Catherine-wheel. 

i?. IN . TAVNTON . 1655 = R . F . S. 
A Richard Snow was one of the capital burgesses in the Corporation of 1677. 

282. O. lOHN . SPRAKE . IN . TANTON = A pair of scalcs. 

J^. IN . SOMERSET . SHIER = I . G . S. 

283. O, lOHN . TAMPSON = I . I . T. 
i?. IN , TAVNTON = 16 . 54. 

284. O. AT , THE . 3 . WIDDOWS = R . E . P. 
-ff. IN . TAVNTON . 1655 = R . E . P. 

A hoose in Taonton is still licensed under the title of The Three Widows. 

285. O, HENRY . TANNERY 1664. 
J^. IN . TAVNTON . DEEN = H . A . T. 

286. O. STEAPHEN . TiMEWELL = A hat and feather. 

J^. OF . TAVNTON = S . E , T. 

The name of Stephen Tymewell occurs as one of the capital burgesses in the 
Corporation of 1677. He appears to have been Mayor of Taunton in 1683, for he 
thus describes having sacked the great meeting-house called Poole, and the Baptist 
one, on the same day : *' We burnt ten cart-loads of pulpit, doors, gates, and seats, 
«pon the Market-place. We staid till three in the morning, before all were burnt. 
Wc were very merry. The bells rung all night. The Church is now full ; thank 
God for it The fanoticks dare not open their mouths." On January 21, 1684, he 
reported that, since demolishing the public meeting-house, he had taken nine 
pnvate conventicles, and made records thereof, and intended to do the like to the 
Kst as soon as he could ; so that he did not hear of any conventicles in that place. 
—Slate Paper Office, Sir L. Jenkins, 13, 14. 

287. 0. ROBERT . TOMPSON = A pair of croppers' shears. 

-^. OF . TAVNTON = R . E . T. i 




288. O. GEORGE . TREACLE . OF = An Open boolc 

-^. TAVNTON . IN . SOMMERSET = G . F . T. } 

The name of Geoi^e Treacle occurs as a bookseller on some publications of the 
Qvil War period, ^.^., •* 3Vlan*s Wrath and God's Praise ; or, a Thanksgiving 
Sermon, Preached at Taunton, in the County of Somerset, the nth of May (a Day 
to be had in everlasting remembrance), for the gratious deliverance of that poore 
Tonne from the strait si^e. By George Newton, M' of Arts, and Minister of the 
(>0ipell in that place. London : printed by M. Wilson for Francis Eglesfield, at 

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992 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

the Marigold in Paurs-churchyard, and are to be sold by George Treagie in 
Taunton. 1646." May 11 was for many years observed as a day of rejoicing at 
Taunton, and a sermon was preached " upon the day set apart for the Annuall Com- 
memoration." Several of these are extant, bearing the name of George Treade 
as the seller ; also a sermon preached at Wiveliscombe. " London : printed by 
A.M. for George Treagle at Taunton." 1652. 

The above George Treagle is the earliest known record of a bookseller carrying 
on business in Taunton. 

289. O. lOHN . TVBB=l666. 

J^. IN . TAVNTON = I . E . T. \ 

290. O, HENERY . YOVNG . AT . THE = An atlgeL 

J^, ANGEL . IN . TANTON . MERC = H . Y. \ 

WALLCOMBE 

(a HAMLET IN THE PARISH OF St. CuTHBERT, WeLLS). 

291. O. FRANCES . EXTON = F . M . E. 

jR, IN . WALKHAM = G . E I 1 666. i 



WELLINGTON. 

292. O. OVERSEERS . OF . WELLINGTON = THEIR | HALFE | PENEY. 
^. FOR . THE . BENEFIT . OF . THE = POORE | 1666. J 

293. A variety reads willington. 

294. O, GEORGE . BiCKNELL= A pair of croppers* shears. 

J^. OF . WELLINGTON = G . P . B. J 

The family of Bicknell was connected with the town of Wellington at an early 
period. Master William Biconyll, or Bicknell, priest, of Wells Cathedral, by ha 
will, dated November 3, 1448, makes bequests to the church at Wellington, to his 
brother John, the Vicar, and the poor. The surname of Bicknell is supposed to 
be derived from the parish of Bickenhall, in the county of Somerset, which was 
formerly written Bicknell and Bycknell. 

295. O. GEORGE . FOWLER . i666 = A pair of croppers* shears. 

Ji, OF . WELLINGTON = HIS | HALF | PENY. J 

296. O, THOMAS . MARSH = A pair of scales. 

J^. IN . WELLINGTON = T . M . M. J 

297. O. CRiSTOPHER . SAMFORD = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^, IN . WELLINGTON = C. A . S. ^ 

The will of Christopher Sanford, gent., who carried on the business of a grocer, 
in Wellington, was proved in the court of the Archdeacon of Taunton, some time 
in the reign of Charles II. 

298. O, NICHOLAS . TROCKE = A WOOlpack. 

J^, IN . WELLINGTON . l665 = N . T. J 

299. O, STEPHEN . WRIGHT . MERCER = A greyhound 

J^. IN . WELLINGTON . l668 = HIS | HALF | PENY. ^ 

Boyne doubts whether the whole of the above should be placed to Somersetshire, 
as Wellineton in Shropshire is a larger town ; but the croppers* shears and wool- 
pack would seem to belong to the Somerset Wellington. 



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SOMERSET. 993 



WELLS. 

300. O. ciTiE . OF . WELLS . IN . THE« Arms: a tree, in base three 

wells (two and one). 

J^. COVNTY . OF . SVMMERSET = C . W | 1657. i 

301. O. ciTTiE . OF . WELLS . IN . THE = Arms as above. 

i?. COVNTY . OF . SVMMERSET . 69 = A crown. | c . w. large \ 

302. O. WILLLVM . ANDREWS = W . A. 

/^. OF . WELLS . 1651 =W . A. J 

303. O. WILLIAM . ANDREWS = W . A. 

-ff. THE . MERCERS . ARMES = The Mercers' Arms. \ 

304. O. lOHN . DAVIDGE = I , D. 

/^. OF . WELLS . 1652 = I . D. \ 

305. O. MATHEW . IRISH = M . I. 

I^. OF . WELLS . 1656 = M . I. J 

306. O. LAMES . MIDLEHAM = I . M. 

I^. IN . WELLS . 1666 = A Stick of candles. ^ 

307. O. WILLIAM . PHELLPES = The Agnus Dei. 

li. OF . WELLS . 1668 = W . P. i 

308. O. WILLIAM . SMITH = W . S. 

J^. IN . WELLS . 1652 = W . S. i 

309. 0. TRISTRAM . TOWSE = T . T. 

Ji, OF . WELS= 1655. i 

31a 0, ROBERT . WARMALL = R . W. 

Ji. IN . WELLES . 1664 = R . W. J 

311. 0. ROBERT . WARMER = R . W. 

jR. OF . WELLS . l66o = R . W. \ 

It is singular that the third initial does not occur on any of the Wells 
tokens. Were the issuers all bachelors, or did they not believe in " women's 
rights*? 

WESTON. 

312. O, THOMAS . covLSON=The Prince of Wales's feathers. 

Ji. OF . WESTON . 1668 = T . A . C. i 

313. O, THOMAS. HANCOCK = A cock. 

Ji, IN . WESTON . 1656 = A hand; a rebus on the issuer's 
name. i 

314. 0, WILL . PAGE . OF . WESON = St. Geotge and the Dragon. 

A SVMMERSETSHEARE = W . E . P. i 



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994 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



WEST PENNARD. 

315. O. GEORGE . AMOR . OF = G . A . A. 

-/?. WEST . PENNARD . 68 = A dovc With an olive branch. 



WHITE BALL. 

316. O. lOHN . SMITH . AT . Y" . WHITE = 1666. 

^. BALE . IN . SOMERSETSHIRE = I . E . S. J 

White Ball is a hamlet in the parish of Sampford Arundell, on the borders of 
Devonshire, and a wayside inn there still bears the sign of the White BalL The 
Great Western Railway passes through the White Ball tunnel ; the turnpike road 
winds over the hill, and at its foot, on the Devonshire side, is an inn called the 
Red Ball, while in the village of Sampford Arundell is another inn, called the 
Blue Ball. 

WILTON. 

317. O. RICHARD . ANDRASSE . OF = FOUF lozengeS. 
J^, WILLTON . NEAR . TAVNTON = R . I . A. 

318. O. Another is dated on reverse = R . i . a | 1666. 



WINCANTON. 

319. O. WILLIAM . IVY . OF = Seven stars. 

J^. WINCALTON . 1659 = W .E.I. \ 

320. O. JOHN . KEVES = A squirrel. 

i?. OF . WINCANTON = I . K. \ 

321. O. BEN . LEWES . AT . v« . BLACK = A Uon rampant. 

J^. IN . WINCANTON . 1667 = B . M . L. \ 

322. O. lOHN . ROGERS . MERCER = I . R. 

^. IN . WINCVLTON= 1652. ^ 



WINSCOMBE. 

323. C?. WILLIAM . 10NES = A roll of tobacco, wound round a 

drum. 

J^, AT . WINCOMBE . l666 = W . L J 

WIVELISCOMBE. 

324. O, lOHN . MiCHELL=A heart. 

^. IN . WIVELISCOMBE = I . M . M. J 

325. O. AMOS . STOCKER«= A laureated head. 

^. WIVYUSCOMB = A . M . S. 



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SOMERSET. 



995 



YEOVIL. 

326. O. MADE . BY . THE . PORTREEVE . ^^ = 1 668. 

/^. THE . BORROVGH . OF . YEOVILL = A CTOWn I E . R. 




327. Another, from a different die, is dated 1669. J 

328. 0. CHRi^ . ALLEMBRiDG^ = A pipe and a roll of tobacco. 

jR. OF . VEAVILL . 1656 = . M . A. ^ 

329. O, JOHN . BANCKES = I . E . B. 

J^. OF . YEAVILL = I . E . B. } 

330. O. lOHN . BOONE = A hand. 

-AT. IN . YEOVELL= I . A . B. J 

331. 0, NATHANiELL . CARYE = An angel. 

/^. OF . YEAVELL . 1652 = N . A . C. J 

332. O. lOSEPH . CLARKE . AT . THE = A mermaid. 

/^. IN . YEAVELL . IN . SOMERSET = I . I . C. J 

333. O, lOHN . cosHEY . AT . THE = A pair of shears. 

i?. IN . YEAVELL . 1 667 = I . C. { 

334. O. WILLIAM . DANiELL = Three cloves. 

J^, IN . YEAVILL . 1653 =W . M . D. \ 

335. O. lOHN . HAYNE = A lion rampant. 

H. OF . YEAVELL = I . D . H. J 

336. O, PHILLIP . HAYNES = A dovc with an olive branch. 

^. IN . YEAVELL . 1655 = P . H. ^ 

337. O. GEORGE . MOORE = G . E . M. 

J^. OF . EYEAVILL = G . E . M. J 

338. O RICHARD . MOORE = A hart lodged. 

I^, OF . YEAVELL . l668 = R . D . M. J 

339. O. AMBROSE . SEWARD . iN = A cross patt^e. 

Ji. YEOVELL . IN . SOMERSET = A . A . S. i 

340. Another is without in on the obverse. i 



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996 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



DORSET AND SOMERSET. 

341. O. lOH . PITMAN . FOR . DORSET = TwO piStob CTOSSed. 

R. AND , SOMERSETSHIRE . $9 = 1 . I . P. J 

GLASTONBURY. 

The following imperfect description is sent in at the last moment 
by a correspondent : 

34a, 0. WILLIAM . GODFREY = 
jR, OLASTONBVRY . 1 668 = 



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Soutbwark 



Number of Tokens issued 501 

Number of Tokens reading SOVTHIVARKE only . no 

Number of Streets and other Places issuing Token.s 

other than above 59 

Tokens issued at three Prisons: the Clink, thk 

King's Bench, and the Marshalsea. 
Ml 



1 



TOL II. 64 

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Soutbwarft^ 

The ancient borough of Southwark, although it does not possess the 
distinction of the name of a county, deserves in our opinion the honour 
of a separate division of this work. 

In area it is nearly equal to the City of London, containing as 
it does 590 acres, while but 600 acres is the extent of the City. 

In political life it has had its own separate continuous existence, 
and its government has been separate and distinct from that of the 
City, although attached to it 

Southwark forms by itself the great ward of Bridge Without, and 
has its own High Bailiff, Courts and Hall. Forming also part of 
Sunrey, it can be considered to have less to do with Surrey even than 
with London, and its position demands for it the separate and special 
consideration its interesting history deserves. We have not, there- 
fore, attached the pages containing its tokens to those of Surrey, pre- 
fening to give them separate consideration. 

Very many of the Southwark tokens bear the name sovthwark 
alone upon them, and it is not easy to identify the majority of these 
with the streets or houses of their issue. With regard to our notes, 
our thanks are very particularly due to the especial courtesy of the 
authors of two important works on Southwark. The first, Dr. Rendle's 
work on " Old Southwark and its People," has been constantly re- 
ferred to by us, and a second work by the same author, in conjunction 
with Mr. Philip Norman, has been laid under still heavier contribution. 
Without the latter work (" The Inns of Old Southwark, and their 
Associations"*), our task would have been laborious and difficult. 
From the book Mr. Norman most generously permitted us constantly 
to quote, and by him were we permitted to obtain electros of the 
woodcuts used to illustrate the tokens struck at the inns mentioned 
by him. These woodcuts of tokens now appear to brighten our 
pages, and our thanks are most heartily rendered to Mr. Norman for 
their use and for his constant and patient assistance of our work. 

The great feature of the Southwark tokens is the number that were 
issued from inns, and the inns of Southwark were the most interesting 
erections in the Borough. " Southwark was," as Dr. Rendle states, 
**the chief thoroughfare to and from London for the southern counties 
and by the coast for the busiest part of the continent — a place for 
* birds of passage,' * for great receipt of people and trade from divers 
shires of the realm,' and so necessarily occupied by inns in number 
out of all proportion to ordinary shops and dwellings.' 

* LoDgmans, i888. 

64 — 2 

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1000 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

In treating of the tokens, we are enabled to give many notes respect- 
ing these old inns, which we gather from Messrs. Rendle and Nonnan's 
works already referred to. Stow, Evelyn, and Pepys have been also 
laid under contribution, while Wilson's " Antiquities of Dissenting 
Chapels," Larwood's " History of Signs," Besse's " Sufferings of the 
Quakers," and very many other Nonconformist works, have each 
yielded their quota of interesting information. 

We believe these notes will be found to well repay perusal, and to 
contain many a scrap of history both fresh and novel to the ordinary 
student. 

We must not omit to mention that Mr. Norman has very kindly 
read the proofs of this portion of the book, and has corrected many 
of the entries by the light of later investigation, adding also some 
additional items of interest, for which we would tender him our very 
sincere thanks ; and we are sure that our readers will derive much 
benefit from his generous aid. 

The Editor. 



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SOUTHWARK. looi 



SOUTHWARK. 
I. 0, AT . THE . SWAN . WITH . 2 = A swan With two necks. 

^. NECKS . IN . SOVTHWARKE = R . I . A. { 

This house is mentioned in 1622, when Edward Hewlett, by deed, conferred a 
rent-charge of ;f 20 upon it and another adjoining thereto, to me poor in general. 
Aiui in the same year by a second deed he gave to the poor of Cures College the 
remainder of the Swan with Two Necks and Dagger tenements. In 17 19 the two 
tenements are made into one, being described as the " house over against the Bull 
Head which was formerly known as the Swan with Two Necks and Dagger.'' — 
[R. and N., 302.] 




2. 0, IN . SOVTHWARKE = SAM. ABERY. 

^. CHESMOVNGER = A womaii churning. \ 

3. 0, AT . THE . WHIT . BVLL . HEAD = A bulFs head. 

li, IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1648 = 1 . A . B. J 

4. C?. AT . THE . 3 . covLTS . IN = A hotsc pnuicing. 

J^. SOVTHWARKE . 1651 =1 . M . B. J 

5. 0. THE . ROSE . AND . CROWNE = A rosc crowncd. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1651 =T . K . B. J 

6. 0, GEORGE . BANNISTER . DISTILLER = An axe and bottle. 

J^, IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

Axe Yard was in High Street, South wark. 

Mrs. Newcomen, a Puritanical believer, who resided there, left by will in 1674 
«Hnc small property for charity and for the education of the poor, then perhaps a 
lundred pounds value, now, so wisely was it administered, some;^2,ooo or more by 
Ibe year. Among her bequests is her messuage in Axe Yard, called the Bottle, in 
^ch, perhaps, we see the origin of the name Axe and Bottle Yard. 

In iTiSo the south gate of London Bridge was taken down and the materials sold 
^ auction. At the sale the fine old sculpture of the King's Arms was bought by 
Mr. Williams, a stonemason of Tooley Street, who, being soon after employed to 
l»ke down the gateway of Axe and Bottle Yard and so form King Street, intro- 
<bced the arms on the right-hand side of the western end of the street. The 
street is now called Newcomen Street, in memory of the good woman above re- 
ined to.— [R. and N., 227-228.] 

7* 0, HENRY . BARDGE« BAKER. 

a. IN . SOVTHWARKE = The Bakets* Arms. i 

8. 0. CALEB . BIGG . THREAD = A raven. 

a. MAKAR . IN . SOVTHWERK = C . E . B. 



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I002 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



9. O. ANTHONY . BLAKE . TAPSTER . Y« . GEORGE . INN . SOVTH- 

WARKE (in six lines). 
^. (M? legend,) Three tobacco-pipes and four pots. \ 




The George is one of the " fair inns'* noted by Stow in 1598. The owner in 155S 
was Humfrey Colet or Collet, M.P. for Southwark 1553. In his will he states that 
he wishes to be buried in the new churchjrard (St. Saviour's) by his uncle, Thomas 
Bullay, and that he owns the George now in the tenure of Nicholas Martin, 
hosteler. In 1634 a return was made by the wardens to the Earl of Arundel that 
the George Inn or tenements within it was built of brick and timber in 1622. The 
landlord was presented in 1634 because he allowed drinking during divine service. 

The 3 cvps on No. 33 was a variation of the name of the building between the 
George and the White Hart, which was also called Three Crane Court, Three Crane 
Yard, and Crown Court. The inn was partly burnt down in 1670, and in con- 
nection with the rebuilding the rent was reduced from £iSO tOjfSo and a sugar 
loaf, which was again reduced to £$0 six years after, when in the great fire of 
1676 the whole inn was destroyed and rebuilt by the tenant. 

In July, 1889, the north and east galleries of this interesting old inn disappeared, 
and we fear that the remainder of the building will not long survive. 

10. O, RICHARD . BLAKE . TAPSTER = BuSt Of the Dukc of 

Suffolk. 

R. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. R . F . B. J 




Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, brother-in-law of Henry VIII., held large 
possessions in Southwark. Suffolk Street was named after him. Mr. Norman 
informs us that there is in the Guildhall Library a drawing made by J. C Buckler, 
1828, which represents the Duke's Head Public House, Red Cross Street, South- 
wark. The inn has long since been destroyed. 



11. O, HVGH . BLVNDELL . IN = A tobaCCO-roU. 

R, sovTHWARKE . GROCER = A sugar-loaf. 

12. O, svsANNA . BOND (in two lincs across the field). 

R, IN , SOVTHWARKE = 1 664. 

13. O, lOHN . BRANDON . IN = HIS HALFE PENY. 
Ji, SOVTHWORKE . 1667 = 1 . B. 

14. O. lAMES . BRATHWAIT . AT . THE = A frying-pan. I 
J^, IN . SOVTHWARKE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

15. O, lOHN . BVCKELY . IN = A plough. 
R. SOVTHWARKE. 1657 = 1 . M . B. 



D. B. 



i 

i 
i 



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SOUTHWARK. 1003 

16. 0, Ric . BVLL . SALTER . FRY = Three birds fljring. 

J^. ING . PAN . sovTHWARKE= A frying-pan. { 

17. 0. RIC . BVLL . SALTER = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

Ji, FRYNPAN . sovTHWARK = A frying-pan. (Lead.) \ 

The Fiying-Pan was in Tooley Street, and to a notice put forth in Cromwell's 

time hj Thomas Garway, the founder of Garraway*s Coffee House in the City, are 

appended these words : 
"Advertisement.— That Nicolas Brook, living at the sto of Fryine-Pan, 

in Sl TuUe's Street, against the church, is the only known man tor making of mills 

for grinding coffee to powder, which mills are sold by him from 40 to 45 shillings 

the mill'' 

18. O, AT . THE . STARE . TAVERNE = A Star of eight rays. 

R, IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1649 = R . M . C. \ 

19. A variety reads w . e . b. in place of date. \ 

20. O. AT . THE COCKE . iN = A game-cock. 

R. SOVTHWARKE . GR0CER = T . C . C. 1 





A broadside of about 1723, but without date, with the heading of a cock, 
tnnoonces *' That Sarah Gardner, late wife of William Kellett, famous for curing 
an sorts of agues, still lives at the Cock, in the Mint, Southwarke ; she has excel- 
lent remedies for many complaints. No core, no money !" — [R. and N., 257.] 

21. 0. lOHN . CARTER = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

R, IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . M . C \ 

22. O. Humphry . Clarke . his . Coffee . house (across the field). 
R. In . Southwarke . His . half . peny . 1668 (across the 

field). i 

23. 0, THO . COKAYNE . AT . THE . COCK = A COCk. 

R. IN . SOVTHWARK . DISTILLER = T . C . C. HIS HALF PENY. \ 
See No. 20, and note to same. 

24. 0. NATHANIEL . C0LLVER=sThe Grocers* Arms. 

R. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1651 =The Grocers* Arms. \ 

25- 0, George \ Corfeild . at . y \ Lyon . 6^ . Lambe \ in . South- 
wark I G . K . c. (in five lines across the field). 
R> HIS . HALF . PENY= 1666. A Uon and lamb. \ 




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1004 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

26. O. THOMAS . DALLENDER = A CrOWIL 
/^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1659 = T . D. 

27. O. lOHN . DAVIS . LIVEING= 1 664. 
J^. IN SOVTHWARICE = I . B . D. 

28. O, wiLUAM . DAVIS . iN==A sugar-loafl 

I^. SOVTHWARKE . SALTER = W . D. 

29. O. RICHARD . DAVIS s A man holding up his hand 
/^, IN . sovTHWARK = A man with a sword. 

30. O, WILUAM . DAVIS = A sun. 

I^. IN SOVTHWARKE = W . I . D. 

31. O. lOHN . DEwsBVRY = Three apples. 

/^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 58 = 1 . E . D, 

32. O, lOHN . DYSON . WHEAT =s A wheatsheaf. 

/^, SHEAF . SOVTHWARKE . 57 = 1 . P . F. 

33. O. lOHN . EDE . NEXT . THE . 3 . cvPS = The name 

monogram. 

^. AGAINST . THE . GEORGE . IN . SOVTH'^^^HIS HALFPENY. 
See No. 9, and note to same. 

34. O. lOHN . ELLIOTT . HABERDASHER « HIS HALFE PENNY. 

I . M . B. 

^. IN SOVTHWARKE . 67 = A unicom. 

35. O. EDWARD . FARMER . CONFECTIONER . i669ssArms; per 

chevron, three garbs on a frying-pan. 
I^. In . Southwarke . His . half . penny . e . F . f. (in six 
lines). 

36. O, RICHARD . FARMER = The Salters* Arms. 

R. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1656 = R . E . F. 

37. O. lOHN . FOSTER . IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1667 (in five lincs). 
R. HIS . HALF . PENY = Three swans. {Octagonal.) 




38. O, lOHN . FOX . AT . THE . CRWN = A CrOWn. 
R. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1657 = A foX. 

39. O, AT . THE . 3 . HORS . SHOOS = Three horse-shoes. 

R. IN SOVTHWARK . 1 665 = WILL FRITH. 



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SOUTHWARK. 1005 

40. 0. lOHN . GREEN . IN . sovTHw^ = A roll of tobacco. 

J^, AT . THE . TOBACO . ROLE = E . G. J 

41. 0. AT THE . GREENE . MAN<=A savage with club on his 

shoulder. 

Ji. IN SOVTHWARKE . 1651 = A . G. \ 

42. 0, lEREMiAH . GALLOWAY = Crossed keys. 

^. IN SOVTHWARKE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

43. 0. EDWARD . GORE = A hand holding a bird. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALFE PENNY. E . M . G. J 

44. 0. loSEPH . GRIFFITH = A chequcrcd square. 

J^. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1659 = 1 . G. \ 

45. 0. lAMES . GVNTER . 16 . . . = St. Georgc and the Dragoa 

/^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . A . G. \ 

See No. 9, and note to same. 

46. O. AT . THE . 3 . KINGS = Three kings crowned, with sceptres. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = M . E . H. J 

47. O. HUGH . HANDY . CHESSMONGER = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^, IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1666 = MerchantVmark. h . h. J 

48. O, lOHN . HOLLOWAY = A wheatsheaf. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . H. ^ 

49- O. RICHARD . HETHER = The Saltcrs' Arms. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1664 = R . I . H. \ 

50. O. AT . THE . HARROW = A harrow. 

^. IN . SOVTWORKE = T . S . H. J 

The Harrow stood to the south-west of St George's Church. The old maps 
show the Harrow Dunghill here, an instance of the old unsanitary custom of neigh- 
bours using the nearest innyard as a laystall— [R. and N., 26a] 

51. O. THOMAS . HALL . AT . THE = Three CUpS. 

I^. 3 . CVPS . IN . SOVTHWARK = T . I . H. J 

52. O. lOHN . HOLLOWAY = A wheatsheaf. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . H. i 

53. O. AT . THE . WATER . SPANEL = A Spaniel dog. 

J?. IN SOVTHWARKE . 1651 =1 .1.1. J 

54. O. EDWARD . iOYE = The Royal Arms, 

J?. IN . SOVTHWARKE = E . E . L i 

55. O. RICHARD . ivDERY=Two dragons combatant. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARK . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

56. O. AT . THE . GOLDEN . KEY = A key. H . L. 

J?. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1649 = The Grocers' Arms. i 

The Golden Key was No. 104, High Street. At this house lived a chemist, 
named Elliotson, whose grandson became a celebrated physician, Dr. Elliot- 
son, F.R.S., who attended Thackeray, and to whom, in gratitude, was dedicated 
"Pendenms." 



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ioo6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

57. O, I AMES . LANE . AT . THE = The Royal Arms. 

i?. IN . SOVTHWARK = I . A . L. 

58. O. HEN . LANGLEY . SALTER = A SpUT. 
J^. IN SOVTHWARKE = H . M . L. 





The Spur Inn is mentioned as early as 1542. A Bre occurred at Southwark in 
1667^ which commenced on these premises, and burnt some of the out-buildings. 
It is probably alluded to by Pepys under date April 29, 1667, where he says : " A 
great fire at Southwarke. I up to the leads and saw it. We at that distance saw 
an engine play and the water go out of it, being moonlight." 

In 1720 the inn is described as '* pretty well resorted unto by waggons,*' and a few 
country carriers even now call there, who yet, in 1886, seem to cling to this, one of 
the last of their ancient places of call in the Borough. — [R. and N., 221.] 

59. O. THOMAS . LENTON . AT . THE = A fleur-dc-lj^ 
-^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1661 =T . H . L. 

60. A variety is dated 1651. 

61. O, WILLIAM . LONGE . WOOD = The Woodmongers' Arms. 

^. MOVNGER . SOVTHWARKE = W . I . L. 

62. O, EDWARD. LOLE = HIS HALF PENY. 

I^, IN . sovTHWARK . i666 = A chandler. 

63. O. WILLIAM . LVCAS = A savage holding a club over his 

shoulder. 

I^, IN . SOVTHWARKE = W . M . L. 

64. O. FRANCIS . MORTIMER = A fox. 
/^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = F . E . M. 

65. O, ROGER . MiDLETON . AT . Y" = The Brewers' Arms. 

i?. IN . SOVTHWARKE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

66. O, THOMAS . NEWSVM = A thistle-flower and leaf. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARK = T . N. 

67. O. 3 . HATS . NAGS . HEAD = Three hats. 

^. ALEY . IN . SOVTHWARKE = I .I.N. 

In 1542 the Nag's Head is termed the Horse Hede. In 1634 it had its court of 
small tenements. In 1720 we are told that the buildings are old and sorry. 
Andrew Ducrow, the great equestrian performer, is said to have been bom at the 
Nag*s Head on May 12, 1796. His parents had put up there, having arrived from 
Germany on the same day. George Colman, the younger, in his '* Poor Gentle- 
man," a comedy produced at Covent Garden, 1801, makes the farmer say : 

" I be come from Lunnon, you see ; I warrant I smell of smoke like the Nag's 
Head chimney in the Borough. Freshest news f Why, hops have a heavy sale ; 



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SOUTHWARK. 1007 

wheat and malting samples command a brisk market ; new tick beanes am risen 
two shillings per quarter, and white and grey peas keep up their prices."— [R..and N., 
222-223.] 

68. 0. IN . sovTHWoRKE = Three hats, w . p. 

^. (Blank.) i 

69. 0. lAMES . PITMAN . IN = A beacon. 

IL SOVTHWARKE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENNY. | 

7a 0. lAMES . PITMAN . IN = A beacon. 

^. SOVTHWARKE . 1655 =1 . I . P. J 

In the High Street in 1723 was the Beacon, a public-house so called. Its exact 
position is shown by its removal for the construction of a better gateway to the 
hospital Thomas Guy and another generous governor were just now spending 
mnch money in improvements and new wards there. The sign may have had 
reference to the well-known tel^raph tower close at hand or to a fire-beacon. I 
would remark, too, that a considerable part of Tooley Street by the church was 
probably so far back as the fifteenth century known as the Bergheny^ apparently 
nom its name derived firom Burgh kenning, meaning a watch-tower, which might 
reasonably be held to imply a beacon. — [R. and N., 118.] 

71. 0, lOHN . NELSON . AT . Y^ = A roU of tobacco. 

R. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1664 = 1 . N. \ 

72. O, WILL . PALMER . AT = A mop. 

R. IN . SOVTHWARKE . l663 = W . I . P. \ 

73. 0, lOHN . POORE . viTLER = The Weavers' Arms. 

R, IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . M . P. \ 

74. 0, RICHARD . POORE = An ape on horseback. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . E . P. \ 

75. 0, RICHARD . POORE = An ape on horseback. 

R, IN .• SOVTHWARKE = R . E . P. \ 

The sign of the Jackanapes. Setting an ape to ride on horseback was a favourite 
(livennon during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

76. 0, RICHARD . PERKINS = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, IN . SOVTHWARKE = R . M . P. \ 

11. 0. FRANCIS . PRESCOTT . AT . Y» . IN = A key. 

R, SOVTHWORCKE . HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 669 . F . S . P (in 

six lines). {Octagonal.) \ 

78. 0. AT . THE . KINGS . HEAD . IN = Bust of Henry VIII. 

R, SOVTHWARKE . GROCER = W . P. 





Ilie King's Head was one of the important inns of Southwark. Its sign was 
*^pnally the Pope's Head, but at the time of Papal repression it changed its 
*""' ^ 1534 the Abbot of Waverley writes that he will be at " the Pope's Head 



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lOoS TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

in South wark.*' Eight years afterwards the inn was marked in the Record Office 
Map as the " Kynges Hed." The property was in the possession of the hmily oi 
Mr. J. Eliot Hodgkin, F.S.A., for some generations, and from a deed of I559t which 
Mr. Hodgkin possesses, the following statement has been gleaned : 

In 1559 the deed is drawn between John Gresham and John White bargaining 
for a certain Sum of money with Thomas Cure for the inn " formerly known as the 
Pope's Hed now as the Kynge's Hed, abutting on the highway called Longe 
Southwarke." 

After this it is found that in 1588 the property passes to the Humbles, and in 
1647 to Humble Lord Ward. The inn was burnt down in 16761 and after the fire 
the tenant, Mary Duffield, appealed to the Court of Judicature a^nst the harsh 
treatment of her superior landlord. The decision, which is contained in the Fire 
Decrees of 1677 in the Guildhall, settled that the tenant should build a eood sub- 
stantial inn and buildings, and that her rent be reduced from;^66 to £^ and her 
tenure extended to forty-eight years. 

In 1720 the inn was ** well built, handsome, and enjoying a TOod trade, and had 
picturesque wooden galleries on both sides of the yard, but in 1885 the last remain- 
mg portion of the east side was pulled down." — [R. and N., 122-127.] 

79. O. AT . THE . CHECKER . IN = A chequcred square. 

^. SOVTHWARKE . 1651 =1 . I . R. J 




Chequer Alley, in which probably this token was issued, is described by Strype 
in 1720 as "small, but pretty well built and inhabited. In 1572 Mr. Osborne, 
afterwards Sir Edward Osborne, Lord Mayor of London and founder of the Leeds 
ducal family, possessed tenements here." — R. and N., 103.] 

80. O. Richard . Roberts . at , y , Bull , head . Taveme . in 
Southwark (in five lines). 
R, HIS . HALF . PENY = A bulFs head. R . R. 1667. I 




In the map of 1542 a few significant sketchy lines by way of a drawing tell us 
of the Bolies Hede at the south-east comer of the precincts of the late priory of 
St. Mary Overy, and by the chaingate which protects the entry to the churchyard 
from the High Street. The BulPs Head is so notable that by-and-by, when the 
churchyard requires enlarging, the ground between the church and the inn is named 
the Bull Head Churchyard. This Bull Head Inn was one of the resorts of Edward 
Alleyn. In 1620 he dines with Bromfield and Tichbome at the Bull Head, at 
what is probably an election dinner. In the fire of 1676 the inn was burnt, but 
rebuilt, and in 1756 it is referred to in the following advertisement : " To be lett, 
being lately repaired, in the Boro' of Southwark near the hospital, a large house 
late the Bull Head tavern, either as a tavern or otherwise, having large vaults and 
a great deal of warehouse room." 

The house disappeared when the new bridge was built in 183a— [R. and N., 
298.] 



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SOUTH W ARK. 1009 

81. 0. THOMAS . ROE . SILKMAN . IN . SOVTHWARKE . HIS . J (in six 

lines). 
J^. AT . Y« . BLAK . [a bull] . T . R . K = {S^are). 

82. 0. THE . ROSE . AND . CROWN = A rose and crown. 

H. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1649*0 . P. 

83. 0. wiL . ROGERS . SWAN . & . STiL« A swan and still. 

J^. SOVTHWARK . DISTILLER =»W . A . R. 

84. 0. AT . THE . 7 . STARES = Seven stars. 

J?. IN . SOVTHWARKE = M . S. 

85. 0, lOHN . SANDON . AT . THE = The SUn. 
J^, SONNE . IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . E . S. 

86. 0, lOHN . SAVAGE . IN = A unicom. 

Ji. SOVTHWARK . HABERDA = I . E . S. 

87. 0. William . Shelly . Cheesemonger . in (in four lines). 
R, Southwark . His . halfe . peny . 1667 (in four lines). 

88. 0, WILLIAM . SHELLEY = CHEESEMONGER. 
R, IN . SOVTHWARKE -W .M.S. 1662. 

89. 0, lOHN . SHEPHEARD . IN = The Gfocers' Arms. 

R, SOVTHWARKE . GROCER = I . S. 

90. 0. lOHN . SMALLBON . AT . Y« . GOLDEN = A horse-shoe 

I . E . S. 
R. HORSHOOE . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. 

91. 0, ADAM . SMITH . 1 668 = A hat and feather. 

R, IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALF PENY. 

92. 0. RICHARD . STANNARD = A cock in a hoop. 

R. IN . SOVTHWARK . 1659 = R .M.S. 

The Cock and Hoop, to which this token evidently refers, was a tenement 
known m 1638 as the Cock and Hart. 

It was settled by William Whithouse, of St Mary Cray, Kent, in that year, upon 
his wife, together with an inn called the Black Bull hard by. The Black Bull was 
later on known as the Three Tuns, and stood between the important Queen's 
Head and the site of the Christopher. In 1701 the Black Bull was sold by Sir 
Francis Whithouse, Kt., late a Justice of the King's Bench. In 1720 Cock and 
Hoop Alley is mentioned as possessing but one house, being a passage to the 
£arden grounds, and the issuer of the token may have resided in that nouse. — 
IR. and N., 213.] 

93. 0, WILL . STEERE . SALTER = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

R, IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. IL \ 

94. O, THOMAS . STONSTEELE = Seven stars. 

R, IN . SOVTHWARKE . 57 = Three birds. \ 

95. 0. ROB . THORNTON . HABERDASHR = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R . E . T. 

R. NEXT . THE . THREE . BRVSHES = IN SOVTHWARKE. 1667. \ 

The Three Brashes or Holy- Water Sprinklers stood within Chequer Alley. 
See No. 79. 



I 



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loio TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

In 1652 it was conveyed by Thomas Ovennan to Hugh Lawton. See No. 322. 
In 1783 the premises are described as heretofore called or known by the name or 
sign of the Holy- Water Sprinklers or the Three Brushes. Bum says the Three 
Brushes was a tavern of some notoriety in one of the many diseracefiil prosecu- 
tions under the papistical Act of King James II. Bellamy, mine host of the Three 
Brushes, figurea most contemptibly as a witness for the Crown in the trial at 
Westminster Hall on Monday, June 21, 1686.— [R. and N., 104.] 

96. O. WILLIAM . TiNDALL = A fleece suspended. 

J?. IN . SOVTHWARCKE = W . P . T. J 

97. O, lAMES . TODD . 3 . TOBACO = I . M . T. 

^. ROLES . IN . sovTHWARK = Three rolls of tobacco. \ 

98. A variety has the three tobacco-rolls suspended. { 

99. O. lOHN . VAiNE . IN = A Hon couchant 

/^, SOVTHWARKE . 58 = 1 . M . V. \ 

100. O. AT . THE . . . BREWERS = Two brewers canying a barrel 

^. . . . SOVTHWARKE = T . V . W. J 

101. O, WILL . WALKER . IN . SOVTHWARK = The SUn. 

^. VI filling the whole field. 6d. 

This is a rare piece, and was probably intended to circulate for sixpence. See 
under Paul's Wharf^ London, two pieces having 6^ and 3 upon them. Nos. 2198 
and 2199 (London). 

102. O. ELIZABETH . WEST . v» * 2 . HORS= 1667 and two horses 

above. 

J^, HEWES . SOVTHWARKE = E . W. 

103. O. AT . YE . DEATHES . HEAD = A skull. 
/^ IN . SOVTHWARKE . 57 = I . H . W. 

104. O. MAR . WEEKES . SALTER = The Salters' Arms. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . l652»M . S. 

105. O. lOHN . WEST = A cannon mounted. 

J^, IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . A . W. 

106. O, CHARLES . WESTON . POTER = Seven stars. 

-^. IN . THE . BVRROW . 1666 = C. M . W. 

107. O. FRANCIS . WHITE . iN = Two angels supporting a crown. 

I^. SOVTHWARKE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

108. O. WILLIAM . WIGFALL = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = The three legs of the Isle of Man. 

109. O. THOMAS . WITTS . AT . THE = Friar Tuclc carrying Little 

John. 

^. IN. SOVTHWARKE. 1667 = HIS HALF PENNY. 

110. O. RICHARD . WOODEN = A pair of scales. 

i?. IN . SOVTHWARKE = R . D . W. 



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SOUTH W ARK. loii 



ANGEL ALLEY and STREET. 

Aagel Street possibly derived its name from the Aungell beerhouse, " which, in 
1585, belonged to Sir Robert Copley, and was let to Henry Leake, brewer, chief 
fooDder of the St. Olave's Grammar School, and one of the refugees from 
Flanders before the persecution under Alva." — [R. and N., 41.] 

It is difficult to identify the following tokens to the exact place of their issue. 
There was an Angel Street between the Old Barge House and St. Geoige's Fields ; 
also Angel Court or Yard on the north side of Foul Lane ; another Angel Court or 
Alley was in Montague Close, about where the Bridge House Hotel or London and 
Westminster Bank now is ; and a fourth near the King's Bench Prison, still repre- 
sented by a dingy little passage, called Angel Place, referred to by Dickens in his 
prefiM» to " Little Dorrit."— [N.] 

111. O. lOHN . ABETHELLs: Seven Stars. 

/^. IN . ANGELL . STREET= I . A . A. J 

112. 0. SARAH . DOWINE . 1671 =HER HALFE PENY TOKEN. 

jR. IN . AiNGELL . STREETE = The Watermen's Arms. J 

113. 0. AVGVSTiN . GRIFFITH . Y" . NEPTVNS = Neptune in his 

car. 

^. PALLAS . IN . ANGELL . STREET = HIS HALFE PENY. 
A . E . G. ^ 

114. O. lOHN . SMITH . AT . ANGEL = An angel. 

jR, ALY . IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . S. \ 

BANK END. 

115. 0. ANTHONY . CRAVEN . AT . THE = A Castle. 

J^. BANKE . END . IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
A . B . C. I 

116. 0, THO . RAYNER . AT. BANK = HIS HALF PENY. 

Ji, END . IN . sovTHWARK = The Bakers' Arms. ^ 

BANK SIDE. 

117. 0. lAMES . BAiLLiE . AT . THE = St. George and the Dragon. 

J?. ONE . Y^ . BANKSIDE . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
I . £ . B. ^ 

118. O, HENRY . BAYLY . AT . THE = A cannon mounted. 

^. BANKE . SIDE . 1657 = H . S . B. J 

119. O. DANIEL . BARD = A shuttle. 

^. AT . THE . BANK . SIDE = D . M . B. J 

12a O. WILLIAM . BOORMAN^The Haberdashers' Arms. 

/?. AT . THE . BANK . SIDE = W . E . B. J 

121. O. WILLIAM . CHAPMAN . ON = A bushel measure. 

J?. THE . BANK . SIDE . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. J 



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I0I2 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

122. O, MELCHiSEDECK . FRITTER = A Cardinal's hat. 

^. ON . ¥■ . BANK . SIDE . BREWER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

123. O, ALEX . HILL . AT . THE = St. Gcorge and the Dragon. 

I^. AT . MASLIN . STA1ERS = BANK SIDE. 

124. O. lOHN . LOVE . ON . THE = St. Gcorgc and the Dragon. 

i?. BANKSID . SOVTHWARK=I . M . L. 

125. O. lOHN . LVDGALL . AT . Y" . BANKE = A CrOOkcd bfllct IN 

SOVTHWARKE. 

J^. SIDE . HIS . HALF . PENY . 1 668 = The Watermen's 
Arms. 

126. O. THOMAS . MARTIN = A hcdgchog. 
/^. ON . THE . BANKSIDE = T . E . M. 

127. O. EDWARD . MASTERES = HIS HALF PENY. 
J?. BAKER . ON . Y" . BANKSIDE = A fish. 

128. O. AT . THE . EARL . OF . ESEX = A Stag. 
^. ARMES . AT . BANCKSIDE = R . E . P. 

129. O. Elizabeth . Fort . at . Banckside (in three lines). 
R, HER . HALF . PENY = Two keys crossed. {Octagonal) 

130. O, THOMAS . SEABRO = A unicorn. 

R. ON . Y* . BANK . SIDE=:T . E . S. 

131. O, HANDREY . STROVD . ON = A UniCOm. 
R. THE . BANK . SIDE . 1658 = H . E . S. 

132. There is a variety reading henerey . strovd . on = A 

unicorn. 

The unicorn was included in one Henry Polstead*s lands, which he purchased by 
exchange of Henry VIII., and came, no doubt, out of the forfeitures of the monla 
of Bermondsey, the Templars, and Knights of St. John to him. In process of time the 
property came to Henslowe (of the Rose playhouse) and to Alleyn (of the Globe 
playhouse). In AUeyn's will the unicorn is among the property left to his wife, 
Constance. The unicorn is granted by King Charles in 1635 to Sydenham and 
others, who afterwards dispose of it At a later period it was the Skin Market.— 
R. and N., 343] 

133. O. EDWARD . shapard . AT . THE = Three tuns. 

i?. BANCKSIDE. SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. 

134. 0> GILES . STVCHBERY . AT . Y= = A coopcr's adze. 

R. BANCK . SIDE . 1658=: HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

135. A variety reads sovthwark in place of the date. \ 

136. O. HENRY . STiLTAT = The Watermen's Arms. 

R, THE . BANCKSIDE . l666 = H .M.S. \ 

137. O. WILL . TOMMAS . AT . BAN = A heart with a star above it 

R, SIDE . SOVTHWARK = W . A . T. \ 

138. O. GEORGE . vAVAS0VR = The arms of the Vavasour family; 

a fess dancett^, a crescent for difference. 

R, ON . THE . BANKE . SID£ = G . F . V. \ 



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SOUTHWARK, 1013 

139. 0, WILLIAM . WILLAMS== A plough. 

jR, ON . THE . BANCKSIDE = W . B . W. J 

N.B.— See Gravel Lane for two more. 

140. 0. R . YOVNG . IN . sovTHW = The Mcrchant-Tailors' Arms. 

R. ARK . ON . Y* . BANKSIDE=R . E . Y. \ 

BATTLE BRIDGE. 

Battle Bridge derives its name from the town mansion or inn of the Abbot of 
Battle. In 1568 Battell House is represented as in length eighty feet ; in breadth, 
forty.four feet. The Abbot's Close had been before the Dissolution one open 
pla<^ of about an acre in extent, and had been freely used for purposes of 
recreation. — [R. and N., 39.] The site is now covered by Hays Wharf and Dock. 

141. 0. ARCVLvs . CROSSDELL . AT . BATTLE = The Weavers' 

Arms. A . c. 

R, BRIDGE . IN . SOVTHWARKE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

{Heart-shape.) ^ 

142. 0, RICH . ALDER . GINGER . BREAD = BAKER. 

R, sovTHWARK . NEAR . BRiDG .HOYS . 1 669 = A baker's 
peel. \ 

143. 0. CHESMOYNGER . AT = An angel. 

R. BATTEL . BRIDG = A . M . F. \ 

144. 0, lOHN . HOLLAND . AT = A Castle. 

R. BATEL . BRIDG . SOYTHWARK = I . E . H. \ 

145. O. HENERY . HAWARD = H . H. 

R, AT . BATTELL . BRIDGE . 1652. \ 

146. O. THOMAS . NEALE . AT . BATTLE = The Salters' Arms. 

R, BRIDGE . IN . SOYTHWARKE = T . W . N. J. {OctagOnaL) ^ 

147. 0. THE . BROOD . HEN . AT . BATLE = A hen sitting. 

R, BRIDG . IN . SOWTHARKE = L . E . S. \ 

143. O, RICHARD . SAPP . AT . BATLE = A peacock wlth its tail dis- 
played. 

R. BRIDG . IN . SOYTH ARKE = R . S . S. \ 

149. 0. EDWARD . TYRNER . i668 = Four dancing dogs. 

R, AT . BATTLE . BRIDG = HIS HALF PENY. E . A . T. A 

150. 0. ELiNER . WHITE . BATEL = Seven stars. 

R, BRIDGE . soYTHWARKE = A crescent. E . w. \ 

BEAR ALLEY and QUAY. 

151. 0. ROWLAND . PENNIFATHFR = A bell. HIS J. 

R, IN . BEARE . ALLEY . BRIDGFOOT = IN SOYTHWARK J 

152. 0, PHILLIP . STOWER . AT = A bear. 

R. THE . BEARE . AT . BARE . KEY = P . S . S. \ 

These two tokens were evidently issued by persons dwelling near to the cele- 
brated Bear Inn alluded to under Nos. 288 and 289. The celebrity of the peal at 
VOL. IL "" 65 



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IOI4 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

St. Saviour, says Dr. Rendle, may have made the sign of the Bell popular. Aboat 
the church itself, Smith, in his Booi for a Rainy Day^ tells us how he meets the 
eccentric waterman, George Heath, who says, *' I was a fiunous ringer in my 
youth at St. Mary Overies. They are beautiful bells." This was the man whom 
Charles Matthews the elder introduced into his entertainment under the pseudonym 
of Joe Hatch. Bear Alley is marked on a Record Office map of about 1542. 

BELL YARD. 

153. O, ANDRA . RANOLS . IN . BELL = A foX. 

R, YARD . IN . SOVTHWARKE = A . M . R. \ 



im 




m 



Chaucer, wishing to make known to us the gathering place of his pilgrims to 
Canterbury, tells us it was *' in South werk at this gentil hostelrie that highte the 
Tabard faste by the Bell,'* the Bell being apparently at that time a better known 
inn. In 1577 mention is made of the inn in the depositions of a man who brings 
an action for the loss of a money-bag, and states '* that he was in the house of one 
John Woodward, called the siene of the Bell, and did inne there." The Bell 
figures as an important landmark " from the Bell towards Waverley House," which 
had been the town-house of the Abbot of Waverley, near Famham. Bell Yard 
in 1637 was a place of dwelling for poor people and had twenty tenements. The 
token is the only pictorial record we have of the inn that was mentioned by 
Chaucer. The fox on it is apparently a rebus, Renols quasi Reynard. — [R. and N., 
293.] The Bell has long since disappeared Both Tabard and Bell are marked 
on Rocque's map of 1746. 

BERMONDSEY STREET. 

154. O, GEORGE . CAVE . STON . BRiDG = The King's head crowned 

J^. IN . BARNEBY . STREET = G . A . C. 

155. 0» AT . THE . CHEQVER . & . BLOCK = A squarc of chcquers 

and a block. 

R, IN . BARMVNSY . STREET :^- P . F . T. 

156. O. SARAH . EVERIT . AT . THE = The SUn. 
R. IN . BARNEBY . STREET . 1667 = HER HALF PENY. 

157. O. RAF . GLADMAN . BAKER = The BakeTs' Arms. 

R. BARNABEE . STREETE = R . M . G. 

158. O, RICHARD . GRAVES = Two poFters Carrying a barrel. 

R, IN . BARNBY . STREET = R . A . G. 

159. O, ELIZABETH . HOPTON = A man smoking. 

R, IN . BARNIBY . STREETE = E . H. 

160. O, PAVL . lAMES . MEALEMAN = HIS HALF PENY. 
R. IN . BARNSLEY . STREET = P .E.I. 1668. 

161. O, RICHARD . MELTON . iN = Crossed keys. 

R. BARNIBE . STREETE = R .A.M. 



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SOUTHWARK, 1015 

162. 0. AT . THE . RED . BVLL . IN = A buU. 

R, BERMONDSEY . STREETE = W . D . R. \ 

163. 0, AT . THE . SHVGER . LOFFE = A SUgar-loaf. 

R, IN . BARNABE . STREETE = R . M . S. { 

164. 0, THE . COCK . AND . FIFE = I . L. 

R, IN . BARNABY . ^^v^Ki ^ (dctrited), \ 

165. 0. WILLIAM . RICHARDSON = A wheatshcaf. 

R. IN . BARNABY . STREET = W . M . R. \ 

166. 0. NICHOLAS . SHELLEY . IN = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R, BARMONDICE . CHESEMONGER = N .M.S. 1 666. ^ 

167. O. lOHN . SKINNER (in two liiies). The holy lamb. 

R. IN . BERMONDSEY . STREET . HIS . HALF . PENNY (in five 

lines). (Square,) \ 

168. 0. lOHN . STEVENS . IN . BARMONSI = I . A . S. 1 666. 

R. STREET . IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

169. O, lOHN , SONE . AT . Y* . QVARTE = A jUg. 

R, IN . BARNEBY . STREETE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

17a 0. AT . THE . WHIT . SWANE . IN = A SWan. 

R. BARNABEY . STREET = W . A . T. \ 

171. O. RICHARD . WADE . AT . THE = The Weavers' Arms. 

R. IN . BARNABY . STREET = R . S . W. \ 

172. 0. WILLIAM . WALLis . IN = A wheatshcaf. 

R, BARNABE . ST . SOVTHWARK = MEALMAN. \ 

173. O, lOHN . STANLY . IN = A Catherine wheel. 

R. SOVTHWARKE . 1656 = 1 .M.S. \ 

^74- 0, John . Warner . near . the . Katherin . wheel (in five 
lines). 

R, IN . Y== . BVROVGH . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

In 1534 the Catherine Wheel was part of the property left by one John Scraggs. 
The rent of the " Kateiyn Whelle " was £'i. It formed part of the Scraggs charity 
left by wiU. In 1564 the inn was in possession of St. Thomas's Hospitd, and was 
let for six years at four marks a year. 156S. The Court granted a lease on a pre- 
mium of £16 6s. 8d. for twenty-one years at a rent of ;^8. In 1595 the tenant 
iOQgfat to rebnild. In 1840 the rent was noted by the Charity Commissioners at 
;f240. 

It has now risen tO;^55o I It ceased to be an inn after 1869, the old structure 
was palled down, and the site is now a receiving place for the Midland Railway 
Company.— [R. and N., 281-2.] 

175. 0. lOHN . THORPE . BLACKMAN = The King's head in profile 
to left, and three hats. 

R. STREET . IN . SOVTHWARKE . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . M . T. J 
Thorpe (see Nos. 176, 177, and 178) probably carried on business within the 
predDcts of the King's Head, his sign being the Three Hats.— [R. and N., 127.] 

65—2 



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ioi6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1 76. O. AT . THE . KINGS . HEAD . IN = Bust of Henry VIIL 

/^. SOVTHWARKE . GROCER = W . P. \ 

177. O. IN . SOVTHWARKE = Three hats, w . p. 

^. (B/ank.) \ 

1 78. A variety has no legend on either obverse or reverse, only 

the device and w . p on obverse. \ 

179. O, MiCHAELL . RAVNER . IN = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

^. BLACKMAN . STREET . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
M . E . R.' I 

180. O. EDWARD . SALTER . AT . Y= . WHITE = A horSC. 

J^, IN . BLACKMAN . STREET . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
E . M . S. I 

BLACKMAN STREET. 

181. O, WILLIAM . ALLSVP . AT . THE = A Stag's antlers. 

J^. IN • BLACKMAN . ST* . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

1S2, O. AT , THE . PRINS . ARMES = The Princc of Wales's 
feathers. 

^. IN . BLACKE . MAN . STREETE«H . E . B, \ 

183. O. AT . THE . THREE . CONIES . IN = Three rabblts. 

J^. BLACKMAN. STREETE = ANN BROAD. \ 

184. O. HENRY . BRIDE . i^ti = {detrtted). 

JR. BLACKMAN . STREET = (^^/nV^^). J 

185. O. WILL . CLAPTON . BLAK = The Queen's head. 

^. MAN . STREET . SOVTHWARK = W . M . C. J 

186. O. WILLIAM . covTEiN = A dragon. 

^. BLACKMAN . STREET = W . A . C. J 

187. O. WILLIAM . COLLARD . AT . THE = A ball and W . A . C. 

J^. BALL . IN . BLACKMAN . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. J 

188. O, ROB . DRiNKELL . IN . BLACKE = A stag*s head and bell. 

J^. IN . STREET . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. R . M . P. | 

189. O. AT . Y* . 3 . MARYNERS . IN = Three sailors. 

J^. BLACKMANS . STREET = D . B . E. J 

190. O. AT . THE . BLEW . BELL . IN = A bell. 

^. BLACKMAN . STREETE = C . M . H. J 

191. O. lOHN . IVES . IN . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

Ji. BLACKMAN . STREET = A horse-shoe. I.I.I. I 

At the Horse Shoe Inn it is believed Sacheverell, the notorious divine, used to 
meet with other members of the High Church party to discuss matters connected 
with their opinions. 

Sacheverell was in 1705 appointed preacher at St. Saviour's. 



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SOUTHWARK. 1017 

In the wakes Liberty Riots of 1768 one William Allen, son of Allen, landlord 
of the Hoise Shoe, was shot by a soldier who pursued him into the cow-house 
of the inn. He was buried in Newington Churchyard, and a somewhat sumptuous 
monument erected by his parents to his memory. The murder was the subject 
of an indignant sermon by the Rector of Newington, was illustrated in a 
print of the period, and was referred to by petition in the House of Commons. — 
[R- and N., 348.] 

192. O. ROBERT . MAYOW . 1667 = A man smoking. 

^. IN . BLACKMAN . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. J 

193. O. HENRY . POWELL . IN = The Coopers' Arms. 

J^. BLACKMAN . STREET . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. H . S . P. J 

194. O, lOHN . PRINCE . IN = A unicorn. 

J^. BLACKMAN . STREET . SOVTHWARK = I . F . P. J 

This Unicom Inn was on the east side of Blackman Street, nearly opposite 
Dirty Lane, now more elegantly Suffolk Street. An elaborate ground-plan of 
this inn, with elevations, dated 1627, is in the library of the Society of Antiquaries, 
presented to the society by the late Mr. Halliwell Phillipps. The premises 
were very extensive, comprising several warehouses, stabling for fifty horses, and 
many tenements sublet to wheelers, cowkeepers, and perhaps weavers. Some 
picturesque wood and plaster houses still standing, one of which is a tavern with 
the sign of the King's Arms, probably formed part of the old Unicom. The 
sables resemble those shown in the old ground-plan. — [R. and N., 347.] 

It was in Unicom Yard that a meeting-house for Baptists was erected by the 
congregation once meeting in Goat Yard. When the lease of their old building 
nm out they erected the new one in the yard at the back of the Unicom Inn, 
and there worshipped until the lease of this expired and they had to migrate to 
Carter Lane (q. v.). The issuer, John Prince, is said to have largely assisted 
them with funds to build this meeting-house at the back of his inn. 

BRIDGE FOOT and BRIDGE HOUSE. 

The Bridge House, which stood east of Bridge Foot, was a store place for 
materials belonging to the city, especially for those used in the repair of London 
Bridge. It came to be occupied as a granary and as a bakehouse with large and 
many ovens. Cotton's warehouses are now on the site. — [R. and N., 49.] 

195. 0. RANDALL. ALDERSEY=HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. AT . Y^ . BRIDG . HOVSE . GATE = R . M . A. J 

196. O. lOSEPH . BROCKET = A talbot with a chain. 

J^. BRIG . FOOT . SOVTHWARK = I . M . B. J 

197. O, ABRAHAM . BROWNE . AT . Y= = A bear with a chain. 

J^, BRIDG . FOOT . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. J 

198. O, coRNELivs . COOKE . AT . THE = A beat With a chain. 

^. BEARE . AT . THE . BRIDGE . FOT = C . A . C i 




The issuer is mentioned in the St. Olave's parish accounts as overseer of 
the land side as early as 1630. He was afterwards a soldier and captain of 



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ioi8 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

train bands ; rose to be colonel in Cromwell's army, and was one of the com- 
missioners for the sale of kinc*s lands. After the Restoration he seems to have 
been settled down as landlord of the Bear. 

In 1 641 he was a churchwarden of St. Olave's, and was concerned with others 
in palling down the altar rails, for which they were ordered to the pillory and 
heavily fined. The curate said they insisted on his ^ving the Sacrament to them 
sitting after about 500 had it kneeling, and told him if he did not they would dia^ 
him about the church by the ears. These very cool churchwardens give this as their 
version : " Many hundreds of the parishioners refused to come to Sacrament on 
account of the rails, and they having asked in vain of Dr. Turner to remove them 
quickly, removed them themselves and sold them for the benefit of the parish." 

The Bear Inn is mentioned as early as 1319 (twelfth Edward II.), when it belonged 
to Thomas Dr3mkewatre, taverner of London. In 1429 it is termed a " brewfaoose 
with a tavern thereto, belonging in the parishes of St. Mary Maudleyn and Seyot 
Oulupte." It was pulled down on the widening of the Bridge in 1761. 

In 1513-14 there is a rent paid for it to the prior of St. Mary Overy. For manj 
centuries it was a most famous inn and visited by most people of note, and b 
alluded to by Pepys upon several occasions, and also mentioned by Wydierieyand 
Shirley in ** The Lady of Pleasure," 1637. [R. and N. 302-315.] 

199. O. WILL . GREENINGTON = A drum. 

R, AT. BRIDGEFOOT . STREET = W . I . G. \ 

200. O. BY . THE . BRiDG . FOOT . T . M . H (across the field). The 

Grocers' Arms. 

R, 1668 . IN . SOVTHWARKE . SILKMAN . HIS . HALF . PENY 

(in six lines). {Heart-shape,) \ 

201. O, HENRY . PHILLIPS . AT = A sugar-loaf. 

R, BRIDG . FOOT . SOVTHWARK = H . S . P. J 



CASTLE STREET and YARD. 

Southwark Castle referred to by Aubrey was probably the house which, in 1531, 
was called " Guldeford Castle at Suthwerk." 

It was given in 1509 by Sir Thomas Brandon to Lady Guylford, and had been 
held by Brandon of the Bishops of Winchester. 

It probably gave its name to Castle Street and Guildford Street— 
[R. and N., 6^,^ 

202. O. lOHN . COOKE . WINCHESTER = A roll of tobacco. 

R. YARD . IN . CASTLE . STREET . SOVTH = WARK. HIS HALF 
PENNY. I . M . C 

203. O. RICHARD . HODGKINE = A boOt 
R. IN . CASTLE . STRETE«R . B . H. 

204. O, SAMVELL . HODGKINE = A boot S . H. 
R. IN . iCASTELL . STREETE = A boot. S . H. 

205. O, EDMVND . PERKINS . IN = 1659. 
R, CASTLE . STREETE = E . M . P. 

206. O, GEORGE . PICKFAT . IN . CASTLE = A Castle. HIS \. 
R. YARD . TALLOW . CHANDLER = 1 666. G . E . P. 

207. O, lOHN . WALKER . IN . CASTLE = A wild boaT. 
R, YARD . HIS . HALFE . PENY = I . E . W. 



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SOUTHWARK. 1019 



CARTER LANE, or WALNUT-TREE ALLEY. 
208. O. EPHRVM . BVLL . IN . WAR = A walnut-trcc. 

^. NVT . TRE . ALLY . 1667 = E . L . B. J 

Carter Lane, or Kater Lane, as it was called in 1 531, is in 1629 described as 
Waloat-tree Lane, otherwise Carter Lane, and in 1746, in Rocque's map, as Walnut- 
tree Alle^, and at the end of the last century as Carter Lane. 

The site was at one time occupied by the inn of the Priors of Lewes, but 
previous to that time had been the Manor House of the De Warrennes, Earls 
of Surrey, the lords of old Southwark, and built, probably, by William, the first 
Earl, who founded the Priory of Lewes. After the dissolution part of the site 
was occupied by the St. Olave's Grammar School of Queen Elizabeth, and part 
became the Walnut-tree Inn. 

In 1532 the Earl of Essex held the hostelry from the Crown, but upon his fall 
it was again divided, and the inn fell into the hands of one Adam Beeston, of 
St. Olave's, brewer. Cuthbert Beeston, his son, citizen and girdler of London, 
died seized of the inn, together with its garden and fifteen messuages in the lane, 
held of the Queen in chief, and worth yearly £$ 6s. 8d. This owner, by his will, 
1579, left considerable charity to St. Olave's parish. 

At a later time the property is mentioned in the Exchequer Depositions, third 
and fourth James II., in the Record Oflfice, as follows : 

** It was purchased by Caleb Lovejoy, who was waggoner to Oliver Cromwell 
in the time of the rebellion, and he instantly ejected some of the King's tenants." 
This owner was a native of Guildford, bom in the parish of St Nicholas, and 
baptized May 8, 1603. He was educated at the Guildford Grammar School, but 
before the age of fifteen was removed to London, where he became a successful 
trader, and iree of the Merchant-Taylors' Company. He was buried in his native 
parish in 1676, and a brass plate as a monument, upon which are inscribed some 
quaint lines of his own composition, was affixed to the wall of the south aisle of 
St. Nicholas Church. By nis will, dated November 15, 1676, he devised the 
thirteen messuages and a workshop in Walnut-tree Alley to trustees for the benefit 
of the poor of his native place under an elaborate series of regulations. 

The property was sold under the Act for rebuilding London Bridge, and the 
proceeds uMd for the building and sustenance of certain almshouses in Guildford, 
which bear the name of their founder to this day. 

^ I757> upon some of the ground in the alley, was built the Carter Lane 
Chapel, which was opened on October 9 in that year by Dr. Gill, the pastor, 
when he preached an eloquent sermon from Exod. xx. 24. After its demolition 
for the new London Bridge approaches, the congregation met in New Park Street 
Chapel ; after that at the Surrey Gardens ; and lastly at the MetropoliUn 
Tabernacle, and in 1854 the Rev. C. H. Spnrgeon became pastor. In inoa^ina- 
tion we may, therefore, picture, as Dr. Rendle says, the Conqueror visiting 
his step-daughter at the house of her husband, the Earl de Warrenne— the Inn of 
the Pnors of Lewes (the foundation of the Warrennes), the Grammar School of 
Queen Elizabeth, and the hostelry of the Walnut-tree, the residence of Oliver's 
waggoner, and the munificent bequest to his native town, and the congregation of 
Baptists all occupying almost exactly the same spot, of which this token is now 
the only visible memento. 

From Wilton's •* Antiquities of Dissenting Chapels " we learn that the pastor of 
Carter Lane Chapel was a man of vast leammg, an eminent Hebraist, and 
acquainted with the Rabbinical works, and with many Oriental languac^es. He 
was a personal friend of the celebrated Toplady. He was minister of the chapel 
fill his death, in 1 77 1. 

Dr. Gill's pulpit b preserved and still used by the students at the Pastor's 
College, esUblished by the Rev. C H. Spurgeon. Dr. Gill was succeeded by 
Dr. Rippon, who was pastor from 1773 to 1836, there being but two pastors of 
thu congregation in one hundred and seventeen years. Dr. Rippon was also a 
Ottn of remarkable power and merit His congregation was a wealthy and 
influential one, and the pastor was the founder of what is now the Baptist Home 
MiBsion, the editor of the Baptist Register^ and the author of many works. Amongst 



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I020 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

them was one which never reached the press, a history of those who lay buried in 
Bunhill Fields. He presented and read an address to George III., on his 
recovery from illness, on behalf of Metropolitan Dissenters, and founded alms- 
houses and schools in connection with his meeting-house. The site of these 
almshouses was sold in 1867, ^^nd new buildings erected near the Elephant and 
Castle. 

Fide Goat Yard. 

CHAIN GATE. 

" Chain Gate," sajrs Stow, "is a fine open place, well-built, and inhabited, and 
is the third alley on the west side towards the Bridge." 

209. O. NICHOLAS . MOORE . AT . Y" = The Butchcrs' Arms. 

7?. CHEANE . GATE . SOVTHWA = N . L . M. J 

210. O, THE . RED . LION . CHAINED = A Hon rampant. 

jR. GATE . IN . SOVTHWARKE = G . K . T. i 

CHURCHYARD ALLEY (Tooley Street). 

211. O. WILL . BARNES . 1 665= A Fose and thistle. 

J^, CHVRCH . YARD . ALLEY = TOOLEY STREET. J 

212. O, lOHN I COX . IN | CHVRCHED | ALLY . IN | S0VTHWARK| 

HIS . HALF I PENY (in scvcn llncs). 

^. THE . PVMP . RVNS . CLEER . W™ . ALE . AND . BEER = A 

pump. J 

The rhyme on this token renders it of unusual interest. 

213. O. lOHN . COX . IN . CHVRCHED = Arms of the Homers' Com- 

pany. 

J^, ALLY . TOLIS . STRET = I . C. J 

CLINK STREET. 

214. O. John . Rollings . in . Clinke . Street (across the field). 

R. HIS . HALF . PENY = A savage with club. {Octagonal,) \ 
Between the great palace of the Bishops of Winchester, where Fox, Gardiner, 
and Andrews among other great Bishops dwelt, and the Thames, to which the 
palace fronted, was and is a narrow way, called Clink Street, along which many 
noble martyrs — men belonging to all forms of the Christian religion — walked to 
their doom into that most miserable of prisons, the Clink. — [R. and N., 321.] 

Stow called the Clink " A Gaole or Prison for the Trespassers in those parts, 
namely, in old tyme for snch as should brabble, fray, or break the peace on the 
said bank (Bankside) or in the Brothell House (the Stews)." 

COUNTER LANE. 

So called from the ancient prison called the '' Compter," which was situate in 
Mill Lane, Tooley Street, and was the prison for the City Court of Record, and 
also used for prisoners committed by the Court of Conscience. It was a most 
horrible place ; no bedding or even straw was allowed ; no fire, no medical 
attendance, and no religious attention. 

215. O, SAMVEL . SMITH = S .M.S. 

R. IN . COVNTER . LANE =; IN . SOVTHWARKE. \ 



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SOUTHWARK. 1021 

216. 0. MARK ; WYN . BEHIND . THE = A dog coming out of a 

wood 

R, COVNTER . SOVTHWARK = M . E . W. J 

217. O, lOH . WHEELER . BEHIND. THE = Three bcll-pulls and a 

bell. 

JR. COVNTER . IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALFE PENY. 1669. 

{Octagonal,) \ 

CRUCIFIX LANE. 

The Lane probably derived its name from a large cross that stood hard by, or 
possibly from the Christopher Inn, which existed near to the Lane. 

218. O, THOMAS . ADAMSEND . IN = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. CRVCIFIX . LANE . IN . SOVTHWARK . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 

T . A . A. (in six lines). {Octagonal,) \ 

219. O. THO . ADAMSAND . BAKER = T . A . A. 

R. IN . CRVCIFIX . LANE = AT HORSIE DOWNE. \ 

DEADMAN'S PLACE. 

Deadman's Place was in 1621 the site of the old Brownist meeting-house, built 
by Henry Jacob in 1616, in the regkter of which is the entry, under 1770, of the 
borial of Mr. Cniden, the author of the celebrated Concordance. In 1732 in 
Dcadman's Place was an alley, called Globe Alley, leading to the renowned Globe 
Playhouse. In 165 1 partly in Maid Lane, but close upon the site and foundations 
of this playhouse, the Globe Alley Chapel was built, and was in use well on to 
the last century. In 1676-77 Richard Baxter, of the " Saints' Rest," occupied the 
pulpit 

The playhouse was burnt in 161 3, but a second erected upon the same site, and 
that which was pulled down in 1644 will always have a world-wide repute, from 
its coDDection with Shakespeare, and the very land is of sacred import to the 
whole English-speaking world. The Globe Theatre was built in the reipn of Queen 
Elizabeth, and James I. granted a patent to Shakespeare and his associates to play 
plays "as within theire then usuall house, called the Globe, in the countie of 
Surrey, as elsewhere." Ben Jonson calls it ** the glory of the Bank and the fort of 
the whole parish.*' 

The land is all included in the great Anchor Brewery of Messrs. Barclay and 
Perkins. It was this brewery that, upon the death of its owner, Mr. Thrale, was 
sold by Dr. Johnson and the other three executors for ;f 135,000 ; and upon this 
occasion the oflen-auoted words were used, that ** they were not there to sell a 
parcel of boilers ana vats, but the potentiality of growing rich beyond the dreams 
of avarice," words which the later history of the brewery has proved to be more 
than mere rodomontade.— [R. and N.] 

220. O, lOHN , FREMAN . IN . DEADMAN . PLACE = A griffin. 

R. IN . S . SAVIOVRS . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

221. O. THE . RED . HART . BRRWHOVS . IN . DEADMANS . PLACE 

(across the field). 
R. 1668 . CONCORDIA . PARVA . RES . CRESCVNT (in six lines). 
{Heart-shape,) J 

222. O. THE . RED . HART . BREWHOVS = A hart. 

R, IN . DEADMANS . PLACE = I . E . M. i 



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1022 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

223. O, AT . THE . FRYING . PAN = A frying-pan. 

^. IN . DEADMANS . PLACE = A . R . T. J 

224. O. AT . THE . DOGG . AND . DVCKE = A Spaniel wlth a duck 

in its mouth. 

J^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1651 =E .M.S. J 

The Dog and Duck wms almost behind the (veorge, in Deadman's Place, near the 

Park Gale. As parish property a lease of it was granted in 1706, and appnis 

in the vestry proceedings. It was natural that so favourite a sport as duck-hunting 

should have one of its temples on the Bankside.— [R. smd N., 321.] 

Vidg St. George's Fields. 

225. O. WILLIAM . MORIS = A hart couchant 

J^. IN . DEDMANS . PLACE = An anchor. 1 



FARTHING ALLEY. 

Farthinf Alley and Halfpenny Alley were the two narrow passages leading to 
Jacob's Isuuid, Dockhead, a spot that, although most horrible in character at the 
time, will always be remembered as the site of the tragedy in Dickens's most 
popular work, ** Oliver Twist." Dickens's graphic description of the filth and 
wretchedness of this alley and of Folly Ditch and the Island was not one whit 
overdrawn ; and as late as 1876 a similarly repulsive picture of it was sketched in 
bold outline by the London City Mission. It was a thriving nursery for 
immorality, which has now been wholly swept away. 

226. O. THOS . PLANT . FARTHING . ALLY = A chequcred square. 

J^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . [668 » HIS HALF PENY. J 



FLEUR-DE-LIS-COURT. 

227. O. WILLIAM . GVISE . IN . FLOWER = A flcur-dc-lys. 

J^, DE . LVCE . COVRT . ST . OLIVE . STREET = HIS HALFE PENY. 
W . A . G. J 

Stow in 1598 mentions an inn, the sign of which is Three Flowers de Lace, t 
resort for French traders, and refers to '* other buildings of small tenements there- 
upon builded replenished with strangers and others, for the most part poor 
people." 

Taylor, the water-poet, rhymes : 

" French flowers doth show there's good French wine to sell, 
Which he that tries will find, and like it well." 

Dr. Renale states that in 1565 one Humphrey Roydon did his baking business 
within the Fleur-de-lis, etc In 1634-35 the tenant of the Flower de Luce is to 
supply diet and provision for the Dean of Canterbury on his coming to London for 
audit and other business. 

In the reign of William III. a meeting-house was erected in the court for a 
society of Particular Baptists, and a Mr. Samuel Ince was the pastor. In the time 
of his successor, Mr. Edward Wallin, a new meeting-house was erected at the 
Maze Pond, where the church still assembled in 18 14. 

In 1656, in a terrier of the property and rentals of the St. Olave's Grammar 
School there is this entry : 

" One called the Flower de Luce, then the Jack- wheel, near Toolyes Watergate, 
£6 per annum." 



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SOUTHWARK, loaj 



FOUL LANE. 



In Foal Lane stood tbe Green Dragon, in 1309 the residence of the Cobhams, 
and referred to in 1369 in the will of Joan Lady Cobham as her hostel, and still 
known in 1652 as Cobham Inn. In 1700 it was the centre of the penny post in 
Southwark. It was one of the six Metropolitan offices. " One penny is to be paid 
at the receiving-honses, and the messenger may take for his own pains and care one 
penny for each letter for delivery, but no more." — [R. and N., 297.] 

The lane derived its name in all probability from Bartholomew Fowle, who was 
Prior of the house of Canons of St. Augustine at St. Mary Overie at the time of 
the dissolution. 

228. O. ANDREW . WATERS . IN = A man making candles. 

^. FOYLE . LANE . SOVTHWARK = A . E . W. J 

229. O. THOMAS . POTTER . IN — FOW = A Stag. 

^. LANE . SOVTHWARK . 1 667 = HIS HALF PENNY. T . A. P. ^ 

FREEMAN'S LANK 

230. O. lOHN . STOCK . 1667 = Three figures. 

J^, IN . FREEMANS . LANE = HIS HALFE PENY. I . S. J 

231. O. lOHN . STOCK . 1667 = The Arms of the Fellmongers' 

Company. 

jR, IN . FREEMANS . LANE = I . S. J 

GLEAN ALLEY (Tooley Street). 

232. O, WILLIAM . ALLEN . IN = The King's head crowned. 

^. GLEEN . ALLEY . SOVTHWAR = W . M . A. J 

233. O, losEPH . CAVNT . NER . GLEEN = A Stick of candles. 

J^. ALY . IN . TVLIS . STREETE = I . R . C J 

234. O, RICHARD . CLARKE . AT . THE = Queen's head crowned. 

J^, IN . GLEANE . ALLY . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

235. O. IN . GLEANE . ALLEY = HEN MVMFORD. 

^. IN . TOOLY . STREET=H . E . M. \ 

236. O, ROBERT . WEBB . IN . GLEAN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. ALLY . IN . SOVTHWARK . l668~R . I . W. ^ 

GOAT YARD. 

The Goat Inn, which gave its name to this yard, is mentioned in 1557 in the 
will of Robert Gaynesbrowe, who lived at the signe of the Goate. 

In Goat Yard was a wooden building erected in 1672 for the Particular Baptist 
co^egation, under the pastoral care of the famous Benjamin Keach. 

Tnis was the Brst church among the Baptists who practised singing in public 
wonbip. Mr. Keach met with great opposition at its mtroduction, and a division 
in his church was the consequence. The chapel was erected immediately upon 
the issue of King Charles II. 's Indulgence for Protestant Dissenters. 

The chapel was closen in 1757. The pastor, Keach, was a man of very deter- 
mined Anabaptist views. As the author of a work entitled the '* Child's 



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1024 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

InstructoFi" he was saromoned before the assizes at Aylesbury, October 8, 1664, 
and committed to the pillory both at that town and at Winslow, the scene of his 
labours at that time. The meeting-house built in this small alley was erected for 
him after the congregation had left the house in Jacob's Street, where they first 
worshipped. The building stood in a court, says Pike in his " Nonconformity in 
Southwark,'' and had a pretty avenue of limes leading up to the door, and it was 
the first meeting-house possessed for divine worship by the Baptists at Southwark, 
whose lineal descendants are the congregation now worshipping at the Metropolitan 
Tabernacle. 

Vide Carter Lane and Jacob Street 

The issuer of this token was a deacon in the congr^ation. 

237. O, RICH . SMITH . IN . GOATE . YARD = Three hoFse-shoes. 

J^, IN . SOVTHWARK . HIS . HALF . PENY = A tTUmpet. J 



THE GRANGE (Bermondsey). 
238. O. THO . PRICE . THE . RED . cowE = A COW and sugar-loa£ 

J^. AT . Y= . GRAYNGE . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. i 

The Grange was pasture and farm land belonging to Bermondsey Abbey, and 
extended from the south-west corner of what is now Bermondsey Square to the 
ancient water-course termed the Neckinger, near which are now the mills bearing 
that name. The Grange Farm was a most valuable possession of the Abbey 3 
Bermondsey and a gift from the Crown in the days of Stephen. 



GRAVEL LANE (Bankside). 

There is a Gravel Lane, Houndsditch, and another at Ratdiffe Highway, 
which see. 

239. O. ROOB . COLLINS . AT . THE = A hart lodged. 

^. GRAVELL . LANE . BANC = SIDE. R . M . C. 

240. O. ROGER . DANNIELL . AT . Y" = A hart lodgcd. 
-/?. IN . GRAVELL . LANE = R . K . D. 

241. O, HENRI . ENGLISH = Two pipCS CFOSSed. 
^. IN . GRAVIL . LANE = H . E. 

242. O, AT . THE . ROVND . HOWSE = I . H . F. 
J^, IN . GRAVELL . LANE = BANCKSIDE. 

243. O. EZERKIELL . WORSLEY . AT = A SUgar-loaf. 

J^, HORS . SHOW . BANCKsiED = E . E . w . and a horse-shoe. 

244. O, AT . Y* . PRINCES . ARMES = R . W. 

J^. AT . Y" . BANKE . SIDE . 59 = Princc of Wales's crest 



HICKMAN'S FOLLY. 

245. O. WILLIAM . HOPPEN . AT . HICKMANS = HIS HALFB PENNY. 

Ji. FOLLY . IN . SOVTHWARK = A crcscent and seven stars. J 
Hickman's Folly was a row of houses near Jacob's Island, and formed a portion 
of London Street, skirting the Folly Ditch (see Farthing Alley). 



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SOUTHWARK, 1025 

HORSLYDOWN (or HORSEY DOWN). 
(So called from its having been used as a grazing place for horses. ) 

246. O, ALLiCE . ACTOON . i668 = A sword thrust through a boar's 

head. 

R, VPON . HORSLY . DOWNE=HER HALFE PENNY. 

247. 0, RICHARD . BAXTER . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. HORSLY . DOWNE . LANE = A woman churning. 

248. 0. lAMES . BYRLY . THREAD = A hank of thread. 

R. MAKER . HORSLY . DOWN = I . D . B. 

249. 0. SAMVELL . CHRISTOPHER = The Grocers' Arras. 

R. AT . HORSLY . DOWNE . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENY. S . I . C. 

250. O. lOHN . COLLINGTON = A blazing star. 

R. AT . HORSE . LIDOWNE = I . K . C 

251. 0, HENRY . CRICH . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. HORSLY . DOWNE . LANE = A wheatsheaf. H . A . C. \ 

252. 0. EDWARD . DELAMAiNE = A globe on a Stand. 

R. VPPON . HORSLY . DOWNE = HIS HALF PENY. (Heart- 

shape ^ 

253. 0, THE . SHVGER . LOFE . AT = A SUgar-loaf. 
R, HORSEY . DOVNE . STARES = W . K . F. 

254. 0, AT . THE . SHVGER . LOFF = A SUgar-loaf. 
R, HORSLY . DOWNE . STARES = R . Q . S. 

255. 0. PETER . HALL . MELMAN = A wheatsheaf. 

R, ON . HORSLEY . DOWNE = P . M . H. 

256. 0, MARY . HARLOE . AT = M . H. 

R, HORSEY . DOWNE = A raiU-rlnd (?). 

257. O, lOHN . HIND . HORSLY = 1668. 
R. DOWNE . NEW . STAIRES= I . I . H. 

258. 0, lOHN . HOBSON . AT . HOSLEY = A monogram of his name. 

R, DOWNE . NEW . STA1RES = I . A . H. 

259. 0, WILLIAM . lONES | CHANDLER (in two lines). 

R, OF . HORSEY . DOWNE = W . M . L 

260. 0, CORDELIA . iOYNER = Two hands joined. 

R, IN . HORSLY . DOWN . LAN = C . I. 

261. O. lOHN . KEMP . LivEiNG = The Carpenters' Arms. 

R. VPPON . HORSLY . DOWN . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

262. 0, AT . THE . GVY . OF . WARRICK = Guy on horseback. 

R. AT . HORSLY . DOWNE«=T . E . L. 



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I026 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

263. O. lOHN . LOCKSMITH . IN . NEW«=I . F . L. 1668. 
J^. LANE . IN . HORSEY . DOWNE = HIS HALF PENY. 

264. O* KATHERINE . MINTER . AT = HER HALF PENY. 
J^. HORSLYDOWNE . STARES = A Castle. 

265. O. RICHARD . PACK . 1 669 = The Butchers' Arms. 

^. IN . HORSE . DONE . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. 

266. O. lOSEPH . PETTY . 1667 = A windmill 

J^. ON . HORSLYDOWNE = HIS HALF PENY. 

267. O, AT . Y" . 3 . MARRiNERS . IN = Three sailors. 

J^. HORSSE . DOWNE . 1657 = R . S . S. 

268. O, THOMAS . STOKES. IN«=HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, HORSLYDOWNE . LANE = Two haiids joined. T . A . s. 

269. O. KINGS . HEAD . TAVERN = Head of King James crowned. 

^. AT . HORSLY . DOWN . 1653 = T . A . S. 

270. O. THOMAS . SHIMMINES = T . S . S. 1667. 
^. IN . HORSEY . DOWNE = HIS HALF PENY. 

271. O, THE . GREEN . MAN . AT 
Ji. HORSEN . DOWNE . STARES = W . T . V. 



ISLE OF DOGS. 

272. O. I AMES . wiNSOR . AT . Y« . ISLE = A pair of stag's-homs. 

J^, OF . DOGGS . SOVTHWARK . 67 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
I . B . W. 

The Isle of Dogs is in the County of Middlesex, but as the token gives it to 
Southwark it is so placed. 

It is p>ossible, however, that the token refers to the Isle of Ducks, which was 
spot on the south side of Tooley Street, near the middle of the street, and which is 
referred to in a work published in the time of Queen Anne called '* The New View 
of London "(1708). 

The estate is now the property of Magdalen College, Oxford. 

JACOB STREET. 

Possibly so called from Richard Jacob, vintner, who left to the prisoners in 
each of the three Southwark prisons, i^.. White Lion, King's Bench, and Marshal- 
sea, £40 per annum, according to Stow. 

In a private house in Jacob Street first met the Anabaptist congregation under 
the pastorate of Benjamin Keach, who afterwards moved to Goat Yard. While so 
meeting the congregation was interrupted by the churchwardens and constables, 
and carried off before the quarter sessions for unlawfut worship. 

273. O. lOHN . BVRTON . IN = Three hats. 

J^, lACOBS . STREEr = I . I . a J 

274. O. THE . BVNCH . OF . GRAPES = A bunch of grapcs. 

7?. IN . lACOB . STREETE = W , A . C. J 



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J SOVTHWARK. 1027 

r 

275. 0. ISAAC . CAMMOCR . AT . BLEW . BOOT . IN . lACOB . STREET 

(in six lines). (Square,) 
R. HIS. HALF . PENY . 69 = The Cotdwainers' Arms; and 
crest, a cavalier's boot \ 

276. O. THOMAS . GESKiNGE . IN = The Carpenters' Arms. 

R, lACOB . STREET . i666«T . E . G conjoined. \ 

277. O. RICHARD . LEE . 1657 =»R . E . L. 

R. IN . lACOB • STREET = Two hands joined. 

278. 0. EDWARD . NEATE . MEALMAN = A wheatsheaf. 

R, IN . lACOB . STREET . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

279. 0. lOHN . PRESTON . AT . Y» . ESSEX = HIS HALFE PENY. 

I . A . P. 

R. ARMES . IN . lACOB . STREET . 68 = The Arms of the Earl 
of Essex, the Parliamentary General ; a fesse, in chief 
three bezants. Crest ; an animal. A coronet. 



KINGS BENCH. 

The King's Bench was on the east side of the Borough High Street, south of the 
Maishalsea. In the latter half of last century it was removed to the comer of 
Bbckman Street and Borough Road. It eventually became the Queen's Bench, 
wai tix)lisbed as a prison for debtors in i860, and has since been destroyed. 

280. O. RICHARD . HART . AT . Y« . KINGS . BENCH . IN . SOVTH (in 

five lines). 
R. WARKE . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1 67 1 (in four lines). 

281. O. NEER . THE . BENCH = Three sugar-loaves. 

R. IN . S0VTHWARKE = R . A . O. \ 

A laige business was done at the gaol tap of the King*s Bench Prison, from 
iriiich possibly Nos. 280, 282 were issued. 

Five hundred butts of ale were drawn in one year at the common side. In an 
ontbretk (1771) the prisoners, suspecting that the strong beer was unduly weakened, 
iome fifty butts belonging to the tap were destroyed, i>., by way of impressing the 
hex upon the authorities. The gaols were at that time, in deed and in name, 
hells.— {R. and N., 54.] 

In 1 381 Stow tells us that the rebels under Wat Tyler ''brake down the houses 
of the Marshalsea and King's Bench and tooke from thence the prisoners." 

Henry, Prince of Wales, afterwards Henry V., was committed on the memorable 
occasion by Sir William Gascoigne to this prison. Baxter was confined there for 
eighteen months for his notes on the New Testament, and Rushworth died there 
in 1690. It was set on fire in 1780 by the rioters under Lord George Gordon and 
the prisoners liberated. 

282. 0. 10 . POORE . IN . THE . KINGS = The Weavers' Arms. 

R, BENCH . S0VTHWARKE = I . S . P. 

283. 0. ROBERT . STONIER . AT . Y" . KINGS . BENCH . IN (in five 

lines). 
R, sovTHWARKE . HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1669 (in five Hnes). \ 



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I028 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



KENT STREET. 

Kent Street has been the scene of splendid cavalcades and processions. Chaucer's 
pilgrims rode along it The Black Prince and Jack Cade both travelled along 
that street ; and in 1597 the Emperor Charles V., with great state, accompanied our 
Henry VIII. into London, acting their diplomatic play as it were before the eyes 
of the people. About a mile from St. George's . Bar, at the end of Kent Street 
(now Great Dover Street), was a tent of cloth of gold put up, in which the royal 
folk reposed while the heralds marshalled the procession. — [R. and N., 3S4.] 

In Kent Street in 1778 was bom Joseph Lancaster, the educationist 

284. O. WILLIAM . CHRISTOPHER . AT . Y" = An anchor. 

-/?. IN . KENT . STREET = HIS HALF PENNY. W . C. (Square ) J 

285. O. RICH . FORMAN . IN . KENT • STREET . HIS . HALFK . 

PENNY (iD six lines), 
i?. (No legend,) A unicorn. i 

286. O. lOHN . lOHNSON . KENT = Thrce goats' heads. 

R, STREET . SOVTHWARK = I . A . I. \ 

287. O, GEORGE . lONES . IN . KENT = A Spread eagle. 

R, STREET . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

288. O. AT . THE . WHITE . BARE=»A bear. H . E . M. 

R, IN . KENT . STREETE = A | FAR | THING | CHANG | ER 

(in five lines). \ 

This man was probably one who made it his trade to change, circulate, and 
gather up these very tokens. 

289. (?. AT . THE . BEARE . AND . RAGED = A bear and ragged 

staff. 

R. STAFE . IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . A . B. Three SUgET- 

loaves. \ 

In the Southwark signs we have the bear, the bear and ragged staff, the bear's 
claw, all colours and variations of bears. They tell of very important conditions 
in the old history of the Bankside Bear Garden, par excellence the place of rough 
entertainment. Some of the signs were cognisance of old families, " My father's 
badge, old Nevil's crest, the rampant bear chained to the ragged staff." 
(" Henry VI., Part II.," Act 5.) Some recall the sports which in those coarser 
times were the recognised enjoyment of high and low.*' — [R. and N., 333.] 

The baiting of bears was the favourite diversion as early as the time of 
Henry II. Stow, writing in 1598, speaks of the two bear gardens " on the Banke 
of the Thames, wherein are kept beares to be bayted, as also mastives." 
Richard III. appointed a royal bear-ward, named John Browne, "Master Guider 
and Ruler of all the Beares and Asses belonging to the Crowne," and the office 
existed until 1639. Edward Alleyn, the founder of Dulwich College, kept the 
Bear Garden on the Bankside during the times of Queen Elizabeth and Jas. I. 
The garden was closed in 1642 and the ground sold, and in 1686 his Majesty's 
Bear Garden was removed to Clerkenwell. 

One of the Bear Gardens mentioned by Stow (see under Bridge Foot) was after- 
wards converted into the Hope Playhouse, in which, in 1014, Ben Jonson's 
" Bartholomew Fair ^ was first acted. 

290. O. BENEIT . MARINOR . IN = B . E . M. 

R, KENT . STREETE . 1657 = A bear and ragged staff. 



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SOUTHWARK. 1029 

291. 0, HENRY . MILES . IN . KENT = H . E . M. 

jR. STREET . WOOLCOMBER = A WOOlCOmb. ^ 

292. 0, MiCKELL . RIDLEY = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

I^. IN . KENT . STREET = M . I . R. \ 

293. 0. THOM . STIVER . AT . THE = ThlCC dovCS. 

jR. END . OF . KENT . STREETE=sT . S. 1652. \ 

294. O. WILL . WILLIAMS . AT . Y" . WHITE = A hofsc and bucket. 

Ji, IN . KENT . STREET . IN . SOVTHWARK . HIS . HALFE . PENY 

(in seven lines). (Octagonal.) \ 

LONG LANE. 

Long Lane, which was westward of St. Jameses Church, was the special seat of 
the leather industry, and the old inn known as Simon the Tanner is in this lane. 
The s^, says Mr. Larwood, is supposed to be unique in England. 

295. O, lOHN . GILBERT . IN . LONG = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, LANE . IN . SOVTHWARK = A hand holding a bird. J 

296. O, John . Holmes . Silk . Weaver (in three lines). A 

shuttle. 
R, In . Long . Lane . in . Southwark . His . half, peny (in 
five lines). \ 

297. O, John . Sherelock . at , the-k bear's head. 

R, In , Long . Lane . Southwark . His half , peny (in five 
lines). 

MAID LANE. 

In Maid Lane and Globe Alley, a passage leading therefrom, originally stood 
the Globe Playhouse, immortalized by having been the place where (it is stated by 
Nicholas Rowe, writing in 1709) ShaScespeare first trod the stage, although in no 
logher character than the Ghost in his own play of " Hamlet'* Hard by was erected 
m 1672 a Presbyterian meeting-house, a good capacious wooden building, with 
three large galleries. Its first minister was Mr. Thomas Wadsworth, the ejected 
Rector of St. Lawrence Pountney, London. The congregation met in this build- 
ing till 1752. Richard Baxter was minister here in 1676. 

298. O, GEORGE . BALL . CHANDLER . IN = A basket. 

R, MAID . LANE . IN . SOVTHWARK = HALF PENY. G . H . B. \ 

299. O, lOHN . HARRissoN . IN = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. MAID . LANE . IN . SOVTHWARK = 1 . H . H. \ 

300. O, WILL . HVMPHREY . IN = The Bakers' Arms. 

R, MAID . LANE . AT . BANKSIDE = W . A . H. \ 

At the Bakers' Arms, Maid Lane, was a small congregation worshipping who were 
known as Separatists and Brownists. The house was then kept by one Owen, and the 
minister to the congr^ation was the celebrated Mr. Caryl, at one time Rector of 
St Magnus. Caryl was ejected on Black Bartholomew's Day, August 24, 1662, 
and was invited by his Separatist congregation to be their pastor. He was the 
anthor of an enormous work, entitled " The Exposition on the Book of Job," an 
exhan^ve and most valuable treatise on that portion of Holy Scripture. 

VOU II. 66 



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I030 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

301. O, ELIZABETH . lOYNE . AT . Y" = An anchor. 

J^. IN . MAIDE . LANE . 1667 = HER HALF PENY. 

The brewing house of Child, the predecessor of Halsey, Thrale and Barclay, and 
the friend of John Bunyan, bore the sign of the anchor. Child, being an owner of 
ships and a contractor for the navy, probably originated the sign for his brewhoose; 

The issuer of this token lived near, and pro^bly carried on a small business ; 
but Dr. Rendle says, '* This small anchor may have given a hint of the name and 
have been absorbed in the brewery ; we can only conjecture." — [R. and N., 65.] 

302. O, lOHN . ROBERTS . IN . MAIDEN = A fountain. 

J^, LANE . IN . SOVTHWARK . 1 666 = HIS HALF PENY. I . R. J 

303. O. MICHAEL . STEELL . AT . THE = A winc cask and measure. 

^. IN . MAID . LANE . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. J 

MARGARET HILL. 

St. Margaret Hill derived its name from the parish church of St Margaret, 
which was suppressed in the year 1540. 

Upon the site of the church there was a Town Hall, erected in 1686 at the chaise of 
the City of London. It is now covered by the London and County Bank and bf 
Town Hall chambers. — [R. and N., 204.] 

304. O. THE . BLACK . BOY . AT . MARG = A black boy smoking. 

7?. HILL . IN . SOVTH WARKE = H . P . H. J 

THE MARSHALSEA. 

The Marshalsea, Stow tells us, was " so called as pertaining to the Mardialles of 
England.** It was broken open by Wat Tyler in I38i,^and Sir John Imwortfa, 
Marshal and Governor of the prison, beheaded. The building was demolished in 
1842. 

The jurisdiction of the Marshalsea was of the highest antiquity, and in rank and 
dignity had none to surpass it. It was coeval with common law, and until 1332 
there was no appeal from it. The cruelty pursued by this potent Court in thar 
most horrible prison was most dreadful, and such enormous oppressions were 
revealed in 1729, by a committee of inspection, that the indignation of the House 
knew no bounds. The chairman of the committee was General Oglethorpe, of 
Westbrook, Godalming, and the Deputy- Warden Acton was prosecuted for no less 
than five murders in the prison. 

Thomson, in his ** Seasons," undei Winter, has some very energetic and noble 
lines with reference to this inquiry. 

Bonner, quondam Bishop of London, was imprisoned for ten years in the 
Marshalsea for refusal to take the oath of allegiance to Elizabeth, and died there 
September 5, 1569. 

305. O. lOHN . LOWMAN . AT . THE = A pOltCuUis. I . M . L 

^. MARSHALSEY . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 
This was probably issued at the gaol-tap of the Marshalsea. Very much ale 
was consumed at these gaol-taps, the miserable people confined in the prisons try- 
ing to drown sorrow or " kill time " by drinking. Six hundred pots of beer were 
supplied at the Marshalsea on a Sunday afternoon for the purpose, so Howard says 
in his book on prisons. So horrible had the |^ols become in 17 18 that in tiat 
year a descriptive pamphlet was published, entitled "The Marshalsea; or, Hell 
in Epitome.*'— [R- and N., 54.] 

Mr. Norman informs us that the later Marshalsea^ built in 18 ii, was not on the 
site of the old building, but considerably further south. Some trace of it still 
remains. The entrance of the older prison was between Mermaid Court or Alley, 
and Axe and Bottle Yard, now Newcomen Street 



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SOUTHWARK. 1031 



THE MAZE AND MAZE POND. 

The Maze formed part of the garden of the Abbots of Battle, and was attached 
to "Baltell House,'* their town residence. 
The Pond was a pool in the same garden for '* fancy fysshe." 
There was a Particular Baptist meeting-house in Maze Pond originated by those 
who separated from Benjamin Reach's church in Goat Yard (q. v. ), occasioned by 
t diflference of opinion upon the subject of singing in public worship. Mr. Samuel 
Hee was first pastor in 1691, and the church existed till at least 1814. 

306. 0. MICH . BLOWER . AT . THE = A COCk. 
R. MAZE . IN . SOVTHWORKE = M . A . B. 

307. 0, GEORGE . HORSLEY . AT . Y^ . GREAT = St. Gcorge and the 

Dragon. 

R, MAZE . PONDE . IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALFE PENY. 
1668. \ 

308. 0. NICHOLAS. MACKRETH = The sun. 
R, MEASE . SOVTHWARKE = N . S . M. 



MERMAID COURT. 

Strype relates of Mermaid Court in 1720 that it is " an open court indifferently 
well built and inhabited, having a long passage down steps to a bowling-green by 
a ditch.'* The Mermaid Inn stood in the thick of the Southwark Fair, and is 
referred to in a grant of 1^51. Taylor, the water-poet, speaking of it, says : 
'* This Mayd is strange (in shape) to Man appearing, 
Shee's neither Fish nor Flesh nor good Red Hearing. 
What is Shee then ? a Signe to represent 
Fish, Flesh, good wine, with Welcome and Content." 

309. O, DANIELL . WRIGHT . IN = The Royal Arms. 

R. MERMAID . CORT . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



MILL LANE (Tooley Street). 

Mill Lane takes its name from the mills of Sir John Fastolfe (" ffostalles mylles 
at Battle Bridge"). 
He possessed " water-mills and dough-mills." — Mag. Coll., Oxford, deeds. 

310. O. lAMES . TOVCHIN . AT . Y= . RED = A lion passant I . A . T. 

R, IN . MILL . LANE . 1 666 = HIS HALF PENY. 
There is a Red Lion &nd Key now in Mill Lane, probably the same house. 

THE MINT. 

The Mint was opposite St. George's Church, and was in the seventeenth 
ceDtnry an Alsatia or refuge for the worst and lowest people. 

Henry VII L established a mint there for coinage. The Mint was first carried 
on in Suffolk House, the residence of the King's brother-in-law, Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, and when the King took over his house as a mint he gave the 
Dakein exchange the house of the Bishop of Norwich, in St. Martin's in- the- Fields. 

In the Mint in 1832 the first case of Asiatic cholera appeared in the Metropolis. 
The Harrow and Three Bells were the two chief inns in the Mint. 

66—2 



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I033 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

311. O. lOHN . BELL . IN . THE . MINT = Three bcUs. 

J^, IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

312. O. IN . THE . MINT = A haiTOW. 
^. IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . G. 

313. O. RICHARD . PERKINS = The Mercers* Arms. 

^. IN . MINT . SOVTHWARKE = R . M . P, 

314. O, lOHN . FLATTEN . IN . THE = HIS HALF PENV. 

/^. MINT . IN . sovTHWARK = The Coopers* Arms. 



MONTAGUE CLOSK 

Montage Close, the space of ground between the church of St. Mary Oreij 
and the nver, was for hundreds of years the priory cloister, the quiet home of 
Augustiuian canons. After the dissolution. Sir Anthony Browne, Viscount Mon- 
tague, acquired the property and built here a town mansion. The Montagues 
were a stanch Catholic family, and under their favour the Close became a refuge to 
which persons hunted on account of their religion fled. Later it came into the hands 
of the Marshalls, Overman, and other rich people who had advanced money to 
the Montague family. About 1830 part of the Close was taken down to make room 
for approaches to New London Bridge. It now still exists by name, the site chiefly 
occupied by wharves. — [R. and N., 317-19.] 

Overman was a rich soap-boiler and local magnate, and a charitable lady of the 
family built in 1770-71 some one-storied picturesque almshouses at the comer of the 
Qose, that were but lately removed. 

One of the issuers. No. 322, bears the well-known name, and was piobablj t 
member of the same family. 

3x5. O, AT . THE . HORS . SHOO = A horse-shoe. 

^. IN . MOVNTAGVE . CLOSE = D . E . C 

316. O. AT . THE . CROOKED . BILLET = A billet of WOOd. 
J^. IN . MOVNTAGVE . CLOSS = T . I . C 

317. O. AT . THE . COCK . IN = A COCk. 

^. MOVNTAGVE . CLOSE = W . E . H. i 

318. O. EDWARD . DRAKE . IN . MOVN^^' . AT . Y« = Bust of Ring 

Charles I. 

^. CLOSE . IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
E . R . D. 

319. O, MARY . LOVDELL . IN = M . L. 

J^. MOVNTAGOV . CLOVS = M . L. J 

320. O. AT . THE . HORSE . SHOOE = A horse-shoe. 

jR. IN . MOVNTAGVE . CLOSE = R . I . K. 1 

321. O. AT . Y* . DYERS . ARMES = The DycFs' Arms. 

^. IN . MOVNTAQVE . CLOSE = A .E.N. { 

322. O, STEPHEN . OVERMAN = A unicorn. 

^. MOVNTAGV . CLOSE = S . M . O. i 



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SOUTHWARK, 1033 



NEW RENTS. 

'* Lead from Foul Lane to St. Saviour's Dock Stairs, on the Bankside, between 
Stoney Street and London Bridge." — Bum. 

Slow sUtes that " New Rents goes from Counter Street to St. Mary Ovaries Dock, 
and is a street of pretty good account, indifferent large and square, with well-built 
and inhabited houses, having trees before the doors, which renders it pleasant." 

323. O. lOHN . BAILEY . IN . NEW = A SOldicr. 
R. RENTS . SOVTHWARK = I . S . B. 

324. O, THOMAS . FLE1'CHER = A rOSC CrOWDCd. 
R, NEW . RENTS . SOVTHWARK = T . M . F. 

325. O. IN . THE . NEW . RENTS = A bell 
R, IN . SOVTHWARKE = G . E . L. 

326. 0, lOHN . LOOMEAR . AT . THE = A harrow. 

R. IN . NEW . RENTS . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

327. O, HENRY . LYBORN . IN = A haiTOW. 
R, THE . NEW . RENTS . 69 = HIS HALF PENY. 

328. O. HENRY . THARPE . IN . THE . NEW = A SUgOT-loaf. H . R . T. 
R, RENTS . IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

329. O, WILL . THVRSTON . AT . THE = A lOSC CrOWDCd. 
R. NEW . RENTS . SOVTHWARK = W . M . T. 

330. O. lOEL . VAVSE . AT . THE = A mermaid. 

R. IN . THE . NEW . RENTS = I . M . V. 



THE PARK. 

The Park referred to in this name was that attached to Winchester House, 
the inn or town palace of the Bishop of the See, and which land was sold on 
September 26, 1649, by the Crown, under whom it had been held in service of five 
wu^l-fees of the value oi £1 lis. 3d. 

In the Park was the first Baptist burial-ground, where was buried Mr. Benjamin 
Keach, who died July 16, 1704 {vide Jacob Street and Goat Yard). 

331. O. RICHARD . BAVGH . AT . RED = A CrOSS. 

R. IN . THE . PARKE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

The sign of die Red Cross was north of Dog and Bear Yard, still shown as Red 
Cross Square, with a way through into Red Cross Street— [R. and N., 283.] 

332. O. PETER . BBALE . MEALMAN . AT = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, Y* . PARK . GATE . IN . SOVTHWARK = A Star. P . B. \ 

333. O, HVGH . CHAFFiN . 1665 = A CFOwn between two (?) 

R. IN . SOVTHWARKE . PARKE = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

334* O. lAMES . GRiGNELL . IN » A horse-shoe. 

R. THE . PARK . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. J 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



I034 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



PEPPER ALLEY. 

Pq>per Alley was a winding passage between Montague Close and the H'^ 
Street, and had a door into the Close, which used occasionally to be shot to prove 
that the Close was private property. 

335. O. ARTHVR . ADAMS = A boat-oar. 

IC. IN . PEPPER . ALEY . 1652 = A peacock with tail dis- 
played, i 

336. O. THOMAS . CROWDER . AT = T C CODJoined. 

Ji, PEPPER . ALLY . GATE = T . S . C J 

337. O. lOHN . HADING . OF = The TuHiers* Arms. 

/^, POPPIR . ALLY . 1664 = T . L . H. 

338. O, ELIZABETH . MILNER . NEARE = A gOat 

^. PEPER . ALLY . IN . SOVTHWARKE = HER HALFE PENNY. 
1666. i 



PICKLE HERRING STAIRS {fuar Tooley Street). 

•Pickle Herrine was a noted brewing centre, and the landing-place, whaii and 
street, received the same name. It was also a centre for the Yarmonth boiixig 
trade, and hence may have possibly obtained its name. 

339. O. lAMES . AYCRIGG . AT = HIS HALF PENY. 

JR. PICKLE . HERRING . STAIRS = An elephant and castle. ^ 

340. O. EDWARD . BRENT . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1 668 (in fivC 

lines). 
^. (No legend,) A sailing boat. \ 

341. O, EDWARD . BRENT = A hoy or sailing-boat. 

R, AT . PICKELL . HERRING = E . C . B. J 

342. O. MARGRET . BROWNE . AT . Y» . BLVE = An anchor. M . B. 
R, NEARE . PICKLE . HERING . IN . SOVTHWARK . HIR . HALFE . 

PENNY . 1668 (in seven lines across the field). {Octa- 
gonal.) \ 

In the original die his was punched ; pieces struck later show the alteratioo to 
HIR, as above. 

343. O, THE . wooDMONGRS . ARM = The Woodmongers' Arms. 

R. AT . PICKLE . HIRNE . STARS = R . A . G. \ 

344. O, lAMES . HOLLAND . HIS . HALF . PENNY (in four Unes). 

^. 1668 = The Bakers' Arms. \ 

, 345- O. lAMES . HOLLAND = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. AT . PICKLE . HERING = I . M . H. 



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SOUTHWARK. 1035 

346. O. THOMAS . HVTHINSONN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, AT . picKELL . HEARING = Fivc tobacco-pipes. \ 



ROCHESTER YARD. 

Rochester Yard and Rochester Row derive their names from the town house of 
the Bishops of Rochester, which stood here, close to the Inns of the Abbots of 
Waverley, Hjde and Battle, and the palace of the Bishops of AVinchester. 

347. 0, RICHARD . CRIPES . IN . ROCHES = A CrOWD. 

R. TER . YARD . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. i 



ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH (Blackman Street). 

348. 0. lOHN . allam . in . s = a shuttle. 

R. GEORGES . SOVTHWARK = I . M . A. \ 

349. 0, DANIEL . ARNOLD . WINE . COOPER . 166 . . (in four 

lines). 

R, NEER . ST . GEORGES . CHVRCH . HIS . HALF . PENY (in five 

lines). (Octagonal.) ^ 

35a O. lOHN . EWING . S^ . GEORGES . CHVRCH . IN . SOVTHWARKE 

(in six lines). 
R, HIS . i . PENY = An ape smoking a pipe. {Octagonal.) \ 

351. O, AN . GRASON . AT . THE . SWAN = A SWan. 

R. AT . S . GEORGES . CHVRCH = A . a \ 

352. O. ELIZABET . HOARE . AT = 1657. 
R, ST . GEORGES . CHVRCH = E . H. 

353. A variety reads 1665. 

354. O. HVGH . LEY . AT . THE . WHITE = A SWan. 

R, BY . S^ . GEORGES . CHVRCH . SOVTHWARK . HIS . HALF . 

PENY (in seven lines across the field). {Heart-shape,) \ 
The Swan, or White Swan, stood immediately south of St. George's Church. 
This was originally, without doubt, a very old inn, probably one of the oldest in 
the Borough. The sign was heraldic, the badge of the Nevilles, temp. Henry V. 
In Rocque*s map, 17^, the White Swan coach-yard appears to be of great extent, 
tod that of Horwood, 1799, shows Swan yard curving round where Swan Street 
i» now, almost to Trinity Street, and quite suitable for a great traffic — [R. and 
N., 248.] 

355. O' c . R . AT . Y* . 1668 = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. AGAINS . ST . GEORGE . CHVRCH . IN . SOVTHWARK . HIS . 

HALFE . PENY (in six llnes). {Octagonal.) i 

356. O. lOHN . SAMSON . BY . ST = I . S. 

R. GEORGES . CHVRCH = IN SOVTHWARK. i 



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1036 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

ST. GEORGE'S FIELDS. 

These Fields, once the resort of the fashionable world to drink the waters at the 
Dog and Duck and Restoration, are now the site of Bethlem Hospital, the School 
for Indigent Blind, Orphan Asylum, Freemason's Charity and Magdalen. 

It is possible that No. 224 may refer to the more notorious Dog and Duck in St 
George s Fields, which in the last century was a fashionable resort, and later a hannt 
of dissipation. Let into the wall of the earden at Bethlehem is a sign of the Dog 
and Duck sculptured in stone similar to Uiat on the token. 

Vide 224. 

357. O, WILL . HAGLEY . AT . Y* . REST = HIS HALFE PENY. 

^. ORATION . S"^ . GEORGES . FEILDS = W . M . H. J 

358. O, THOMAS . MICHELL . AT . THE = MVSIK HOVSE. 

J^. ST . GEORGES . FEILDES = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The Restoration Gardens were so called from the presence of a restoratife 
spring. According to an advertisement of 1733, i^ ^"^^s "a very fine chalybeate 
spring of the nature of Piermont-water, but superior. The water could be had 
fresh daily at the gardens, and at a cork-cutter's under Exeter Change, in Uie 
Strand." 

1714.— *" At the new cock-pit at the Restoration Spring, in St. George's Ficldi, 
there will be a great match of cock-fighting, two guineas the battle, and twenty 
guineas the odd battle, all the week, b^inning at four o'clock exactly."— 
[R. and N., 367.] 

ST. MARY OVERY'S STAIRS. 

359. O. lAMES . BRiGNELL = The Skinners' Arms. 

J^. SEN . MERY . OVERS . STERS = I . I . B. J 

360. O. SAM . GLADMAN . IN . s . MARY = A chandler. 

^. OVERS . CHVRCH . YARD = S . K . G. J 

361. O. lOHN . ROBINSON . AT . S . MARY = (deMfed), 

R. OVERY . STAYRS . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

362. O, GEORGE . SHELTON . AT . Y» . COALE . WHARF (in fOUI 

lines). 

E. NEARE . ST . MARY . OVERIES . STAIRES . HIS . J (in 

five lines). large \ 

363. O, John . Standbrooke . Lymetnan , at , S' , Mary . Overs 

Stairs (in five lines across the field). 
R, In , Sauthwarke . His . halfe . Penny . i . s . s . (in five 
lines). {Octagonal) \ 

ST. OLAVE'S (see Tooley Street). 

ST. SAVIOUR'S, DOCK HEAD. 

St. Saviour's was the name given to the consolidated parishes of St Maigaret 
and St. Mary Magdalen, Southwark, on their purchasing the Churdi of St Maiy 
Overy, soon after the dissolution of the religious houses. 

364. O, lOHN . BATES . AT = I . D . B. 

R, SAVRIES . DOCKHEAD= 1658. \ 



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SOUTHWARK. 1037 

365. O, HENRv . BEDFORD . AT = The Princc of Wales's feathers. 

i?. S . SAVERIES . DOCK = H . I . R \ 

366. O. THOMAS . BENNET = An hoUf-glaSS. 

i?. AT . SAVIOVRS . DOCK = T . D . B. \ 

367. O. RICHARD . BERRY . AT . THE . 3 = Three men with 

astronomical instruments standing round a globe. 

R, AT . S*^ . SAVERYS . DOCK . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

368. O, CHRISTOPHER . BRIANT = C . A . R 

R, AT . s . SAY . DOCK = Noah's Ark. 

369. O, WILLIAM . COVLTMAN = A shovel. 

R, AT . SAVERES . DOCKHEAD = W . A . C \ 

370. O, JAMES . COWAN . UTERMAN = A man rowing a boat. 

R. AT . S . SAVERY . DOCK . HEAD = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

371. O. WILLIAM . EDWARDS = Three sugar-loaves. 

R, AT . SAYERIES . DOCK = W . E. 

372. O. PHABEE . GODWIN = The Drapers' Arms. 

R, AT . SAVORIES . MILL = P . G. \ 

373. O, AT . THE . SHIP . AT = A ship. 

R. SAINTE . SAVERES . DOCK = I . K . H. 

374. O. GRACE . HARWOOD . AT . s = Three porters. 

R, SAVERYS . DOCK . HEAD = HER HALFE PENNY. J 

375. O. CHARLES . HARWOOD . AT = C . I . H. 

R. S . SAVERES . DOCKHEAD = 1658. \ 

3761 O. THOMAS . HILL . BAKER = The Bakers' Arms. 

i?. AT . S . SAVERIES . DOCK = T . 1 . H. J 

377. A variety reads at . st . saveries . dock = g . m . k. 

378. O. GEORGE . KERiNGTON . BAKER = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. AT . S . SAVIERS . DOCK = G . M . K. \ 

379. O. ROBERT. KiNGSLAND = Noah's Ark. 

R. AT . SAVERIES . DOCK = R . E . K. \ 

380. O. SAM"- . MANSELL . AT . Y« . 2 . LASTS = TwO UlStS. 

R. AT . SAVORIES . DOCK . HEAD = HIS HALFE PENNY, 
S . C . M. 1660. 

381. 0. THOMAS . NORRis . AT = Three birds. 

R, SAVIORS . DOCK . l666 = T .M.N. \ 

382. O, BiNiAMiN . PARRAT . AT = A lion rampant 

R, S . SAVERIES . DOCK . HEAD = B . E . P. \ 

383. O. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 668 . AT=L . E . R. 

R. Y* . DOCKHEAD . BREWHOVSE = iN sovTHWARKE, A pen- 
tagram. \ 
The pentagram is regarded by the superstitious as a charm against witchcraft. 
Daring the Middle Ages it was much used, and it sometimes occurs as a merchant's 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



. w. 




i 


VIRGINNY 


= An Indian stand- 


. HEAD = 


HIS HALF 


PENNY, 



1038 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

mark ; it is also found on an uncial coin of Rome. In Germany it is called '* Dm* 
denfiiss," or wizard's-foot ; readers of ** Faust " will remember the scene in which 
Goethe represents Mephistopheles as unable to escape from Faust's study becanse 
of the wizard's-foot on the threshold. 

A similar device, composed of two triangles, one inverted on the other, called 
Solomon's Seal, is now used in the East to avert the influence of the evil-eye ; 
it is always found suspended from new buildings, and is formed of six pieces of 
wood. The modern cast copper money of Morocco has this device filling the 
whole field, and on the reverse the date. It occurs as a merchant's mark on 
the token of James Elliot, of Bideford, and is frequently found in the stained gUa 
of old churches. 

Both the above devices are in use in Freemasonry. 

384. O. lOHN . SHiLEN . AT = A windlass. 

/^, SEVERES . DOCK . 1659 = ! . N . S. 

385. O. ELIZABETH . WAPSHOTT . AT . y^ = Two portcrs Carrying a 

barrel 

J^. AT . SEVERIES . DOCKHED . l666 = HER HALF PENV. J 

386. O. HENRY. WATKINS = A rose. 
J^, AT . S . SAVERIS . MILL = H 

387. 0» SAMVEL . WHITE . AT . Y'= . 

ing amongst trees. 

^. AT . SAVORYS . DOCK 
S . A . W. 



ST. THOMAS. 

St. Thomas is the smallest parish in Southwark. It had anciently no inhabitants 
but persons connected with the original hospital of St. Thomas. 

388. O. THE . TALLOW . CHANDLER = A tallow chandler. 

jR, IN . TOMAS . SOVTHWARKE = I . A . C 

389. O, lANE . HART . IN = A heart. 

J^. S . THOMAS . SOVTHWARK = I . H. 
See below, No. 395, for a note as to this token. 

390. O. THO . HAWES . IN = S^ THOMASIS. 
^. IN . SOVTHWARK = T . H . H. 

391. O. THOMAS . HOOPGOOD . iN = A large ball suspended. 

I^. S'^ . THOMASES . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. 

392. O. FERMAN . HOVLT . IN . s = The Blacksmiths' Arms. 

^. THOMASES . SOVTHWARK = F , A . H. 

393. O. THE . TALLOW • CHANDLER = A man making candles. 

J^, IN . S . TOMAS . SOWTHARKE = I . I . M. 

394. O. lOHN . NELSON . HIS . HALF . PENY = The Mercers Arms. 

J^. IN . S^ . THOMASES . SOVTHWARK . 1667 (in five lioCS; 

{Heart-shape,) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SOUTHWARK. 1039 

395- O. WILLIAM . PANTOLL=IN S'»' THOMASIS. 

^. NEAR . Y« . WHITE . HART = W . E . P. 1665. \ 

The White Hart Inn, which is possibly also alluded to in No. 389, was one of 
the most important of old South wark inns. 

As Dr. Rendle tells us it is embalmed in English history and in the pages of 
Shakespeare. It was Jack Cade's headquarters when he dominated London in 
1450, and is the subject of constant reference in the " Paston Letters.** It was a 
few steps from the White Hart, we learn, that the celebrated conference took 
place between Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester, and Cade, which ended in the 
diroersal of the riot. 

The um is mentioned in 1529 as the place of meeting between Thomas Cromwell, 
and an anonymous person, "one R.,** who desired to see him. 

In 1637 it comes into prominent notice in connection with the Southwark riots 
and rising against Laud. 

In 1676 it was burnt down, but speedily rebuilt. 

Charles Dickens has immortalized it in ** Pickwick," and Mr. Waller refers to it 
in the ** Gentleman's Magazine '* of April, 1855. 

In July, 1889, the last remains of this historical old inn were levelled to the 
ground. 

396. O, lAMES . PARRY . IN . ST = A lion rampant. 

i?. THOMASES . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALFE PENY. 1667. \ 

397. O. lOHN . POND . IN = 1659. 

R. THOMASES . SOVTHWARK = I . M . P. J 

398. O. lAMES . TAVEY . IN . ST = A lion rampant. 

R. THOMASES . IN . SOVTHWARK = I . T. 

399. O, lOSEPH . woRwooD . 1669 = A helmet. 

R. IN . THOMAS . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. J 

40a O, Y» . GREEN . MAN . s^ . THO = A savage with a club. 

R. PARRISH . SOVTHWARKE = H . K . W. 



SHAD THAMES. 

It has been conjectured that the name of this street, running along the river- 
ride, may be an abbreviation of " St John at Thames." 
It is in St John's parish.— [Brayley's " Surrey," 377.] 

401. O. AT . THE . PRiNCis . ARMES = The Prfnce of Wales's 

feathers, p . c. 

R. IN . SHEAD . THEMES . 1649 = W • 1 • B. \ 

402. O. lOHN . CANVTY = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . SHAD . TEAMES . i666 = A tree. i 

403. O, RICHARD . RATHBORNE = The Prince of Wales's feathers. 
R. IN . SHAD . TEMES . 1 665 = St. George and the Dragon, j 

404- O. EDWARD . WINCE . 0P = An anchor. 

R, SHAD . THAMES . 1659 = A boat-oar, e . m . w. \ 

405- O. EDW . WINCE . HVRST . IN . SHAD = An anchor and cable. 
R. THAMES . HIS . HALFPENY = A horse. (OctagonaL) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I040 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



SNOW'S FIELDS. 

In Snow's Fields stood a small Welsh Dissenting chapel, which was John Wesley's 
place of worship, built by himself, when he first preached the Go^)el in Sooth- 
warlc In it he first preached August iS, 1764. 

In i8i6 the old chapel had become on the week-days a ** court of requests " for 
the recovery of small debts, and on Sundays a Methodist Sunday-school! 

There was another chapel in Snow's Fields, built by a Mrs. Ginn in 1736, and to 
which Wesley, in his diary, under date August 6, 1743, refers : ** A convenient 
chapel was offered me in Snow's Fields, the other side the water. It was built on 

Eurpose, it seems, by a poor Arian misbeliever, for the defence and propagation of 
er bad faith. But the wisdom of God brought that device to nou^t, and ordered 
by His over-ruling providence that it should be employed, not for crucifying the 
Son of God afresh, but for calling all to believe on His name." John Wnley only 
used this chapel for a short time, and then built the other. 

406. O. BEN . BATES . IN . SNOWE = Guy of Warwick riding on a 

cow. 

i?. FIELDS . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

STAR CORNER. 
There was at one time a coney-warren here. 

407. O. THo . POWELL . AT . STAR = A winged horse. 

^. CORNER . SOVTHWARKE = T . 1 . P. J 

408. O. WILL . WEST . STARR = A paper of pins. 

J^. CORNER . SOVTHWARK = W . A . W. J 

409. O, ALEX . RICHMOND . AT . THE = A Star, a Pegasus, and the 

Mercers' Anns. 

/?. STAR I CORNER | IN . SOVTH | WARK . HIS | HALFE | PENY| 

(in six lines). {Octagonal.) \ 

STONY LANE (Tooley Street). 

Sir John Fastolfe had his great house in Stoney Lane, which was of such pre- 
tensions as to be called a palace, and here the mother of the Duke of York, after- 
wards Edward IV., was lodged once upon occasion. The house is spoken of at 
the time as ** ffostal."--[R. and N., 32.] 

410. O. wiLUAM . FLEMING . AT . Y* . 3 = Three porters. 

^. IN . STONEY . LANE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

411. O. THE . SHIP . AT . THE . STON . STRETE« A ship. 

R. END . IN . SOVTHWARKE= I . H . L. \ 

SUFFOLK STREET. 

At one time called Dirty Lane, but from the palace of Charles Brandon, Doke 
of Suffolk, receiving its more elegant name. 

412. O. ISAAC . MARDOCK . OYLEMAN = An oil-jar. I . I . M. 

R. IN . SVFFOLK . STREET . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SOUTHWARK. 1041 

4i3< O, The . Black . boy . 1668 (in three lines). A boy smoking. 

R. \ . nere . Suffolk . Street . end (in three lines). The 

Grocers' Arms. \ 

THREE CRANE YARD. 

There was a Three Crane Yard between the Geoige and the White Hart, 
SoQthwark ; and another inn of the same name on the Bankside is referred to by 
the old gossip Pepys. Under date 1666 he states : *' When we could endure no 
more upon the water, we went to a little alehouse on the Bankside over against the 
Three Cranes, and there staid till it was dark almost, and saw the fire grow, and, 
as it grew darker, appeared more and more, and in corners, and upon steeples and 
between churches and houses, as &r as we could see up the hill of the City, in a 
most horrid, malicious bloody flame, not like the fair flame of an ordinary fire." 

In Three Crane Alley (mentioned as near to Tooley Street) was also situated a 
small wooden meeting-house occupied by a society of Panicular Baptists. The 
pastor was one Thomas Wilcox, bom 1622, who escaped from the Plague of 
London over into South wark, and was minister of this congregation until his 
death, in 1687. The maps of Rocque and Horwood do not mention any house 
called the Three Cranes in Tooley Street, and it is very doubtful where to place 
this token. It may have been by an error of the die-sinker that it was referred to 
Sl Olives or Tooley Street. 

414. O, AT . THE . 3 . CRANES = Three cranes (birds). 

-/?. IN . S . OLIVES . STREETE = S . E . S. 



TOOLEY STREET. 

Tooley is a corruption of St. Olave, King of Norway, who was slain in fieht by 
his rebellious subjects in 1030 ; the church in Tooley Street is dedicated to nim. 

415. O. AT . THE . 3 . svGER . LOFES = Three sugar-loaves. 

R, IN . S . TOVLES . STREET = T . E . B. \ 

416. O, NICHOLAS . BARNARD = N . S . B. 

R, IN . OLIVES . SOVTHWARKE= 1654. \ 

417. O. WILLIAM . BEBOW = W . M . B. 

R, IN . TOOLEY . STREET = A boar's head. \ 

418. O, AT . THE . BORES HEAD = A boar*s head 

R. IN . SOVTHWARKE . 1 649. W . M . B. \ 





The Boar's Head was the property of Su: John Fastolfe. 

Vide Stony Lane. 

This inn Dr. Rendle believes to indicate the site of the birthplace of John Harvard, 
founder of the Harvard University in the United States. Robert Harvard, his father, 
carried on the business of a butdier in 1607 in one of the shops exactly opposite to 
Boar's Head Court These shops were taken down in 1829.— [R. and N., 115.] 

419. 0, AT . THE . WIND . MILL = A windmill. 

R, IN . TOOLIES . STREETE = I . E . B. \ 



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1042 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

420. O, AT . THE . 3 . DOVES . IN . s = Three doves. 

^. OLIVES . SOVTHWARK = W . A . B. 

421. O. HANNAH . BELL. IN = A bcU. 
J^, S . TOOLYES . STREETE = H . B. 

422. O, THO . BELL . AT . THE= A SWan. 
I^, IN . ST . OLIVES . STREET = T . M . B. 

423. O. THO . BLACKWELL . IN . TOOLV = A ram's head. 

^. STREET . SOVTHWARKE = T . B . B. 

424. O, BRIAN . BOWDLER = HIS HALF PENV. 

J^, IN . TOOLis . STREETE = An aochor. B . S . B. 

425. O. PHILLIP . BROWNE . IN = A buDCh of hopS. 
^. S . OLIVES . STREET = HIS HALF PENV. 

426. O, AMBROSE . BVTLER . AT . ST . OLIVES = A bushcl measure. 

I^. WATERGATE . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENV. A . M. B. 

427. O. AT . 3 . TOBACCO . PIPES = Three tobacco-pipes. 

^. IN . S . OLIVES . STREETE = A clove. M . C 

428. O. THE . BLEW . ANKER . TAVERN = An anchor. 
^. IN . S . TOOVLES . STREETE = R . M . C 

429. O. Y* . WHITE . LYON . IN = A lion rampant. 

^. TOOLEY . STREET . 57 =T . A . C. 

430. O. AT . THE . RAMS . HEAD = A ram's head. 

^. IN . SOVTHWARKE . M . COOKE = M . A . C 

The Ram's Head by the river, next St. 01ave*s Church, is mentioned in the 
map of 1542. It was an ancient inn, and belonged to Sir John Fastolfe. Taylor, 
the water-poet, in 1630 refers to it in his rhyme thus : 

** At Ram or Ram's Head be it known to all 
Are wine predominant, and capitall 
To set a horseman quite beside the saddle, 
And make a footman's pericranium addle." 
See Nos. 442, 463 and 473. 

431. O. CHARLES . COOKE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, IN . ST . TOOLEYS . STREET = AT THE KINGS ARMS. J 

432. O, ROBERT . CORNELIVS . IN . 1665 = WE ARE 3. TwO heads 

facing. 

^. ST . TVLIS STREET . HIS . HALF . PENY = R . D . C. J 

433. A variety has wee three loger heads below the two 

heads, which, with the issuer's or receiver's, formed the 
complement of the three loggerheads. } 

This humorous 8i|;n is probably referred to by Shakespeare in the following 
lines : 
Sir Andrew : Here comes the fool, i' faith. 

{Enter Clown,) 
Clown : How now, my hearts ! Did you never see the picture of we three ? 

"Twelfth Night," Act ii., Scene 3. 



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SOUTHWARK, 1043 

454. O. SAMVELL . DEWELL . AT . THE = A dog and duck in his 
mouth. 
/?. IN s^ . TOOLi . STREET . sovTHWARK = Same as obverse. 

435. O. MOSES . Dix . IN = A stick of candles. 

J^, S . TOOLES . STREET = A ploUgh. J 

436. O. NEHEMIAH . DROVGHT = The sun. 

jR, IN . S . TOVLES . STREETE = N . M . D. J 

437- O. EDETH . EDLiNSON . IN = A hand holding a pair of 
scissors. 

i?. S"^ . TOOLES . STREET . 1665 = HER HALF PENY. | 

438. O. WILL . ELLIS . AT . s . CLEMENTE = A bishop Standing, 

holding a crozier, and leaning on an anchor. 

jR. IN . ST . TOOLEYES . STREET = W . M . E. J 

439. O, lOHN . FARRAH . SHOEMAKER = A Cat fiddling and three 

men dancing. 

i?. IN . TVLEY . STREETE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

440. O, WILL . GREENING . TOOLY = A drum. 

J^, STREET . AT . BRIDG . FOOTE = W . I . G. 

441. O, lOHN . HARRIS = A chequcred square. 

/?. IN . TOOLEY . STREET = I . E . H. 

442. O, lOHN . HICKS . IN = A ram's head. 

J^, ST . TOOLEYS . STREETE = I . E . H. J 

See above, No. 430, and below, 463 and 473. 

443. O. ANDREW . HVRD . IN = An Indian holding a bow. 

^. S . OLAVES . STREETs=A . E . H. \ 

444. O. lOHN . IBBOTT . AT . Y= . IN . ST = An anchor. 

I^, TOOLIS . STREET . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALFE PENY. 
I.H.I. ^ 

445. O. WILL . KELIN . AT . Y= = A SWan. 

J^, ST . OLIVE . STREET . 1658 = W . A . K. J 

446. O. FRAN . KING . AT . ST = F . S . K. 
^. OLIVES . CHVRCH . DORE= 1 65 7. 

447- O. DANIELL . KING . AT . THE = Bust of King Charlcs II. 
crowned between c . r. 

jR. IN I TOOLYE I STREET | HIS . HALF | PENNY | 1 668 (in six 

lines). (Heart-shape,) 
King's Head Yard is marked in Rocque*s map as on the south side of Tooley 
Street, beyond the Maze and opposite Tooly's Gate. 

448. O, AT . THE . GOLVDEN . HART = A heart. 
R, IN . TOVLIS . STREETE = E . E . L. 

449- 0, EDW . LEADER . IN TOVLIS = E . E . L. 

R, STREET . SOPE . BOYLER = E . E . L. \ 



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I044 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

450. O. THOMAS . MACLiE = Three candles within a horseshoe. 

^. IN . TOVLES . STREETE = T . M . M. J 

451. O. lOHN . MADELY . IN . s . OLIVES = Three kings. 

i?. STREET . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

452. O. RICHARD . MARSON = Seven Stars. 

i?. IN . TOOLEYS . STREETE = R . I . M. \ 

453. O. Thomas \ Mills (in two lines). (Script.) 

R, IN . TOVLis . STREET . 1 666 = Bust of Cluirles I , 
crowned. 

454. O. WILLIAM . NORRis . IN . ST = A lion rampant in a hoop. 

R. TOOLIS . STREET . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. 167a 

455. O. ED . ORPIN . AT . coFFE . HOVSE = An angel 

R, IN . TOOLEY . STREETE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

456. O. LEONARD . OTTER = A man smoking a pipe. 

R, IN . TOOLY . STREET . l663 = L . E . O. 

457. O. AT . THE . KINGS . ARMES . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, TOOLYES . STREET . GROCER = I . E . P. 

458. O. RICH . PACKER . IN = A crown. 

R, ST . TOOLES . STREET = R . E . P. \ 

459. O. MATHEW . PEARCE . MEALE . MAN = A wheatshea£ 

M . K . p. 
R. S^ . OLIVES . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

460. O. TiMOTHEY . PHELPS . AT . THE = Eagle and child. 

R, IN . ST . TOOLIS . STREET . 1 665 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

461. O, STEVEN . POPE . IN . TOOLY = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, STREETE . NEARE . Y^ . PVMP = Arms of the City of 
London. \ 

462. O. AT . THE . 3 . DOVES . IN . s = Three doves. 

R, TOLIVES . SOVTHWARKE = W . A . R. 

463. O. AT . THE . RAMES . HEAD = A ram's head. 

R, TAVERNE . IN . SOVTHWARKE = I . S . R. 
See above, Nos. 430^ 442, and below, 473. 

464. O. AT . THE . KINGS . HEAD = Head of Charles I., crowned. 

R, IN . TOOLEYS . STREET = I . H . R. \ 

465. O, SPIER . IN . ST . OLIVES . 66 = HIS HALFE PENY. R . H . & 

R, STREET . sovTHWARKE = A lion rampant within a garter. 

466. O, AT . THE . ST . CLEMENT = St. Clement standing. 

R, IN . TOOLEY . STREET = R . M . T. \ 



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SOUTHWARK, 1045 

467. O. RICHARD . THOROWGOOD = The sun. 

J^, IN . TOOLES . STRETE= R . E . T. 

468. O, JOHN . TVRNER . AT . THE = The King's head. 

J^. AND . [drum] . IN . ST . toolis . STREET = A drum. 

I . M . T. 

469. O. AT . THE . GOVLDEN , BELL = A bell. 

^. IN . S . OLIVES . STREET = I . E . V. J 

470. O, THE . SHEEPEHERD . AND = A shepherd and dog. 

J^. DOGG . AT . TVLYS . GATE= I . S . W. \ 

471. O, AT . THE . SVGGER . LOFE = A SUgar-loaf. 

Ji. IN . TOOLEYS . STREETE = W . S . W. ^ 

472. 0, wiL . WATKING . PIN = A Hon rampant. 

-A*. MAKER . TOOLES . STRT = W . R . W. { 

473. O. RICHARD . woRRALL = A ram's head. 

J^, IN . SOVTHWARKE = R . M . W. ^ 

See abo^e, Nos. 430, 442, and 463. 

UPPER GROUND. 

474. O. AT . THE . NEW . SHIP . ON = A ship. 
-^. THE . OVPER . GROVND = G . I . B. 

475. 0, HENRY. BACHELOR . IN . THE . VPPER = The Butchers' 

Arms. 

^. GROVND . IN . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALF PENY. H . E. B. J 

476. O, lOSlAS . CHECKET . BREWER = A SWan. 
^. IN . THE . VPPER . GROVND = I . E . C 

477. 0. GILES . COX . IN . THE = A COClc. 

jR, VPPER . GROVND . BAKER = G . P . C 

478. 0. ELIZABETH . CLIFTON . AT = BLEW. A laSt. 

-^. VPER . GROVND . SOVTHWARK = HER HALF PENY. J 

479. 0, RICHARD . DYER . AT . THE = A bear and ragged staff. 

^. IN . THE . VPPER . GROVND . 67 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
R . M . D. J 

48a 0, CHANDLER . 1656 = E . R . G. 

^. IN . THE . VPPER . GROVND = An anchor with cable. I 

481. O. GEORGE. HOLLYWELL = A goat. 

J^, IN . Y» . VPPER . GROVND = G . A . H. 

482. O. PETER . HENDY . IN . THE . VPER = The Prince of Wales's 

crest and coronet. 

J^, GROVND . IN . SOVTHWARK . 68 s HIS HALFE PENNY. 
P . 1 . H. 

vou n. 67 



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1046 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

483. O. DANiELL . lARMAN . IN . Y" = D . I in a triangle. 

i?. VPER . GROVND . BREWER = HIS HALFE PENY. } 

484. O. ARNOLD. KNIGHT = HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. IN . THE . VPPER . GROVND = Two boat-oars crossed. ^ 

485. O, EDWARD . LEWIS . AT = A CrCSCCnt 
i?. THE . VPPERGROVND = E . E . L. 

486. O, IN . THE . VPPER . GROVND . NEER = O . M . L COnjoined 
/^. THE . KINGS . OLD . BARGE . HOVSE = O . M . L COnjolned. 

HIS HALF PENNY. J 

487. O. NIC . YATES . AT . Y* . KINGS . OLD . BARG = HIS HALFE 

PENY. 1669. 
i?. HOVS . VPER . GROVND . SOVTHWORK = The BakCTS' 

Arms. J 

West of the Falcon Stairs Ferry and inn was the house and landing for the King's 
barges— Old Barge House Alley of the present Ordnance Map. In 15 15 a cha^ 
of i6d. is entered in the accounts for the King's barge to Paris Garden, probably 
for the sport. Later on we have a public-house with the sign the King s Baige. 
Hence referred to on the above two tokens, and on 489. — [R. and N., 359.] 
Old Barge House Alley is marked on the Ordnance Map of 1875. 

488. O, PETER . SALLWAY , IN . Y^ = Three nags' heads. 

J^. VPPER . GROVND . l666 = P .M.S. 

489. O, THO . LAMBE . SALTER . AT = The Vlntnefs' Arms. 

-/?. Y= . KINGS . BARGE . HOVSE = T . M . L. J 

490. O, ELYZABETH . SMITH = A man rowing a boat. 

/^. IN . Y= . VPPER . GROVND = E . S . 9 . [1659} J 

491. O, WILLIAM . Sl'EWART . AT . Y= . BLAK = A bull. 

j^. BVLL . IN . THE . VPER . GROVND = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

W . s. i 

492. O. WILLIAM . WARNER . IN . THE = An angel. 1669. 

i?. VPER . GROVND . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALF PENY. 
W , R . W. J 

493. O, ANN . WHITE . IN . THE . VPER = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

A . W. 
J^, GROVND . IN . SOVTHWARK = HER HALF PENY. J 

494. O. lOHN . WHITHOVSE = I . I . W. 

i?. IN . Y^ . VPPER . GROVND = I . I . W. J 

WINCHESTER YARD and STREET. 

Winchester House, the town mansion of the Bishops of Winchester, gave the 
name to these localities. The house was built by Bishop William Gifford, 1 107. 
During the time of the Commonwealth it was used as a prison for the confinemeni 
of Loyalists, and after Charles I.'s death was sold, September 26, 1649, to Thomas 
Walker, of Camberwell, for ;^4i38o 8s. 3d. At the Restoration it reverted to the 



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SOUTHWARK. 1047 

See of Winchester, bat having become dilapidated^ an Act passed 1663 empowered 
Bishop George Morley to lease it out. 

The old palace graclually became minoos, bat considerable remains were exposed 
to light in 1 8 14, when a great fire destroyed some modem warehouses surrounding 
it There is a unique drawing of it in the Guildhall Library. — [R. and N., 46.] 

In 1692 a portion of the house was formed into a place 01 worship for the use of 
a society of Particular Baptists, many of whom were Fifth Monarchy men and 
Sabellians. The congregation was severely censured on March 25, 1705, by the 
Association of Baptists on account of disorderly habits and strange opinions, and 
was cut off from membership with the association. It continued, however, to meet 
tiU 1738. 

Soine of the land, at one time the park to Winchester House, is still the property 
of the See, and is held on lease from the See by Messrs. Pott, the vinegar brewers, 
as the site of their manufactory. 

495. O, I . c . IN . WINCHESTER = The Biewers' Anns. 

R. YARD . SOVTHWARK = I . M . C \ 

496. O. THOMAS . lEFFS . i668 = The Merchant Tailors' Arms. 

R, IN . WINCHESTER . STREETE = HIS HALFE PENNY. T.I. \,\ 

497. O. WILLIAM . RiYERs . IN . wiNSHESS = A Uon and lamb. 

R. TER . YARD . IN . SOVTHWARK = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
W . M . R. 

498. O. EDWARD . ROBERTS . AT . Y" . WHIT = A SWan. 

R. IN . WINCHESTER . YARD , SOVTHWARK = HIS HALFE 
PENNY. 

499. O. EDWARD . ROBERTS . IN = A SWan. 

R. WINCHESTER . YARD = E . E . R. \ 

500. O. WILLIAM . THOMPSON . AT . THE = A VUltUre. W . T. 

R, IN . WINCHESTER . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

501. 0. loSEPTH . WIGHT . IN = St Gcorge and the Dragon. 

R, WINCHESTER . YARDE = I . M . W. 4 



ZOAR STREET. 

502. 0. THE . SWAN . INN . AT = A SWan. 

R, SOR . STREETE . SOVTHWARKE = HIS HALF PENY. I . N . H. ^ 

We imagine that this token must refer to Zoar Street, although we do not find 
any reference to a Swan Inn in that street. Zoar Street will always be remembered 
in history from the fact of the meeting-house that stood there being the scene of 
the preaching of the celebrated John Bunyan. The meeting-house, we learn from 
Manning and Bray, belonged to Dr. Thomas Barlow, Bishop of Lincoln, who per- 
mitted Banyan, as the friend of his old pupil, Dr. John Owen, to deliver his dis- 
coorses there. Barlow was a bishop, who, by virtue of being a willow and not an 
oak, succeeded in retaining his position dunng the troublous times in which he 
Hved. He was Bishop of Lincoln in 1675, ^^^ ^^^^ i^^ 1691. 

Banyan was committed on three occasions to prison for presuming to preach, 
and was confined alt(^ether for a period of twelve years and a half, but was at 
length discharged by the interposition of Dr. Barlow in 1676. While in prison the 

67 2 



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I048 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

third time in Bedford Bridge Gaol he wrote his immortal work, '*The Pilgrim's 
Prepress." 

A Presbyterian meeting-house was built in Zoar Street in 1687 at a cost of ^360, 
and was a good building, with three galleries. The first minister was an ejected 
divine, one Mr. John Chester. 

In connection with this chapel there was a school afterwards termed the Gravd 
Lane Charity School, which Mr. Waller Wilson's book, already referred to, stotcs 
was one of the first charity schools in which Protestant Dissenters were especially 
concerned. Bunyan possibly preached in the meeting-house before the erection 
of the later building m 1687, ^^^ ^^ is equally probable that by permission of the 
Presbyterians he occupied the pulpit of their meeting on the occasion of his last 
visit to London in 1688, immediately preceding his decease. 



NOTE. 

Tokens issued from taverns where lodges of Freemasons were held in the reign ef 

Queen Anne. 

On reference to the extremely rare plate of French origin, referred to in Vol. I., 
page 803, in which the signs of the headquarters of all the English lodges, 129 in 
number, are engraved, we find that three lodges met in Southwark. One was at 
the Bull, or Black Bull {vide No. 80) ; another at the King's Arms, St. Margaret's 
Hill, and at a tavern at St. Saviour's Dock, the sign of which it is not easy to 
identify. It has the appearance of being the Mercers' Arms. 



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Stafforbsbire, 



Number of Tokens issued roj 

Number OF Places ISSUING Tokens '. . ^ ^j 

Town Piece issued at Lichfield. 



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Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



StafEor&0bire» 

To a late valued and highly-esteemed friend, Llewellyn Jewitt, F.S. A., 
of Derby, the Editor is indebted for much kindly aid in arranging 
the tokens of this county. 

Mr. Jewitt promised to take entirely in hand the arrangement of 
tiiis county, and to supply notes as to the issuers, but his untimely 
decease prevented this kindly work being carried out. 

There is no very special interest attaching to the tokens of this 
county. They are few in number, and generally of ordinary type. 
The token of Gnoshall is an exception to this rule, and displays some 
character in its inscription on the obverse, and prayer for peace, 
specially appropriate in those troublous times, on the reverse. It is 
Ae only octagonal token of the series, with the exception of the one 
issued at Yoxall by Zechariah Lightwood. 

The only corporation piece in the county is that issued by the city 
of Lichfield. 

A partnership token is issued of Thomas and Joseph Smiths, at 
Sedgeley. 

Several tokens attributed to Smethwick by Boyne have been re- 
moved to Cornwall, as they were issued at Falmouth, and bear the 
ancient name of that town, Smithwick. Three of the tokens of Staf- 
ford bear the well-known device of the Stafford Knot, and one issuer, 
Davenport by name, was entitled to call himself armiger, and uses 
his family coat on his token. One token of Walsall is struck in 
lead. 

One trader, Thomas Richardson, had evidently business in two 
villages, and puts the names of Bettley and Batterley both upon his 
token. The arms of trading companies represented are those of 
Mercers, Grocers, Ironmongers, Stationers, Apothecaries, Tallow- 
chandlers, and Merchant Tailors. 

The king's head and the royal arms also appear on the token. 

The blocks are from drawings specially made by the late Llewellyn 
Jewitt, and are most kindly lent by Messrs. Swan Sonnenschein and 
Co., of Paternoster Square, London, from their work entitled " English 
Coins and Tokens." 

The Editor. 



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1052 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



ABBOT'S BROMLEY. 

1. O. GEORGE . TRIGG . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

i?. ABATS . BROMLEY . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 

ALSTONEFIELD. 

2. O, I AMES . SHELDON . AT = The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. OSTENFEILD . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 






BETLEY AND BATTERLEY. 

3. O, Thomas Richardson his halfe petty 1667 (in five lines). 

(Script) 
R, IN . BETTLY . AND . BALTERLY = The Grocers' Aims. \ 

BILSTON. 

4. O, HENRY . PEARSON = A pack-hoFse. 

R, OF . BILSTON . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. H . E . P. \ 

5. A variety reads h . e . b. 

BURNTWOOD. 

6. O, ABELL . LI FORD . AT Y" = A CrOWD. 

R. IN . BVRNTWOOD . l666 = A . M . L. \ 

BURTON-ON-TRENT. 

7. O. John . Blundell . his . halfe . peny (in four lines). 

R, AT . BVRTTEN . ON . TRENT = Three hats. I . E . B. \ 

8. O, DANiELL I BOTT | IN | BVRTON | D . I . B., and a rose (in 

five lines). 
R, HIS I HALF I PENNY | 1669 = The Mercers* Arms (in three 
1 ines). {Heart-shape, ) 

This token is in possession of Miss Bott, of Hanbury Hall, Burton, who informs 
me of a family tradition that members of the family have lived in Burton for 300 
years. 

Vide Shaw's " Staffordshire " for further information. 



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STAFFORDSHIRE. 1053 
9, 0. lOHN . w . A . FEiLD . IN = The Mcrccrs* Arms. 

jR. BVRTON . ON . TRENT = I » W. ^ 

10. O. BENiAMiN . HAPTEN =» The Grocers' Arms. 

^. BVRTON . VPON . TRENT «= E . M . H. ^ 

11. 0. WILLIAM . MORETON . 1 666 = The Mercers* Arms, w . i . m. 

jR. IN . BVRTON . VPPON . TRENT = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

12. O. WILLIAM . TAYLER . CARIER = W . M . T. 1 668. 

Ji. AT . BVRTON . VPON . TRENT = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 



CHEADLE. 

13. O. RICHARD . ASTON = A bull's head. 

i?. IN. CHEADLE . l666 = HlS | HALF | PENY. J 

14. O. ROBERT . SMITH . OF . 1667 = Three greyhounds courant 

J^. CHEADLE . HIS . HALF . PENY = R . I . S. ^ 



DARLASTON. 
15. O. WILLIAM . TVNKES = Apau: of scales. 

J^. OF . DALASTON . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 



ECCLESHALL. 

16. O. RICHARD . HARDMAN = HIS HALF PENY. 
J^. IN . EGLESHALL . l666 = R . H. 



GNOSHALL. 

17. O. SEND I MEB . TO | THE | MERCER . OF | GNOSHALL. Three 

cloves (in six lines). 
li. GOD I GRANT | PEACE | 1 667 (in four lines). (OctagonaJ,) J 



GREAT HEYWOOD. 
18. O. RICHARD . TETTLEY = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . GREAT . HAYWOOD = HIS HALF PENY. J 



HANCH PITS {Parish of Longden, near Lichfield). 
19- O. WILLIAM . bentae = A bunch of grapes. 

R. HANCH . PITTS . 1657 «= W . R J 



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1054 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



HORTON. 

20. O. GEORGE . GOAD . OF . HORTON = G . M . G. 
I^. HIS . TOKEN . FOR . A «= HALF PENY. 



KINGSWINFORD. 

21. O, lOSHVA . HANCOX . IN = HIS HALFE PENY. 1 . D . H. 

A KINGSWINFORD . 1669 = A scythc with handle. 



KINVER. 
22. O. lOHN . COOKE . MERCER = The Mercers' Arms, i . c 

I^. IN . KINVER . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. 



LEEK. 

23. O, lOSEPH . CLOWES = I . C 

i?. IN . LEECK . 1 670 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

24. O, lOHN . GENT = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. IN . LEEKE=I . G. J 

25. O. lOHN . GENT = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. IN . LEAKE . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

26. O. lOHN . WOOD. 1667 = 1 . W. 

J?. IN . LEEKE = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 



LICHFIELD. 

27. O, TO . SVPPLY . THE . POORES . NEED = 7%^ | Ctffy \ Of 

R, IS . CHARITY . INDEED . j6jo = ZicA \ field. {Octagonal) \ 

28. O. lOHN . BYRNES . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

JR. LICHFEILD . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

John Barnes was Bailiff of Lichfield the same year he issued his token, as well 
as in other years. 

29. O. lOHN . BYRNES . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. LEICHFEILD . l666 = I . B. \ 

30. O. THO . CATTERBANKE=The Mercers' Arms. 

JR. IN . LEITCHFEILD = T . C. J 

Catterbanke was Bailiff in 1659, 1665, 1670, and 1678. 

31. O. EDWARD . MiLWARD . BOOK = The StatioQeTs' Arms. 

R. SELER . IN . UCHFIPLD = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



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STAFFORDSHIRE. 1055 

32. O. THOMAS . MYNORS = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^, IN . UCHFEILD = T . M. 1656. J 

33. A variety reads minors, and is dated 1657. i 

34. Another variety reads minors, 1658, on the obverse, and 1657 

on the reverse. 

35. O. THOMAS . minors . l66o = T . S . M. 

I^, in . LICHFEILD = T . S . M. \ 

' Thomas Minors, member of Parliament for Lichfield in the time of the Com- 
monwealth, founded and endowed the English Free School in Bere Street, Lich- 
field, in 1670^ for teaching thirty poor boys to read the Bible in English. He died 
m 1677. 

36. 0, lOSiAH . MOSSE . OF = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J?. LEICHFEILD . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. | 

37. 0. losiAH . MOSSE . OF . 66 = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

li. LEICHFEILD . IRONMONGER = I . R . M. J 

38. 0. lOHN . QviNTON . MERCER = The Mercers' Arms. 

-ff. LICHFIELD = I . Q. J 

39. O. lOHN . QviNTO** . MERCER = Mercers* Arms. 

J^. IN . LICHFEILD . 1659 = 1. Q. J 

40. 0, HVMPHREY . ROGERSON . 0F = The Mercers* Arms. 

J?. LICHFEILD . MERCER * 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. H . E . R. ^ 



NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYNE. 

41. O, WILL . BEARD . OF . NEW = The Saltcrs* Arms. 

J^, CASTELL . VNDER . LYNE= 1656. J 

42. O, RICHARD . COOPER . IN . NEW = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. CASTELL . VNDER . LINE . 65 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

43. 0, RALPH . LOVATT . IN . 1 667 = A lion and unicorn facing. 

w^. NEWCASTLE . VNDER . LYNE = HIS HALF PENY. J 



PENKRIDGE. 
44- 0, lOHN . PHiLLiPES = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^, IN . PANCRIDGE . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. 



ROWLEY REGIS. 

45. 0. RICHARD . RVSSELL = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J^. IN . ROWLEY . REGIS = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

46. 0. WILLIAM . RVSSELL . OF . ROWLEY (in four lines). 

i?. HIS . HALF . PENY . w . R . 1667 (in fouT lines). J 



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10S6 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
47. O, HENRY. WAKEMAN = HIS HALF PENY. 

j^. OF . ROWLEY . 1666 = A horse-shoe. 



RUGELEY. 
48. O, NICHOLAS . GOSLING = The Mercers* Arms. 

j^. MERCER . IN . RVDGELEY = HIS HALF PENY. 



SEDGELEY. 

49. O, Thomas . 6- . loseph . Smiths . halfe . petty (in four lines). 
R. IN . SEDGELEY . i668 = A pair of scales. 



SMETHWICK. 

50. O. THOMAS . PARKES = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. OF . SMETHwicKE = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

51. O, A variety reads paries, evidently an error. 



STAFFORD. 

52. O, THOMAS . ABNETT= 1664. 
R, IN . STAFFORD = T . M . A. ' 

53. O, WILL . BARKER . IN . Y= = A CrOWn. 
R. BVRROW . OF . STAFFORD = W . E. B. 

54. O, THOMAS . COLUNS = The Staflford Knot. 

R, OF . STAFFORD . 1667 = T . S . C. 

55. O. SAMVELL . COTTON . MERCER = The Mercers* Arms- 

R. IN . STAFFORD . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. S . C. 

56. O, THO . DAVENPORTE = Arms of the Davenport family ; 

chevron between three crosses, crosslet fitch^. 

R. IN . STAFFORD . 1661 -T . D. 

57. O, WILLIAM . ELVEis . IN = A closed hand. 

R, STAFFORD . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . A . E. 

58. O. WILLIAM . ELVEIS = A closed hand. 

R. IN . STAFFORD = W . A . E. 

59. O, THO . GYLES . APOTHECARY = The Apothecarics' Arms. 
R, IN . STAFFORD . HIS . HALFE . PENY = The Stafford Knot 

60. O. RICHARD . HiCHC0CK = The King's head crowned. 

R, OF . STAFFORD . HIS . HAPENNY = R . A . H. 1667. 

61. O. lOHN , HVDSON . OF=l659. 
R, STAFFORD . IREMONGER = I . H. 



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STAFFORDSHIRE. 



1057 



63. 


0. 


63. 


0. 
R. 


64. 


0. 
R. 


65. 


0. 
R. 


66. 


0. 
R. 


67. 


0. 
R. 



FRANC . MOSSE . OF . STAFFORD = HIS HALFE PENY. 

FOR . NECESSARY . CHANG . 66 = The Stafford Knot i 

HVGH . RODD = Arms; three lions. 

IN . STAFFORD = W . A . E. J 

lOHN . sovLE = A stick of candles. 

IN . STAFFORD = I . E . S. ^ 

SAMVEL . TANNER . IRONMONG - A rOSC. 

IN . STAFFORD . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. S . T. J 

RICHARD . WALTER = R . M . W. 

IN . STAFFORD . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

lOHN . WELLS . IN = A unicorn's head. 

STAFFORD. 1665= HIS HALFE PENY. | 



68. a 





R. 


69. 


0. 
R. 


70. 


0. 
R. 


71- 


0. 
R. 


72. 


0. 
R. 



STONE. 

ANDREW . GERVILL . IN . STONE = HALF PENY (in four 

lines). 
The Blacksmiths' Anns. 1669 = a .e.g. 

lOHN . WHITTACRES = HIS HALF PENY. 
IN . STONE . 1664 = I . M . W. 



lOHN . WHITACRES . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 
STONE . MERCER . 1667 = I . M . W. 

RICHARD . WHiTMORE . OF . STONE (in four lines). 
HIS . HALF . PENY . R . L . w . 1667 (in four lines). 

THOMAS . WHITMORE = HIS HALF PENY. 
IN . STONE . 1665 = T . L . W. 



i 



UTTOXETER. 

73. 0, lOHN . BVRTON = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . VTTOXETER . 1664 -=The Haberdashers' Arms. J 

74. 0, WILLIAM . CARTWRIGHT= 1668. 

Ji. IN VTTOXETER = HIS HALF PENNY and a pair of scales, i 

75. 0. ROBERT . GILBERT = The Mercers' Arms. 

J?. IN . VTTOXETOR . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

76. 0. lOHN . HALSEY . 1 668 = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. IN I VTTOX I ETER | HIS . HALF | PENNY (in five lincs). 

{Octagonal,) ^ 









ihts-kalf 
-■ penny'. 



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I058 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 
77. O. WILLIAM , LAYTHROPP = The Royal Arms. 

J?. IN . VTTOXETER . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. 






78. O, WILLIAM . LEESE . i668 = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . VTTOXETER . HIS . HALF . PENNY (in fourllinCS). 

{Octagonal.) t 

79. O, THOMAS . LEESE = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . VTTOXETER . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

80. O, lEFFERY . POWER . QF = St. Gcorge and the Dragon. 

jR. VTTOXETER . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 





81. O. WILL . WAKELIN . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. VIVE . LE . ROY . IN . VITEXETOR = A CrOWn. 




WALSALL. 

82. O, CHRISTOPHER . DICKEN = C . E . D. 

J^, MERCER . IN . WALSALL = C . E . D. i 

S^, O, WALSALL . 1656 = 1 . F. 

R, AND . WEDGBVRY = I . F (lead). 1 

84. O, HENRY . HODGKINSON = A hart lodged. H . A . H. 

R, OF . WALSALL . 1664 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

85. O, lOHN . LANDER = A heart 

R, IN . WALSALL . 1656 = 1 . S . L. J 

86. O, ROBERT . STOTESBVRY = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R, OF . WALSALL . 1 663 = R . s . T. A bear and ragged staff. 



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STAFFORDSHIRE, 1059 



87. O. ELIZABETH . WEBB = The Mcfcers' Arms. 

J?. MERCER . IN . WALSAL = E . W. 



WEDNESBURY. 
^. O. THOMAS . ATENE = The Merchant Tailors' Arms. 

J^, IN . WEDNESBVRY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

89. O HENRY . FiDOE = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

i?. IN . WEDNESBVRY . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

90. O. THOMAS . FLETCHER = HIS HALF PENY. 

A, IN . WEBVNBVRY = T . F. 1 666. J 

91. O. THOMAS . HINES = HIS HALF PENNY. 

J^. IN . WEDNESBVRY . l666 = T . A . H. J 

92. O. WILLIAM . KEELING . AT . THE = An angel. 

J^. IN . WEDNESBVRY . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. i 

93. 0. lOHN . RATLY . i668 = A hand grasping a hatchet 

I^. OF . WEDNESBVRY = HIS HALF PENY. i 



WOLVERHAMPTON. 

94. O. WILLIAM . ALBBORROw . IN = A Weaver's comb. 

J^. IN . WOOLVER . HAMPTON . WEAVER = HIS HALF PENY. 
W . I . A. 

95. 0. lOH . COMBERLADG . HIS . HALF = A bell. 1664. 

-ff. PENY . IN . WOLVERHAMPTON = A tankard. J 

96. 0, ISAAC . FLETCHER . OF = The Mercers' Arms, i . f. 

J^, WOLVERHAMPTON . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

97. 0. FERDiNANDO . LEE . 1 664 = A cavalier's boot. 

J?. IN . WOLLVERHAMPTON = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

98. 0. KITT . OTH [stc] . COCK = A COCk. 

-ff. IN . WOLVERHAMPION = A tUn. \ 

99. 0. FRANCES . PARKER . IN . THE = A COCk. 

-^. STREET . WOLVERHAMPTON = Arms of Wolverhampton ; a 

tun. F . I . p. i 

Thae is a Cock Street in Wolverhampton ; no doubt Parker's token was issued 

100. 0, WILL . PARKS . HOWSE = A crown. 

li, IN . WOLVERHAMPTON = W . I . P. J 



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io6o TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
loi, O. losEPH . TVRTON . IN = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J^. WOLVERHAMPTON. l670 = HIS HALF PENY. 



YOXALL. 
1 02. O. THEOPHiLVS . FELKiNGHAM = The Tallowchandlers'Arms. 

/?. OF . YOXALL . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

10 J, O. zACHARiAH . LiGHTwooD = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

m. OF * YOXALL . 167I =Z . K . L. {OctagOfUll.) \ 



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Suffom. 



NxJMBER OF Tokens issued 375 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 74 

Town Pieces issued at Beccles, Bungay, Ipswich, Lowes- 
toft, SOUTHWOLD, AND WOODBRIDGE. 



Sub- Editors: 

Vide Preface. 



VOL. II. BS 

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I 



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QnttolK 

The tokens of Suffolk have already been so exhaustively described 
by Mr. Charles Golding in his privately printed work, " The Coinage 
of Suffolk," f 868, that but little remained for the Editor to do as to 
this county. Mr. Golding very generously placed the whole of his 
mformation at the disposal of the Editor for this work, and the 
interesting notes which had been carefully gathered by him as to 
the tokeners of the county, are transferred to this work in ipsissima 
verba, Mr. Golding has also most kindly lent his original wood- 
cuts, which were prepared for the work ahready referred to, and the 
loan of which for this book is most gratefully acknowledged. Mr. 
Edward Skinner, of Norwich, the sub-editor for Norfolk, devoted 
much time and attention also to the county of Suffolk, and many of 
the conections and additions that have been made since the issue of 
Mr. Golding's book are due to the thoughtfiilness of that gentleman. 
His aid also is very warmly acknowledged. 

From "The Coinage of Suffolk" is extracted the information con- 
tained in the following preface to the series, and we cannot too fully 
express our indebtedness to so valued a sub-editor as Mr. Golding has 
in effect been for this county. With reference to the interesting devices 
which form a feature of Suffolk tokens, we notice that the principal 
edifices in the towns were frequently adopted as a device by the 
issuers, and in this county we notice the castles of Bungay and 
Framlingham, the market-cross at St. Edmund's Bury, and the sheep- 
pen at Beccles. 

The armorial bearings of various families, with or without their 
crests, are also chosen as devices. In the following list are those 
of Crane, of Beccles ; Baythorne, of Bury ; Elliston, of Clare; Ray, 
of Laxfield ; Skinner, of Sudbury ; Knights, of Saxmundham ; and 
others. 

Merchants' marks, curious trade devices, and other designs are 

68—2 

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io64 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. . 

also met with, as examples of which see Richard Prime, of Bury; 
Stephen Green, of Ipswich ; Samuel Fitch, of RickinghalL 

Inns and taverns were well represented by their various signs. In 
the following list are to be found those of the Ship, Lion, Sun, Angel, 
Rose, Crown, Waggon, Hare, Griffin, Pickerel, Woolpack, Star, Half- 
moon, Eagle, Falcon, Ring's Head, Greyhound, Royal Oak, Seven 
Stars, Hart, Cock, Anchor, Three Tuns, Swan, St George and the 
Dragon, and others, many of which are still the principal places of 
resort at the present day, and many have remained nearly unaltered 
in the towns for a period of more than two centuries. 

The trades of Suffolk, consisting then of weaving and the manu- 
facture of woollen cloth (introduced by the Flemings, who settled in 
this county in large numbers), serge, hempen cloth, and baize, gave 
employment to many of the population. These trades are shown by 
the tokens, as, in addition to a roll of cloth, a shuttle, and a bale of 
wool, we have the Arms of the Clothworkers, the Drapers, the Haber- 
dashers, and the Merchant Tailors' Companies. Others in trade give 
examples of their chief implements or occupation ; thus, on a butcher's 
token, there is an axe ; on a tallow-chandler's, a man dipping candles ; 
on a gardener's, a bunch of grapes ; on a cordwainer's, a shoe ; on a 
vintner's, a barrel, on which is seated a boy ; on a baker's, his peel; 
on a bootmaker's, a leg with high boots ; on a maltster's, a bushel 
measure ; on another baker's, three rolls of bread ; and so on. The 
armorial insignia of the various Companies of the Brewers, Brick- 
layers, Fishmongers, Bakers, Apothecaries, Skinners, Chandlers, 
Mercers, Ironmongers, Grocers, and others, also firequently appear. 
On a few there are punning devices on the issuers' names ; as Crosse, 
of Clare, gives a cross pat^ ; Shipp, of Needham, a ship ; Rozer, 
of the same place, a rose ; whilst some show the justice of their 
dealings by a pair of scales equally balanced; and one issuer, 
to impress the fact more fully, declares himself to be "honest" 
George Turner. One piece bears the singular inscription, "we 3 

SISIXRS." 

The most numerous are the farthing and halfpenny tokens ; the 
pennies are few, only three being at present known. The tokens of 
Saxmundham, Walpole, Woodbridge and Yoxford appear to be double 
farthing tokens, and as such are unusual forms of the halfpenny 
token. The tokens of Suffolk are generally round ; but there are also 
square, heart-shaped, and octagonal ones among them. 

The number of tokens issued by the traders and corporations of the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUFFOLK. 1065 

county of Suffolk here described are three hundred and seventy five 
in number, which were issued in about seventy different towns and 
villages. The earliest date in the series is 1648, and the latest 1671. 
The series as a whole is a very large and important one, and possesses 
very many points of special interest. 
Many of the notes will be found to be of unusual importance. 

The Editor. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1066 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ACTON. 

An engraving of a token of Jambs Wilson in Acton is giTcn in the 
" Anastatic Prints of Suffolk Tokens," by the late Mr. Filch, of Ipswich ; but 
tokens of Acton are numerous, and the name of Acton is likewise found in several 
other counties. Wilson's token cannot, therefore, be positively assigned to Acton, 
in Suffolk. 

ALDBOROUGH. 

1. O. lOHN . BRIGGS . OF . 1671 = A ship. 

J^. ALBOROVGH . HIS . HALPENY = I . R } 

2. O, lOHN . MVRDOCKE = Three doves ; the Chandlers* Arms. 

J^, IN . ALDEBVRGH = I . A . M. \ 

The obverse of this token is the same as on one issued at Ipswich by Murdocke. 

3. O, lOHN . YATES . OF . ALBROVGH = Arms of the Yates family : 

a chevron between three gates. 

jR. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1669 = A globe. } 

There is a town named Aldborough in Yorkshire ; yet, the towns both in Sufiblk 
and Yorkshire being ol nearly equal size and population at this period, Suffolk has 
as much claim to these tokens as Yorkshire. Though the name of the town is 
found written in many different ways, that of " Aideburgh," on No. 2, being 
peculiar to Suffolk, leaves little doubt that it is correctly placed here. 

BARNINGHAM. 

4. O, lOHN . HOWARD = A deer trippant. 

J^, IN . BARNINGHAM = I . A . H. 

BECCLES. 

5. ^. A . BECCLES . FARTHING . 1670 . B (in four Hnes). 

/^, (No legend,) A house and sheep-pen; the Arms of 
Beccles. i 




At a meeting of the Corporation of Beccles, held March 8, 1670, "for y* 
p'curing of farthings for 3^ comon utility of y« poore," ten pounds were granted. 
The dies are still preserved in the Corporation chest. The same view of a booie 
and sheep-pen is on the seal of the Corporation, which is dated 1584. 

6. O. WILL . CRANE . OF . BECK = The Arms of the Crane family; 

on a bend three crosses crosslet. 

/^, ELLS . IN . svFFOLKE = The Drapers' Arm s. \ 

A hospital for lepers, called the Hospital of St. Mary Magdalene, in Beccles, 

and the lands belonging thereto, were granted to the Corporation for the use of the 

poor, and the said lands were, by the Corporation in 1675, leased to a Mr. Crane. 

The Crane family were long resident at Chilton. Sir John Crane, knight, was 

made baronet in 1627, and Sir Robert Crane was High Sheriff of the county of 



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SUFFOLK. 1067 

Saffolk ID 1632. Their arms, argent, a fess sable, between three cross crosslets, 
bottoQ^ fitch^ ((^les, are still to be seen io die churches of Preston, Waldingfield 
Parva, Long Melford, and Chilton. 

7. O. WILLIAM . cvTLOVE . IN = The Fishmongers' Arms. 

/^. BECKLES . IN . SVFF . 1664 = W . M . C \ 

8. O. WILLIAM . cyTLOVE = The Fishmongers' Arms. 

/^. IN . BECCLBS . 1667 = W . M . C J 

After the depriTadon of William Fleming, Rector of Beccles in 1584, by Arch- 
bishop Whitgift, an independent society was established to free itself from the 
doctrines of Popery or the obsenrances of James (. It grsidually increased. In 
JoIt, 1652, it app«irs that, with others, ** William Cutlove joyned in covenant 
■nder y visible R^ment of Christ," and commenced the foundation of a separate 
eongregation. In December, 1656, William Cutlove was chosen a deacon of it, 
and in June, 1657, one of eight '* to speake unto the questions which shall be here- 
after p'poanded,." but which questions, or the manner they were treated of, has not 
been preserved. One Joseph Cutlove was Port Reeve here in 1652. 

9. O, HENREY. FARRER = A lion rampant 

i?. IN . BECCLES = H . F . H. J 

The "Farrar" family existed here in 1855. The Red Lion Inn is still in Bly- 

burghgate Street, and the White Lion Inn in Smallgate Street In this instance 

the initials are somewhat differently placed ; the usual plan being that the initial 

letter of the surname is placed above those of the Christian names, but here they 

arc placed thus, jj**p. 
la O. DAVID . GRiCE . OF = Three boars' heads. 

£. BECCLES . IN . SVF0LKE= D .E.G. J 

The &mily of Grice or Le Grys, of Langley and Brockdish, in Norfolk, were 
long connected with the borough of Great Yarmouth. William Grice was M.P. 
for that borough in 1570 to 1585. Gilbert Grice was Bailiff in 1542 and 1551 ; 
having made a reasonable excuse for not wearing his '* gown of skarlett furryd with 
ibyner lyppett, and dublett of velvet, after the auncyent honorable customa of the 
towne aforesaid, on Sundays and holydays, and at assemblys," he was pardoned on 
condition that he procured a new one before the following Michaelmas. The 
arms of Le Grys were xjuarterly azure and gules on a bend argent, three boars 
passant fable. 

A brass memorial in Wiston Church, in Suffolk, to the minister, John le Gris, 
who died in 1630, bears arms, quarterly on a bend, three boars passant, a mullet 
for difference. 

11. O. lOHN . KING . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. BECCLES . 1657 = 1 . M . K. J 

The name of King is still found among the residents in Beccles. 

12. O. TOBIAS . MVRDOCK . IN = A man making candles. 

J^. BECKLES . IN . SVFFOLK = T . M . M. \ 

The tokens of the Murdockes appear three times in these lists, once each at 
Aldborough, Beccles, and Ipswich, and, singularly, they each bear on them 
proof that the owners carried on the then important trade of chandlers. 

13. C7. lOHN . NiCHOLLS = A roll of tobacco. 

/^. OF . BECCLES-I .R.N. { 

14. O. lOHN . WARDE . 1659 = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

J^. OF . BECKLES . IN . SVFOLK = I . E . W. J 

Mr. John Ward was one of the constables of Beccles in the years 1643 ^"^ >^* 
He left by will a yearly rent-charge of jfa 12s., to be distributed in bread, viz., one 
ihilUng's worth every week. 



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io68 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
BERGHOLT {see East Bergholt), 
BILDESTONE. 

15. O. ABRAHAM . ALSTONE = A heart 

i?. IN . BILDERSTONE « A . A. \ 

The "Alstons," formerly of Newton, afterwards resided in Marlsford. One 
Samuel Alston was engaged in the militia in 1667 with the Dutch at Felixstowe. 
Thomas Alston, in 1690, devised to poor people of Assington* twenty-six shillings 
a year, to be distributed in sixpenny loaves of meslin. William Alston, Esq., had 
also a seat in Bildeston in 1734. The Alstons of Bildetton bore for arms a chevron 
between three goats' heads. 

16. O. EDWARD . BROWNSMiTH=»The GroccTs' Arms. 

/^. OF . BVILDERSTONE . S9 = E . A . B. 

17. O, WILLIAM . BVRCH . 1667 = A man making candles. 

/^. IN . BVILDSTONE = W . E . B. 

18. O. lOHN . cvLPiCKE . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^, BVILDSTON . IN . SVFOLK = I . E . C. 

19. O. AT . Y* , CROWNE . IN = A ClOWn. 
J^, BILLSTON . IN . SVFFOLKE = I . A . K. 

The Crown Inn has remained here to the present time. 

BOTESDALE. 

20. O. lOHN . SEAMAN = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. IN . BVDSDELL . 1664 = 1 .M.S. 

21. O. lOHN . wHiTiNGE = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . BVDSDELL = I . W. 

" Bttdsdell " has continued to be the local pronunciation of Botesdale to the 
present day. 

BOXFORD. 

22. O. DANiELL . BOWTELL = A heart crowned 

/^. IN . BOXFORD . MERCER = D . B. 
The ** Bouttell ** family still exist here as farmers. 

23. O. svsANNA . KING = A swan. 

J^. IN . BOXFORD . 1664 = 8 . K. 

The Swan Inn remains at the present time. Families named King are still 
residents. 

24. O, lOHN . RiDDELSDALE . AT = The sun in rays. 

J^, IN . BOXFORD . 1667 = I . R. 

25. O. lAMES . WARWELL = A fleur-de-lys and crown. 

^. OF . BOXFORD . DRAPER = I . W. 



Digitized by 



GooQie j 



SUFFOLK. 1069 

26. Also a variety reading draper . of . boxfordoii the reverse. \ 

The Warwells were Royalists, and the device on the token was probably intended 
to make known their adherence to that party. 

A scarce Suffolk volume, printed in 1660, entitled ** Votiva Tabula ; or, Two 
Sermons preached at Boxfora on the Two Days of Public Thanksgiving appointed 
for the Happy Restoration of King Charles II., on May 24 and June 2§, 1660," is 
by James Warwell, Rector of Boxford, in Suffolk, in the preface to which he states 
*'his heart hath never in the worst. times declined from his loyalty, and alwaies 
prayed for your Majesties happy restauration in secret." It is in small quarto, and 
of eigh*y-eighl pages. 

See also under Groton, an adjoining parish to Boxford, for another token of 
James Warwell, who was a draper at both places, and probably a son of the 
Royalist minister. 

BRAMPTON. 

27. O. lOHN . DEARE . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

-^. IN . BRAMPTON = I . E . D. J 

28. O, THOMAS . SMITH = HIS HALF PENY. 

I^. OF . BRAMPTON . i668 = T . s conjoinecL J 

These two tokens are engraved in Llewellynn Jewitt's List of Derbyshire Tokens 
{Hgiiquary^ vol. iv., p. 103), and by him assigned to Brampton, near Chester- 
6eld ; but as a Thomas Smith, of Brampton, was married to Margaret, daughter 
of John Lenoan, of Brampton, Suffolk (who died and was buried there in 1070), 
the second token must be considered as one of the Suffolk series. 



BRANDON. 

29. O. WILL . BREWSTER = W . P . B. 

Ji. OF . BRANDON = W . P . B. \ 

An early family of the Brewsters resided here. In 1535 ^^ ^^^ ^hat "Thomas 
Bmster at Brandon, hym and his ij men " had, '* for working of ij doores of free- 
stone, xlvij*jd '* 

Some of the Brewster family long resided at the Hall, at Wrentham. Robert 
Brewster was a warm advocate of Oliver Cromwell ; he sat in the Long Parliament 
for the borough of Dunwich, and voted for conferring the title of King upon the 
Protector. Francis Brewster also represented the county in 1653, and the 
&mily resided at this seat until 1797. The Brewsters still hold estates here. 

30. O, HENRY . EVERARD = The Groccrs' Arms. 

Ji. OF . BRANDON . l668 = H . E . E. \ 

The name of Everard is still to be found in the town. 



BRANTHAM {see Derbyshire). 



BUNGAY. 

31. O, FOR . CHANGE . NOT . FRAyDE = T . T . 1 664, in a shlCld. 

R. IN . BONGAY . BiGGOTTS = Arms ; a castle. \ 

The initials T . T are most likely intended for ** Town Token,*' or may, as sug- 
gested in the GentUmatCs Afagazine for May, 1 8 10, stand for **Town Trust.'* 

This token was doubtless issued by authority of the feoffees and Town Reeve for 
circulation. It has always been so received and acknowledged for the last two 



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I070 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

hundred years. The town books, however, which would probably have given some 
account of its issue, are lost ; they were most likely destroyed iii the great fire of 
1688, which consumed the principal part of the town. 

The castle and fortress, built and held by successive members of the Bigods, 
gave rise to the bold defiance given by Hugh Bigod in Stephen's reign : 

*• Were I in my castle at Bongay, 
Upon the river Waveney, 
I would ne care for the King of Cockney.** 

32. O. HENRY . BLOMFiELD = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. OF . BVNGAY . l670 = H . I . a \ 

Accounts of the family of Henry Blorofield exist in the parish books ; the birth 
of a daughter in 1658, and of a son in 166 1, are noted, and a death is thus recorded, 
*• Henry Blomfield was buried 7bcr y* 24^, 1703." 

33. O. THOMAS . HOWELL = The Brewers* Arms. 

J^. IN . BVNGAY . 1660 = T . N. J 

The name ** Thomas Nowell '* occurs on several deeds of this period, but the 
£unily and name have been extinct for at least a century in this town. 

34. O. THOMAS . WALCOTT = T . w. and two Small fleurs-de-ly& 
J^. OF . BVNGEY . 1 660 = T . w. and two small fleurs-de-ly». \ 

This name is frequently mentioned in the Church records about this 
period ; he was a man of repute, and lived in one of the best houses of the 
town. 

35. O, HENRY . WEBSTER . IN = The DrapcTs' Arms. 

J^. BVNGAY . DRAPER . 67 = H . I . W. i 

Henry Webster, the issuer of this token, was a silk-mercer and drap^ ; and io 
the Church of St. Mary, in Bungay, is an altar-tomb to his memory, stating he died 
in 1715, at the good old age of eighty-three, and that " he was much lamented by 
the poor." By his will, dated 17 1 2, he gave an acre of land in Parnow Meadow, 
in Ditchingham, on the Norfolk side of the river, and twenty pounds, for teaching 
the poor children of Rungay to read and write. 

The families of Webster appear to have resided here and in the immediate 
neighbourhood since 163 1, down to 1830, and are described in the registers as 
"gentlemen." Various monuments to their memory still exist in Bungay 
Church. 

The tokens of Bungay, Nos 31, 33, 34, and 35, are engraved in the GiHiUmam's 
Magazine^ May, 1810^ p. 425. 

BURGH. 

36. O, THOMAS . CRACROFT = A fleur-de-lys. 

H, MERCER . IN . BVRGH . 66 = A large cross patt^ 



BURY ST. EDMUNDS. 
37. O. GEORGE . ADKissoN = The Bakers' Arms. 

R, IN . ST . EDMVNDS . BVRY = G . A. \ 

In 1655 George Adkisson was one of the burgesses of the Common Council ; in 
1657 he resided in the High Ward, and, with a Mr. Thomas Macro, was charged 
with the care of the ward. 



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SUFFOLK. 1071 

38. O. AMBROSE . ALEXANDER = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

i?. IN . ST . EDMONDS . BVREY = A . M . A. J 

The Alexanders were bakers in the borough. One William Alexander, in 1663, 

daimed of the feoffees one pound sixteen shillings and threepence for bread supplied 

to the prisoners in the gaoL Ambrose Alexander was churchwarden of St. Mary's 

parish in 1719. 

39. O, EDWARD . BARNBE . GARDINER = A bunch of grapeS. 

^. IN . ST . EDMVNDS . BVRY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. } 

4a O. lOHN . BAYTHORNE OF = Arms; a chevron between three 
garlands. 
/^, ST . EDMVNDS . BVRY . 1657 = 1 . B . B. Mint-mark — ^a 
mullet of five points. \ 

41. A variety from a different die. Mint-mark — a pomegranate. J 

In the registers of St. Mary's parish is recorded the burial of John Baythome, 
senior, od December 30, 1685. 

42. Another variety has mint-mark — a diamond. 

43. 0. WILLIAM . BRYDON = A shoe. 

/^. IN . BVRY . H^70 = H1S HALF PENY. J 

The family of Bridon had resided in Bury for at least a century. The burials 
are recorded in the re^psters of St. Mary s parish, of Martha, wife of William 
Brydon, on July 17, 1684, &°d of William Brydon, cordwainer, on August 16, in 
the same year. Mary, daughter of Ambrose Bryden, of Bury St. Edmund's, was 
wife of Sir Tames Ware, Auditor-( General of Ireland in 1630. She, as well as her 
husband, died in Ireland, and they were buried in St. Werburgh*s Church, 

44- 0, THOMAS . BVLL . IN = A waggon without horses. 

/^, ST . EDMONDS . BVREY = T . B. J 

Thomas Bull, in 1663, was one of the common burgesses ; in 1673 he was Alder- 
nun or Chief Magistrate and also churchwarden of St. James's parish ; in 1680 he 
was a chief burgess. The will of " Thomas Bull, Gent.," proved February, 1686-7, 
is preserved in the Rq;istry of Wills at Bury. 

45. O. THOMAS . CHAPMAN . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . ST . EDMONDS . BVRY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

Thomas Chapman, and his father also called Thomas, appear to have carried on 
the business of grocers, in ** the great Markett Place, over against the Cross." 
The borial of Thomas Chapman, grocer, on March 11, 1679-80, is recorded in the 
registers of St, James's parish, and his will is preserved at the R^stry. The will 
of his mother, dated 1649, is printed in *' Bury Wills and Inventories," p. 220, 
by Samuel Tymms, F.S.A ; published by the Camden Society. 

46. O, lOHN . CHESSON . IN = 1 666. 

J^. ST . EDMONDS . BVREY = I . C. • J 

47. O- lOHN . CHESSON = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

£. OF. BVRY. 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

The last survivor of the Chesson family in Bury died in 1864. 

48. 0, WILLIAM . COLBVRN . AT . THE = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. STILL . IN . ST . EDMVNDS . BVRY = A Still. ^ 

William Colbum was a " strong-water distiller," as appears by his will, dated 
1673. 



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I072 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

49. O. lOHN . coppiN . 1 669= A hare running. 

Ji, OF . ST . EDMVNDS . BVRY»^HIS HALF PENY. \ 

Our issuer might have been thinking of the following quotation when he chose 

the hare as his sign. ** Hares' flesh procurelh bcaulie, fresh colour, and cheerful 

countenance, insomuch as Italians say, of a fair man, * He hath eaten an hare ' ** 

(** Bultes Dyet's Dry Dinner," 1599). 

50. O, MARIE . CRESSENER . iNsA mortat and pestle. 

J^. ST . EDMONDS . BVREY = M . C J 

51. O. DANiELL . CROSLAND . AT . THE=A griffin rampant 

/^. IN . BVRY . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

Daniel Crosland was an *' innholder," and resided at his own house, the sign of 

the Griffin, which is still an old hostelry remaining on the Comhill. His bunal is 

entered in the registers of St. Mary's parish, on December 9, 1676, and his will is 

in the Will Office. 

52. O. THOMAS . ELLIS . AT . THE»A four-wheded waggon. 

J^. IN . BVRY . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

An inn still exists of the sign of the Waggon, in Risbygate Street, in the parish 
of St. James. 

53. O. lOHN . FARECLOTH=The Gfocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . BERREY . 1667=1 . F. \ 

54. O. ROB . FiDEMAN . OF . BVRY = The Groccrs* Arms. 

jR, THE . COVNTY . OF . SVFOLK = R . F. \ 

This is an uncommon reading in the Bury series of tokens. The last burgess of 
this name died in 1830. 

55. O. MATHEW . FRITH . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. ST . EDMANS . BVRY = The Bricklayers' Arms. J 

56. O, FRANCIS . GODFREY = The Merccrs' Arms. 

^. IN . ST . EDMONDS . BVRY = F . E . G. J 

The Godfreys were a family of some note in Bury. Richard Godfrey was a 
common burgess in 1630, and Thomas Godfrey also, in the same year. Francis 
Godfrey appears as a witness to a will in 1648. 

The last survivors of this name lived in a fine old house at a comer of Crown 
Street, which in the year 1539 was the residence of John Reeve, last Abbot of 
St. Edmund's Bury. The house was taken down in 1856. 

57. O. lAMES . GRANDY . 1664 = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

J^. IN . ST . EDMONDS . BVRY = I . G. J 

James Grandy was one of the burgesses of the Common Council in 1652 ; and m 
the register of St. Mary's Church it is recorded that " Mr. James Grandy, mercer, 
widdower, and Mrs. Mary Russell, of St. Matthew's, Ipswich, daughter of Mr. 
Robt. Russell, were published at Market Cross three market days, and married 
Jan. 3, 1655-6, in the presence of Tustice Dunken, of Ixworth." He died in 
1684, excommunicated, and his will was proved in December of the same 
year. 

58. O, THOMAS . GRIFFIN . IN . ST = A pikc-fish. 

jR, EDMVNDS . BVRY . l666 = T . G. J 

59. O, NICHOLAS . GYRLiNG = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J^, IN . ST . EDMVNDS . BVREY = N . R . G. J 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUFFOLK. 1073 

6a A variety reads gilling. 

61. 0, HEN . HAMOND . CLOTHIER = The Clothwotkers' Arms. 

^. OF . ST . EDMONDS . BVRY = H . E . H. ^ 

The Hammoods were early settled as clothiers and tailors in Bury. One John 

Hammond was possessed in 1519 of gardens in Cryspen Lane. Henrie Hamonde, 

clothier, gave, November 2, 1595, to the library in St. James's Church, a book 

entitled ** fiemardi Opera." Thomas Hammond was churchwarden in 1673. 

62. 0. HENRY . HEADACH . viNThR = Bacchus Seated on a barrel. 

£, AT . ST . EDMONDS . BVRY = H-. M . H. \ 

63. A variety bears on the obverse in the field a man's head. 

64. O, EDMVND . HEASEL = The Bakers* Arms. 

Ji, IN . BVRY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. E . H. ^ 

65. 0, EDMVND . HEASEL = The Bakers* Arms. 

£. IN . BVRY . 1664 = E . H. \ 

66. 0, lOHN . LANSETER . IN = I . L. 

^. COOKE . ROW . IN . BVRY = I . L. J 

In St Mary's register it is stated that John Lansetter, milliner, was buried 

March 10^ 16S8-9. Samuel Lanceter was a churchwarden of St. James's parish in 

1707. 
Cooke Row is now Abbeygate Street, the principal street in Bury St. Edmunds. 

67. O, lOHN . LVCAS . 1 668 = A roll of tobacco. 

i?. OF . BVRY . ST . EDMONDS = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

Se?eral individuals of the name of Lucas tilled the offices of Aldermen and 

Bailifis in Bury. John Lucas was one of the burgesses of the Common Council in 

1654. In St. James's Church register his burisd is recorded on July 11, 1689, 

and in his will, proved in August, 16S9, he is described as a haberdasher. 

68. 0, EDWARD . PANE = The Grocers* Arms. 

H. IN . BVRY . GROWCER = E . P. \ 

In the will of Edward Payne, proved August 5, 1667, he states that he was a 
grocer, and had a messuage situate in Crown Street, in Bury St. Edmunds. 

69. 0. THOMAS . PAYNE = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . BERRY . BAKER = A baker's peel. ^ 

One Ambrose Payne or Paine was Alderman in 1674-5 ^^^ 1685-6. 

70. 0. THO . PRETYMAN . SENIOR" A Hon rampant. 

Ji, IN . ST . EDMONDS . BVRY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

The Pretyroans had an estate called Brames Hall, in Wetheringsett, and Hasly 
Htll, in Thomdon. They sold these estates and afterwards removed to St. 
£diniihd's Bury in 1655. Another branch of the family was settled at Bacton as 
ttrly as the reign of Elizabeth, and were lords of the manors of Bacton and 
ThorDdon. 

Gcoree Pretyman, father of the Lord Bishop of Lincoln, was a haberdasher in 
Cooke Row. He was an Alderman in 1773-4 and 1787-8. Residing in Bury 
seventy years, he died December, 1810, in his eighty-ninth year, and was buried in 
tlie vaoit of his ancestors at Bacton, Suffolk. 

The arms of Pretyman are, gules, a lion rampant, between three mullets, or. 
These arms al>o are to be seen in Brampton Church, Suffolk, a member of the 
&mily having intermarried with the Leman family of that place. 

There was a Golden Lion Inn on the Market Hill, which was taken for a work- 
house in 1734 from the Earl of Strafford, on lease, for twenty-one years. 



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1074 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

71. O. RICHARD . PRIME = The Groccrs' Arms, 

Ji, AT . BERRY . i66o = R . M . p and an uncertain device. \ 

Richard Prime was ODe of the burgesses of the Common Council, and one of those 
named in the east ward in 1663 "to be very vigilant in seeing that no forriners 
likely to be chargeable settle in the town." He was a justice for the borou^ ind 
as such attested deeds during the years 1699 to 1707. 

Memorials of the family remain in the church of Great Saxham, near Bmy 
St. Edmunds. On a gravestone it b stated : " Here lyeth y« body of Rich* 
Prime, gent., of Buiy S< Edm., having been thrice chief magistrate of y' borough, 
who departed this life v« ii<^ day of December, 171 1, aged about 88 yeais." 
And " Margaret his vrife, who died 9*** of May, 1691, aged 60.** No doubt the 
initial M. on the token is for Margaret. The arms of Prime are, or, a man's 
leg erased at the thigh, sable. 

72. O. lOHN . PVRCAS . 1 664 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . ST . EDMVNDS . BVRY = I . P. 1 

John Purcas, senior, was a grocer ; his will is dated May 25, and was proved 
September 30, in the year 1698. It mentions his son John, a grocer, as living 
in the north-east corner of Churchgate and Whiting Streets in Bury. He was 
overseer of the poor of St. Mary's parish in 1719 ; his wife Elizabeth died April 21, 
1 73 It aged eighty-two. 

73. O. MARTIN . SEYDEN = A leg wearing a shoe with a rosette at 

the instep and another rosette at a band or gaiter 
under the knee. 

J^, IN . BVREY . 1666 = M . G . S. { 

Seyden was a bootmaker in Bury. 

74. O, MARTIN . SEYDEN = A boot with a spur. 

^. IN . BVREY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

Boots and spurs were so commonly worn both by pedestrians and horsemen, 
that in the last Parliament of Elizabeth the Speaker of the House of Commons 
directed the members to come to the House without spurs, as they had become 
such a nuisance. 

75. O. lOHN . SHARPE = A woolpack. 

J^, IN . BVREY . 1666 = 1 . S. \ 

The Sharpe family were residents in Bury for many years. John Sharpe, in 1632, 
willed charities to be distributed yearly at Hallowmas, Candlemas, and Christmas. 

John Sharpe was a burgess, and afterwards a chief burgess of the Town CoundL 
His burial is entered in St. Mary's register, July 7, 1686, in which he b described 
as a clothier. 

Some of the Sharpes of Bury were also chandlers. Robert Sharpe, diandler, 
in Bury, 1537, bought of his father, Richard Sharpe, of Hegsett (now Hesset), 
three closes of land in Hegsett, next the land of the Abbot and Convent of Buy, 
before the dissolution of that monastery in 1539. 

Robert Sharp, of the same family, was Alderman 1676-7, and was buned in 
St. James's Church. His tomb beats the following inscription : 

" Here lyeth y« body of Robert Sharp, Gent., who was a Justice of y« peace of 
this Borough nigh 40 years, who died y* ly^ day of February, 169J." 

76. O, FRANCES . SMITH =1666. 

jR, IN . ST . EDMONDS . BVRY = IN SVFFOLK. { 

Francis Smith was a chief burgess of the town in 1660. 

77. O. GEORGE . STANARD . iN = A vicw of a market-housc. 

/^, ST . EDMONDS . BVRY = G . s. Mint-mark — a full-blown rose. { 

78. A variei) with mint-mark — a star, or mullet, of five points. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUFFOLK. I07S 

79. O. GEORGE, STANARD . 1 667 = The market-house. 

/^, IN . ST . EDMONDS . BVREY = G . S. i 

This token gives a correct view of the old Market Cross as it then existed.^ A 
fine view of it is engraved on a scarce plan of the town, by Alexander Downing, 
1740^ and published 1761. 

So, 0. KO. STANTON . AT . THE . COFFEE = A hand pouring coffee 
from an urn into a cup. 

^. HOVSE . IN . ST . EDMVNDS . BVRY= 1^ . 1 669. I 




The coffiee-hoose was situate in the Hatters* Street in 1730. 

CofTee, introduced about 1648, is thus described by a writer in 1659 : ** This 
oofie-drink hath caused a great sobriety amongst all nations ; apprentices and clerks 
wed to take their morning-draughts in ale, beer, or wine, that often made them 
unfit for bosinesB, now they play the good fellows in this wakefull and civil drink." 
Coffee-houses in 1663 had to be licensed at the sessions ; in 1675, by proclama- 
tioa, they were closed as seminaries of sedition, but, by another royal proclamation 
iasoed a few days after, this order was annulled. 

81. O. EDWARD . TAYLER = The Grocers' Arms. 

/i, IN . BVRY . GROCERY E . T. \ 

82. O. lOHN . vsHER . OF . ST = A woolpack. 

i?. EDMVNDS . BVRY . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. I . V. } 

John Usher was a clothier, as shown by his will, dated June 2, 1684, and proved 
June ID, 1688. 

83. O. WILLIAM . WARRING A ToU of tobaCCO. 

i?. IN . BVRY . 1666 = W . W. \ 

Fosbroke, in his " Encyclopeedia of Antiquities,*' 1843, P* i<>55> says : " Tobacco 
was fifst brought into England about 1586 ; women as well as men smoked after 
sapper, and when the children went to school, they carried in their satchels with 
their books a pipe of tobacco ; this their mothers took care to fill early in the 
morning, to serve them instead of a breakfast. At an accustomed hour, everyone 
laid his book aside, lit his pipe, and the master smoked with them, and taught them 
how to hold their pipes.'* 

84. 0, SIMON . WILKIN . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. ST . EDMONDS . BVRY = S . K . W. J 

85. 0, EDWARD . WORTON . IN . BVRY = A COg-whecl. 

i?. ST . EDMONDS . OTMELMAKER = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

86. 0. NATHANELL . WORTON . IN . BVRY = A bushcl measure. 

iP. ST . EDMONDS . MAVLSTER = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

CAVENDISH. 

87. 0. WILUAM . ALCOCKE = A COCk. 

i?. OF . CAVENDISH . 1657 = W . A. \ 

William Alcocke was named as one of the trustees for the establishment of a free 

Khool in Cavendish in 1696 (with a dwelling-house and lands), for fifteen poor 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I076 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

children, and binding them ipprentices, by the gift of the then Rector, Rev. Tbos. 
Grey, of Cavendish. This cnarity, which in 1696 was worth about twenty-four 
pounds annually, has since increased in value more than fourfold. 

SS, O. DANIELL . CHICKELL=l6S7. 

R. IN . CAVENDISH . 57 = D . C J 

Lands in the occupation of a Mr. Chickell, at Pentlow, in Essex, adjoiiiiDg 
Cavendi3h, are also mentioned in the school-deeds referred to above. The name 
of Chickell has continued to the present time at Cavendish. 

89. O, lAMES . ELLIS . 1669 = A pair of scales. 

I^, OF . CAVENDISH = HIS HALF PENY. I.E. J 

James Ellis was also named as one of the trustees with Mr. Alcocke. This is 
engraved in the Gentleman^ s Magazine, February, 1790, pL 2, p. 118. 

90. O. wuFJS . FITCH . 1669 = A pair of scales. 

R. OF . CAVENDISH . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . F. \ 

91. O, THOMAS . FVLLER = A blazing Star. 

R. OF . CAVENDISH =T . F. { 

The name of Edward Fuller also occurs as one of the trustees of Grey's School ; 
he was probably a son of this token-issuer. 

92. O. lOHN MERRILLS = The sun. 

R. IN . CAVENDISH . 1664 = 1 . M. \ 

93. O, lOHN . WOODS = An oak-tree, with leaves and acoms. 

R, IN . CAVENDISH . 1663 = 1 . M . w. Mint-mark — a flaming 
star. \ 

94. O. lOHN . WOODS = Three crowns on the royal oak. 

R, IN . CAVENDISH . 1665 = 1 . M . w. Mint-mark— a mullet 
of five points. \ 

This name is still found amongst the inhabitants of Cavendish. 

CLARE. 

95. O. WILLIAM . CADGE = A crescent-moon. 

R. OF . CLARE . 1655 =W . C. \ 

William Cadge was a great benefactor to the town. In his will, dated January, 
1668, he described himself as occupying the Half- Moon Inn, the chief inn in the 
town. He bequeathed an annual payment of £2$ from a farm called Bockards, in 
the parish of Bamardiston (otherwise Hanson), in Suffolk, to the Vicar, church- 
wardens, and chief inhabitants of Clare, for the following uses : j^io per annam 
to a schoolmaster for teaching ten poor boys of Clare ; j^i5 per annum for the 
clothing of eight poor widows with a blue gown, two shuts, and one pair of 
shoes each, every year, and to receive a twopenny loaf of bread every Sunday in 
the year. This annuity in a few years was much in arrear, in consequence of 
which the churchwardens, about the year 1736, seized the lands as security until 
the arrears were paid ; this was never done, and the parish has now full possessioa 
of the estate. The income arising from these lands having increased to aboat 
;f 84 a year, a new scheme for its administration was obtained from the Court of 
Chancery in 1856, and the trustees now expend the same on the Town School and 
Widows' Charily. 

William Cadge died in April, 1668, aged sixty-three. His inn, the Half-Moon, 
yet remains in the High Street. 

He also issued a variety of his token from a different die, but of the same date. 



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SUFFOLK. 1077 

96. O. WILLIAM . coLTE = A colt galloping. 

R. IN . CLARE . l664 = W . R . C 

The Colts, who originally came from Carlisle, resided at Grey's Hall, in Caven- 
dish, adjoining Clare. Thomas Colt was Chancellor of the Exchequer in the 
reign of Edward IV. He died about 1473, ^^^ ^^ buried in the parish church 
of Cavendish. Sir George Colt married into the family of the Polejrs, of Boxstead, 
and their heir. Sir Henry, died in the second year of Charles I. His son. George 
Colt, sold his property in Cavendish and elsewhere, Which he spent in the service 
of Charles L and IL 

Anns : Argent, a fess between three colts in full speed, sable. 

Colt's Hall, now a large farmhouse, still stands in the adjoining parish of 
Cavendish. 

97. O. GEORGE . CRISP = An anchor, o . c. 

R. IN . CLARE . 1656 = WEBSTER. \ 

The woollen manufacture was carried on to a considerable extent in Clare during 
the seventeenth century. George and Richard Crisp were the principal traders of 
their day. In 17 14 Mr. Poulter, an eminent attorney of that town, took every 
possible method to eradicate the manufacture, which he at last effected, and 
drove it to Cavendish and Glemsford, where it flourishes to the present day. 

98. O. RICHARD . CRISP = WEBSTER. 

R. IN . CLARE . 1656 = R . C. \ 

99. Another similar, dated 1664. \ 

In the Court Leet Books, amongst the verdicts of the head -boroughs of Clare, 
under the year 165 1, it is stated that, " Uppon the complaynte of John Pettet, wee 
present Richard Crispe, for a fence of his lying open, to the ereate annoyance of 
the saide John Pettet, and wee doe amerse the same Ricnard Crispe thurte 
shillings if he amend not the same fence in a fortnightes time after this Court 

100. O. FRANCES . CROSSE = A CTOss pat&. F . M . c. 64 in the 

angles. 
R. IN . CLARE = A fleur-de-lys. \ 

The figures 64 in one of the angles of the cross stand for 1664, a common mode 
of shortening the date at this period. 

The tokens of Cadge, Crisp, and Cross are engraved in the Gentleman's 
Magmute, February, 1790, pi. 2, p. 118. 

loi. O, WILLIAM . CROSSE = A woolpack. 

R. IN . CLARE . 1668 = W . S . a \ 

Some of the Crosses were butchers, as, in the Court Leet books of 1622, the 
following entry appears : ** John Crosse for selling of flesh upon the Sabbath day, 
we doe amerce him ij*." 

102. O. LAMES . ELLISTON = Arms. 

R, IN . CLARE . 1659 = 1 . A . E. \ 




The Arms are those of the Ellbton and families ; quarterly, first and 

foorth, Elliston ; an eagle displayed. Second and third ; a fess between two 

helmets. 

VOL. IL 69 



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107S TRADERS* TOKENS OF. THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

The Manor of Overhall, in Gcstingthorp, in Essex, belonged to the Ellistow. 
Memorials exist to the families of the Ellistons in Gestinglhorp Churdi, wiih the 
same armorial bearings. 

COTTON. 

103. O. PETER. HOLMES = A Stocking. 

I^. IN . COTTON . 1654 = ? . K . H. \ 



CRATFIELD 

104. O. ROBERT . PALLANT . 0F = A peaCOClc. 

I^. CRATFEILD . GROCER . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. R . P. J 

105. O. lOHN . WILLIAMS . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 

li. CRATFEILD . DRAPER = The Drapers* Anns. J 

106. O. lOHN . WILLIAMS = The Drapers* Arms. 

I^. IN . CRATFIELD = I . W. \ 



DALHAM. 
107. O. lOSEPH . PEAKE = A roll of cloth. 

^. OF . DALHAM . 1 670 = HIS HALF PENY. 



DEBENHAM. 

108. O. AVGVSTINE . CVLLYER=l666. 

li, IN . DEBINHAM = A . M . C J 

109. O. lONATHAN . DAVIE = The Drapers* Arms. 

I^, IN . DEBENHAM . 1664=1 . S . D. \ 

The name of Will Davie, of Debnara, in Suffolk, is found as an assistant in appre- 
hending I'homas Spicer, of Winston, in the same county, who was burnt May 21, 
1556, for refusing to attend Mass. 

Iia O. WALTTER . DENANT. 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

j^. IN . DEBINHAM . HOSIER = W . D. ^ 

The Denant family afterwards removed to Framlingham, where many of them 
are buried, and some as late as the year 1822. 

III. O. ROBERT . DRAPER = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . DEBENHAM . 1659 = R . M . D. { 

1X2. A variety has, in lieu of the Grocers* Arms on the obverse, 
two mullets. (MSS. of Fitch.) 

Robert Draper, of Debenham, was one of the twelve trustees for this town 
named in the Ordinance of Cromwell of 1633, for the distribution of the rents 
of lands left by Sir Robert Hitcham, knight, in 1636, amounting then to about 
yf 105 yearly, *' (or setting the poor to work, to relieve the needy and impotent 
inhabitants, towards providing a workhouse, and for educating twelve or twenty 
poor children of Debenham, in a school-house, in reading, writing, accompts, or 
grammar learning." 



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SUFFOLK. 1079 

113. (7. AMOS . FISHER . 1661 =The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. OF , DEBENHAMs A . F conjoined. i 

114. O. AMOS. FISHER. l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

I^. OF . DEBENHAM^AF and a flowcr. {Heart-shape^ \ 



BENNINGTON. 

115. O, EDWARD . STVBBES = A rosc and crown. 

R, IN . DENINGTON . 1669 = ES conjoincd. 1^ I 

116. O, EDWARD . STVBBS = A rosc and crown. 

R. IN. DENNINGTON . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

It appears from the registers of Dennington that Edward Stubbs was married 
to Rose Curtis in 1665 (May 15) ; that she died in 1666 (October 12) ; and that 

he married ibr his second wife Susanna . The births of seven children at 

tarioos dates between 1672 and 1689 are also recorded. Edward Stubbs was 
boried March i, 1715, and his widow Susanna, July 20, 1732, aged ninety-two. 



DUNWICH. 

117. O, lOHN . WHITTMAN = I . F . W. 

R. OF . DVNWICH = I . F . W. \ 

The custom of marrying in the time of the Commonwealth was, first to publish 
the banns in the market-place, then to solemnize the marriage before the Mayor 
or bailiflfe of corporations or justices of the peace. During this period Whiteman 
appears to have been a registrar of marriages, for in the register of Framlingham 
we find that **Alin Davison," one of the "bailies of Dunwich" and "witnes 
yjD Whiteman, regester there,** performed the office upon an inhabitant of 
FramliDgham and one of Farnham, who were married at Dunwich in 1656. 



EAST BERGHOLT. 

118. O, LANCELOT . FELTON . IN = Three rolls of bread, l . s . f. 

R, EAST . BARGHOLT . BAKER = HIS HALF PENY. {Heart- 

shape.) J 

119. O. HABBAKKVK . LEYMAN = HL conjoined. 

R. IN . EAST . BARDGHOLT = HL CODJoined. i 

Fitch's MSS. mention one of H. Leyman, with the word '' Draper '* on it, and 
heait-shape. 

EYE. 

120. O. GEORGE • BRAYHAM = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . EYE . GROSSER = G . M . B. \ 

121. O, NATHANIEL . FLOWERDEVO = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. GROCER . IN . AYE = N . F. \ 

The Flowerdews were, in the sixteenth century, seated at Stanfield Hall and 
Hethersett, in Norfolk. Edward Flowerdew was Under-steward for the borough of 

69 — 2 



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oogle 



I0&) TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Great Yarmouth, and afterwards one of the Barons of the Exchequer. He gave to 
the Corporation of Yarmouth a silver cup gilt in 1586. 

Samuel Flowerdew, curate, was buried at Eye, November I, 1681. 

122. O. RICHARD . GViLBERT = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. GROCER . IN . EYE . 1659 = R . G. { 



FRAMLINGHAM. 

123. O. DANIEL. BARNES. 1669 = A whcatsheaf. 

^. IN. FRAMLINGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

This family is resident at Framlingham at the present time. 

124. O. NICHOLAS . BROWNE . OF = N . B. 

/^. FRAMLINGHAM . AT . Y" = A Castle. J 

Nicholas Browne was one of the churchwardens in 1661 ; his initials, N. B., 
occur on the board on which the Kins's (Charles IL) arms are painted, and set op 
in the church at the cost of j^io 3s. 9d. 

William Browne, one of the descendants of the Brownes of Framlingham, 
removed to Yarmouth, became a wealthy merchant and brewer, and was Mayor 
there in 1744 and in 1748. At a general election for members of Parliament in 
1754 he was an unsuccessful candidate (he polled, however, 342 yotes), and after- 
wards, by changing his politics, he received from Government the lucrative appoint- 
ment of Receiver-General of the county of Norfolk. He died in 1769, aged 
eighty-one. 

125. O. lOHN . CAPON . GROCER = A CaStlc. 

j^. OF . FRAMLINGHAM . 1653 = 1 . E . C J 

126. O. lOHN . CAPON . GROSER = A CaStlc. 

J^. OF . FRAMLINGHAM . 1656 = 1 . C. i 

The Capons were for a long time inhabitants of Framlingham. In 1537 John 
Capon was holder of ** the Guild of the Blessed Mary ;** in 1629 *' Johes Capon" 
occurs in a list of jurors at a Court Baron ; and in an ordinance of Cromwell for 
distribution of charitable bequests, John Capon and Thomas Capon were appointed, 
March 20, 16^3, with others, trustees. The family continued there, as appears by 
monuments, till 1814, or subsequently. 

127. O. lOHN . DAWSON = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

JR. IN . FRAMLINGHAM = I . D. J 

The Dawsons appear to have been of some note in the town. John Dawsoo 
was an apothecary, as is shown by his tombstone in the chancel of Framlingham 
Church. 

128. O. FRANCIS . IRELAND = A castle. 

JR. IN . FRAMLINGHAM = F . I. J 

The Ireland family also resided here for a long period. In the churcbwardens' 
accounts of 1557, "John Irelonde"is mentioned as one of the churchwardens 
Selling the plate for repairs of the church. Francis Irelapd was one of the jurors 
in the Court Baron, 1629, and was also, by an ordinance of Lord Protector Crom- 
well and his council, dated March 20, 1653, "for settling the estates left by Sir 
Robert Hitcham, knight, of Framlingham and Saxted, to charitable uses, in 1636," 
appointed to be one of the principal trustees. 

The device of a castle, which appears on so manv of the Framlingham tokens, 
refers tu the stronghold of the Bieods, Earls of Norfolk, the ruins ot which form 
an important object of beauty in the scenery and also in the history of the town. 



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SUFFOLK. 1081 



GLEMHAM PARVA. 



129. O. THO . MARCKES . OF . GLEMHAM . PARVY (in five lines). 

^. T . A . M . 1669 . HIS . HALF. PENY (in five lines) = Within 
a shield, a bird ^ 




13a O. THOMAS . MARCHE . OF 

I^. GLENHAM . PARVA = 1 665. 
A long pedigree of the Marcbe family of Haddenham and the Isle of Ely, and 
of Wordwell, in Suffolk, is printed in the ** Topographer and Genealogist," vol. ii., 
P-247. 

GLEMSFORD. 

131. O. EDMOND . BiGGES . IN = The sun in splendour. 

J^, GLIHESFORD . SVFFOLK = E . M . B. i 

The Bigf; ftimily are still inhabitants of Glemsford. 

The son in rays, or in splendour, is part of the Distillers' Arms. " The best 
drink nnder the sun " has been and still is to be found inscribed on the signboards 
of taverns. 

132. O. GILES . MiDLEDiTCH = A lion rampant. 

J^. OF . GLENSFORD . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

The lion inn still remains in the village. 

GROTON. 

133. O, THOMAS . GOODALE . AT . THE= A falcon With Spurs. 

Ji, FALCON . IN . GROATEN , 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 
T . E . G. J 

The Falcon as an inn-sign is ancient, and one existed as early as 1463 as a large 
hostelry at Bury St. Edmunds. 

134. 0, MATHEw . TEPER = An eagle. 

-^. IN . GROTON . 1664 = M . E . T. i 

135. O. lAMES . WARWELL = A fleuf-delys crowned. 

Ji. OF . GROTTEN . DRAPER = I . W. J 

136. O. lAMES . WARWELL . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 

H. GROTTEN . DRAPER . i668 = A fleur-de-lys crowned. J 

See an account of this issuer, under Na 26, p. 1069. 

The fleor-de-lys originated as a device of the French royal name Loys, now 
Louis. 

HADLEIGH. 

137. O. THOMAS . BVMPSTED = A heart. 

Ji. OF . HADLEIGH . 1656 = T . A . B. { 



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io82 TRADERS TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

138. O. RICHARD . DIPLAK= 1665. 

I^. IN . HADLIGH = R . M . D. J 

139. O, ARTHVR . GAiLE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

/^. OF . HADLEIGH . 1655= A . A . G. J 

Some members of this family were clothiers. John Gaell was the first Mayor of 
Hadleigh in 161 8, and ag|ain in 1628. His wife, Sarah, died in i630» and a 
singular monument exists in Hadleigh Church to her memory. Others of the 
family are frequently named in the history of the town. Several monuments exist 
to the memories of the Gaells in Hadleigh Church. 

140. O, ARTHVR . GALE= 1 664 and the Apothecaries' Arms. 

^. IN . HADLEIGH = A . A . G. 

141. O. NATHANIELL . GOLDiNG = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . HADLY . GROSER = N . A . G. \ 

The Goldings are curriers in the High Street, Hadleigh, at the present time. 

142. O. THOMAS . MARTIN = The Apothecarfes' Arms. 

J^, OF . HADLEIGH . l667=T . S . M. \ 

The Martin family of Hadleigh have memorial tablets existing in the parish 
church of Whaifield, Suffolk. The registers of Hadleigh give us the baptism of 
Thos. Martin, February 3, 163^, the baptism of the children of Thomas and 
Susannah Martin, and the wife's burial, Susannah, is recorded, June 21, 1675. 

143. O. SIMEON . MoiSE . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. HADLY . GROCER . IN = SVFFOLK. J 

144. O, RICHARD . RAND = A man making candles. 

^. IN . HADLEIGH . 1664 = R . R. ^ 

The Rand family still exist here. 

The family names of Gaell, Golding, Martin, Moyse, and Rand appear in 1701 
as inhabitants subscribing money to regain the charter for the borough, which had 
been surrendered in 1687, but it has never again been granted. 



HALESWORTH. 

145. O. MICHAELL . BARFOOT=HIS HALF PENY. 

JR, IN . HALLSWORTH . l668 = M . S . B. J 

One John Barfoot, of Halesworth, is described as a currier, and signs a deed in 
1685 as conveying a lease of lands and messuages in Halesworth and Unstead 
Parva. 

146. O, SAMVEL . WATTS = The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. IN . HALSWORTH = S . M . W. \ 



HAVERHILL. 

147. O, lOHN • BORAM=l658. 

^. IN . HAVERELL=I . B. J 

In 1655 two Borams mother and daughter, were hanged at Bury St. Edmunds, 
as witches. W. W. Boreham, Esq., is still one of the principal residents. 



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SUFFOLK. 1083 

148. O. A variety reads borhan. 

149. O. ROBERT . DARKiN = The Drapers' Arms. 

^. OF . HAVERHILL . 1656 = R . E . D. \ 

The following extracts are from the parish registers : 
" 1660. Mary, the daughter of Samuel Boreham, bap. March y« I**." 
•• 1678. Robert, the son of Mr. Robert Darkin, bap. Septemb. y» 3'**." 

150. O. THOMAS . EWiN . OF = A man with a hatchet. 

jR. HAVERILL . IN . SVFOLK = T . E. 1 669. \ 

The Evrin family are still to be found in the town. 

151. O. GILBERT . iAGGERD = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . HAVERHILL ==G . I. \ 

HERRINGSWELL. 

A token was issaed by Mary Kent, at Soham, in Cambridgeshire, in 1666, and 
by John Kent of hornswbll. As no Homswell is to be found in any part of 
England, it is presumed that Herringswell, in Suffolk, was the intended place. 
The token is, therefore, here given, as well as under Soham. 

152. O. MARY . KENT . OF . SOHAM = M . K. 

^. lOHN . KENT . OF . HORNSWELL = I . K. 1 666. \ 

The Kent family is still residing in Herringswell. 

HICHAM. 

For two tokens which may belong to this place see under Higham, Derbyshire. 

HOXNE. 

153. O, ROBERT . MORPHEW = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . HOXEN . IN . SVFFOLKE = R . M. { 

154. A variety has draper on the obverse, after the word morphew. 

155. O. beniamin . WHVT = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. in . HOXSON . GROCER = B . W. 
This token, although placed in Ackerman's " London Tradesmen's Token 
p^ iiiZy to Hoxton, near London, is, I think, more correctly a Suffolk one. 



HUN DON. 

156. O. ROGER . GARNONS . OF = Two lions passant gardanU 

R, HVNDON . IN . SVFFOLK . DRAP = R . G. \ 

The Lion inn still exists. 

157. O. THO . HEMPSTED . AT = T . M . H. 

R. HVNDON . IN . SVFFOLK = T . M . H. i 



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1084 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



IPSWICH. 

158. O, AN . IPSWICH . FARTHING . 1670 (in fOUF lirics). 

J^, Anns of Ipswich; per pale, on the dexter side, a lion 
rampant; on the sinister, three hulls of ships. 




159. A variety differs slightly on the reverse and is evidently from 

another die. 

160. O, lOHN . ALLEN = Three cloves; the Grocers' Arms. 

j^. OF . IPSWICH . 57 = 1 . A. 1657. J 

The family of Allen occupied some position in Ipswich. John Allen was Port- 
man, and in the year 1570 gave ;^6o, the yearly profits of which were to be dis- 
tributed annually in clothing to the p>oorest and most needy inhabitants of Ipswich. 
The Market Cross on the Comhill, originally the gift of Edmund Daundy in 1510, 
Was rebuilt in 1628 ; and Thomas Allen, in 1028-9, received various sums of 
money for the framing of the said cross, the timber for which was taken from 
Ulverstone. 

161. O. ANTHONY . APPLEWHiT = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

J^, IN . IPSWICH . 1664 = A . A. J 

Anthony Applewhite was one of the twenty-four Chief Constables of Ipswich 
named in the charter of Charles II. (17 Ch. II., 1665) confirming previous charters 
to the town. 

162. O, RICHARD . BEAVMOND . IN = The Apothecarfes' Arms. 

J^. IPSWICH . APOTHECARY = R . B. \ 

The name of Beaumond occurs as feoffee in 1747. 

163. O. lOHN . B0RRET = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . IPSWICH . 1655 = 1 . A . R J 

164. O. lOHN . BRENN = The Princc of Wales's feathers and 

coronet, 
i?. IN . IPSWICH . 1659 = 1 . M . B. I 

A John Brcnn was elected Alderman of the Corpus Christi Guild in Ipswich in 
1555, and was fined £^ 6s. 8d. for refusing the office, when Geoffrey Cautche was 
elected in his place. 

The sign of the Three Feathers was in existence as early as 1620, and was 
retained till about 1730. 

165. O, lOHN . BVRRovGH = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . IPSWICH = I . B. J 

Mr. John Burrough, of London, in 161 3, by will, gave /"lOO to the Bailiflfs of 
Ipswich to purchase lands or tenements to bring in the yearly value of £$, which 
was to be distributed on Good Friday, after morning service, to forty poor men and 
women of Ipswich, by the Bailiffs and burgesses, or by the churchwardens, in the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUFFOLK. io8s 

parish church of St. Lawrence. The property of this charity has now increased so 
much in value that 300 persons annually receive 3s. 6d. each from it. His son, 
John Burrough was one of the twenty-four Chief Constables named by the charter 
of Charles II. in 1665. He was Portman in 1676 and 1690, and in the latter year 
he presented various books to the public library. In the charter of Charles II. of 
July, 1685, he is called gentleman, and appointed Bailiff, and to which office he 
was again chosen in 1688. The inscription on his gravestone in St. Lawrence's 
Church states that he died July 26, 1695, aged sixty-eight. 

John Burrough, of St. Stephen's parish, also gave ;f 100 to be laid out in an estate, 
hot the parish neglected to claim it within the time appointed (one year after his 
death), and it was lost. 

166. O, THOMAS . BVRROVGH = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . GROCER = T . A . B. \ 

Thomas Burrough was Bailiff in 1663 and 1664. He gave, in 1664, £100 in 
trust to the Bailiflfe, to be lent in sums of ;^io each to ten grocers, of full age and 
tpprenticeship, freemen of Ipswich, if they were orderly, sober, and good hu^nds, 
for ten 3rears, without interest, if so many of the grocers should require it ; if not, to 
other tradesmen. In the charter of Charles II. in 1665 he is described as Portman 
and gentleman. 

The following note appears in the town books : 

January 20, 1652. " At this Assembly it is ordered that Thomas Burroughs and 
Thomas Gladwin bond ffor the paiem*. of ffortie Pounds the ffyve and twentieth 
day of Julie next shalbe taken to Mr. Benjamyn Butter in p*. of W™. Gladwins 
yeers Rent due att Michaellmis last past," etc. 

167. O. THOMAS . BVRROVGH = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . IPSWICH = I . B. \ 

This token has the obverse of No. 166, and the reverse of No. 165 ; no doubt, 
from this circumstance, John and Thomas Burrough were brothers. 

168. O, AT . THE . IPSWICH = A bunch of grapes within a hoop. 

R, TAVREN . 1648 = R . A . a \ 

169. O, WILL . CANNE . BVCHER = A slaughtcrman's axe. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . 1668 = W . M . C. \ 

170. O, losEPH . coLMAN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . IPSWICH . 1664 = 1 . D . C. J 

The Colmans were of St. Lawrence's parish. Joseph Colman was a Head- 
Borough and one of the Chief Constables named in the charter of 36 Charles II. 
(1685). Francis Colman was Bailiff of Ipswich several times from 1709 to 1731. 
Id 1717, when Bailif!, a reservoir was made and pipes laid down for supplying the 
town with water under his management. He was a benefactor in 1729, for bread 
and clothing from land in St Helen's parish, to the amount of £% 2s. annually to 
the poor of St. Lawrence's parish. There are monuments to him and his wife, 
Eliiabeth, in St. Lawrence's Church. 

171. O, NICHOLAS . COOKE= A pump. 
R, OF . IPSWICH . 1656 = N .I.e. 

172. 0. lOHN . cvTTRis = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. (OctagOfiaL) \ 

173. O, LEBBEVS . DiMBLEBY = The King's head crowned. 

R. IN . IPSWICH . 1666 = L . A . D. \ 

About the year 1530 the King's Head was the principal inn, and stood on town 
grounds belonging to the Corporation, and was therefore adjudged to pay one 
•billing annually as rent. 



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lo86 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

174. O, WILLIAM . DOGGETT . 1 668 = The Grocers' ArriJs. 

j^. IN . IPSWICH . GROCER . HIS . HALF . PENNY (in fivC Uncs). 

(Square,) \ 

William Doggett was discharged of his fine of £1$ at Corpus Christi Gailcl 
(14 Charles I.). 

A brass memorial on an altar-tomb still exists in the church of Boxford, in 
Suffolk, to one William Doggett, who was a merchant-adventurer, citizen and 
mercer, of London, who died in 16 10, and left issue six sons and six daughters. 

175. A variety has the Mercers' Arms on obverse. 

176. O, Samuel , Doner , Apothecary (in four lines). 

R. In . Ipswich , His . Haife , Fenny (in four lines). {Heart- 
shape,) \ 

177. O, CHARLS . FAREWEATHER = A ship. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . i6s6 = c . F. \ 

The Ship was assessed early in the seventeenth century, and was standing till 
about 173a 

178. O, GEORGE . GiRLiNGE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . IPSWICH . 1666 = G . M . G. \ 

179. O, STEPHEN . GREENE . AT . v" = A greyhound running. 

R, GRAVHovND . IPSWICH = s . G. A merchant's mark. J 




The Greyhound Inn stood in St. Margaret's parish. 

The ancestors of the Greens of Ipswioi resided for a long period at Wilby, ind 
som& of the family were distinguished for their literary acquirements in later yean. 

The greyhound, derived from the house of Beaufort, was the sinister suppoiter of 
the arms of King Henry VII. 

180. O, lAMES . HARWELL = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . 1659 = I . M . H. i 

181. O. lOSEPH . HAVMER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . 1666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

182. A variety from a different die reads on the reverse : of . ips- 

WICH . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

Joseph Haymer was one of the ** twenty-four ** named in the charter of Charles, 
1665. He was one of the jurors, in 1658, for Richard, Lord Protector of the 
Commonwealth, who presented to the Quarter Sessions one Timothy CiimWc, 
as a harbourer of idle, loose, and dissolute people, called Quakers, in his house, 
to the great nuisance of his neighbours. 

183. O, ABIGAIL . HVLLEN = A pOt of lilieS. 

R. OF . IPSWICH = A . H. i 

184. O. lOHN . MORRIS = A cannon mounted on wheels. 

R. IN . IPSWICH = I . M . M. } 



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SUFFOLK. 1087 

185. O, lOHN . MVRDOCKE = Three cloves; the Tallowcbandlers* 

Arms. 

^. IPSWICH . GROCER . 1651=8 . A . S. \ 

The initials do not agree with the issuer's name. Murdocke may have married 

the widow of Samuel Stannard, and thus become possessed of his dies, using the 

reverse for his own token. See Murdocke's token, of Aldix)rough, No. 2, p. 1066. 

186. O. EDWARD . PAYNE = A pair of scales. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . 1657 = E . p. 

187. R, A variety reads of instead of in, on the reverse. 

188. O. ROBERT . REDNALL = The Haberdashen' Arms. 

R. IN . IPSWICH . 1663 = R . R. \ 

Robert Rednall was, by Charles's charter, 1685, appointed one of the new Chief 

Consubles. He was also Head-Borough and Coroner. John Rednall, in 1690, 

gave by will to the churchwardens oi St. Mary Tower, in Ipswich, four tenements 

in that parish, for the use and benefit of the poor. 

189. O. WILLIAM . SAYER . 1 664 = The Gfocers' Arms. 

R. GROCER . IN . IPSWICH = W . S. 

190. O. WILLIAM . SPALDINGE = A roll of tobacco. 

R. OF . IPSWICH . 1656 = W . T . S. \ 

191. O. lOHN . SPARROW . 1659 = Seven stars. 

R, DRAPER . IN . IPSWICH = I . S. \ 

The Sparrows were a family of some consideration ; they served various offices 
ra the town : John Sparrow was Member of Parliament in 1 54 1 ; John Sparrow, 
probably the token-issuer, is described as a gentleman, in 1665, and John Sparrow 
was Bailiff in 1722. Many monuments to various members of the family still exist 
in the Church of St. Lawrence, in which parish they resided. One of the family 
built a great house in Thurlston, called the Sparrow's Nest, where the name is 
still to be found. 

192. O. ROBERT. SPARROW = Three birds. 

R, IN . IPSWICH . 1654 = R . S. i 

Robert Sparrowe was of the same family as the last mentioned. Robert Sparrowe, 
Portmtn, who died in 1594, has a memorial in the church of St. Mary Tower. 
Robert Sparrow, *' a man of great note,*' who lived in Ipswich in the time of 
Charles II., lent, in conjunction with his son-in-law, Robert Clarke, to the Cor- 
poration, whose finances were then very low, the sum of ;f 300. Robert Sparrow 
was Bailiff in 1659, 1666, and 167 1, and is described as gentleman and Bailiff in 
the charter of Charles II., 1665 ; he gave £$ to the public library in Ipswich in 
164a Robert Sparrow held an estate in Offton in the time of Charles II., and 
some of the family are still there. 

Id the town books we read : 

" Apnl 28, 165J. At this Court M'. Rob*. Sparrowe who was fformerlie chosen 
into the office of one of the Comon Councell of this Towne by Mr. Henry 
Whitinge made request to be discharged of ihe s** Office for A fyne; and the 
same being moved to the Court, it was ordered that he should not be admitted to 
a fyne." *" 

The birds on the token are probably intended for sparrows, being a play on the 
name. The arms of the Sparrows of Ipswich are : Argent, three roses purple, 
seeded or. barbed vert ; a chief of the second. 

193. 0. SAMVEL . STANNARD . OF = The Grocets' Arms. 

R, IPSWICH . GROCER . 1651 =S . A . S. \ 

The Stannard family occur early in connection with the town. Henry Stannard 
was a Bailiff in 1522, and a Justice in 1528. 



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ip88r TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

194. ^. I AMES . STORY . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, IPSWICH . GROCER = IS conjoined J 

John Story, the Keeper of the Gaol in Ipswich in 165$, is mentioned as 
inhumane, and craelly using some Quakers who were fined and imprisoned here. 

195. O, AT . THE . ANGELL=An angel holding a scroll. 

J^, IN . IPSWICH . i656 = w . T. \ 

The Ancel Inn on the Quay in the parish of St. Mary was tAe inn in pre-Re- 
formation days, and was freouented by the parishioners of St. Clement's, especially 
in their perambulations at Rogation-tide. Permission was granted to place the 
''Angel Post " upon town soil upon payment of is. annually (White's "Inns and 
Taverns "). The tavern existed in 1766. 

196. O. ELIZABETH . THOMSON = E . T. 

-^. IN . IPSWICH -1 656. i 

197. O. ROBERT . TVRNER = The Apothccaries' Arms. 

J^. OF . IPSWICH . 1655 = RT conjoined. J 

198. O. WILLIAM. WILKINSON =« A ship. 

J^. IN . IPSWICH = W . M . W. i 

199. (9. IN . IPSWICH = w . WYE. (ww ETC conjoincd.) 

JR. APOTHECARY =1663. J 



IXWORTH. 

200. O, REBEKAH . BOVLDERO . AT . Y" = A pike fish. 

J^, IN . IXWORTH . IN . SVFFOLK = HER HALF PENY. 1669. J 

The Pickerell is an old hostelry, and we find it called, in a will of Robert 
Garrard, of Ixworth, 1533, "my tenement the PykkerelL*' The public-house still 
exists at Ixworth. 

Various mural marble monuments are still in the parish church of Ixworth to 
various members of the Boldero family, dated from 1 75 1 to 1836. Arms of the 
family, per pale or and azure, a saltire counterchanged. 

In the reign of Henry VII. a young pike or pickerel was of more value than a 
fat capon. 

201. O. GARDEN AR . ISHAM . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

/^. IXWORTH. GROCER. l668 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

In the neighbouring church of Stowlangtoft there is a monument to Sir Paul 
D'Ewes, who married, for his second wife, Elizabeth Isham, of Lamport, 
Northamptonshire. 

202. O, WILLIAM . SYER . OF = A full-Wown rOSC. 

j^. IXWORTH . WEAVER . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

Weavers were established in the county of SuflTolk as early as the year 1462. 
We find notices of their living in Bury St. Edmunds at that date. 



LAKENHEATH. 

This large parish has considerably increased in importance since the issue of the 
token. 

203. O. lAMES . PARLETi' = I . M . p and a flower. 

J^. OF . LAKEN . HEATH = I . M . p and a flowcr. 1 



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SUFFOLK. io8^ 



LANDGUARD FORT. 

Lftndguard Fort is in the parish of Walton, from which it is distant abbut 
three miles. The fort was existing at the end of James I.'s reign, although no 
dtte can be assigned positively to the erection of it. The Dutch, in 1667, landed 
3,000 men at Fdixstowe Clin, from whence they marched 2,000 men unsuccess- 
roily against the fort. Another fort was built here in 171^, after an Act of 
Parliament had ordered the destruction of the previous ruinous one. A MS. of 
garrison orders and parole words in use at the fort, together with the state of 
the garrison and fort, daily, from 1761 to 1766, is in existence. 

204. O. LANDGVARDrsA Uon rampant. 

R, POYNT . FORTE . 1 66 7= OB. A cross pat^e. \ 

OBn the abbreviation for obolus, a halfpenny. In old MSS. ob. stands for half- 
penny, and ^., the initial of quadrans, for farthing, thus — when three farthings is 
expressed, it is written ob, q. OB. very rarely occurs on tokens ; it is found also>on 
the Walion token. 

305. Another similar, of smaller size, and without ob. on th^ 
reverse. \ 

LAVENHAM. 

The name of Lavenham has been written in seven different ways^ thus : Lanl;^m, 
Laneham, Lauenham (Doomsday Survey), Lavenham, Laynam, Lenham, and 
Leveaham. It was a town of considerable importance for making blue cloths, 
serges, shalloons, says, and stufis, and had a market for wool every Thursdays which 
was held in a wool-halL 

206. O. lOHN . BROWNE=A Spread eagle. 

R. OF. LAVENHAM. 1 669 a HIS HALF PENY. | 

The charity given to the poor of Lavenham by John Dister, in 1577, is sealed 
and delivered in the presence of Stephen Browne. 

207. O, RICHARD . CAGE . IN = R . M . C. 

R, LAVENHAM . SVFOLK=l662. \ 

The family name of Cage is found at an early date in Lavenham. The will of 

Thomas Spring *' Clothmaker of Lauenh*m," has *' I geve and bequeth to Petir 

Ctwge myn apprentice x half bayls of woole.'* The will of Christian Spring, 1605, 

it witnessed by a William Cage. 

208. O, SOLOMAN . CLARKE . IN = 

R, LAVINIJAM. i 

This description is obtained from the MSS. of the late Mr. W. S. Fitch, of 
Ipswich. 

209. O. NICHOLAS . DANSiEsA man making candles. 

R, IN . LAVINHAM»N . D. \ 

210. A variety reads on the reverse, lavenham, and date. 1667, 

and initials n . s . d. \ 

One field of three acres and thirteen perches, in the parish of Brent Eleigh, but 
still part of the old town lands of Lavenham, is still called Dansie's Piece. Thomas 
Dansie was schoolmaster here in 1795. 

211. O, lOHN . GIRLING=A swan. 

R. IN . LAVENHAM . l667=.I .B.C. \ 

The Swan Inn was here in 1865. Mrs. Curling, aged eighty-two, was an inmate 
of the almshouses in Lavenham in 1827. 



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1090 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

212. O, BENIAMIN . MILLS . OF=l657. 

I^, LAVINHAM . 1657 — B .A.M. J 

The will of Robert Ryece, a great preserver of Suffolk antiquities, is dated 1637. 
By it he gives to William Mills, of Lanham, in the county of Suffolk, painter and 
glazier, 40s., with some boxes of painting colours for to keep, renew, and amend 
Uie tables, writings, and inscriptions as they are fixed in the parish cfauich of 
Preston, in Suffolk. 

A Mr. William Mills resided in the High Street in 1826. 

213. O. ROBERT . SAVL . 1 669= A Uon rampant 

^. OF . LAVENHAM = H1S HALF PENY. i 

214. O. ROBERT . SAVL = A Uon rampant 

j^. OF . LAVENHAM = R . . S. J 

The Red Lion Inn was in the market-place in 1645, and is still there. The 
accession of King James VI. of Scotland to the English throne in 1603 introduced 
the Red Lion as a sign of frequent occurrence. 

215. O. lOHN . WHiTiNGE = The Grocers' Arms^ 

JR. OF . LAVENHAM = I . E . W. J 

216. Also a variety slightly different, from another die. \ 

217. Also a variety with date 1661 on reverse, and in instead of 

OF. { 

Part of the town lands of Lavenham are in the parish of Brent Eleigh. "John 
Whiting, in 1683," is recorded as paying " 13s. 4d. for eight years' loS's rent due 
for the town lands lying in Brent Eleigh." 

218. Another variety is dated 1666. 

219. O. lOHN . wiLMOT . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

JR, LAVENHAM . IN . SVFOLKE = I . E . W. J 

220. O. lOHN . wiLLMOT=The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . LAVENHAM . IN . SVFF = I , W. J 

One Robert Willmotts was occupier of a croft of land in Lavenham in 1645. 
The names of Clarke, Curling, Mills, and Whiting are still to be found amongst 
the tradesmen of Lavenham. 



LAXFIELD. 

221. O, lOSEPH . RAY . OF = Arms ; a chevron between three fleors- 

de-lys. 
j^. LAXFEiLD. 1665 = /^ conjoined. \ 

There is a variety of the above which is dated 1668, and is also of the ferthing 
size. 

222. O. lOHN . STAGOLL . IN = Three crowns on the royal oak. 

^. LAXFEILD . GROCER = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

llie Royal Oak Inn still exisis at Laxfield. 



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SUFFOLK, 1091 




223. O. ROBERT . TOviLL=*The Drapers' Arms. 

R. OF . LAXFILD = R , S . T. 



LOWESTOFT. 

224. O. VILLA . LowisTOFF . SVFFOLK = Arms j a rose and crown. 
R. A . LOWESTOF . FARTHING (in three lines). large \ 

This and the following token were engraved in the Gentleman's Magasine, 
November, 1789, PL III. 

225. C7. VILLA. LOWISTOFF . SVFFOLK = Antis ; a rose and crown. 

R. lOS . SMITHSON . ROB . BARKER . CHVRCH . WARD . 1 669 

(in seven lines). large \ 

3M1THS0^ 

The fish honses occupied by Mr. Joseph Smithson were entirely consumed by a 
fire in November, 1 7 1 7. 

Joseph Smithson subscribed, in 1698, to the rebuilding of Lowestoft Chapel, 
which was a place for worship, much nearer the town than the parish church, 
and had been previously used before the Reformation, and licensed for church 
service by the bishop of Norwich, in 1570. 

Sir Edward Barker, of Lowestoft, with others, in 1643, ^^^^ taken prisoners by 
Cromwell, and carried to Somerleyton. 

The Barker family arms were barry of ten, or and sable, over all a bend, gules. 

In 1670 Robert barker was owner of boats employed in the herring fishery 
at Lowestoft, and the family of Barker continued so for many years after. 

The name of Robert Barker occurs in the list of contributors, in 1750, towards 
the rebuilding of Kirkley Church, about a mile and a half from Lowestoft, for 
the sum of half a crown. 

226. O, ROBERT . BETTS . OF = The Bakers' Arms. 

R, LOWESTVFE . 165S = R . G . B. \ 

227. O. THOMAS . BOTSON . IN = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. LOESTAFE . SVFFOLK = T . A . B. \ 

Some of the Botsons were also fishing adventurers and fishermen. Robert 
and Thomas Botson were engaged in a petition, in 1670, to the Parliament for 
enforcing the old statutes relative to the consumption of fish in England. 

228. O. THOMAS . HAftVY . OF = The Gfocers' Arms. 

R. LAISTOFT . GROCER = T . H. \ 

On March 10, 1644-5, a great fire took place at Lowestoft, when upwards of 
j(lo,ooo of property was destroyed. Amongst the sufferers was Thomas Hanrey, 
to the extent of;f53i. 

229. O. THOMAS . PASEY . 1659 = The Brewers' Arms. 

R, IN . LOESTAFE = T . M . P. \ 

Thomas Pacey was a widower when he married Mary Arnold, widow, in 1655, 
first by a justice, and then by a minister, agreeably to the Act passed in 1653, 



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1092 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

empowering those in the commission of the peace to perfonn the office of 
matrimony. 

Samuel Pacy, a merchant, was prosecutor against Rose Cullender, and Ann 
Duny, both of Leystotf, as bewitchmg his children, Elizabeth and Deborah, in 
October, 1663, for which they were tried on March 13, 1664, found guilty and 
hanged. 

230. O. lOHN . SMITH . OF = Seven stars. 

i?. LOWESTVFE . 1656 = ! . S. } 

231. O, WILLIAM . VNDER WOOD = The Groccrs* Arms. 

i?. IN . LOWESTOFT . 1651 = W . E . V. J 

William Underwood was also a sufferer from the fire above mentioned in 1644-5, 

hi goods of the value of ;^8o. 
Some of the Underwoods resided, as early as the year 1437, at Lowestoft, and 

afterwards at Norwich. 
The families of Underwood bore for arms gules, on a fesse ermine, between 

three annulets or, a lion passant azure. 



MELFORD, OR LONG MELFORD. 

232. O. ANDREW . BYAT . OF = A . B. 

J^. LONG . MELFORD . l6S2=A . B. J 

233. O, ANDREW . BYATE = A . B. 

i?. LONG . MELFORD = A . B. J 

234. O, ANDREW . BIATE . AT= 1667. 

^. LONG . MELFORD = A . B. J 

Although three distinct tokens are here described, neither gives any device or 
emblem of the issuer's calling or occupation, but he is called "Andrew Byat, Gent.," 
as possessor of freehold property in the adjoining parish of Hariest, by the will of 
Thomas Wright, of Hartest, dated 1646, and published in ** Bury Wills and Inven- 
tories " by the Camden Society. 

235. O. WILLIAM . CLARKE . IN = The Bakers* Arms. 

2^. LONG . MELFORD = W . A . C 

236. A variety reads millford. 

237. O. iames . GiLSON . AT . THE = A hart lodged. 

R. IN . LONG . MELF0RD = I . R . G. { 

The White Hart Inn still exists here. 

One of the badges borne by King Richard II. was the white hart lodged under 
a tree proper, gorged with a crown, and chained, or« 

238. O, TOBIAS . groome=A hand holding a dog. 

J^. IN . LONG . MILFORD = T . G. J 

239. O, THOMAS . HVBBART . OF -The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, LONG . MILFORD . 1655= T . M . H. J 

240. O, lOHN . KNOPP . OF = 1 . M . K. 

^. LONG . MELFORD =165 7. J 



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SUFFOLK. 1093 



MELTON. 

241. O. lOHN . HILL . IN MILTON » A ship. 

k. IN . SVFFOLKE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

243. O. lOHN . HILL . IN . MELTON = A sbip. 

k. AT . THE . SACKE . SHOPE = I . E . H. J 



MENDLESHAM. 

243, O. THO . SOLLEY . GROCER = 1 663. 

J^, IN . MENDLESHAM = T . S . S. i 

244. O. lOHN . TANN . OF = The Grocers' Aims. 

JL MENDLSHAM . GROCER = I . T. ' i 



MILDENHALL. 
245. O. FRANCIS . BVGG . OF . 1667 = A pack-horse. 

jR, MILDENHALL . IN . SVFFOLK = HJS HALFE PENNY. F . E . B. ^ 

Francis Bugs was bom at Mildenhall, of reputable parents, in 164a In his 
book, ** The Pilgrim's Progress from Quakerism to Christianity," he states that 
he was brought up in the profession of the Church of England, and that at the 
age of about seventeen, bemg then living at Lakenheath, an adjoining village, 
and having " itching ears " to hear the Quakers who came there from Norwich, 
Thctford, and other places, in a few years he "became a very zealous member,'* 
and "to silent meetings went.** After living in their society many years and 
becoming dissatisfied with their false doctrines and writin|;s, he wrote many 
letters, remonstrances, and works, in orders to expose their views. At a general 
Quakers' meeting, held at Haddenham, in 1682, he was adjudged ** to have greatly 
abased and misrepresented faithful diinisters of the Gospel and antient Friends, ' 
and thereupon was expelled. The Bishop of Norwich, in 1697, gave a certificate 
that "thro the hardness of the times, several losses, and the publishing of useful 
books to convert the Quakers, he was reduced to great difficulties, and deserved 
the bounty of well-disposed persons as a sober, honest and industrious man ;" 
this gained him many friends at the colleges of Cambridge and elsewhere. In 
1700 the second edition of the " Progress was published, to which his portrait, 
enpaved by Van Hove, at. 60, is prefixed, a previous one appearing in the quarto 
edition of 1698. In his work, " Quakers Set in their True Lieht/' quarto, 1698 
(pp. 48), is a list of sixteen works written by him to confirm his views. After- 
wards eight or more others appeared ; but his last, entitled *' Finishing Stroke ; 
or, Gleanings from Quakers' Books,*' was published in 17 12. His family continued 
Quakers, and his son, Francis Bugg, junior, was a member of their meetings at 
Miklenball in 1687. 

246. O. ROBERT . COOKE . OF = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

jR. MILDENHALL . SVFF = R . C 1 668. ^ 

247. O. ROBERT . CRANNIS = A WOOlpack. 

I^. IN . MEILDENHALL = R . A . C J 

Cranniss is a name well known in Mildenhall. Philip Crannis lived with Francis 

Bogg, and was a man of good reputation. He signed a declaration that Bugg 

had suffered lately very severely tnrough the persecution of the Quakers, to the 

injury of his trade and business. 

VOL. II. 70 



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10^ TRADERS' TOKENS OP THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

248. O, NATHANIEL . HOWLETT = The DrapcFs' Arms. 

^. IN . MILDINHALL . 1667= N . H. J 

249. O, MYLES . RODGiN . i666 = MR conjoined 

^. OF . MiLDENHALL = MR conjoined. i 

250. O, ANDREW . SARGENT = A pack-horse. 

It. IN . MILLDENHALL = A . P . S. J 

251. O. I AMES . WEB . 1 668 = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

Jt, IN . MILDENHALL . IN . SVFFOLK = HIS HALF PENY. I . W. J 

James Webb appears by the Records of Conviction to have allowed a meeting 
of Quakers at his house on Sunday, March 28, 1676, for which he was fined, 
and the records say, ** Because J. Webb is so poor that the fine of ;f20 caAnot be 
levyed on his goods and chattels ; F. Bugg we impose to pay ;£"io, and J. Folks 
;^io." The Quakers of Mildenhall met generally at James Webb's house. 

The name of Webb is still to be found in Mildenhall. 

MONKS ELEIGH. 

252. O. WILLIAM . CHAPLIN = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . MONKE . SEELLE = W . S . C. I 

In 1678, with a view to encourage the wool trade, persons were required by Act 

of Parliament to bury their friends in woollen. The raster of Monks Eleigh 

states that, in 1694, Mr. Robert Chaplin, of that place, executor to one Mary 

Clarke, paid the penalty of £$ for neglecting to comply with the Act. 

253. O. THOMAS . KING . i666 = A swan. 

J^, IN . MVNCK . SEELEY = T . S . K. \ 

The name of King may still be found among the residents in the parish. 

NAYLAND. 

254. O, WILLIAM . BLYTH . IN = A <!ock. 

J^, NAYLAND . 1656 = W . R \ 

The BIyth family live here still 

255. O. MATHEW . HALLIETT = A CIOWH. 

^. IN . NAYLAND = M . H. J 

256. O. WILLIAM . MEGGS = The Clothwoikers' Arms. 

J^, IN . NAYLAND . 1657 = W . M. J 

257. O. EDMAN . TOWLLER. BAKER = E . T. 

i?. IN . NEYLAND . IN . SVFOLK= 1654. J 

257*. A variety is dated 1652. 

258. O. HONEST . GEORG . TVRNER = A rOSC. 

R, OF . NEYLEND . 1657 = . T. J 

NEEDHAM MARKET. 

259. O- ROBERT . CHENERY = R . R . C. 

J^. OF . NEEDHAM . MARKET = 1658. J 

Among the names of residents at Needham that of Chenery stills remains. 



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SUFFOLK. 1095 

26a O. lAMES . HARLWIN= 1666. 

R. IN . NEEDHAM . MARKET = I . M . H. \ 

261. O, THOMAS . LOVE . IN = TEL conjoined into one character. 

R, NEEDHAM . MARKETT => 1 664. \ 

262. O. lOHN . ROZER . 1664 = A rose. 

R, IN . NEDHAM . MARK£TT= I . E . R. \ 

At the present time the name is spelt Rosier, in Needham. 

Bishop Earle, in his " Microcosroography ; or, A Piece of the World Discovered 
in Essays and Characters," first edition, 1628, observes that ** a taveme is a degree, 
or, if you will, a paire of staires, above an ale-house, where men get drunk with 
more credit and apolo^. If the vintners' rose be at door, it is sign sufficient, 
but the absence of this is supplied by the ivy-bush." 

263. O, lOHN . SHiPP . 1664 = A ship. 

R, IN . NEDHAM . MARKETT = I . E . S. \ 

264. O, WE . 3 . SISTERS . 1667 = OVR HALF PENY. 

R. IN . NEDHAM . MARKETT = M . H . S. \ 

NEWMARKET. 

265. O, WILUAM . BRIANT . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. NEWMARKET . 1669 = W . M . a ^ 

266. O. WILLIAM . BRYANT = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R, OF . NEWMARKET = l659 = W . M . B. \ 

The Bryant family is still found at Newmarket. Mural monuments in marble 
exist in the church of Newmarket St. Mary, in Suffolk, to various members of 
the Biyant family. 

267. O. FRANCIS . GREENE =*The Apothecarfes' Arms. 

R, IN . NEWMARKET . 1664= F . G. \ 

268. O, lOHN . GRAY . AT . MOTH . SHiPT*^** = Mother Shipton. 

R. PETER . STRE . IN . NEW . MARKETT = HIS HALFE PENY. 
1667. J 

269. A variety reads on the reverse his halfe penny 1667. 

270. O. AT . THE . 3 . TVNS = Three tuns. 

R. IN . NEWMARKET = I . H. \ 

The Three Tuns Inn still exists in the market-place in Newmarket, Suffolk. 

271. O. lOHN . HENDERSON . AT . THE = A ship. 

R. SHIPP . IN . NEWMARKETT = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

272. O, ROBERT . MYNN . AT . Y" . GOLDEN = An anchor. R . M. 
R. ANCHOR . IN . NEW . MARKETT = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

273. O. ADAM . PEARSON . IN . BEARE . YARD = A hat and feather. 

R. NERE . NEW . MARKET . AT . Y» . BLEW . CAP = HIS HALFE 
PENY. i 

The Black Bear Inn and Black Bear Lane still exist in Newmarket, Suffolk. 

70 — 2 

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1096 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

274. O, WALTER . povLTER . AT . THE=Queen*5 head 

J^. IN . NEW . MARKET . IN . SVFFOLK = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
1669. { 

275. Also a variety without date, w . p in place of it, and reading 

PONLTER. i 

276. O. THAMAS . PECKE . IN = Three tuns. 

i?. NEWMARKET = l663 = T . A . P. 

277. O, THOMAS . PRATT = A ship. 

J^. IN . NEW . MARKETT = T . E . P. i 

One Walter Pratt left a charity, out of the Manor Farm, to be distributed to 
the poor of St. Mary's parish in Newmarket, in Suffolk. 

278. O. lOHN . RENDE . COFFEE =1^. 

^. HOvsE . IN . NEWMARKET = I . R and SL flower. I 

279. O. WILL . WAiTE . iN = A stick of caudles. 1657. 

J^. NEW . MARKETT = W . W. { 

ORFORD. 

280. O. MARY . THVRSTON = A pair of scales. 

J^. OF . ORFORD . l659 = M . T. 

RICKINGHALL. 

281. O, SAMVELL . FITCH . 1665 = A merchant's mark. 

J^. IN . RICKINGHALL = S . F. \ 

From an early work, entitled " Theater of Honour and Knight-hood," Wio, 
1623, we learn that ** merchants were not permitted to have shields, but might 
beare the first letters of their names and surnames enterlaced with a crosse ; to 
have notes or markes of the profession or trades which they used, as — a shear- 
man, his cloth sheares ; a tailor, his sheares ; a mason, his compass, or square, or 
his trowell ; a cutler, a knife, and so on." 

These merchants' marks often consist of a cross with a down stroke to form a 
smaller cross of the limb on the dexter side, and another line from the top to the 
limb on the sinister side, which gives the appearance of the Arabic numeral four 
turned backwards ; they generally have below this the Christian and somame in 
monogram, interlaced by some geometrical figure. 

282. O. ROBERT . SPENCER = Two swords crossed. 

^. OF . RICKINGALE . 1667 = R . S. . J 

Two swords crossed ; part of the Cutlers' Arms. 

ST. OLAVFS BRIDGE. 

St. Olave's Bridge is in the parish of Herringfleet, in Suffolk, whence it crosses 
the river Waveney, near to Haddiscoe, in Norfolk. Herringfleet Priory was dedi- 
cated to St. Olave. 

283. O. lOHN . DEERING . AT . ST . OLAVES . BRIDG = A SWan and 

pitcher* 

^. NEERE. YARMOVTH . IN . SVFFOLKE «= HIS HALFE PENNY. 
I . E . D. i 



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SUFFOLK, 1097 



SAXMUNDHAM. 

284. O, lOHN . HVNT . APOTHECARY = The Apothccaries' Arms. 

I.I. 
R, IN . SAXMONDHAM . 1669 = lEH conjoincd. J 

The I . I or two figures of i stand on the token doubtless to express its value 
(two farthings). It occurs also on a token of Walpole, on two of Woodbridge, and 
on one of Yoxiord, in this county. Probably the dies were each made by the same 
die-sinker. 

The family name of Hunt is also still to be found in the town. 

285. O. THOMAS . KNIGHTS = Arms ; on a shield, two chevrons. 

R, OF . SAXMVNDHAM = T . E . K. \ 

286. O, NICHOLAS . SHEPHERD = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. IN . SAXMVNDHAM . DRAPR = HIS HALF PENY. J 

287. A variety reads his half penny. 

288. O. NICHOLAS . shepherd = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. IN . SAXMVNDHAM . DRAPR = N . M . S. \ 

289. A variety has draper, and the arms are not in a shield. \ 

290. Also a variety has draper, and the arms are in a shield. \ 



SIBTON. 

291. O. PHILLIP . THORNE = Crossed keys. 

R. OF . SIBTON . GROCER = P . T. \ 

The crossed keys are the symbol of St. Peter, who is the especial patron of fisher- 
men and fishmongers. The keys form part of the ensigns of the Fishmongers' 
Company. 

SOUTH TOWN and SOUTH YARMOUTH. 

South Town, Little Yarmouth, and South Yarmouth are all in the parish of Gor- 
leston, which is in Suffolk, although, by the late Acts of Parliament, they are all 
included for Parliamentary and municipal purposes in the borough of Great or 
North Yarmouth, in Norfolk. 

292. O, RICHARD . BVRTON = The Cordwainers' Arms. 

R, OF . SOVTH . 1668 = R . B. \ 

Blany of the Burton family are interred in the Church of St. Nicholas, Great 
Yarmouth, the dates varying from 1659 to 1793, and some as late as 1841. 
Burton is a name yet remaining in the town. 

293. O. SAMVELL . THOROLD = The Mercers* Arms. 

R, IN . SOVTH . 1668 = S . T. \ 

The Thorolds we cannot associate with Yai mouth, but the name is found in 
Suffolk. An essay on ** Coat Armour/' by J. Thorold, was printed at Yarmouth. 
TuARROLD also occurs as a token-issuer at Norwich. 



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139*^ TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



SOUTHWOLD. 

294. O, THE . ARMES . OF . sovTHwovLD = Two aiTOws in saltirc 

enfiled with a ducal coronet, a dolphin in chief^ 
another in base, e . s. 

i?. A . ^ . FOR . THE . POORES . ADVANTAGE . 1 667 (b fivC 

lines). J 

295. O. ivDETH . LvscoE = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. OF . sovTHOVLD . 1 666 = The Brewers* Arms. \ 

296. O, DANIELL . MORE . l668 = D . M . M. 

^. IN . SOVTHWALD . GROCER = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

297. O, DANIELL . MORE . IN = D . M . M. 

I^. SOVTHWALD . GROCER = D . M . M. 1 663. J 

Daniel More's name appears in the Ibt of BailifTs of Southwold in 1671, 1690 
and 1700. 

298. O. THOMAS . POSTLE = The Gfocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . SOVTHWOLD . 1652 = A heart t . p, small crescent 
and star. \ 

299. O, THOMAS . postle = A heart, t . p, small crescent and star. 
^. IN . SOVTHWOLD . 1659 = A heart, t . p, small crescent 

and star. \ 

Thomas Postle was Bailiff in 167 1, 1690, and I7CX5. Thomas Postle, in 1662, 
refused to take the then necessary oaths, and was discharged from being on, or 
bearing any office in the government of, the Corporation of the town. 



STANSTEAD. 
300. O, lOHN . BVRNER . GROCER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

i?. IN . STANSTEAD . 1656 = 1 . E . B. 



STANTON. 

The name of Stanton (derived from Stony Town) is found in many other parts of 
England. 

301. O, THOMAS . BVCKELL . AT . Y« = A COCk. 

^. COCK . IN . STANTON . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The Cock is the principal inn at Stanton to the present day. 

302. A variety reads of stantoo gerocer. 

303. O. THOMAS . G0FFE=TG conjoined. 

^. in . STANTON . COCK = T . M . G. } 

This token is engraved in the Gentleman's Magazine^ September, 1790, p. 799^ 



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SUFFOLK. 1099 

304. O. STEPHEN . HOVELL = S . H . H. 

./?. OF . STANTON . GROCER -The Grocers' Arms. \ 

The Hovells were seated at Walsham-Ie-Willows and Wetherden from an early 
period. Richard Hovell held lands in Wyverston at the time of the Norman Con- 
quest. Sir Robert Hovell, knight, did homage and service of half a kiii|^ht'& fee 
to Edmund, Abbot of St. Edmund's Bury. Robert Hovell, of Wyverstun, was 
possessed, 20th Edward HI., of various lands in Risby and adjoining parishes. 
Sir R. Hovell was Knight of the shire in 20th and 21st of Edward HI. Richard 
Hovell was Body-Esquire to King Henry V. In the time of King Charles ihcy 
were seated at Walsham, adjoining Stanton, and assumed the name of Smith. 
Arms, sable, a cross, or. 

305. O. lOHN . SEAMAN = A talbot. 

R. IN . STANTON = I . A . S. t 



STOKE-BY-CLARE. 

306. O, lAMES . SMITH . AT -HIS HALFE PENNY. 167O. 

J^. STOKE . NEXT . CLARE = I . S . S. J 

307. O. lAMES . SMITH . AT = I . S . S. 

R, STOKE . NEXT . CLARE- 1655. f 

Smith's farthing token was engraved in the Gentleman* s Magazine^ February, 
1790* pi. ii., p. 118. 

STOKE-BY-NAYLAND. 

308. O, lOHN . GROOME . OF-iG conjoincd. 

R, STOKE . BY . NAiLON-iG Conjoined. J 



STOWMARKET. 

309. O. ISRAELL . BARREL -The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . STOWMARKET=I . M . B. J 

The Barrel family appear to have lived in Stowmarket during the times of 
Charles I. and II. In the year 1641 we find Israel Barrel contributing X\^ the 
niarket lecture at the Church iii*. In 1651 he collected for the lecture, volunitTrily, 
in the adjacent villages, 15s. lod. In 1652 and 1653, I. Barrel paid up the babnce 
of arrears due thereon. About 1644, when Matthew Hopkins, the witchlinddr of 
the eastern counties, proceeded to this town, Israeli Barrel was one of the: rtfceivers 
of " the rate for the discovery of witches. " 

310. O. PETER . BRASIER=l658. 

R. IN . STOW . MARKET-? . B. J 

T^e Braziers were inhabitants here for a long period; we see notices of the 
family appearing in 1595. In 1662 Peter, the issuer, was churchwarden ; anJ^ to 
maintain the ancient reputation of its being a King's town for loyalty, he su]mhtd, 
on May 6, 1662, ** the soulgers" with plenty of **pouther and match," uml Uie 
ringers with " dynners, beere, and money," to celebrate ** the comin of the i^uten ^ 
from Portugal to London. 

311. O. GEORGE . FLINTE-G . S . F. 

R, OF . STOWMARKET- 1666. \ 

The Flint family likewise subscribed with the Barrels towards sustaining a [inquire 
for the farmers on market days. 



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iioo TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

312. O. ROBERT . GREENE = R . G. 

jR, IN . STOW . MARKET=l6S7. J 

The ** church spyre ** in 1674 was so decayed in " its tymbers and lead " that, 
wiih others, Robert Greene petitioned to the Archdeacon for permission to have it 
taken down and rebuilt. 

313. O, JONATHAN . PEKE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. OF . STOWMARKET = I . P. \ 

Both " Jonathan and F. Peake " also were desirous to save their steeple from its 
downfall. 

314. O. lOHN . TARVER . IN = 1 664. 

/^, STOW . MARKET = I . T. i 



STRADBROOKE. 

315. O, THOMAS . FOVLGER = HALF PENY. 

J^. OF . STRADBROOKE . 1670 = A lion rampant. {Heart- 
shape.) \ 

The name Foulger is still frequently met with in the county. 



STRATFORD. 

316. O. ABELL . BONO . AT . Y»^ . WHITE = A SWatl. 

R, IN . STRATFORD = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

The swan argent, derived from the earldom of Hereford, was a badge of King 
Henry V. 

317. O. IN . STRATFORD . MERCER = I . B. 

R. IN . STRATFORD . MERCER = I . B. \ 

318. O, lOHN . CANDLER = A swan. 

R. IN . STRATFORD = I . C. \ 

King Edward IV. ordained that no one whose income was less than five marks 
should possess a swan, and imprisonment to anyone who dared to touch their eggs, 
and they were anciently considered as " the King's game," 

King George II. landed at Lowestoft January 14, 1736, and the same evening 
reached Ipswich, and the following day proceeded onwards to London, but night 
overtook them, and the cort^e stayed that night at the Swan at Stratiord, where 
the King rested, and at six o'clock the next morning proceeded to London, reach- 
ing it by two o'clock — a different rate of travelling to the present ! 

319. O, lOHN . CLARKE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . STRATFORD = Three diamond squares of glass. } 

John Clark was overseer of the poor in 1664. 
A John Clarke was buried here in 1664, and another of the same name 1 701. 

320. O. lOHN . eson=t657. 

R. AT . STRATFORD = I . A . E. J 

321. O* THOMAS . IAMES = A hand holding a pair of scissors. 

R, IN . STRATFORD. 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. T.I. \ 



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SUFFOLK. IIOI 

322. O. THOMAS . lOLEY . IN» A hand holding a bird. 

Jk. STRATFORD. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

323. O, SAMVEL . PHILLIPS = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J^. IN . STRATFORD . 1652 = S . I . P. } 

324. O. svsANA . ROBINSON = A Hon rampant 

^. OF . STRATFORD . 1670 = HER HALF PENY. S . R. J 

325. O. lOHN . WILLMOR = I . E . W. 

/^. IN . STRATFORD . 1650 = 1 . E . W. J 

Probably some of the above tokens were issued at Stratford in Essex. 

SUDBURY. 

326. O. WILLIAM . ABBOT = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . SVDBVRY . 1667 = W .A. J 

Charles Abbott is mentioned as a trustee in 1600 for the faithful distribution of 
charities left to poor people of Sudbury by Martin Cole, draper there. 

The Abbott family have been connected with the county of Suffolk for many 
centuries. As early as the year 1260, some of them were living at Lawshall in 
Saffolk. William Abbott had arms registered in the Heralds^ College in 1664. 
Charles Abbott was Mayor of Sudbury. William Abbott was buried in 1667. 
ArchbUhop Abbott, who was bom at Guildford, in Surrey, was of this family. 

Arms, gules, a chevron between three pears, slipped, or. 

These arms can be seen on the doors of the Hospital of the Blessed Trinity, 
founded by the Archbishop, in the town of Guildford. 

327. O. ROBERT . CHAPLYN = Arms of the Chaplyn family. 

i?. IN . SVDBVRY . 1667 = R . C i 

The descendants of the Chaplyn family have memorials to their memories at All 
Saints* Church, Sudbury, dated 1730 and 1751. 

Arms of the Chaplyn family, ermine, on a chief indented three griffins' heads 
erased. Crest, a griffin*s head erased. 

328. O. DANIELL . COOKE = D . C. 

J^, IN . SVDBVRY = D . C J 

John Cooke was Mayor here in 1650 and in 165$. 

329. O. FRANCIS . DYER =1667. 

/^, IN . SVDBVRY = F . I . D. J 

330. O. lOHN . EDWARDS = I . S . E. 

^. OF . SVDBVRY = 1 65 7. J 

Tht name of Edwards occurs on monuments as late as the year 1814. 

331. 0. WILLIAM . ELLERY«=The Mercers' Arms. 

Ji, IN . SVDBERY . 1655 = W . S . E. \ 

332. 0. WILLIAM . FRENCH . Y*= 1657. 

Ji, ELDER . IN . SVDBVRY . 57 = W . I . F. J 

William French is named one of the Chief Burgesses of the borough in the charter 
of Charles II. to the town. 

333. O. lOHN . HAYWARD = I . H. 

a. OF . SVDBVRY = 1657. J 

333*. A variety reads lONATH'f instead of iohn. 



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im TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

334. O. EDWARD . INGRAM = A FOSC CIOWnecL 

jR. IN . SVDBVRY . 1669 = E . I. \ 

The Rose and Crown Inn existed in St. Peter's parish in Sudbnry in 1564, and 
is now a principal inn. 

The Tudor rose, half red, half white, surmounted by the crown, became the royal 
badge at the union of the houses of York and Lancaster by the marriage of 
Henry VII. with Elizabeth of York. 

335. O, lOHN . lONES = I . A. 

I^, OF . SVDBVRY = 1657. \ 

The two letters as here given do not agree with the initials of the issuer, bat are 
plainly as described on the token. 

John Jones is also one of the twenty-four " faithful subjects " to govern the town 
by King Charles's charter of 1664. 

In 1062 a John Jones stated he had been an inhabitant upwards of sixty yeus. 

336. O. RICHARD . PAINE . AT . Y« = A half-mooa 

J^. IN . SVDBERY= 1667. J 

337. O, lOHN . PARISH . IN = A mullet of five points. 

J^, SVDBVRY . 1667 = A mullet of five points. i 

338. O. lOHN . RAY . OF = The Drapers' Arms. 

I^. SVDBERY . 1654 = 1 . R. } 

339. O. MARKE . SALLTER . IN = A WOOlpack. 

^. SVDBVRY . IN . SVFFOLK = M . S. J 

Mark Salter is one of '' our faithful subjects whom we do confirm to be one of the 
present Chief Burgesses for the borough of Sudbury." — Charter of the i6thChadesII. 

340. O. WILLIAM . SHERMAN = Tiic Haberdashers' Arms. 

I^. IN . SVDBVRY . 1663 = W . S. J 

William Sherman was one of the " twenty-four " burgesses for the government 
of the town appointed by King Charles's charter. See Nos. 332 and 335. 

341. O. RICH . SKINNER = Arms ; three crossbows, two and one. 
/^. IN . SVDBVRY = RS Conjoined. { 

Richard Skynner in 1616 gave the matrix of the Corporation seal. 

342. O. RICHARD . WAITT= 1 664. 

-^. IN . SVDBVRY = R . H . W. \ 

343. O. RICHARD . WEST . OF = R . W. 

J^, SVDBVRY . 1651 =R . W. \ 

The West family were seated formerly at Great Comard, in this county. Thomas 

West, who died in 1508, gave a portion of waste land, called Armsey, situate in 

the parish of Bulmer, in &6ex, to the free burgesses and Corporation of Sudbury, 

for charitable uses. 



THELNETHAM. 

344. O. ABRAHAM . W0THERELL=A shuttle. 

J^, OF. THELVETHAM . IN . SVFFOLK = HIS HALF PENY. 



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SUFFOLK, 1103 



THURLOW. 



345. O, THOMAS . lAGGARD . OF = The Meicers' Arms. 

^. THVRLOW . IN . SVFOLKE = T .D.I. 



UFFORD. 

346. O, ROBERT . TERRY . IN = A heart. 
^. VFFORD . GROCER = R . M . T. 



WALPOLE. 

347. O. SAMVELL . FOLKARD . 0F = A pair of scales. I . I. 

J^. WALPOOLE . GROCER . 1670 = 8 . F. J 

348. O, SAMVEL . FOLKARD . 68 = S . F. 

J^. IN . WALPOOLE . GROCER = A pair of scales. J 

Thomas Folkard, probably a descendant of the family, gave, in 1756, five shiUlngs 
towards rebuilding Kirkley Church. 



WALSHAM-LE-WILLOWS. 

349. O. ROBERT. GOVLSELL. IN =1665. 

J^, WALSHAM . LE . WILLOWES = R . E . G. 

350. O. lOHN . HYNSBY . IN . 1667= The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. WALSHAM . LE . WILLOWS = I . H. J 

351. O. STEPHEN . VINCENT . IN = The Groceis' Arms. 

J^. WALSHAM . Y» . WILLOWES = S . E . V. J 

The name Vincent is still to be found amongst the residents. 



WALTON. 

Walton is derived from Wall-town, a walled town in the time of the Roinansy 
ud the ruins of the castle, destroyed in King Henry II. 's reign, still remain* 

352. O. JOSEPH . SCOTT . OF . WALTON = I .M.S. 1 667. 

J^. GROCER . IN . COLDNES . HVND = A pair of SCalcS. OB. ^ 
OB. (obolus) : see note on token, No. 204, p. 1089. 

Benjamin Scott signed as one of the chief inhabitants in testimony to a true 
Terrier of lands, etc., belonging to the Vicar of Walton, taken June 22, 1709* 

353. A variety omits the word ob. 



WANGFORD. 
354- 0. lOHN . ROPE . IN . WAYNFORD = A man tnaktng candles. 

R. IN . SVFPOLKE . TALOW . CHAND = HIS HALF PENY. 1 668. J 



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1 104 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



WHITTON. 

3SS. O. GEORGE. BEALE^HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, IN . WHITTON . 1667 = St. George and the Dragon. 



WICKHAMBROOK. 

356. O. lOHN . RAYMENT . IN . WICKHA = A FOSC and CTOWD. 

/^. BROOKE . GLASYER . 1669=: HIS HALF PENNY. 
The Crown Inn still exisU. 



WOODBRIDGE. 

r 

357. O, WOODBRIDGE . HALFE . PENY (in four Hnes across the 

field). 
I^. THE I POORES I ADVAN | TAGE | 1670 (in five lines). J 

In 1670 general public attention was called to the necessity of providing regal 
small change, and Henry Slingsby, Esq., then Master of the Mint, suggested the 
issue of farthings in Swedish copper; and in February, 1670-1, Lord Lucas, in 
Parliament, alluded to the scarcity of small money, and an intended issue of half- 
pence and farthings was announced of the type of the 1665 pattern pieces, but it 
was never carried out. 

Very few English town pieces were issued after 1670 ; only those of Lichfield 
and Chard. 

358. O. lOHN . cooKSON = The Merchant-Tailors' Arms. 

li. IN . WOODBRIDG = I . S . C. \ 

359. A variety reads cockson. 

360. O, THOMAS . EDWARD = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. IN . WOOD . BRIDGE = T . E. { 

361. O, HENRY . STEBBING . 1667 = A bird. I . L 

JR. OF . WOODBRIDGE . GROCER = Hs conjoined. J 

, 362. C?. HENRY . STEBBINGE . IN = A bird. 

J^, WOODBRIDG . GRCER . 1656 = HS Conjoined. J 

, 363. A variety, henery, is dated 1655. J 

364. O. PETER . TOWSON . HOSIER- HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. IN . WOODBREDG . 1669 = P . M . T. ^ 

365. O. DANYELL . WAKER = The Grocers' Arms. 

/?. IN . WOODBRIDG . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

366. O, DANYELL. WAKER = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . WOODBRIDG = D . S . W. { 

367. O, DANiELL . WALKER = The Grocers' Arms. 

^.^ IN . WOODBRIDG ==^D . S . W. } 



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SUFFOLK. 1105 

368. O, DANELL . wiKER = The Groccl^' Arms. 

R, IN . WOODBRIDGE = D . S . W. \ 

369. O, DANELL . WLKER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . WOODBRIDG = D . S . W. \ 

370. O, svsAN . WALKER . 1 668 = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. IN . WOODBRIDGE = HER HALFE PENEY. \ 

371. O, FREDERICK . WOODALL = A bird. I . I. 

R, IN . WOODBRIDGE . GROCER = F . W. 1669. \ 

''Mr. Woodall, of Woodbridge," was named as one of the commissioners 

appointed by the Lord Protector Cromwell, in 1654, for the " removal of scandalous, 

ignorant, and insufficient ministers and schoolmasters in churches and chappells in 

Suffolk." 
In 1 65 1 Mr. Frederick Woodall was minister of the Protestant Dissenters' 

Meeting at Woodbridge, which then consisted of fifty-seven members. 



WOOLPIT. 
372, O. THOMAS . HVDSON = A crown. 

R. IN . WOLPIT . l664 = T . H. i 

The Crown is now the present chief inn. 

Thoooas Hudson was one of the feoffees living in 1668, charged with the govern- 
ment of an almshouse for poor people, founded according to the will of Sir Robert 
Gardener, knight, in 1614, at Elmswell, adjoining Woolpit. 



WORLINGWORTH. 
373. O. lOHN . BLVMFEILD . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. WORLINGWORTH . GROCER = HIS HALF PENY. 



YOXFORD. 
374. O. I.I. WILL . SMITH . 1667 (in three lines). 

R, OF . YOXFORD . WOLLEN . DRAPER = W . S. 




375. O, WILLIAM . SMITH . l666 = W . S. 
R. YOXFORD . IN . SVFFOLKE = W . S. 



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Barmingham. 



BmtT St. Edmund's. 




Burt St. Edmund's. 




Bury St. Edmund's. 





DXBXNBAM. 



Framlingham. 





Havsrhill. 



IXWORTH. 





SOKAM. 



SUDBURT. 




Walsham-lb-Willow8. 



To Q. MlLMtll-QlBtON-OULLUM. 

Bury 8t. Eomuno^s, this Plati. 

FULLY DIDIOATED 





WOODBRIDGK. 



Esq.. F.8.A., OF HAWvridR^^L^T 

PRB8ENTED BY HIM, It RltPIOf^LV^ 

tY THE Editor. ^ 



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Qixvvc^. 



Number of Tokens issued 307 

Number of Places issuing Tokens • ... 54 

Town Pieces issued at Chertsey and Guildford. 



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In Surrey tokens were issued at fifty-five different places, and it is 
interesting to note the peculiarities in the method of describing 
and spelling the name of the place of issue. 

Abinger, for instance, on its solitary token, appears in the older 
name of Abenworth. 

Battersea is spelt Battersey. 

Bletchingley appears as Bleachingley and Bleachingly. 

Dorking as Darking, Darkin, and Dorkinge. 

Egham as Eadgham, Egam, Eggam, Edgham, and Eggham, five 
methods of spelling. 

Epsom reads Ebisham and Apsum. 

Ewell is spelt Yewell and Yewill. 

Famham, phonetically as Fanum and Famum. 

Godalming as Godlyman, Godahnan, Godalmin, Godallmig, 
Godallminge, Godalminge, and Godallmin, seven methods of spelling. 

Guildford varies between six ways, reading Gillford, Gilford, 
Guilforde, Gilldford, Gildford, and Guilford. 

Haslemere reads Hasselmore and Haselmore. 

Mortlake as Mortlacke and Moreclack. 

Rotherhithe as Rotherhith, Redcriff, Redriff, and Rotherhith — 
these spellings being in all cases extra to the few instances in which 
the name of the place is put in the modem style. 

A few of the issuers of the tokens were women, probably single 
women. 

Florance Webb issued the Abinger token. 

Elizabeth Bothel issued a token at Dorking. 

Eleanor Right at Egham and Elizabeth Amus at Epsom, Mary 
Osbume at Godstone, Elizabeth Smith at Putney, Margaret Catt at 
Reigate ; and at Rotherhithe, Mary Berry, Sussannah Dannill, Sara 
Heywood, Rebekah Smallman, Elizabeth Swan, and Mary Warren; 
and at Wandsworth a token was issued by Elizabeth Crow. 

The information as to the trades carried on by the issuers is very 
varied, and in many cases we have no more to guide us than the 
trade signs on the tokens. These must not be taken to invariably 
mean inn-holdings, although, of course, many of them do refer to 
such a trade, but the majority of important trades at that time 
traded under a sign, and in many instances the sign was formed from 
the arms of the trading Guild. 

There is hardly a trading Guild bearing arms that is not repre- 
sented on tokens, although naturally some occur very much more 
frequently than others. 

VOL. II. 71 

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mo TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

It is evident that use of these coats-of-arms as signs of trade was 
very frequent ; in many towns every token bears the arms of some 
trade, and probably used the coat armour as its sign. In some 
towns, research in Corporation and Guild records has revealed die 
feet of a close relationship, alliance, and, to some extent, obedience, 
existing between those of a trade in a town forming that Guild, and 
what was evidently looked upon, to some extent, as headquarters in 
London. It is impossible to say to what extent this intimate connec- 
tion existed ; it is referred to but seldom in Guild records, and then 
only briefly, as though well known ; but it is clear that the trades 
largely and extensively used the armorial bearings of the company, 
formed themselves into local Guilds for the management and restric- 
tion of their own trade, and to a certain extent owned and recognised 
a sort of allegiance due to the London company. The very woid 
Guildford is derived from the presence of a trading Guild in the 
town, and for generations the governing body of the town was known 
as Gilda Mercatoria, 

In Barnes we have the sign of the Horse, and we find from an 
Exchequer bill that the issuer, Timothy Harley, was a brewer. 
Another issuer, Goodwin, describes himself as a vintner, and traded 
at the sign of the Bear. 

Thomas Embery bore the Blacksmiths' Arms, and these were also 
borne by an issuer in Farnham. 

The Cordwainers' Arms appear in Battersea and Farnham. 

The Grocers* at Chertsey, Lingfield, Rotherhithe, Sutton and 
Walton. 

The Mercers', at Cranleigh. 

The Fishmongers', at Farnham. 

The Butchers', at Kingston and Walton. 

The Barber-Surgeons', at Kingston. 

The Tallowchandlers', at Kingstone, Reigate. 

The Bakers', at Lambeth, Rotherhithe, Walton, and WandswortL 

The Merchant-Tailors', at Mortlake. 

The Salters', at Putney. 

The Haberdashers' and Merchant-Adventurers', at Ripley. 

The Drapers', at Rotherhithe. 

At Rotherhithe we are not surprised to find the arms of the Ship- 
wrights and Watermen, nor is it strange to find the Watermen's Anns 
also at Putney, Richmond, and Lambeth ; but it is curious that the 
solitary Clapham token should bear this achievement also. 

A man making candles, or a stick of candles, are favourite devices 
in Surrey, and are found on tokens of Croydon, Dorking, Farnham, 
Godalming, Kingston, and Wandsworth. 

Sugar-loaves, which probably refer to a grocery trade, appear at 
Farnham, Reigate, and Rotherhithe; while the staple industry of 
Guildford is clearly denoted by the fact that of 28 tokens 22 bear 
the woolsack. 

A malt-shovel is a favourite device on Godalming tokens ; a fleur- 
jde-lys on Farnham ones. 

A simple sort of punning appears in the presence of a church on 



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SURREY. nil 

the Chertsey town token, and the same humour is noticeable upon 
other of the Surrey tokens; Thus, for instance, a thorn dusA, or 
Glastonbury Holy Thorn, appears on the token of Edward Bush, of 
Croydon. 

A King's head is borne by Robert King, of Richmond, etc. ; a 
swan, by Elizabeth Swan, of Rotherhithe. 

In most cases the sign of the shop or business appears on the 
tokens, so that the token is what is termed a speaking type. Robert 
Lloyd, of Croydon, at the Greyhound, bears a greyhound ; and two 
Lambeth issuers bear the Wild Boar and the Bear and Ragged Staff, 
and describe themselves as of the Blue Boar, and of the Bare and 
Raged Stafe. 

Another trades at Yo Punchinelly, and bears Punch in a chair, and 
a Putney issuer is at the Red Lion, and puts a lion passant gardant 
on his token of unusual and peculiar character. There are a few 
special tokens among the Surrey series. John Sole, of Battersea, 
bears a bird with a- garter, and an Earl's coronet above it, as though 
he ckiimed connection with a noble family. Thomas Lusher, of 
Chiddingfold, has the curious device of "two pipes and a roll of 
tobacco ;" and John Luffrum, of Egham, has a coach and pair of 
horses. Severai Famham issuers have a castle, as referring to 
Famham Castle, upon their tokens, and most of the Guildford 
tokeners have a castle upon their tokens also, as a reference both to 
the old keep and the town arms. 

The Kingston issuers, in many cases, also bear portions of the 
Kingston arms upon their tokens, " The Three Salmons hauriant." 

Other curious devices are the one on the tokens of Edmonds, of 
Lambeth, which represents two porters holding a kind of hand- 
barrow, and a third loading it with a sack ; and the one of Joseph 
Hall, of Newington, who states that he is "at old smuggs," at 
Newington Butts, and gives a smith working at an anvil on his token. 
What is known as the Guildford Postman's tokens has a postman 
upon it with a very long staff, and two varieties of the token differ in 
the head-gear worn by the postman ; one has a quaint, high hat, and 
the other a very low hat and a wig, and the issuer is supposed to have 
lived at Compton, as his initials are found cut into Compton Church 
in a similar fashion to the engraving on the token. Peter White, of 
Mortlake, was evidently in doubt as to how to fill up the space on his 
token, and so put the royal motto, " Honi soit qui mal y pense," and 
curiously accompanied it with the arms of the City of London ! 

It has been interesting to find out odd bits of information respect- 
ing the issuers of several of these quaint little pieces, and although 
the information obtained is often of a disjointed character, it throws 
light upon the possessions and position of the traders. The Hearth- 
tax Rolls often mention the assessment of the issuers. Some were 
assessed at four, others at eight hearths ; some are declared as free 
for various reasons, either for poverty or by widowhood. 

Richard Greene, of Battersea, was a Constable of the parish. 
Steven Theckstone, of the same place, is specially dubbed " Mr.," and 
is assessed at no less than nineteen hearths. 

71 — 2 

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1 112 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

Then, again, the Subsidy Rolls often mention their names, and the 
Exchequer Bills and other records. An issuer at Bramley was a 
Popish recusant, and her estate at Southwark declared forfeited to the 
Crown. An issuer at Chertsey, William Burnett, was an Anabaptist 
teacher, and received in 1672 a special license to teach in the house 
of William Longhurst, in Chertsey. Thomas Lusher, of Chidding- 
fold, was churchwarden, overseer, and surveyor for the poor in his 
native parish, and evidently a man of importance in the place ; his 
family were old residents in the neighbourhood. 

The rolls of the Feet of Fines again often tell us little bits of 
information on these seventeenth-century traders, and we learn of 
their landed property and of its transfer by purchase or deed. 

These ^nes were practically deeds transferring land, not payments, 
as we now understand the word They were nominally the " finis " 
or end of a fictitious suit. Fines which did not relate exclusively 
to real property operated nominally as an amicable arrangement 
putting an end (finis) to a hostile suit in the King's .Court, and early 
became a popular method of conveyance, not only from their efficacy, 
but from the safety insured to a purchaser by the fact of a duplicate 
of the foot of the fine being preserved as a record in the custody of 
the Court They had somewhat the effect also of a registration of title. 

One man at Cranleigh is declared as living in the street and with- 
out home, while the other issuer in this little village was a man of 
large means, and by his will bequeaths considerable estate in land. 
Several wills of issuers have been discovered in the Probate Court, 
and their mention of land under curious local names, often still well 
known, makes them of especial interest ; while the persistence of 
local names, as Didlesfold, Mower, Strudwick, Enticknap, and Gaston, 
all from the villages of Cranleigh or Bramley, is one of the more 
striking features of our Surrey village life. Sometimes the informa- 
tion is gathered from other sources, as, for instance, the gallery of 
Croydon Church records the name of the man who issued the only 
heart-shaped Surrey token, and who was churchwarden when the 
gallery was erected. 

At Ewell a token is issued by Samuel Hawkins, and on searching 
the parish registers for this small hamlet, the name of Hawkins 
seems to fill up the greater portion of the entries. From 1600 to 
1776, the registers are full of entries of births, deaths, and baptisms 
of member of this family, who seem to have been a very large 
family, and evidently formed the leading residents of the place. The 
other Ewell token is hardly decipherable, but bears a most unusual 
name, Ferdinando Dow, and conjecture is busy to determine whether 
this issuer was of Spanish or of Dutch extraction. 

Many a quaint entry in the churchwardens* books at Famham, 
and many a tombstone at Guildford, have been laid under contribu- 
tion to furnish information. 

In one case we read of a woman issuer standing and doing public 
penance in Farnham Church for offence, and of a Guildford issuer, 
one John Martin, we learn quite a little history. Apprenticed by the 
overseers as a town poor boy, serving his master faithfully and well, 



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SURREY. II 13 

rising to be Mayor of his native town, and being elected several 
times, subscribing largely to a fund for welcoming Charles II. on his 
visit to the town in 1663, becoming churchwarden. Bailiff, overseer 
for his parish, and living to the age of 75, and then being buried with 
great honour, form a series of interesting links of information in the 
life of a successful hardworking Surrey trader of the seventeenth 
century. Then the religious scruples of some of these sturdy men 
must not be overlooked, and Besse's " Sufferings of the Quakers " 
tells us that many of them belonged to that most persecuted sect, 
and suffered hard things for conscience* sake. A Kingston issuer. 
Fielder, signed the celebrated Quakers* petition in 1659, and had a 
distress, amounting to ^£2^, served upon him for attending meeting, 
and later on was committed to prison for refusing to take an oath. 

Another Kingston issuer, Hubbard, was cruelly beaten, " to keep 
him," as the record curiously adds, " out of his meeting-house," and 
fined j£2o per month for absence from national worship. 

John Hollis, of Kingston, was imprisoned in the Marshalsea for 
non-payment of tithes, and fined for attendance at meeting, and in 
Guildford several issuers were fined for refusing to take an oath of 
ofl5ce as Bailiff, and removed from their position. Some of these 
issuers expressly declared their children as " Borne " in the column 
of the church register apportioned to baptisms, and in this way also 
declared their religious scruples. 

Our forefathers in the Government of the day had strange and 
harsh methods of obtaining what they were pleased to term unity 
and uniformity ; and these sufferings for conscience' sake, so little ago 
as 1670, are remnants of a bygone practice that we are thankful to 
feel will never be renewed. Of a far more pleasant character is the 
epitaph on the tomb of Charles Salter, of Kingston, another tokener, 
which records the decease of himself at the age of 83, and his wife 
at that of 77, within twenty days of each other, and which continues its 
narrative in these words : 

•• And God took them. They lived a pattern 
Of conjugal affection, and when one was gone 
This world was no longer pleasing to the other." 

Many inns named on tokens, and which were at the time good and 
well-known posting-houses, still remain; and the Swan, Haslemere; 
Red Lion, Richmond ; Noah's Ark, l^mbeth ; Catherine Wheel, 
Egham ; Hart, Chobham, are examples of many cases in which the 
present day and the old token tell the same tale, although it is to be 
feared that the measure of business done by many of these houses is 
very different now to what it was. 

Robert King, of the King's Head, issued a token at Richmond, 
and this family kept that inn at the ferry for generations — the 
Protector's commission renewing the privilege at a rental of one 
mark per annum being still in existence. 

It is of interest to note that Surrey tokens have been found in 
almost every county in the kingdom, a proof of the commercial im- 
portance of the county in those days. 

The Editor. 



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1II4 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ABINGER. 

1. O, FLORANCE . WEBB = F . W. 
J^. OF . ABENWORTH . 63 = F. W. 

This is the old spelling of the name of the village. 

BAGSHOT. 

2. O, WILLIAM . MOORE = A tree. 

J^, IN . BAGSHOTT = HIS HALF PENY. J 

In the Exchequer Bills, Surrey, Charles II., No. 191, we read : 
" Arthur Earl of Anglesea versus William Moore and others concerning tithes 
within the manors of Bagshot and Windlesham.'' 



BARNES. 

3. O. THOMAS . EMBERY . AT = The Bkcksmiths' Arms. 

J^, IN . BARNES . 1667 =T . M . E. 

4. A variety is dated 1657. 

5. O. CHARLES . GOODWIN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, OF . BARNES . VINTNER = A bear. J 

He is charged for eight hearths in the hearth-taxes of Charles I. and II. 

6. O. TIMOTHY . HARLEY . AT . THE = A man OH horseback. 

J^. HORSE . IN . BARNES . 1 66 7 = HIS HALF PENY. T . M . H. J 

In the Exchequer Bills, Surrey, Charles 11., No. ill, we read : 

" Timothy Harley, of Barnes, brewer, and Mary, his wife, versus Thomas Collins 

and Margaret, his wife (the said Mary being administratrix of all and singular the 

goods of Alice Lyford, late of Mortlake), concerning a legacy of /"lOO, to which 

they consider themselves entitled." 
Timothy Harlow is assessed at seven hearths in the hearth-taxes of Charles I. 

and II. 

7. O. TIMOTHY . MARLEY . AT . THE = A man on horsebacL 

I^. HORSE . IN . BARNES . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. T . M. J 

This is probably from an error on the part of the die-sinker. 

BATTERSEA. 

8. O. RICHARD . GREENE = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. OF . BATTERSEY = Two oars crosscd. i 

Richard Greene was one of the constables in 15th Charles II., and was 
assessed at four hearths in both Charles I. and II. *s hearth-taxes. 

9. O. lOHN . KEMP . IN . pvTNEY = The Cordwamers' Arms. 

J^, OF . BATERSEY . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. J 



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SURREY. I "5 

10. O. lOHN . KEMP . IN = The Cordwaioers' Arms. 

jR, PVTNEY . OR . BATERSEY = I . B . K. 1 663. i 

11. 0. lohn . Sole . Ais . half . peny . 1668 (in four lines). 

R, BATTERSEA . IN . svRRY = A bird within the garter and 
motto ; above it an Earl's coronet. i 

He is assessed at six hearths in Hearth-Ux 15th Charles II. The device is remark- 
able and very unasoal. It would seem to imply that the issuer claimed connection 
with a noble family^ or was the claimant to a dormant peerage. 

12. 0. STEVEN . THECKSTON = S . G . T. 

R, LYON . IN . BATTERSEA = A Hon. {Lead.) \ 

He is assessed at eleven hearths in both 15th and 17th Charles II. In a later 
tax of Charles II. he is charged with nineteen hearths, and is one of the few men 
dubbed " Mr." 

BEDDINGTON. 

13. 0. ROBERT . HiLLER . IN = (detrited). 

R. BEDINGTON . IN . SVRREY = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

Na 187-479 (i4tb Charles IL). Schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax — Robert Hiller was exempt. 

BLETCHINGLEY. 

14. O. lOSEPH . BVTTRE . 1 666 = I . B. 

R. IN BLEACHINGLY = I . B. \ 

15. A variety is spelt bleachingley. 

16. O. RICHARD . MILLS . AT = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, BLECHINGLEY . 1656 = R . M. 

17. 0. RICHARD . MILLS . AT = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. BLECHINGLY. 1665 = R. M. 

BRAMLEY. 

18. O, lOSEPH . CHiTTY = The Blacksmiths* Arms. 

R. IN . BRAMLEY . l666 = I . S . C. 

The following entries as to the family from the parish registers are kindly 
npplied by the Rev. Canon Coulson : 

*• William Chitty and Jane Plant married September 9, 1667." 

"Jonah, the son of Jonah Shiti, baptized March 20, 1644." 

In the lists of Forfeited Estates, Surrey, No. 104, Bramley, we find Joseph 
Chitty occupier of a piece of ground belonging to Henrietta Copley, widow, 
Popi& recusant in Southwark, at the yearly rental of £%, 

In the Subsidy Rolls, Surrey, i6th Charles I., 1640, is this entry : 

** 186^51. Jonas Chittie, of Bramley, 8s." 

CAMBERWELL. 

19. 0. THOMAS . PHILIPS . AT . Y= = A buU's head. 

R. IN . CAMBERWELL . l666 = T . M . P. 



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Iii6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



CHERTSEY. 

20. O. THIS . FARTHING . MADE . FOR = A chuFCh. 

^. CHERTSEY . IN . SVRRY . 1 668 = A chUFCh. \ 

The town-piece ; the church is probably intended as a pun on the name of the 
town. — Fidg " Surrey," plate No. I. 

21. O. WILLIAM . BVRNETT . IN = A woman churning. 

J^, CHIRTEY . IN . SVRY . l666 = W . M . B. i 

22. A variety is not dated. 

In the State Papers, Domestic, 1672, Licences to Preach, p. 93, we read : 

** A licence was granted unto William Burnett to be an Anabaptist teacher in 

the house of William Longhurst, in Chersey, Surrey, 9th May." 
In the Hearth-tax, Charles II., 188-504, William Burnett was assessed at 4s. ; 

also in 15th, 25th, and 26th Charles II. at similar amounts. 

23. O. THOMAS . bVtterfeild = Three doves. 

J^. IN . CHVRCEY . 1652 =T . B. i 

24. O, THOMAS . BVTTERFEILD = Two doVCS. 
jR. IN CHVRCEY . 1659 = T . B. 

In the Hearth-tax, Charles II., 188-504, Thomas Bulterfeild pays 6s. ; also 25th 
and 26th Charles II. a similar amount ; also the same in the 15th Charles II. 

25. O. RICHARD . CHAPMAN = R . A . C. 

J^, IN . CHERCSEY . 1 65 2 = The Grocers' Arms. { 

26. A variety reads in . chertsey= 1652. 

In the Subsidy Roll, i6th Charles I., 1640, 186-451, is the entry: "Richard 
Chapman, i6s." ; and in the Subsidy Roll, 17th Charles I., 187-466: "Richard 
Chapman, in goods £2, assessed at i6s." 

In the Hearth-tax Rolls, 15th Charles II., he is assessed at 16s. 

27. O. WILLIAM . LEE . 6f = A portcullis. 

j^. CHERSEY . 1656 = W . I . L. { 

28. O. FRANCIS . POND . IN = A pair of scissors, f . i . p. 

j^. CHERSEY . IN . SVRRY . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 
In the Hearth-tax, Charles II., 188-504, Francis Pond pays 2s. ; also 25th and 
26th Charles II. a similar amount. 



CHIDDINGFOLD. 
29. O. THOMAS . LVSHER . 68 = Two pipes and a roll of tobacco. 

jR, IN . CHIDDINGFOLD = T . E . L. i' 

From the burial register, Chiddingfold parish, we obtain the following entries : 
** 1691. May y* 19*^, Elizabeth, y« wife of Mr. Thomas Lussher, was buried. 

1691. Tune y« 23"* Mr. Thomas Lussher was buried. 

1662. He was Surveyor for the Poor. 

1665. Collector or Overseer. 

1679. Churchwarden. 

1686. Again an Overseer." 
Kindly extracted by Rev. T. J. Cooper, M.A. 



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SURREY. 1 1 17 

1S7-4791 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
bearth-tax, Thomas Lusher is exempted for five hearths. 

Subsidy Rolls, i6th Charles II., Thomas Lusher is charged in lands 20s., and 
paid 8s., and is charged for three hearths in 25th Charles II. 



CHOBHAM. 

30. O, WILLIAM . LVFFE = A halt lodged. 

^. IN . CHOBHAM = W . A . L. 

" William, son of William Luff, baptized January 7, 1675.** 

The foregoing extract from the parish register is kindly extracted by the Rev. 
H. S. Heworth, Rector. 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, 19th Charles II. (1667), is this 
entry: 

"William Luffe, plaintiff, and Thos. Shrubband Maria his wife, defendants, of one 
messuage, one garden, one orchard, 5 acres of laws, 10 acres meadow, 5 acres of 
pasture, with appurtenances, in Cbobham granted to the- said William, who pays 
£60 sterling." 

Widow Luff is charged for two hearths, Charles II., and William Luff for 
six hearths, 25th Charles II. 

Several members of this family appear in the Hearth-tax Rolls. 



CLAPHAM. 

31. O. WILLIAM . GVRNEY = The Watermen's Arms. 

j^. OF . CLAPHAM . l664 = W . A . G. 

The following entries are kindly extracted by E. Armitage, parish clerk, from 
the registers : 

"Anne, daughter of William Gumey, baptized April 17, 1664. 

" William Gumey, buried Aug. 27, 1665. 

" Benjamin Gumey and Margaret Spencer, after banns of matrimony, mary<* y* 
5 of May, 1681." 

He is charged at four hearths in 15th Charles II. 

A Dr. Gurney is mentioned in the Hearth-tax Rolls of Clapham, possibly a 
connection of the issuers. 

COBHAM. 

32. O. THOMAS . KING . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. COBVM . IN . SVRREY = T . E . K. ^ 

33. O. FRANCIS. TVRILL = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
^. OF . COBHAM . 1667 = F . A . T. 



CRANLEIGH. 
34. O, WILLIAM . DiDLESFOLD = Mcrcers' Arms and a head. 

^. OF . CRANLEY = W . D. 

In the Feet of Fines, Siirrey, Hilary, 30th and 31st Charles II. (1678-9), we read : 
**Jobn Mower, plaintiff, and William Didlefold and Margaret his wife, defend- 
ant, of one cottage, one bam, one garden, one orchard, and three acres land, with 
tpportenances in Cranleigh, the same granted to the said John, who paid £60 
sterling." 



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Iii8 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

The will of William Didlesfold, of Gasson (or Gaston), in the parish of Craoley, 
county of Surrey, yeoman, in the Will Office (book Pye, folio 56), reads : 

" To his eldest son Richard he bequeaths all his messuages and tenements known 
by the name of Stovoll Lane and Vastbridge Lands and Farm in the Parishes of 
Alfold and Hascomb, also containing 160 acres, to his heirs and assigns for ever ; 
to his youngest son, William Didlesfold, his messuage and lands of Gasson with 
the appurtenances ; to his three daughters, Anne, Elizabeth and Sarah, ;f 200 each. 
Dated 9*** Jany, 1672. Proved 3"* May, 1673." 

He was assessed in the Subsidy Roll, i6th Charles L, 1640, 186-4$!, at 16s. 

And in 187-479, 14th Charles IL, schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax we read : ** William Didlesfold, four hearths.*' 

There are two members of this family mentioned in the rolls of the same 
Christian and surnames, one declared of Gasson, who is one of the assessors in 
15th Charles IL, and possesses land value 20s., and the other declared as living in 
the street without home. 

35. O. lOHN . MOWER . AT . THE = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

^. IN . CRANLEY . 1667 = 1 . M. i 

In the Will Office (Book, Wootton, folio 590), we find : 

" The will, dated 22 May, 1653, of John Mower, of Cobham, yeoinan, who 
devises to Joan hb wife two rooms in Stoners Hill, or in any other of his houses, 
with furniture and bedding for the same ; to Anne Mainwaring, hb daughter, 
los. ; to John Mower, hb son, the House he lives in and /"lo a year out of his 
lease of Bagshot ; to his son, Thomas Mower, 20s. a year out of the same lease ; 
to hb cousin, Joseph Mower, his annuity out of the Manor of Vann in Godallman, 
and to hb heirs for ever ; to Joseph Mower, his son, the manor of Fostres in 
Windebham, and to his heirs for ever, out of which to pay Robert Mower, 
another son, £$0 ; to his son Robert his house, called Janes, in Windlesham ; to 
his son Daniel hb house and land in Cranleigh. He appoints hb sons Joseph, 
Robert and Daniel to be executors. Proved 2"<* Sept., 1058." 

In the Feet of Fines, Hilary, 17th and i8th Charles IL, 1664-5, « thb entry: 

"John Childe, Gent, plaintiff, and John Mower, defendant, of one messoage, 
of one garden, one orchard, 120 acres of land, 5 acres of meadow, 40 acres pasture, 
5 acres of Wood in Cranleigh, granted to John Childe, who pays ;^i6o sterling." 

And again, Hilary, i6th and 17th Charles IL, 1664-5 : 

"John Mower and George Enticknapp, plaintiffs, and William Furlongcr, 
defendant, of 2 messuages, 2 gardens, 2 orchards, 50 acres of land, 5 acres 
meadow, 20 acres pasture, 8 acres wood, and appurtenances in Dunsfold and Has- 
combe, and the said William granting the same to the said John and George, who 
paid jf 100 sterling." 

In the Hearth-tax, I5ih Charles IL, 188-481, we read: "William Mower, of 
Cranleigh, i hearth "; and again, " He was assessed in the Subsidy Roll of i6th 
Charles IL, No. 186-451, at 8s.*' 

In No. 187-479, I4tfi Charles IL Schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth -tax — John Mower, one hearth. 

In the Feet of Fines, Hilary, 14th and 15th Charles IL (1662-3) : 

** William Strudwick, Gent, plaintiff, John Mower and Elizabeth hb wife, 
defendants, of one messuage, one garden, one orchard, 100 acres of land, and 30 
acres of pasture in Cranleigh, granted to the said William, who pays ;Ci^ 
sterling." 

A John Mower was buried in Cranleigh Church, and a tombstone records hb 
death, July 9, 1746, aged 63. He is spoken of as a mercer. There are also in- 
scriptions to the memory of ten other members of the family. 

CROYDON. 

36. O, EDMOND . ATWATER = St. Gcorgc and the Dragon. 

J^. IN . CROYDEN . HIS . HALF . PENY = E . E . A. J 

He is charged for eight hearths, 15th Charles IL, and in 25th and 26th 
Charles IL, for fourteen hearths. 



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SURREY. 1 1 19 

37. O. £DMOND . ATWATER = St. Gcorge and the Dragon. 

J^. IN . CROYDEN = E . E . A. J 

38. O. EDWARD . BVSH . OF = A thom-bush (or Holy Thorn of 

Glastonbury). 

^. CRAYDON . IN . SVRREY = E . K . R J 

39. O, MATHEW . GLOVER . M . M . G (across the field). (Heart- 

shape,) 
^. OF. CROYDEN . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1 668 (in five lines). ^ 

He is charged at three hearths, Hearth-tax, Charles II. 

In Croydon Church, on the front of a gallery, Aubrey records the following 
inscription : 

" This gallery was built in the year 1714. 

Thos. How and Matth. Glover, Church Wardens.'* 
—Aubrey's ** Hist," vol. ii., 29. Vide " Surrey," plate Na 2, 

40. O. lOHN . HEFFEiLD = A man making candles. 

R. OF . CROYDON = I . M . H. \ 

He is charged for six hearths, 15th Charles II. 

41. O. lOHN . iOHNSON = A spade. 

R. IN . CROYDEN . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

He is charged at two hearths, Hearth- tax, Charles II. 

42. O. ROBERT . LITTLE . AT . THE = Three tuns. 

R, IN . CROYDON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

He is charged at eight hearths, 25th Charles II. 

43. O, ROBERT . LLOYDE . AT . THE = A greyhound. 

R. GRAYHOVND . IN . CRAYDON = HIS HALF PENY. 1 668. \ 

44. O. RICHARD . RAGG . AT . Y^ = Catherine wheel. 

R. IN . CROYDON . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. R . A . R. 

45. O. CHARLES . AND . MARGERY = HALF PENY. 

R. SEALE . IN . CROYDEN . 1667 =C .M.S. | 

Charles Scale, charged for three hearths, 15th Charles II., and for five, 25th 
Charles II. 

46. O. ANTHONY . STOCKES . OF = A man making candles. 

R. CROYDON . IN . SVRRY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
A . E . S. \ 

He is charged at four hearths, 25th Charles II. 

DORKING. 

47. O. ELIZABETH . BOTHEL . OF = E . B. 

R. DARKING . IN SVRREY = E . B. \ 

Widow Bothell was assessed at the subsidy, i6th Charles I., at 8s. 

In the Hearth-tax, 15th Charles IL, 188-481, Widow Bothell's tenements pay 3s. 
in the division of East Burr, near Dorking. 

A William Bothel is mentioned in the Subsidy RoUs as having land worth 20s., 
anessed for 8s. 



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II20 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

48. O. EDWARD . GOODWIN = A man making candles. 

J^. OF . DARKIN . IN . SVRRY = E . E . G. 

!"In the Subsidy Roll, 1 6th Charles I. (1640), 186-451, Edward Goodwin, gent, 
pays £1 4s., and Edwin Goodwin, sen., gent., pays 8s. 

The affix " gent." would appear to imply that the family was one of importance 
and position in the town. 

49. O. EDMOND . LISSNE = E. L. 
^. IN . DARKING = E . L. 

50. O, lOHN . PENFOLD . OF=I . P. 

^. DORKING . IN . SVRRY = I . P. \ 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Hilary, 29th and 30th Charles II. (1677-8) : 
'* John Penfold, plaintiff, and Augustine Belson, Esq., defendant, of one messuage, 

one stable, one garden, and one orchard, with appurtenances, in Dorking, the same 

being granted to the said John, who pays ;f 60 sterling." 

No. 187-479, *4th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 

of hearth-tax is the name John Penfold, four hearths. 
In the Hearth-tax, 15th Charles II., 188-481, John Penfold, East Burr, near 

Dorkiog, pajrs 4s., and in a later hearth-tax the same amount ; also 25th and 26th 

Charles II. a similar amount. 

51. O. WILLIAM . PENFOLD = W . M . P. 

jR. IN . DARKIN . 1666 = W . M . P. J 

187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth -tax occurs the entry : 

"William Penfold, two hearths." 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, 2nd James II. : 

" Adam Browne, bart., plaintiff, and William Penfold, and Mary his wife, were 
defendants of one messuage, one bam, one stable, one garden, and two orchards in 
Dorking, which were granted to the said Adam, who payS;£'ioo sterling." 

52. A variety is dated 1665. 

53. Another variety 1663. 

54. O. THOMAS . STEEDMAN . OF = A SUgar-loaf. 
J^. DORKINGE . IN . SVRRIE = T . E . S. 

The above unique token is in the cabinet of the Right Hon. G. Cubitt, M.P. 

No. 187-497, ^4^^ Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from pay- 
ment of hearth -tax is the name of Thomas Stedman for five hearths. 

In the Feet of Fines, Easter, 15th Charles II. (1663), we read : 

" Thomas Steedman, John Bratherton, and Frances his wife, and Chas. Wood- 
man, gent., plaintiff ; John Webster, William Worsfold, sen. and jun., and Richard 
Payse and Eliz. his wife, of three messuages, three gardens, and one orchard, with 
appurtenances, in Dorking, Reigate. and Betchworth, granted to Thomas Steed- 
man and others, who pay ;^6o sterling." 

In the Hearth-tax, 15th of Charles II., he was assessed for 4s. in two cases, 
and for a similar amount in 25th of Charles II. 

55. (9. THOMAS. STEEDMANCE = A sugar-loaf. 

jR, DORKING . IN . SVRRIE = T . E . S. 
This is probably an error of the die-sinker for No. 54. 

56. O. lOHN . WATKINS=l667. 

J^, IN . DARKING = 1 . A . W. J 



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SURREY. 



EGHAM. 
57- O. STEPHEN . ERLE . AT . THE = King's head. 

i?. IN . EGHAM . 1666 = HIS | HALFE | PENY. | 

The King's Head, then kept by Elizabeth Clarke, is named in the ** List of 
Tavernes in Ten Shires about London," in the British Museum. 

58. O. NICHOLAS . ESTWICKE = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR, OF . EADGHAM . 1669 = N . M . E. | 

In the Will Office (book Eure, folio 73) is the will of Nicholas Estwicke, of 
Egham, mercer. To his sons, Thomas and William, £^0 each, to his wife Mary 
(whom he appoints sole executrix) he ''bequeathes the house he now lives in, with 
the land thereunto pertaining. Trustees, Richard Dibbin, in the bother end of 
Drurie Lane, Scrivenor, and Mr. Acton, near the Temple Barr, turner." Dated 
May 18, 1672. Proved June 18, 1672. 

He is charged for two hearths, 17th Charles II. 

59. O. GEORGE . FRY . AT . WHITE = A lion. 

Jd. IN . EGGAM . 1666 = G . A . F. J 

60. O. EDWARD . HIDE . OF . EGHAM = A CrOWn. 

J^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 667 = E . H. ^ 

61. O. ROGER . LiVEiNG = A yoke for carrying a barrel. 

jR. BREWER . IN . EGAM = R . I . L. ^ 

62. O. lOHN . LVFFRVM = A coach and pair of horses. 

I^. IN . EGGHAM . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. I . A . L. J 

63. O, ROBERT . NAiSH = A Catherine wheel. 

J^, OF . EGHAM = R . N. 

He is charged at two hearths, 15th Charles II. 

The Catherine Wheel was a '* taverne " named in the ** List of Tavernes in Ten 
Shires about London," Britii^h Museum. 
The inn was then kept by Margaret Guy. 

64. O, ELLENOR . RIGHT = E . R. 

J^, OF . EGHAM = E . R. ^ 

Widow Right is charged for two hearths, 15th Charles II., Hearth-tax. 

65. O. MATHEW . TERRY . i668 = A Catherine wheel. 

^. IN . EDGHAM . IN . SVRRY = HIS HALF PENY. M . A . T. J 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Easter, 31st Charles II. (1679), we read : 
" Samuel Byfield, clerk, plaintiff, and Matthew Terrey, and Cleat his wife {sic)^ 
defendant, of one messuage, two barns, one garden, one orchard, 120 acres of land, 
ten acres meadow, fifty acres pasture, and sixty acres wood, with appurtenances in 
Wonersh, the said Samuel paying ;f 200 sterling for the same.** 

66. O, lOHN . WILLMER . OF . EGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. I . W (in 

four lines). 
^. THE . BVCHARS . AREMS = The Butchers' Arms. ^ 



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1 122 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



EPSOM. 

67. O. ELIZABETH . AMVs . AT . THE = The King's head crowned 

^. IN . EBISHAM . 1667 = HER HALF PENY. J 

68. Another similar, dated 1668. i 
Vide *• Surrey," plate No. 3. 

69. O. ANTHONY . ARNOLD = A Stag couchant 

R. IN . EPSVM . 1657 = A . M . A. 

70. O. ALEXANDER . PEAKE = A . A . P. 

R. IN . APSVM . 1655 = A . A . P. i 



EWELL. 

71. O, FERDiNANDO . DOW ♦ * ♦ (detrited). {Script) 
jR, OF . YEWiLL . HIS . HALF . PENY = (detrited). 

The name of this issuer is remarkable. 

72. O. Samuell . Hawkins . of . Yetvell , in . Surry (in four lines). 
R, Chandler , His . halfe . Penny (in three lines). \ 

Vide " Surrey," plate No. 4. 

In the Exchequer Bills for Surrey, Charles II., No. 277, is an action of Thomas 
Bartlett versus Samuel Hawkins and others concerning tithes in Ewell. 

187-479, '4th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, occurs the name of Samuel Hawkins, four hearths. 

The following extracts from the parish registers relating to this family are very 
kindly supplied by the parish clerk. 

The name is of very constant occurrence in the register, and the &mily was 
evidently both a large and important one. 

1633. William, the sone of Samuel Hakins, buried October 20. 
„ Maria, filia Samuel Hakins, baptized December, 1633 ; died November, 

163J. Elizabeth, filia Samuel Hakins, was bapt. the sixth. 

1638. Samuel, sone of Samuel Hakins, was bapt. the 18 of Sept'. 

1600. John, son of Robt. Hawkings, was buried 28 of November. 

,, Elsbeth, the wife of Kobt. Hawkins was buried 3 day of March. 
1681. John, the sonne of Tho. Hawkins, was bund 23 day of June. 

„ ould wid. Hawkins was buried 26 of August. 
1683. Charlotte, the wife of John Hawkins was buried 10 day of September. 
1688. Elizabeth, the d. Samuel Hawkins, was buried 2 day of September. 
1691. Ann Hawkins, the wife of Thomas Hawkins, was buried May the 20. 

„ Thomas Hawkins, jun., was buried December the 15th. 

1698. Nicholas Hawkins died March 5 ; was buried 9. 

1699. Mary Hawkins died March 2 ; was buried 5. 

170a Elizabeth Hawkins died June 30 ; was buried July 2. 
„ James Hawkins died September 20 ; was buried 22. 
1701. Ann Hawkins died April 6 ; buried 3. 

1704. John Hawkins died September 6 ; was buried 8. 

1705. Thomas Hawkins died July 14 ; was buried 15. 
,, Samuel Hawkins died March 16 ; was buried 19. 

1707. Ann Hawkins died May 9 ; buried 12. 

17 12. Elizabeth Hawkins died Aug. 7 ; buried 10. 
,, Mary Hawkins died Aug. 12 ; buried 13. 

1713. May Hawkins died May 11 ; buried 12. 



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SURREY, 1 123 

171 5. Joanna Hawkins dyed May 20 ; buried 22. 

17 16. Susanna Hawkins dyed November 10 ; buried 15, 
1718. Jane Hawkins dyed November 17 ; buried 19. 
172a Sarah Hawkins died March 2 ; was buried 5. 

1721. Thomas Hawkins died July 15 ; was buried 18. 

1722. Robert Hawkins, y parish clerk (of small-pox), Feby. 17. 

1723. Jane, daughter of John Hawkins and Elizabeth, his wife, baptized 
Oct 15. 

1725. Robert, son of John Hawkins and Elizabeth, his wife, baptized Feb. 1 1. 

1727. Susana, daughter of John Hawkins and Elizabeth, his wife, bom July 2 ; 
baptized July 16. 

1728. Buried Susan Hawkins 3rd May. 

„ „ Margaret Hawkins September 6. 

„ „ James Hawkins November 17. 

1729. Baptized Robert, son of John Hawkins and Elizabeth, his wife, July 15. 
173a Buried Robt. Hawkins Feby. 25. 

1731. Baptized Robert, son of John Hawkins (y« dark) and Elizabeth, his wife, 
Feb. 3. 

1732. Deborah Hawkins buried Sep*". 2. 
1736. Elizabeth Hawkins buried Oct. 12. 
1739. Samuel Hawkins buried Aug. 17. 

1742. Elizabeth Hawkins buried June 2. 

1743. Samuel Hawkins, buried Oct. i. 
1745* James Hawkins buried July 29. 
1746. Robert Hawkins buried Jan^. 21. 
1749. J'^^ Hawkins buried May 23. 

1753, April I, Martha Hawkins (widow), buried. 

1760. John Hawkins was bury*d Jan. 7. 

1 77 1. Elizabeth, the wife of John Hawkins, parish clerk, was buried Oct. 5. 

1774. Robert Hawkins, clerk of this parish, was bur**, y* lOlh of Nov'. 

'776. John Hawkins was buried y^ loth of Jany. 

1718. Robert Hawkins and Jane Niblet were married September 28. 

1699. James Hawkins and Elizabeth Lee were married September 12. 

FARNHAM. 

73. O. AT . FARNHAM = I . M . D. 

Ji. IN . svRREY . 1658 = The Blacksmiths' Arms. J 

74. O. ROBERT . PRIOR . OF . FARNVM = A fleur-dc-lys. 

Ji. OAT . MEALE . MAKER = R . I . F. 

Viiig " Surrey,** plate No. $ 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, i6th Charles II. (1664), we read : 

"George Slarkey, Esq., and Robert Fryer, sen., plaintiffs, and Robert Fryer, 
jun., and Johanna his wife, defendants, of one messuage, one garden, and twelve 
acres of land with appurtenances, in South Famham, Robert Fryer, jun., granting 
the same to the said plaintiffs, who pay a sum of money." 

In 1682 Robert Fryer was chosen Vicar's churchwarden, and the following 
is his entry in the churchwardens' book, and a charge is made by him of £i for 
writing the entry : 

Payd for Writting and Perfecting these accompts 01 00 00 

Payd the Appariter for bringing the Proclamation how ye Royal 

ffiimely should be Prayed ffor 

Ptyd the Ringers when the Rebels were beaten 

Payd ffbr Ringing when my Lord Bishop came out of the West ... 
Payd ffor Ringing when my Lord came from the Parliament 
Payd ffor Ringing when the King (James II.) was proclaimed 

Payd ffor Ringing when the Kinp was crowned 

Payd ffor Ringing on Thanksgivmg Day 

Ptyd to the Ririgers when the Queen went ffrom London to Winton 
Payd Goody Jeffrey ffor mending and washing the surplices 



00 


01 


00 


00 


II 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


05 


00 


00 


10 


00 


01 


00 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


12 


00 


00 


06 


00 



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II24 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

75. O. lOHN . GENANG . 1669 = The Cordwainers* Arms. 

^. IN . FARNHAM . IN . SVRRY = I . 1 . G. J 

76. O. lOHN . GODDARD . 0F = A sugar-loaf. 

^. FARNHAM . IN . SVRREY = I . B . G. J 

The following will appears to relate to a member of this family : 

Will Office (book Ruthven, folio 142). " The will of Ellis Goddard, of Famham, 
servant to Almighty God, to his brother, Thomas Goddard, £$ ; to his brother's 
son Ellis, £$ ; to his brother Gabriel, £$ ; to his brother Gabriel's daughter 
Dorothy, £$ ; to his cousin, Thomas Goddard, son of Richard Goddard, /^lo ; to 
Ann and to Joan, the daughters of his cousin Thomas, £$ each ; all the residue to 
his brother, Richard Goddard, whom he appoints executor. Dated March 2, 1655. 
Proved April i, 1657." 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, John Goddard is exempted for seven chimneys. 

He is mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of Charles II. as having lands worth 20&, 
and is assessed at 4s. in the Hearth-taxes of Charles I. and II. 

77. O. lOHN . HOLLOWAY = A Stick of candles. 

J^, IN . FARNHAME . 1658 = 1 . M . H. \ 

No. 187-479, ^4^^^ Charles II., .schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, John Holloway is named for three chimneys. 
He is charged for two hearths in Hearth-tax Charles II. 

78. O. lAMES . HVNT . IN = A Castlc. 

J^. FARNHAM . IN . SVRRY = I . H. A flcur-dc-lyS. \ 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Easter, 23rd Charles II. (1671), we read : 

** James Hunt and Nicholas Turner, plaintiffs, and Edward Peck, Esq., 

defendant, of three messuages and three gardens, with appurtenances, in Farnham, 

the said Edward granting the same to James and Nicholas, who pay ;^ioo 

sterling." 

79. O. IAMB . HVNT . JN = A CaStlc 

^. FARNHAM . IN . SVRRY = I . H. A flcur-dc-lyS. i 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, James Hunt is exempted for four chimneys. 

He is noted in the Subsidy Roll of Charles II. as possessing goods value of /j, 
assessed at i6s. 

He is assessed in the Hearth-taxes in both Charles I. and II. in several places 
at 4s. 

A Thomas Hunt in 1700 was " payd 00 12 00 for ringing the eight o'ckxk 
bell " by the churchwardens. 

Another member of the Hunt family at a later date was hedgehog catcher to 
the parish, and the following entries occur of moneys paid to him : 

£ s. d. 

Payd for 91 hedgehogs i 

A pole-cat o 

Hedgehogs at sundry times o 

35 hedgehogs . . .. o 

25 hedgehogs o 

80. O. RICHARD . LVNN . AT . THE = A flcUF-de-lj^S. R . M . L. 
R, IN . FARNHAM . IN . SVRRY = A grifflD. \ 

In the 187-479, 14^^ Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, is the name of Richard Lunn for eight chimneys ; but he is chsurged for 
eight hearths in Hearth-tax of Charles II. 

A woman named Mary I^unn, together with another named Mary Allen, appear 
to have lived in Farnham about this time, and to have given great trouble to the 



10 


4 





6 


14 


8 


II 


8 


8 


4 



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SURREY. 1125 

parish authorities, for which they were eventually compelled to undergo penance. 
In the churchwardens' books of 16S9 ^^ ^^^ these entries : 

** Paid at a Justice meeting about Mary Allen and Mary Lunn, 6s." 

** Expended when we put up Allen and Lunn's daughter in the Spiritual Court, 
IS. 6d/' 

** Expended on the Appariter twice about Lunn*s and Allen's standing penance, 
and for letters and to Judd and his son, los." 

** Payd a bill from Doctor's Commons for Mary Allen's and Mary Lunn's stand- 
ing penance in the church, £$ 12s. 8d." 

81. O. FRANCIS . MABBERLEY . 0F« F . A . M. 

J^. FARNHAM . FISHMONGER = The Fishmongers* Arms. J 

Na 187-479, I4^h Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth- tax, Francis Mabberley is exempted for nine chimneys. 

He is charged for nine hearths in Hearth-tax Charles II. ; and in an undated 
one at end of Charles II.'s reign for seventeen, an unusually large number. 

82. O. HENRY . MORRIS . OF = The Fishmongers* Arms. 

I^. FARNHAM . IN . SVRREY = H . E . M. | 

83. O. I AMES . WRATH = 1658. 

J^, IN . FARNHAM = I . M . W. ^ 

84. Another similar, dated 1664. \ 
187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 

hearth-tax, James Wroth is exempted for four chimneys. 

He is mentioned in the Subsidy Roll of Charles II. as having land worth 2O6., 
and is assessed in the Hearth-taxes of Charles I. and II. 4s. and 5s. 

GODALMING. 

85. 0. HENERY . BRADFOVLDE = A stick of candles. 

jR. OF . GODALLMIG . 1657 = H . B. \ 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, Henry Bradfold is exempted for four hearths ; but he is charged for 
fire hearths in the Hearth -taxes of Charles II., and in Charles I. for four. 

86. 0, HENRiE . CHiTTY = The Grocers* Arms. 

jR, IN . GODALMAN = H . E . C. J 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Easter, 30th Charles II., 1678, we read : 
" Henry Watts and Edward Coe, gent., plaintiffs, and Henry Chitty and Anna,, 
his wife, and Matthew Dare, defendants, of three messuages, three gardens, and 
ooe acre of land, with appurtenances, in Godalming, and in the parish of the most 
Blessed Virgin in Guildford, Henry Chitty granting the same to the plaintiflBs, who 
pay ;f 100 sterling." 

in the 187-479, H^^ Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax, Henry Chety is exempted for one hearth at one forge. He is 
charged in Subsidy i6th Charles I., 1640 (186-451), Hen. Chittie, 8s. ; and in the 
Hearth-tax, 15th Charles IL, 3s., 2s.; 25th and 26th Charles II., 4s., 2s. ; 
iSlh Charles 11., 3s., 2s. 

87. 0. ROBERT . CLINTON . 0F = A gown or cloak. 

^. GODALLMIN . IN . SVRREY = R . X . C \ 

88. A variety reads, on the reverse, godalmin. in. svrry = r . c. \ 

187-4791 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, Robert Clinton b exempted for two hearths. 

VOU IL 72 



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II26 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

89. O. LAWRENCE . COLLINGS = A WOOlpack. 

jR, OF . GODALLMINGE . 69 = L . C. \ 

90. O, HENRY . MARTIN = A bottk. 

^. GODALMINGE . l666 = H . I . M. J 

91. O, HENRY . MAY . IN = A leathern bottle. 

Ji. GODALMINGE . l666 = H . I . M. J 

187-479, I4»h Charles IL, schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, Henry May is exempted for two hearths. 
Henry May is charged for two hearths in Hearth-tax of Charles IL 

92. O. HENR . MAY . IN = M. 

^. GODALLMINGE . 1661 =H . I. \ 

93. O. lOHN . RANDALL. 

^. IN . GODLYMAN = I . D . R. J 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax, John Randall is named for four hearths. The name has the prefix 
of "Mr." 
The Subsidy Roll of 1 6th Charles I., 1640, 186-451, reads : 
"John Randall, 8s. ; and the Hearth-tax, 15th Charles II., 4s." 

94. O, WILLIAM . RAPLEY = W . R . R. 

jR. IN . GODALMiNG = A malt-shovel 
187-479, 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of hearth- 
tax, William Rapley is exempted for three hearths ; but he is charged for two and 
three hearths in the Hearth-taxes of Charles II. 

95. O, WILLIAM . RAPLEY = W. R . R. 

^. IN . GODALMING . i666 = A malt-shovel. { 

In the Exchequer Bills, Surrey, Charles II., No. 385, there is an action between 
William Rapley, malster, debtor, and accomptant to the King, versus William 
Sun and John Smvth, concerning tithes in the parish of Godalming, William Rapley 
being farmer of all the tithes belonging to the vicarage of Godalming by virtue of a 
grant of Samuel Speed, Vicar of the said parish. 

No. 142, a similar bill between Samuel Speed, clericus, and William Rapley. 

96. O, WILLIAM . RAWLEY = W . R . R. 
iP. IN . GODALMING = 1 666. 

Probably from an error on the part of the die-sinker in preparing the dies for 
No. 95. 



GODSTONE. 
97. O. MARY . OSBORNE = Unknown aims. 

jR. GODSTONE . IN . SURREY = (dctrited). 

In the Will Office (book Car., folio 171), is the will, dated August 9, 1667, of 
John Osborne, of West Moulsey, yeoman. 

He bequeaths to his wife, Mary, all his copyhold lands in West Moulsev for 
her life, and at her death to his son, John Osborne, and his heirs. To his daughter, 
Mary Osborne, ;£'200. He appoints his wife executrix. Proved December 3I1 
1667. 

Book Hene, folio 22. There b also the will, dated December 31, 1667, of Maria 
Osborne, of West Moulsey, widow. 



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SURREY. 1127 

She bequeaths to her son, John Osborne, ;£'ioo at the age of 21 ; her goods, 
etc., to her daughter Mary. Appoints her sister, Anne Pluckington, executrix. 
Proved February 3, 1668. 

The following may also refer to this family : 

Book Bruce, folio 96. The will of John Osborne, gent., of Croydon, dated 
June 14, 1664. 

His wife, Elizabeth, to enjoy the profits of his lands and warren in Croydon, 
during her widowhood ; should she re-marry, the whole to go to Gabriel Osborne, 
of West Twitteringe, in Sussex, with one messuage in Croydon in the tenure of 
John Heathfield. Proved August 31, 1664. 

Widow Osbume is charged for one hearth in Hearth-tax, Charles II. 



GUILDFORD. 

{Vide separate Plate.) 

98. O. GviLDFORD . 1 668 = A castlc between two woolsacks, in base 

a lion couchant ; the arms of the Borough of Guildford. 
^. F . M . F . s . 1668 = A cross patonce, between five mart- 
lets ; the arms of St Edward the Confessor. (Plate, 
No. I.) i 

99. Variety of above, same as No. 98, except that the cross on the 

shield of the reverse is smaller, and the castle on the 
obverse larger. J 

The initials are probably those of the overseers. 

100. O, lOHN . BROWNE = A woolsack. 

^. IN . GILFORD . 1656 = A castle. J 

John Browne was elected Bailiff of the town in 1662, in room of another dis- 
charged. 

loi. O, SIMON . CRANE = A woolsack. 

jR, IN . GILFORD . 1656 = A castle. (Plate, No. 2.) J 

This man was a grocer in the High Street, and as a lad was a Guildford town 
appentice, being noted in the town books as having served his father, also a 
grocer, " seven full years.** He was made a Justice of the Peace in 1652, and in 
the same year was elected Mayor of the town. 

The following passage occurs in the parish register of Holy Trinity : 

"I do approve of the eleccion of Caleb Cooper to bee Register for the marriages, 
etc, of the parish of Trinity in Guldeford, September 22, 1653. 

**SvMON Crane, Maior." 

He resided in St Mary's parish, and was evidently a person of some property, 
as in the Roll of the Subsidy, granted to Charles I. in Parliament in 1640, we 
read: 

" Symon Crane in goods iij^ ; the assessment being at the rate of 

He was buried November 29, 1658. 
102. O. CHARLES . HANBY = A woolsack. 

iP. IN . GILFORD . 1662 = A castle. (Plate, No. 3.) J 

The parish book states that Charles Handby was — 
** Elected Constable for St Mary's, Dec. 31, 1670." 
Also: 

'* Charles Hanbey was discharged from being Tythingman, John Burt being 
appoiuted in his room, Sept. i, 1602 (14 Car. II.)." 

72 — 2 



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liaS TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

103. O. CHARLES. HANDBY = A woolsack. 

jR, IN . GILFORD . 1662 = A castle. } 

104. O. lOHN . KING . IN — A woolsack. 

-^. GviLDFORD . 64 = A castlc. (Plate, No. 4,) \ 

John King was a freeman of Guildfordt having taken up his freedom from his 
father (also a freeman) as eldest son. 
He was appointed collector for the poor of St. Mary's, April 25, 167 1. 

105. A variety is dated 1658. 

106. O. EDWARD . LEE = A castle. 

I^. GiLLDFORD . 1658 = A woolpack. (Plate, No. 6.) 

107. O. EDWARD. LEE = A woolpack. 

^. GVILDFORD. 1 664 = A castle. 

Nothing whatever is known respecting this issuer. He is presumed to have 
been a relative of Henry Lee. 

108. O, HENRY. LEE = A woolsack. 

J^, GVILDFORD . 1658 = A Small castle. (Plate, Na $•) 

Henry Lee was one of the town poor apprentices, having been apprenticed by 
the overseers to "John Childs and another, and faithfully served them seven fiill 
jrears," taking up the freedom of the town. 

He evidently attained to a good position in the town afterwards, from the fact of 
his issuing his own trade token. He was elected overseer for the parish of 
St. Mary, April 4, ilSSo, and December 26, 1682, and churchwarden, April I3» 
1691. 

The modem spelling of the name of the town appears on this token for the fint 
time. 

109. A variety is dated 1653. 

no. O. NICHOLAS. LINTOTT = A castle. 

-ff. OF . GILFORD . 1656 = A woolsack. (Plate, No. 7.) 

A town apprentice, having been bound to Thomas Newman, and served him 
** seven full years." 

He was made " Bayliffe " in 1659, and elected one of the " approved men," or 
Town Councillor, in 1660, and also in 1661. 

In 1662, however, the following record appears in the town books : 

" Nicholas Lintott was discharged from being called by the name of Baylifie in 
1662, for refusing to take the oath and make subscription. " 

This probably refers to the Corporation Act* (17 Car. II., cap. 2), and to the 
Oath of Non- resistance and abjuring the Covenant (15 Car. II., cap. 5) ; and the 
fact of Lintott refusing to take it would imply that he was a Dissenter, probably a 
Quaker, very possibly one of those who, with other Guildford men, supported 
Cromwell. 

A remarkable proof of this man's strong Puritan opinions appears in Holy 
Trinity register, in which his family are conspicuously entered as '* Borne," in the 
** Baptized " column, and never as '* Baptized." 

* The objectionable words in this Act were the following : ** I, A. B., do swear 
that it is not lawful upon anpr pretence whatever to take up arms against the King, 
and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking up arms agamst His Person, 
or against those that are commissioned by him. And that I will not at any time 
endeavour any alteration of Government either in Church or State." 



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SURREY. 1 129 

111. A variety is dated 1666. 

112. Another variety also dated 1658. 

113. O. lOHN . MAY . SHOOMAKERs A ShoC Or laSt. 

HIS 
^. IN . GILFORD. l668 = HALFE 
PENNY 
M 

I . . s. (Plate, No. 9.) 
With one exception, this is the rarest of all the Guildford series, and one of the 

scarcest of the tokens of the county. 
Nothing is at present known about the issuer of this token, the only halfpenny 

of the series, and an exception to the general rule as regards the spelling of the 

word PENNY. 

114. O. ABDIAH . MARTIN . 1 664 = A WOOlsack. 

^. IN . GILFORD . 1664 = A castle. 

A freeman of Guildford, having served his father in apprenticeship seven 
years. 

He was proprietor of a piece of ground next the Tun Inn, in Tunsgate, upon 
which an annual charge to the Grammar School existed, as in the rent roll of the 
Free Grammar School, December 15, 167 1, we read : 

"Abdiah Martin is charged for his garden and where the mercate house is 
bmlt,xxd.*' 

A piece of this ground was afterwards purchased by the Corporation, and the 
wheat market-house above referred to built upon it. 

This market-house was, however, let on a lease of 1,000 years to a Mr. Stcere 
on June 13, 1737. 

115. A singular variety of this token bears on the obverse, in 

addition to the legend, the date 1664, and on the 

reverse 1652. (Plate, No. 8.) 
It is clear, on examination, that the obverse is the usual one, as described above ; 
but the reverse exactly resembles that of the following token of John Martin, and 
it is supposed that the same coiner struck each of these tokens, but that, in error, 
he used an old reverse die of John Martin in striking a second issue for Abdiah, 
instead of the correct die. 

116. Another most curious variety reads ABDIAH . martin . martin 

on the obverse, and is clearly one struck from an in- 
correct die, probably only a proof. 

117. A third variety is struck upon pure copper, not brass as usual, 

and is nearly one-eighth of an inch thick. 

118. O, lOHN . martin = A woolsack. 
i?. IN . GILFORD . 1652 = A castle. 

This John Martin is another instance of a poor lad rising to considerable position 
and affluence in his native town. 

The old parish register informs us that he was apprenticed by the overseers to 
Mr. Cobbett, and served his master ** faithfully and well for nine years." Some- 
tiiing like an apprenticeship ! 

In 1640 he had become a man of property, and the Roll of the Subsidy, pre* 
▼iously quoted as granted by Parliament to Charles L, has his name thus : 

** lohn Martyn in goodes uj£ pa3nng vs, iij</. in every pound." 

In 1643, the town records note that John Martyn was one of the wardens of the 
Rye Market-house. 

The Rye Market-house stood in High Street, and occupied a site in the north- 



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1130 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

east corner of Holy Trinity Church. It was pulled down on January 6, 1758, and 
its value Cf 200) invested in bank stock. 

In 1647 John Martyn was elected as Mayor, but, singular to state, does not 
appear as an " approved man," or Councillor, until 165 1, and would therefore appear 
to have been selected from the town without first passing through the CounoL 

He was elected an "approved man" six times, i.t. in 1651, 1652, 1653, 1656, 
1657 and 1658, and was a^n Mayor in 1654 and 1655. 

In 1663 the town incurred an expense of one hundred and fifty-five pounds 
{£iSS — in those days an enormous sum), which was all spent in welcoming his 
Majesty Charles II., in his visit to Guildford soon after his restoration. 

Like a brave old Royalist, as he most certainly must have been, John Martyn— 
or Martin, as the name then appears — gave a subscription of five pounds {£s\ 
towards this expense ; and, with the exception of John Smallpeece and Jose^ 
Nettles, who gave an equal amount, we do not find that any Guildfordian gave so 
large a gift. He evidently lived in the parish of St. Mary, as the churchv^urdens* 
book proves, his signatures being bead of the list for several years in the signatures 
of those who attended the vestry meetings. The fact that it is first written when- 
ever he attended shows he was considered a man of great importance in the parish. 
He is buried near the north door of St. Mary's Church, having died at the age of 
seventy-five. 

119. A variety is dated 1657. 

120. O, lOSEPH . NETLES . OF=.^* 

I . E. 

J^, GviLDFORD . IN . svRRY = A thlstlc Of a wheatsheaf. 

Vidg «• Surrey " plate, No. 6. 

Joseph Nettles was an '* approved mam" of Guildford five times, viz., in 1657, 
1658, 1659, 1660, and 1661. 

He is described in Russeirs '* History " as being of St. Mary*s parish ; and he 
founded an exhibition to the University of Oxford or Cambridge, for the son of a 
freeman taught in the Grammar School, by leaving to the said school certain lands 
in Stoke on trust. 

This man shared the same fate as Nicholas Lintott, previously referred to, being 
discharged from being called by the name of Baylifie for refusing to take the ottb 
in 1662. 

He was a publican, and tenant of the Grammar School for the Tun Inn. See 
the Rent Roll of December 15, 167 1, in which his rent is mentioned at ** xxxs. for 
the halfc yeare." 

He also rented of the same charity *'a come chamber over the wheat mercate 
house and a shed thereto belonging for xxvjj. for the halfe yeare." 

As mentioned before, he was one of the three men who subscribed £$ ^^ 
towards the expense of;^i55 incurred in welcoming Charles II. to Guildford in 1663. 

121. O, lOHN . REMNANT = A CaStle. 

/^, OF . GiLLFORD • 1667 = A woolsack. (Plate, No. 10.) 

John Remnant was a resident in St. Mary's parish, and was appointed collector 
for the poor for that parish in 1669. 

He was also appomted surveyor of highways for the same parish on Decem- 
ber 29, 1671, and overseer of highways for the same, December 29, 1674. 

Boyne gives the spelling of Gill ford incorrectly as Gilford. 

•The issuer, with two others, had a distress served upon him in 1670, in which 
goods value /'17 1 6s. were taken from the three of them for an attendance at a 
meeting held in the street, when kept out of their meeting-house at Guildford.— 
** Sufierings of the Quakers," vol. i., p. 699. 

In 1670 we read the following quaint and interesting entry of him : ** Jane Rem- 
nant, of Guildford, had taken from her soe much cheese as was worth aboute fower 
pounds for three pounds imposed on her son John for being at a silent meeting 
amoungst Friends, where shee was not nor did usually frequent. The wch cheese 
was keept by ye magistrates whilst it was spoyled, for none would buy it, but it 
was cast forth and buryed." 



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SURREY. 1 131 

122. O, DANiELL . SARLLE = A castle (no inner circle). 

jR, IN . GILFORD . 1667 = A woolsack with inner circle. 
(Plate, No. II.) 

One of the specimeDS in the Eklitor's possession was found between some boards 
in the Town Hall by Apark, the beadle, in 1847, ^^^ ^ the only token we ever 
heard of being found in the hall. 

The issuer is supposed to have been a lawyer ; his signature appears on receipts 
in the receipt-book of Nettles* Charity, and also as a ratepayer of the parish of 
Holy Trinity, in the churchwardens' book at the Easter vestries of 1697, 1699, 
1702 and 17 13. In the roll of voluntary contributors toward the alteration of 
the gallery in the church, in 1699, his name appears, with that of John Smallpeece, 
as a donor of 2s. 6d. 

He took up his freedom of the town, as eldest son, from his father ; and he was 
appointed Tythingman in 1658, and overseer of the poor for the parish of St. 
Mary, 1676. 

123. O, JOHN . SMALLPEECE = A castlc with a woolsack before it. 
/^. IN . GviLF0RD = A barge with four men rowing. (Plate, 

No. 12.) 

The representative of one of the very oldest Guildford families, resident in the 
town now for over 400 years. 

This John Smallpeece was a grocer, and his father was also of that trade ; and 
in the constitution-book of the town, amongst the apprenticeships registered, is 
this name : 

** Apprenticed to his Father and Mother, Grocers." 
An unusual entry, and one which would appear to prove that the mother was an 
active and working partner in the business, so much so as to be mentioned in the 
indenture of apprenticeship. 

On Tuesday, August 26, 1662 (14 Car. II.), twelve royal commissioners, 
amongst whom was Sir Richard Onslow, held sittings at Guildford, to inquire into 
the proceedings of the flayer and certain magistrates of the town, who had re- 
fnsed to take the oath of supremacy and non-resistance upon the restoration of 
Charles II. ; 

"and Henry Parson, Maior ; R. Budd, sen., John How, John Alderton, W". 
Hill, T. Smith, T. Horsnaile, magistrates, were discharged and acquitted from 
the ofl&ce of maioraltie and magistracey of the said towne for refusing to take the 
Oathes and make subscription as by the said act of parliament is enjoyned. And 
for the future they be not called or beare the name of magistrates and approved 
men of the towne aforesaid ; and John Smalepeice, grocer, was chosen Maior in 
his stead.'* 

He was, from this extract, evidently a man of some note in the town for loyalty 
to Giurch and King, or he would not have been specially selected for this honour 
by the royal commissioners. 

He lived to the age of seventy-nine, and died July 29, 1701, and is buried in the 
centre aisle of Holy Trinity Church. 

He was elected constable, a kind of special overseer, for his native parish of St. 
Mary on December 24, 1668, and in the churchwardens' book for St. Mary's occurs 
the following entry : 

"Sept. ye i, 1672. 

" Collected for John Smallpeece of Guildford for losses by Fire xxiijs. viij^." 

It would appear from this entry that he was a person of so much consequence in 
the parish, that a special offertory was made at the parish church to assist him in 
meeting some heavy loss incurred by fire. 

In 1S95 he was churchwarden of the parish of Holy Trinity, and his signature 
as a ratepayer occurs in the churchwardens*-book of that parish at the Easter 
vestries of 1697, 1699 and 1 70 1. Among the list of voluntary contributions 
towards the altering of the gallery of Holy Trinity Church, 1699, his name appears 



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1132 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

as a donor of 2s. 6d. In this roll the total amount collected was only £y 14s., 
and only five donations were of los^ most of the amounts being 2s. 6d. and is. 
There is an oft-recurring item in the churchwardens* account, reading, "For 
breaking the ground in the Church, paid lohn Smallpeece 6s. 8d." 

An ancestor of this issuer was Mayor of the town in 1502, and the nameappean 
on the Mayor's Roll in 1552, 1560, 1568, 1574, 1582, 1591, 1596, 1602, 1662 (as 
above), 1707, 1714, 1831, and 1836; but, although members of the family have 
been on the Council since, they have not provided another Mayor of the borough. 

A descendant of the issuer is at present Town Clerk of Guildford ; and the 
character borne by old John Smallpeece in 1662 may be said with much certainty 
to belong still to the honoured descendants of the same family.- 

124. O, lAMES . SNELLING = A woolsack. 

^. IN . GviLFORDE = A castlc (Plate, No. 13.) 

As far as can be ascertained, the specimen of this token in the cabinet of the 
Editor of this work is unique. It was presented to the late John Nealds, Esq., a 
well-known Guildford antiquary, by the Rev. Charles Kerry, M.A., when curate 
of Puttenham, who is a most zealous and painstaking antiquary himself, and who 
found it near Guildford when searching for some flint implements on March 4, 1873. 

There is no specimen of it in the British Museum, nor in any public or private 
collection within the personal knowledge of the author, and it is very singular that 
one only of this issue should be known as surviving from those originally struck. 

The issuer was a freeman of the town, taking up his freedom from his father as 
eldest son. He was evidently a well-known and respected man, as he served his 
town as " an approved man " no less than ten times, t.^.t in 1665, 1666, 1667, 1668, 
1669, 1670, 167 1, 1672, 1673. 1674, and was elected Serjeant-at-mace September I, 
1662, in room of William Tisberry, discharged for refusing to take the oath. 

In January, 1660, James Snelltng, Quaker, was taken from his house at Guild- 
ford, and committed to the White Lion Prison, South wark, and there placed 
among the felons, with seventy other Quakers from different parts of Surrey, 
thirty-two of whom were tried on October 30, 1662, for obstinate refusal to rqoir 
unto a church or chapel, and being present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle, 
and were sentenced to be imprisoned for three months, and after that time to 
abjure the realm or be proceeded against as felons.— ** Sufferings of the Quakers," 
vol. i., p. 69a 

125. O. THOMAS . TOMPSON = A castle. 

^. OF . GILFORD . 1 657 = A woolsack. 

Thomas Tompson was apprenticed to Mathew Birchell, and served him seven 
full years, taking up his freedom therefrom. 

He was elected ** approved man " three times, viz., 1665, 1666, 1667, and Bailiff 
of the town, 1664. 

In 1608 (6 Jac. I.) the entry occurs in the Guildford constitution-book relative 
to this Issuer, probably of his father : 

** Thomas Tompson, the elder one, of the Corporation of Guildford, disfran- 
chised, and dismissed from the fellowship of the Mayor and approved men during 
such tyme as he shall keep a comon alehouse or tiplingehouse. ' 

126. O, THOMAS . TOMPSON = A CaStlc. 

jR, OF . GiLLFORD . 1657 = A woolsack. 

The only difference between this issue and the last occurs in the spelling of the 
word ** Gilford '» or ** Gillford," one being with only one ** L," the other having 
two. 

In January, 1660, Thomas Thompson, Quaker, was taken from his bed at 
Guildford and committed to the White Lion Prison, Southwark, and there placed 
among the felons, with seventy other Quakers from different parts of Surrey, 
thirty-two of whom were tried on October 30, 1662, for obstinate refusal to repair 
unto a church or chapel, and being present at an unlawful assembly or conventide, 
and were sentenced to be imprisoned for three months, and after that time to 
abjure the realm or be proceeded against as felons.—** Sufferings of the Quakers, 
vol. i., p. 69a 



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SURREY, 1 133 



w. 



127. O. THOMAS .WILMOT = _ 

T . A. 

R. NEERE . GViLDFORD — A postmati With a Staff and bag, and 
wearing a high-crowned hat, and the w on obverse 
being plain and solid. 

128. O. THOMAS .WILM0T= ^' 

T . A. 

I^. NEERE . GVILDFORD = A postman With a staff and bag, 

and wearing a high-crowned hat, and the w on obverse 

having the centre strokes overlapping each other at 

their junctions, thus, ^. (Plate, No. 14.) 

The mark "tf is deeply cut in the stonework of Compton Church in several 

places. Might not this refer to this issuer, as he is expressly mentioned as residing 

^necre" Guildford? 

129. O. THOMAS . WILM0T = „^* 

T . A. 

^. NEERE . GVILDFORD — A postman with a staff and bag, 
wearing a low-crowned hat and bag-wig. (Plate, No. 15.) 

130. O. 'I Struck with the obverse of No. 127, and the reverse of 
i?.J No. 129. 

Of their issuer nothing is known. It is termed the Postman's Token. 

HASLEMERE. 

131. O. lOHN . EDE . AT . THE . SWAN = A SWan. 

J^. IN . HASSELMORE . 1665 = 1 . M . E. J 

In the Feet of Fines, dated Hilary, 28th and 29th Charles II. (1676-77), we 
read: 

•* George Osborne, gent., and others, plaintiffs, William Haslegrove, jun., John 
Ede and Margaret his wife, William Osborne and Susanna his wife, and others^ 
defendants, of two messuages, two barns, two gardens, and sixteen acres of 
pasture, with appurtenances, in Haslemere, which were granted to George 
Osborne and the other plaintiffs, who payj^6o sterling.** 

And again in the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Easter, 2ist Charles II., 1669 : 

" Susan Wroth, widow, plaintiff, and John Ede and Margaret his wife, of one 
messuage, one bam, two gardens, two orchards, and appurtenances, in Haselmore, 
otberwise Haselmere, John and Margaret granting the same to the said Susan, 

In the Hearth-tax of 15th Charles II., 188-481, he is named as follows : 

** John Eade, of Haslemere, three hearths " ; in that of 15th Charles II., 188-504, 

•*Mr. John Edes, three hearths" ; in that of 25th and 26th Charles II., 188-496, 

"John Eades, Haslemere, three hearths." 

132. O, lOHN . OSBORN . OF= 1 666. 

J^. HASLEMORE . IN . SVRRY = I . O. \ 

133. O. HENRY . SHOTTER= 1667. 
J^. IN . HASLEMORE = H . E . S. 

134. O, HENRY . SHOTTER=l667. 

jR. IN . HASELMORE = H . E . S. ^ 

in the will of Henry Shotter, dated December 23, 1669, of Haslemere, mercer, 
be bequeaths to William Shotter, his son, ;£'40 when he attains twenty-one years ; 



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1134 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

to Elizabeth, his daughter, £i lo when she attains twenty-one years or npon ber 
marriage ; the residue of his goods and chattels whatsoever to Elizabeth, his wife, 
whom he appoints executrix. Overseers, Roeer Sboiter, of Pitfield, and James 
Osborne, jun., of Lithill. Proved at London March 9, i669-7a 

In the Heanhtax, Charles II., 188-504, we read : 

" Henry Shotter, of Haslemere, three hearths " ; in that of 25th and 26th 
Charles II., 188-496 : " Henry Shotter, of Haslemere, three hearths." 



EAST HORSLEY. 

In the Hundred of Woking. The benefice is a peculiar of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury. 

135. O. lOHN . MOODY . OF = I . M. 

^. HORSLEY . CHANDLER = A man making candles. i 



KENNINGTON. 

136. O. EDMVND . WARREN . OF . KENINGTON = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. A man and dogs hunting a hare. 

137. A variety spelt kennington. 

KINGSTON-ON-THAMES. 

138. O. ROBERT . BALLARD . OF = A crane. 

^. KINGSTON . IN . SVRRY . HIS HALF PENNY. R . M . & (in 

six lines). {Square.) { 

See the will of Stephen Feilder, No. 143. 

This man appears to have been a tenant of the testator, and residing in t 
tenement adjoming the inn known by the sign of the Crane in 1672. It is, 
therefore, possible that the bird on the field of the obverse is intended to represent 
a crane rather than an ostrich, as stated by Boyne. 

Assessed at ten hearths, Charles II. 

139. O. lOSEPH . BRYAN . 1 666 = I . F . B. 

J^, IN . KINGSTON . VPPON . THAMES = HIS HALF PENY. J 

In the Will Office, under Joseph Bryan, of Kingston, is the administration: 
"May 22, 1675, to John Nobes, principal creditor, Frances, the widoWi 
renouncing.'* 
He is assessed at four hearths, Hearth-tax, Charles II. ; in one case at three. 
The following entries occur in Kingston parish register : 
1664. July II, Joseph Briant and Frances Sherbon married. 
167 1. May 22, Frances Briant, dau. of Joseph Bryan, buried. 
1674. September 14, Joseph Bryan, a chandler, buried. 

140. O, EDWARD . BVLD WIN = Three salmon hauriant in a triangle. 

J^. IN . KINGSTON . 1654 = E . M . B. 

141. O, lOHN . FEiLLDER . IN = Three shuttles. 

J^. KINGSTON . VPON . THAMES = I . A . F. 1 

For the will of Stephen Feilder, see No. 143. 

This issuer appears to have been either a son or a brother of the testator. It is 
impossible to determine which, as his token does not bear any date. 



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SURREY. 1 135 

In the Feet of Pines, Hilary, 20th and 21st Charles II., 1667-68, we read : 
''John Feilder, plaintiff, and Rich. Bennett and Maria, his wife defendants, of 
four acres of land and six acres of pasture, with appurtenances, in Kingston-on- 
Tbames, the said Rich, and Maria granting the same to the said John, who 

And again, Michaelmas, 14th Charles II., 1662 : 

''John Feilder, plaintiff, and Sackford Gonson, Esq., defendant, of one 
inessuage, one garden, and one orchard, and purtenances, in Kingston-on-Thames, 
granted to the said John, who paysj£'6o sterhng.*' 

In the Hearth-tax of 15th Charles II., 188-481, there is an entry of John 
Feilder, of Kingston, for four hearths. 

142. O. lOHN . FIELLDER . IN = (detllted). 

-^. KINGSTON-VPON-THAMES = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, 26th Charles II., 1674, is the 
record of: 

"John Feilder, plaintiff, and Sackford Gonson and Hesta his wife, defendants, 
of seven acres of ground and four acres of pasture, with appurtenances, in the 
parish of Kingston-on-Thames, the same being granted to Jonn Feilder, who pays 
£60 sterling." 

And again, Michaelmas, 27th Charles II., 1675 : 

"John Delamain and Maria his wife, plaintiffs, and John Feilder and Anna 
his wife, defendants, of one messuage, two bams, one garden, and one orchard, 
with appurtenances, in Kingston-on-Thames, the same t^ing granted to said John 
and Maria, who pay;f6o sterling.'* 

This roan appears to have be^ a Quaker, as a distress Mras levied upon him and 
three others for an attendance at a meeting at Kingston on May 12, 1670, amount- 
"% ^o £^3 IS. lod. In 1667 the same person was committed to prison for refusing 
to answer upon oath.—** Sufferings of the Quakers,*' vol. i., pp. 694, 698. 

Mention is made in the records of the Corporation of the City of London in 
January, 1649, o^ a John Fielder as printer to the Parliament of England, and a 
Quaker. 

In 1659 a petition, very largely signed, was presented to Parliament by Quakers, 
praying for redress for the 140 of their brethren then in prison, and for the 1,900 
who were at that lime under persecution for conscience* sake. To this petition the 
name of John Fielder was appended. 

143. O. STEPHEN . FEILDER . HIS . HALF . PENNY (ill foUF lines). 

J^. IN . KINGSTON . 1 668 (in three lines). Three salmons. 
(Square,) 

144. O, STEPHEN I FELLDER | 1 666 (in three lines across the 

field). 

J^. IN . KINGSTON . VPON . THAMES = HIS HALF PENY. 
S . S . F. i 

The following extracts from the parish registers refer to the family : 

1650. Dec. 14, a child of John Feilder buried. 

1651. Dec 27, Margrett, daughter of Stephen Feelder, christined. 

1653. April 27, James, son ofStephen Feelder, christined. 

1654. Dec 8, Sarah, daughter of Stephen Feilder, bom. 

1655. Sept. 7, Margrett, daughter of Stephen Feilder, buried. 

1656. April 29, John, son of John Feilder, buried. 
1656. July 5, Rose, daughter of Steaven Fielder, born. 
1656. Oct. 24, Rose, daughter of Steaven Fielder, buried. 

1659. May 15, Thomas, son of Steaven Fielder, bom. 

1660. March 23, Rosse, daughter of Steaven Fielder, bom. 

1661. Feb. 27, John, son of Steaven Fielder, bora. 

1662. Oct. 31, Ross, daughter of Steaven Fielder, buried. 
1672. Dec 23, Stephen Feelder, the chandler, buried. 
1679. Sept 26, John Feelder, from London, gent., buried. 
He was assessed at three hearths, Charles II. 



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1136 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

145. O. STEPHEN . FELDER . IN <= A man making candles. 

^. KINGSTON . CHANDLER = S . S . F. i 

At the Will Office (book Pyc, folio 6) is the will of Stephen Feilder. of 
Kingston-on-Thames, mercer : 

" He bequeaths to Sarah, his wife, in recompense of her faithful love and carefol 
industry, all his messuages, houses, and lands, with their appurtenances, in 
Kingston ; his messuage, tenement, or inn, called or knowne by the name orsi^ 
of the Crane, and its appurtenances, and four tenements thereunto adjoining (now 
in the several tenures of Robert Ballard, Samuel Hobbes, George Walter, Jama 
Gould, and William Carpenter), to Stephen, his eldest son, and his heirs for ever, 
on condition that he pays to Thomas and Samuel Fielder (his sons) and Sarah 
(his daughter) jf 10 each yearly for the term of their natural lives. Other 
messuages in Kingston he leaves to John Feilder, fourth son, and to James 
Feilder, second son ; all his personal estate to Sarah, his wife, whom he appoints 
•ole executrix- Trustees, his brother, John Feilder, brother-in-law, James 
Knowles, and faithful friends, James Hargrave, gent, and Francis Holdcn. 
Dated Dec., 1672. Proved Jan. 28, 1673." 
In the Feet of Fines, Easter, Surrey, i6th Charles II., 1664, is the entry : 
" Stephen Feilder, plaintiff, and Edward Blackfan, defendant, of one messoage^ 
one yard, one garden, with appurtenances, in Kingston-on-Thames, granted to me 
said Stephen, who pays ;^6o sterling." 

In the Hearth-tax, 15th Charles II., 188-481, is the entry : 
*• Stephen Felder, of Kingston, for three hearths.** 

146. O, lohn . Hollis . 1666. {Script.) 

R. KINGSTON . ON . THAMES = Butchcrs' AlTOS. \ 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, 23rd Charles II. (167 1 ), we read: 

"Jeremiah Hollis and Anna his wife, plaintiffs, and John Hollis, sen., and 
Margaret his wife, defendants, of one messuage, three cottages, three bams, and 
three gardens, with appurtenances, in Kingston-on-Thames, the same being granted 
to the said Jeremiah and Anne, who pay2^6o sterling." 

And again, Michaelmas, 28th Charles II. (1676) : 

** James Smallpeice, sen., plaintiff, and John Hollis and Elizabeth his wife, 
defendants, of one bam and three gardens, with appurtenances in Kingston, the 
same John and Elizabeth granting the same to the said James, who pays £^ 
sterling. " 

In the Hearth-tax of 15th Charles II., 188-481, is the entry of Mr. John 
Holies, eight hearths. The prefix " Mr." shows the issuer to be a man of import- 
ance. 

In the Feet of Fines, Easter, 1st William and Mary, is the entry : 

"Robert Band ford, plaintiff, and John Hollis and Elizabeth his wife, defend- 
ants, of one messuage, one cottage, one barn, one stable, and one garden in King- 
ston, for which the said Robert paid ;^ 60 sterling." 

There is also note of a suit between John Hollis and Wlliam Elsey, gent, con- 
cerning certain tithes in Kingston, entered in the Exchequer decrees, 20th of 
Charles II. 

The issuer appears to have been a Quaker, as in a distress issued at Kingston in 
1670 he, with three others, appears as attending meeting, and goods were taken 
from the four of them amounting tO;£'i7. He was also imprisoned in 1681 in the 
Marshalsea for non-payment of tithes. 

The following entries also relate to him, Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, 
14th Charles II., 1662 : 

"Tobias Yates, plaintiff, and John Hollis and Margaret his wife, defendants, 
of one messuage, one yard, with appurtenance, in Kingston-on-Thames, the said 
John and Margaret granting the same to the said Tobias for 50 years, who pays 
£60 sterling." 

Exchequer Bills, Surrey, Charles II., No. 324 : 

•* Giles Bevell, Gent., versus John Williams, John Hollis, and others, concerning 
the tithes within the vicarage of Kingston-on-Thames." 

Is assessed at 4 hearths in Charles II.'s time. 



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SURREY, 1 137 

147. O. Stephen . Hvbbard^^ 1666 (in three tiers). {Script) 

R, IN . KINGSTON • ON . THAMES = The Cordwainers' Arms. 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, i6th Charles II. (1664), is the entry : 

** Stephen Hubard and Elizabeth his wife, plaintiffs, and Thomas Hay ward, 
Gent, and Barbara his wife, defendants, of one messuage, one stable, one garden, 
with appurtenances, in Kingston, the said Thomas and Barbara granting the same 
to the said Stephen and Elizabeth, who pay {fio sterling.'' 

And again, Easter, 22nd Charles II. (1670) : 

** Stephen Hubbard, plaintiff, John Kidd and Frances his wife, defendants, of 
one messuage, one bun, one stable, one garden, one orchard, and 20 acres of 
land, with appurtenances in Hooke in the parish of the Kingston-on-Thames, John 
and Frances granting the same to the said Stephen and Elizabeth, who pay £(30 
sterling.'* 

Also, Easter, i8th Charles II. (1666) : 

" Richard Hammond, plaintiff, and Stephen Hubbard and Elizabeth his wife, 
defendants, of one messuage, one garden, with appurtenances, in Kingston-on- 
Thames, the said Stephen and Elizabeth granting tne same to Richard, who pays 
;f 60 sterling." 

In the Hearth' tax, Surrey, 15th Charles II., 188-481, are these entries : 

'* Stephen Hubbnrt, of Kingston, 5 hearths." Later on he is assessed at 10 
hearths. 

1653. Feby. 18, John, son of Stephen Hubbard, christined. 

1655. April 15, Stephen Hubbard buried. 

On May 12, 1670, this person was cruelly beaten, with others, by soldiers, to keep 
them out of their meeting-house, and a distress was levied upon him, with John 
Fielder and two others, for attendance at meeting, goods worth ;f 23 is. lod. being 
taken from the four of them. — " Sufferings of the Quakers," vol. i., p. 698. 

In 1685 he was fined £20 per month for absence from the national worship. — 
Vt sMprUy p. 706. 

148. O, lAMES . LEViiT . OF = Three salmon hauriant ; the Arms 

of Kingsioii-upon-Thames. 

R. KINGSTON . PON . THA = I . M . L. \ 

He is assessed at six hearths. Hearth-tax, Charles II., and dubbed " Mr." 

The following entries as to this family appear in the parish register of Kingston : 

164a Dec. II, Elizabeth, dau. of Jeames Levett, christened. 

1641. April 18, Daniel, son of Jeames Levett, christened. 

1641. Nov. 28, Richard, son of Jeames Levett, christened. 

1646. April 9, James, son of Jeames Levett, christened. 

1648. April 26, Rebecca, daughter of Jeames Levett, christened. 

1649. Feb. 3, Elizabeth, daughter of Jeames Levett, christened. 
1652. Aug. 15, William, son of Jeames Levett, christened. 

1654. June 29, Mary, daughter of Jeames Levett, born. 

1656. Feb. 28, Martha, daughter of Jeames Levett, born. 
1659. Sept. 5, Sarah, daughter of Jeames Levett, bom. 
1692. Dec. 12, James Levett, grocer and gent., buried. 

149. O. HENRY . MARTINE . AT . Y= . GOULDEN = A griffin. 

R. AT . KINGSTONE . ON . THAMES = HIS HALFE PENV. 
H . M . M. 
He is assessed at seven hearths in Hearth-tax, Charles II. 

150. O. ROBERT . PEARSON = Three rabbits, two and one. 

R OF . KINGSTON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax, Robert Pearson was exempted for tnree hearths. 
AsB^sed at two hearths, Hearth-tax, Charies 11. 
A 'William Pierson was one of the Common Council of the borough in 1686. 



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1 138 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

151. O, CHARLES . SALTER . IN . i665 = The Tallowchandlcrs* 

Arms. 

J^. KINGSTONE . VPON . THAMES = C . M . S. J 

187-479, 14th Charles IL, in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, Charles Salter the sum of £^ 4s., for the half-year ending Michaelmas, 
1662, for five hearths and stoves, is declared. 

Mem. — ^The word " stoves " is of unusual occurrence in this schedule, and this 
man is termed one of the '* head burroughs of Kingston, and a constable that has 
made defaulte in bringinge their moneys." The tax, therefore, did not probably 
refer to his own property, but to that for which he was a collector. 

He was assessed at six hearths, Hearth-tax, Charles H. 

In 1686 Charles Salter was an Alderman of the borough under the new charter 
of James IL, daied Aufi[ust 28, 1685. 

In Kingston parish church. Manning and Bray record the following inscriptioo : 

** In expectation of a joyful and glorious resurrection, here lye interred the 
bodies of Charles Salter, Gent., and Martha his wife. He had issue by her 19 
children, and was seven times Bailiff of this Town. He died the 12^ of March, 
A.D. 1 710, in the 83"* year of his age. And God took her the 9*^ of February pre- 
ceding, aged 77 years. They lived a pattern of conjugal affection, and when one 
was gone, this world was no longer pleasing to the other. * — Manning's ** Hist," 
vol. iii., p. 377. 

This was evidently the tomb of the issuer of the token. 

152. O. I . T . T . OF . KINGSTON = Three salmon hauriant. 
J^. I . M . L . OF . KINGSTON = Unknown. 

153. O. lAMES . WIGHT . IN . KINGSTON = Barber-Surgcons' Arms. 

J^. VPPON . THAMES . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. I . I . W. J 

154. A variety reads white. 

He is assessed at three hearths and at four in the Hearth-tax. 

iSS* ^- GEORGE . WOODMAN . AT = Man making candles. 

J^, KINGSTO . IN . THEAMES = G . B . W. { 

187-479, 14^^ Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax, George Woodman is exempted for two hearths, but he is asse^ed at 
two and at four hearths, Charles II. 

156. O. ROBERT . WOORNVM . IN = A shovel. 

J^, KINGSON . VPON . THEAMS = R . F . W. i 



LAMBETH. 

157. O, RICH . ALLFORD . ON . v" . NAROW = Crcst of the Water- 

men's Company : an arm holding an oar erect 

J^, WALL . IN , LAMBETH . PARISH = HIS HALFE PENY. 

1668. i 

187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 

hearth-tax, Rich. AUford ; he is declared as living in the Princes' liberty, 

Lambeth. 

He is assessed at three hearths, 25th Charles 11. 

158. O, lOHN . BVRTON . HIS = A blackamoor*s head. 

^. HALF . PENY . IN . LAMBETH = I . E . B. J 

187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, John Burton is charged for four hearths 4s. 



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SURREY. 1 139 

159. O, lOHN . BORGEINE = A fish. 

J^. IN . LAMBETH . 1663 = 1 . A . B. J 

160. O. ARON . CARTAR = A sword erect. 

J^, IN . LAMBATH . MARSH = A . A . C. J 

161. O. HERCVLis .COX . STARCH = A wheatsheaf and three birds. 

J^. MAKER . IN . LAMBETH . 69 = HIS HALF PENY. H . E . C ^ 

1^7*479^ 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, Hercules Cox is charged for seven hearths 7s., residing in " Lambeth 
lownc." 

162. O. AT . THE . BLVE . BOOR = A wlld boar. 

J^. IN . LAMBETH . 1651 =T . I . D. J 

163. O. THOMAS . EDMONDS = Two porters holding a hand-barrow, 

a third placing a sack on it. 

^. IN . LAMBETH . l668 = HIS . HALFE . PENNY J 

164. O, THOMAS . ESMONDE = Two men carrying a load. 

^. IN . LAMBETH . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

165. O. GABRIELL . FISHLOCKE = The Bakers' Arms, g . c . f. 

iP. IN . LAMBETH . MARSH . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, Gabrell Fishlock is declared of " Lambeth Mersh." 
He is assessed at four hearths, 17th Charles II. 

166. O. ROWLAND . HILL . IN . LAMBETH = A lion and anchor, 

above each a crown. 

/^. MARSH . HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1667 =R . F . H. J 

1^7*479* 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
beartb-tax, Rowland Hill is exempt for three hearths. 

He is declared as dead in the Hearth-tax, 17th Charles II. 

It would be interesting to know if this issuer was an ancestor of Sir Rowland 
Hill 

167. O. THE . BARE . AND . RAGED = A bear and ragged staff. 

J^. STAFE . IN . LAMBETH = T .E.I. ^ 

168. O, CHRIST . lONES . AT . Y= . RED . 0NE = A COW. 

JR. Y" . NARROW . WALL . IN . LAMBETH = HIS HALFE PENY. k 

'^7*479b 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, **Christoph. Jones not able to pay the monies charged upon him, 
1662." 

He is assessed at four hearths, 15th Charles II. 

169. O. WILLIAM. KIMBEL. IN. LAM = Punch Seated in a chair; 

around yo pvnchnelly. 

JR. BETH . MARCH . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . B . K. J 

Tbe sign is very unusual on tokens. 

170. O. lOHN . RAINE . NEW . PLANT ACVN = HIS HALFE PENY. 

I . A . R. 
^. NARROW . WALL . NEAR . LAMBETH = TwO SawyCTS at 

work. i 



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1 140 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

171. O, lESPER . ROASE — Noah's Ark, and a dove over. 

^. IN . LAMBETH . 1667 = 1 . £ . R. i 

172. A variety reads iasper. 

173. O. iames . WAST . 1669 = 81. George and the Dragon. 

A IN . LAMBETH = HIS HALF PENY. I . I . W. J 

174. (?. WILLIAM . wiLKESON = Two men carrying a barrel 

J^. IN . LAMBETH . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

LEATHERHEAD. 

175. O, EDWARD , SHALLES . AT . Y" = A CrOWn. 

-^. IN . LEATHERHEAD . IN . SVRRY » HIS HALF PENY. 
ride "Surrey" plate, No. 7. 

LINGFIELD. 

176. O. THOMAS . HEATH = The Mcrchant-Tailors* Arms. 

-^. IN . LINGFEILD . l668 = T . I . H. 

The following entries relating to the family were kindly extracted firom the 
registers by Rev. W. G. Bryan, Rector : 

1666. June 3, Jeana, filia Thos. Heath, baptized. 

1666. May 18, Johan, filius Rich. Knight, deed. 

1667. Dec. I, Thos. Heath and Ann Inderford married. 

1668. May 19, Teana, filia Thos. Heath, deed. 
1668. July 18, Maria, filia Johan Knight, baptized. 
1673. April 18, buiyed the wife of Thos. Heath. 

177. O, lOHN . KNIGHT . IN = Unknown Arms. 

^. LINGEFILD . IN . SVRRY = I . E . K. 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Easter, 22nd Charles II., is the entry of 
'* Lawrence Patrick, sen., plaintiff, and John Knight and Eleanor his wife, de- 
fendants, of one messuage, one barn, one garden, one orchard, in Lingfield, granted 
to Patrick, who pays;f«) sterling." 

178. O, FRANCIS . WEST . IN = The Grocers' Anna 

J^, IN . LINEFEILD . 1659 = F . F . W. 



MALDEN. 

In the Hundred of Kingston. The manor at one time belonged to Walter de 
Merton, Bishop of Rochester, founder of Merton College, and the college wis 
originally formed in Maiden. 

179. O. MATHiAS . TOMPKINS as Man on horseback. 

I^. AT . MALDEN . 1667 = M . S . T. 



MERSTHAM. 

180. O. WILLIAM . SHORTER =165 8. 

I^, IN . MESTHAM . IN . SVRREY = W. S. 



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SURREY, 1 141 

The following entries relating to the family were kindly extracted from the 
registers by the Vicar : 

1663. December 22, Jane, daughter of William Shorter and Anne, his wife, 
christened. 

1665. October 8, John, son of William Shorter and Anne, his wife, christened. 

1667. December 8, William, son of William Shorter and Anne, his wife, 
christened. 

i669-7a March 13, Thomas, son of William Shorter, christened ; and buryed 
August 16, 1671. 

1672. June 13, Anne, daughter of William Shorter, christened. 

1674. April 23, Thomas, son of William Shorter, christened. 

^677. July 26, Richard, son of William Shorter, christened. 

1678. October 16, William Shorter, mercer, was buryed. 

MITCHAM. 

181. O, HENRY . LVKE = HIS FARTHING. 

^. OF . MICHAM . 1667 = H . A . L. J 

i82« A variety reads 1664. 

183. O. DAVID . MORGAN . AT , Y"^ = In the field, within the inner 
circle, a buck^s head (as on the crest of the Smythes, of 
Mitcham). 
I^. IN . MICHAM . IN . svRRY = In the field within the inner 

HIS 

circle half 

PENY. ^ 

The Buck's Head Inn, which is situated at Upper Mitcham, and on the east side 
of the highroad to London, was formerly an old-fashioned house ; but it was 
enlai^ed, much modernized, and altered to its present condition about forty years 
ago. In the seventeenth century it was part of the estate of the visitation family 
of Sm3rthe, of Mitcham, for it appears from an inquisition held at Southwark, co. 
Surrey, May 8, 15 Car. I., 1639, after the death of George Smythe, of Mitcham, 
Esq., who was buried at Mitcham, October 12, 1638, that he died seized, amongst 
other property, of a messuage in Mitcham called by the sign and known by the 
name of " the Bucke's Head, now or late in the tenure of George Fisher.** George 
Fisher and Joane Hethersall were married at Mitcham, October 14, 1616. It 
should be noted that the crest of the Smythe family of Mitcham is, a buck's head 
gales, attired argent. It would seem that David Morgan occupied the Buck's 
Head on February 23, 1672-3, the annexed entry occurring under that date 
amongst the baptisms in the parish register : 

" Rebekah, the daughter of one Thomas Blisset, whose wife being in a journey 
was deliue'd at the Buck's Head.*' 

There b little doubt that the following item from the overseers* accounts for the 
year 1673 refers to the above : 
" P** Morgan for keeping a woman broug' to bed in his house, 01 05 oa** 
The seven entries given below are all of the name of Morgan that i»ccur in the 
parish register during the seventeenth century. The issuer of the token is probably 
the David Morgan buried on March il, 1695-6, but there does not appear to be 
any will or administration for him in the P.C.C. or the Surrey courts. 
Extracts from Mitcham parish roister : 

Baptism. 167 1. November 14, Margaret, the daughter of David Morgan. 
„ 1673. April 13, David, the son of David Morgan. 
„ 1674. June 21, Nicholas, the son of David Morgan. 
Burial. 1673-4. March i, David, the Sonne of David Morgan. 
„ 1675. ^*y 2, Margaret, the daughter of David Morgan. 
„ 1690. December 15, Mary, the wife of David Morgan, buried in woollen. 
„ 1695-6. March ii, David Morgan, buried in woollen. 
VOL. II. 73 



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II42 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

184. O, W.I. THORPE . 1667 (in three lines). 

J^. AT . MiCHAM = A dog running with a duck on his back. \ 
Kindly extracted from the register by the Rev. T. Wilson, vicar : 
William Thorpe and Judith Ashburnham married September 15, 1664. 



MORTLAKE. 

185. O. WILLIAM . THORNTON = The Mcrchant-TailoFS* Anns. 

^. IN . MORTLACKE . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

186. A variety reads thorneton. 

In the Will Office is the will, dated October 7, 1676, of William Thornton : 

He bequeaths his goods, etc., to his daughter, Martha Thornton, whom he 

appoints executrix. Thos. Snegnall and Thomas Collins, of Mortlake, carpenter, 

and his son Thomas Thornton are appointed overseers (query trustees) ; no wife 

mentioned. Witnesses, Benjamin Feilder, jun., and William Morry. 

In the Act Book William Thornton is described as of East Sheen, Mortlake. 

187. O, PETER . WHITE . IN . MORECLACK«P . D . W. 

J^. HONi . soiT . Qvi . MAL . Y . PENSE = Arms of City of 
London. i 

Vide " Surrey " plate. No. 8. 



NEWINGTON BUTTS. 

188. O. EDWARD . BATT . AT . THE . BELL = A bell. 1667. 

R. AT . ST . MARY . NEWINGTON . BVTTS = HIS HALF PENNY. 

E . A . B. \ 

187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 

of hearth-tax, Edward Batt, victualler, is exempt, twelve hearths. And, again, 

for five hearths (not habited). 

189. O. AT . THE . 3 . TVNNES = Three tuns. 

R. AT . NEWINTVN . BVITES = W . I . B. \ 

190. O. lOSEPH . HALL . AT . OLD . SMVGGS = A Smith working at 

his anvil 

R, AT . NEWINGTON . BVTTS . 1667 = HIS HALF PENNY. 
I . M . H. \ 

191. O, EDWARD . NIX . IN . s**" . MARY = A Hon passant. 

R, NEWINGTON . IN . SOVTHWARKE. = HIS HALF PENY. 
1669. \ 

192. O. laspar , Patridg . at . St 

R, Mary . Newington . Bvtts, {Script,) \ 

193. O, lESPAR . PARTRIDGE . AT . Y* = A Hon Hunpant. 

R, HART. NEWINGTON, BVTTS = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1666. \ 
No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax, is the name of Jespar Partridge, victualler, six hearths. 



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SURREY. 1143 

194. O. AT . THE . BVLL . HEAD = A bull's head. 

J^, IN . NEVENTON . BVTS = M . R. i 

195. O. AT . THE . GREEN . DRAGON = A dragOD. 

I^. AT . NEWINGTON . GREENE = I . M . W. i 

196. O, THOMAS . WELLS . OF= 1 668. 

jR. NEWINGTON . CHANDLER = T . M . W. i 

197. O. WILLIAM . WIMBLE . AT = W . S . W. 

I^. NEWINGTON . BVTTS = 3 IVNE. 1652. J 

The exact date as on this token is of very unusual occurrence. 
Vtde " Surrey *' plate, Na 9. 



OXTED. 

198. O. THOMAS . STONE = T . I . S. 

J^. IN . OXSTEED . 1653 = T . I . S. \ 

Vide " Surrey" plate, No. 10. 

The Rev. Frank Pamell, Rector, kindly extracts the following from the 
register : 
"John, the sonn of Thomas Stone, was buryed 17 day of November, 1671." 
In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Trinity, 17th Charles XL, is an entry of : 
** Thomas Stone, plaintiff, and John Holmden, Esq., and Elizabeth his wife, 
defendants, of twenty-four acres of land, with appurtenancef;, in the parish of 
Oxtted ; the said John and Elizabeth g^nt the same to the said Thomas Stone, who 
paid £^i sterling." 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from payment 
of hearth-tax, Thomas Stone is charged four hearths, 4s. 

This man is mentioned in the Lay Subsidy Roll, Surrey, No. 188-495, as a col- 
lector for West Moulsey, and also for Oxted. 
In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Trinity, 21st Charles II., we also read : 
"Thomas Stone, plaintiff, and Charles Bickerstaffe, Esq., and Elizabeth his wife, 
defendants, of one messuage, one stable, ten acres of land, in Oxted, granted to 
the said Thomas, who pays £(k> sterling." 



PECKHAM. 

199. O. WILL . ERBERY . AT . THE«= A grcyhound. 

R, GRAYHOVND . IN . PECKHAM = W . M . E. \ 

This inn is noted in the " List of Tavernes in Ten Shires about London," in the 
British Museum, as the only one at Peckham. 

200. O, WILLIAM . MARSHALL = A lion rampant. 

R, IN . PECKHAM . 1658 = W . M . M. J 

No. 187-479, '4^^ Charles II., schedule of persons not exempted from payment 
ofhetrth-tax, "William Marshall, 4s." 

201. 0, WILLIAM . WALL = The King's head. 

R. IN . PECKHAM = W . E . W. \ 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
heanh-tax, William Wall is charged 3s. 

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II44 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



PETERSHAM. 

202. O, WILLIAM . KNIGHT . 1 666 = The Groccrs' Arms. w.l.k. 

^. IN . PETERSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. i 

203. O. WILLIAM . KNIGHT. 1 666 = The Grocers* Arms, w . i . k. 

J^, IN . PEETERSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. l 

Possibly this token was struck after a second marriage. 



PUTNEY. 

204. O. RICHARD . BROVGHTON = The Watermen's Arms. 

J^. OF . PVTNEY . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. R . E . B. J 

This man is noted as being a collector for Putney of the lay subsidies in the 
reign of Charles II. 

The issuer was probably living at the ferry. 

In 1656 General Lambert, lord of the manor, granted a small piece of land near 
the waterside to the Company of Free Watermen of Putney for the purpose of 
erecting a shed and conducting a ferry. 

205. O, RICHARD . FISHER . AT . Y" = A hart lodged. 

J^. WHIT . HART . IN . PVTNEY = R . M . F. { 

206. O. RICHARD . FISHER . AT . THE . WHIT = A hart lodgcd 
i?. IN . PVTNEY . HIS . HALFE . PENNY = R . M . F. i 

207. O. RICHARD . FOSTER = Two oars crossed. 

^. IN , PVl'NEY . 1658 = R . E . F. } 

208. O, ROBERT . lACKSON = A man making candles. 

/^, IN . PVTNY . 1657 =R . I. { 

209. O. ROBERT . iackson «= The Salters' Arms. 

-^. IN . PVTNEY . 1663 = R . I . L \ 

210. O. IN . PVTTNEY . OR . AT = WILL . KEMP. 

J^. parsons . GREENE = W . D . K. \ 

211. O. lOHN . LEE . HIS . HALFE . PENY = Three tuns. 

J^. AT . Y= . IN . PVTNEY . 1 668 = An anchor. J 

Vtds " Surrey" plate, No. 11. 

212. O. THOMAS . MARQVES = T . M . M. 

J^. AT . PVTNEY . 1660 = A wheatsheaf. i 

213. O. lAMES . RVSHELL . AT . THE = A falcon. 

/^. FALCON . IN . PVTNEY . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. i 

214. O, ELIZABETH . SMITH = E . A . S. 

^. IN . PVl'NEY = E . A . S. } 

215. O. ANDREW . WELLER . AT . Y^ = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. RED . LION . IN . PVTNEY = A Hon passant gardant. i 

216. There is a variety of the above from a different die. I 



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SURREY, 1 145 



PUTTENHAM. 

217. O. lOHN . WOLLASTON = I . D . W. 

^. IN . PVTTENHAM = 1 . D . W. i 

218. A variety is dated 1667. 

The following entries from the parish register are kindly extracted by the 
Rev. D. G. Clarke, Rector : 
1660. John, y« son of John Woollaston, baptized Oct. i. 
1662. George, y« son of John Woollaston, baptized April 23. 
The issuer is assessed at two hearths, 17th Charles II. 



REIGATE. 

219. O, WILLIAM . CASTLEMAN=W , K . C 

/^, OF . RIGATE . 1652 = W . C. J 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Easter, 31st Charles II., is the record of: 

**Alex. Lambert, plaintif!) and William Castleman and Sarah his wife, de- 
fendants, of two messuages, one stable, two gardens, in Reigate, granted to the said 
Alex., who paid ;£"6o sterling." 

Hearth-tax, 25th and 26th Charles II., No. 188-496 : 

** William Castellman, of Reigate, four hearths." 

And again, in the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmas, 21st Charles II. : 

** William Castleman, plaintiff, and Rich. Roads and Sarah his wife, defendants, 
of one shop, with appurtenances, in Reigate, granted to the said William £40 
sterling." 

Na 187-479, ^4th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from pay- 
meDt of hearth-tax : 

"William Castleman is exempted for three hearths (not able to pay)." 

220. O. MARGARET . CATr = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

J^, OF . RIGATE = M . C. J 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted firom pay- 
ment of hearth-tax is the name of : 
"Margaret Catt, four hearths (not able lo pay)." 

221. O. THOMAS . HEATHFEILD = A SUgai-loaf. 

^. OF . REYGATE . IN . SVRY = T . H. J 

In the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Michaelmaj:, 21st Charles II., is the record of: 

"John Barnard, plaintiff, and John Cuduington and Elizabtth his wife, and 

Thos. Heathfield and Alice his wife, defendants, concerning one messuage, one 

bara, one garden, one orchard, with appurtenances in Reigate, granted to John 

Barnard, who pays jf 100 sterling. " 

The issuer is named in the Hearth-tax Rolls, 15th Charles II., No. 188-481, but 
the entry is almost illegible. And also those in 25th, 26ih Charles II., for five 
hearths. 

No. 187-479, 14th Charles II., in the schedule of persons exempted from pay- 
ment of hearth-tax, Thomas Heathfield is exempted for four hearths. 



RICHMOND. 
222. 0. RICHARD . CAMPION . 1668 = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

.-/?. OF . RICHMOND . TALOW . CHAN LR = HIS HALF PENY. J 

This was discovered during the excavation in Duke Street, Richmond, Surrey^ 
and is in the possession of Mr. Cockburn. 



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1 146 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

223. O. LVKE . CHYNNALL = A windmill. 

J^. IN . RICHMOND . 1657 = L .E.G. \ 

This was discovered daring the recent excavations in Dnlce Street, Richmond, 

Surrey, at a depth of eight feet, together with some pottery, and is in the possession 

of Mr, Cockbum. 

'* One Luke Shynnel occupied a seat in the church in 1650," according to 

" Richmond Notes," March, 1865. 
The following entry appears in the parish registers of Isleworth : 
'* Buried at Isleworth, Dec. 27, 1642, K;rtherine, wife of Luke Chinar.** 
'* Married at same, Feb. 6, 1644-5, Luke Chinar and Rose .'* 

224. A variety is dated 1667. J 

225. O. MICHAEL . CLAYLE . 0F = A Catherine wheel. 

J^. RICHMOND . TVRNER . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

It is suspected that Clayle is a misprint for Flayle. Michael Flayle was a .some- 
what important man in Richmond, Surrey. The name appears in the Hearth-tax 
Rolls {circa 1670), and in the Surrey Poll Book for 1705. 

226. O, WILL . FARLEY . AT . Y* . READ . LION = A lion rampant 

/^, IN . RICHMOND . IN . SVRREY = W . M . F. | 

One Edward Farley, of Richmond, died i66o, leaving a son, William, whose 
wife was Marv, and who died December 13, 167 1. 

Mary, the daughter, was baptized in Richmond Cliurch October 2, 1665. 

The Will Office contains the administration, February 7, 1673-4, of: 

** William Farley, of the King's Commissory Court of Surrey, to John Aniill, 
husband of Ediih, sister of the deceased." 

William Farley appears to have witnessed the will of Robert King, of Richmond, 
dated September 5, 1668. See No. 229. 

In the Hearth-tax, 15th Charles IL, 188-481, is the charge for : 

" Will Farley, of Richmond, twelre hearths." 

227. O, ROBERT . KING . AT . THE«=BuSt of CharlcS II. 

iV. FERRY . IN . RICHMOND . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. 
R . E . K. i 

E 

The position of R . e . K is contrary to the usual rule, R . K. 

228. A variety is dated 1667. i 

229. O. ROBERT . KING .*AT . THE = BuSt of CharlcS IL 

^. GOD . SAVE . THE . K1NG = R . M . K. J 

Obviously Robert King kept the King's Head Inn at the Ferry, perhaps on the 
site of the present inn of the same sign. About twenty yearai previously one 
William Kinge occupied the Richmond Ferry under the Protector's commissioners, 
at an annual rent of cne mark. 

He died October 19, i688. 

In the Will Office is the will of Robert King, dated September 5, z668, of Rich- 
mond, victualler : 

" He bequeaths to his wife, Mary, all that messuage now in the occupation of 
Thos. Barnes, commonly called by the name or sign of the Waterman Arms. 
To his brother John's four children, John, Mary, Elizabeth, and William, £$ etch. 
To his sister, Margaret Silver, ;f 10. To his cousin, Elizabeth Coydell, ^^5. To 
his cousin, Anne Buckwell, £S* ^^^ ^^^ premises in Richmond to Mary his wife, for 
her lifej and at her death to his brother, John King, and Elizabeth his wife. Execu- 
trix, Mary, his wife. Witnesses, Thos. Hallowell, William Farley, and Walter 
Smith." 

In the Hearth-tax of 15th Charles II., No. 188-481, is the charge of : 

** Robert Kirg, of Richmond, eight hearths." 



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SURREY. 1 147 

230. O. lAMES . KNOWLES = The Drapers' Arms. 

^. IN . RICHMOND . 1 664 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

231. O, lAMES . KNowLES = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. IN . RICHMOND = I . K. i 

The name appears in the Hearth-tax Rolls as of Richmond, Surrey. 

232. O. WILLIAM . MARSHAM = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . RICHMOND . 1663 = W . S . M. i 

The name appears in the Hearth-tax Rolls as an inhabi^nt of Richmond, 
Surrey. 

233. O. lOHN . RANDELL . 1 668 = The Watermen's Arms. 

-^. IN . RICHMOND = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . S . R. J 

The name occurs in the Hearth-tax Rolls as an inhabitant of Richmond, Surrey, 
25th and 26th Charles XL, No. 188-496, for six hearths. 
The death is recorded of "John Randall, Watterman," March 12, 1705-6. 
1662. October 9, married at Richmond, John Randell and Sarah Batman. 

234. O. lOHN . SKINNER . 1658 = A man making candles. 

^. OF . RICHMOND = I , S. J 

The name appears in the Hearth-tax Rolls for Richmond, Surrey, iSth Charles H. 



RIPLEY. 

235. O. THOMAS . EELES . IN = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

/^. RIPLEY. IN . SVRRY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

236. O, THOMAS . GARFORTH = The Merchant-Adventurers* Arms. 

/^. OF . RIPLEY = T . G. J 

Vide " Surrey *' plate, No. 12. 

237. O. THOMAS . GARFORiTH = The Turners' Arms. 

J^, RIPLEY . SVRRY = T . A . G. J 

238. O, THOMAS . GARFORTH = The Arms of Christ's Hospital, 

London. 

^. RIPLEY . SVRRY = T . E . G. J 

The three tokens of Garforth are very extraordinary. We cannot understand 
why a man in so small a village as Ripley should have issued three tokens, each 
bearing different coats of artns. We presume when he issued No. 236 he was^ a 
bachelor, tnit Nos. 237, 238 point to two marriages, one with a wife whose initial 
is A, and the other whose initial is E. Neither of the three tokens is dated, and 
No. 238. stands in an absolutely unique position in bearing the coat armour of 
Christ's Hospital, leading us to surmise that the issuer was educated at that magni- 
ficent foundation, and gratefully adopted on his token its armorial l>earings. 



ROEHAMPTON. 
239. O, WALTER . NORWOOD = A rosc crowDcd. 

^. AT . ROWE . HAMPTON »= W . M . N. 



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1 148 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

240. A variety reads hamton. i 

241. O. THE . 3 . STAGGS . HEADS = Three stags' heads. 

-^. IN . ROHAMPTON . 1659 = R . A . W. i 

ROTHERHITHE. 

242. O. WILLIAM . ADAMS = HIS HALF PENY. 

I^, AT . REDERIFE . WALL = A bull. i 

243. O, MARY . ARNOT . l668 = HER HALFE PENY. 

J^, REDRiFF . PARISH = A curious dcvicc or merchant's mark. 

244. O, WILLIAM . BATES . ON = Three dolphins in pale. 

/^, REDERIFE. WALL. 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

245. O. MARY. BERRY. AT = HER HALF PENY. 

J^. REDERiF . WALL = The Shipwrights' Arms. J 

246. (?. HENRY . BODDY . AT . THE = Salutation ; two men bowing. 

I^, IN . REDRIF. 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

247. O. EDWARD . BVRD = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . REDERiFF = A boar's head. J 

248. O, lAMES . BVRTON . NEERE=The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. REDRIFE . STAYRES . 66 = I . M . B. \ 

249. O* lAMES . BVRTON . 1 668 = The Drapers' Arms. 

I^, IN . ROTHORITH = HIS HALFE PENY. I . M . B. | 

250. O, AT . OLEVANT [elephant] . staires = A spread eagle. 

i?. IN . REDEREF . 1659 = E .B.C. { 

251. O. THOMAS . CLIFFORD = A roll of tobacco. 

/^. IN . ROTHORITH . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

187-479, 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth-tax, Thomas Clifford is exempt, for two healths. 

252. O, PHILLIP . COOKE . AT = The Shipwrights* Arms. 

J^, REDERIF . WALL. 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

253. O. THOMAS . COOPER = A sugar-loaf and scales. 

J^. IN REDDERIFE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. T . E . C } 

254. O, EDMVND . CROSS = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, IN . REDERiFF = A Spread eagle. i 

187-479, '4th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from pajrment of 
hearth-tax, Edmund Cros is exempt for two hearths. 

This man is entered in the lists of those that '* bee dead aad gone, and tmty 
houses and no enstres to bee found." 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SURREY. "49 

255. O. SVSANNA . DANNILL = A ship. 

^. ON . REDRIFE . WALL = S . D . 1655. i 

256. O, AT . THE . DARKE . HOVSE = M . F. 

/^, IN . REDRIF . LANE= 1 653. J 

257. O. THOMAS . FARENER . BAKER = The Balccrs* Afms. 

^. IN . REDRIFFE . LANE . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. T . H . F. ^ 

258. O, lOHN . FARMER . AT . Y» . WATERMANS = The Watermen's 

Anns. 

J^. ARMES . AT • REDERIFE . STAIRES = HIS PENNY. 1 669. 
I . I . F. I 

259. O. lOHN . GIBS . IN . REDRIF = A tree. 

-^. AT . THE . ORCHARD . HOYS = I . S . G. { 

260. O, RALPH . GOLDSMITH . IRON = R . G . G. 

J^, MONGER , ON . REDERIFE . WALL = HIS HALF PENY. 

1669. i 

261. O. EDWARD . GREENE . AT . Y» = Three crowns on the royal 

oak. 

J^. BY . REDRIF . WALL . 1666 = E . E . G. i 

262. O. AT . THE . THREE . NAGGS = M . H. 

J^. HEADES . IN . REDRIF = Three nags' heads in shield. i 

263. O. AT . THE . CASTLE = A CaStle. 

J^. ON . REDRIF . WALL = T . I . H. J 

264. O. lOHN . HARisoN . IN = A whcatsheaf. 

^. REDRIFE . MEALMAN = I . K . H. | 

265. O, SARA . HEYWOOD . AT . Y= . WHEAT = A bird on a wheat- 

sheaf. 

J^. SHEAFE . IN . REDERRIFE = HER HALF PENY. 1669. ^ 

266. O, THOMAS . HEYWOOD = A bird on a wheatsheaf. 

I^, IN . REDERRIF . l666 = T . S . H. J 

267. A variety is dated 1664. 

268. O, THOMAS . KAM . AT . Y= = The Bakers* Arms. 

/•. AT. REDRIFFE. l666 = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

269. O, WILL . MANARD . AT . THE = A Cradle and sugar-loaf. 

J^. IN . REDERIFE . l666 = W , E . M. J 

270. O, THOMAS . MAY . AT . Y» . BVNCH . OF = A bunch of grapes. 

/^. GRAPES . IN . REDERRIF . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 
T . E . M. i 



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1 150 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

271. O. EXiLL . MiCAELL . IN = A barrel. 

^. REDARIFE . HIS . HALF . PENNY « E . E . M. 

272. O, EDWARD . MOSELEY « Unknown Arms. 

^. IN . REDRIFl'H . i666bE . E . M. 

273. O. GEORGE . NVTKIN . AT« A ship. 
/^. REDDERITH . WALL — G .F.N. 

274. O. lOHN . OTTER = HIS HALF PENY. 
I^. ON . REDERIF . WALL = A bird. 

275. O, GEORGE . PRICE . IN = Three men standing round a globe. 

J^, REDREFE . l666 = G . S . P. 
187-479, 14th Charles II., schedule of persons exempted from payment of 
hearth -tax, George Price, four hearths. 

276. O, WILLIAM . RVSHLEY . 0F = A mill-stone. 

I^. REDERIF . MILLER = W . R . R. 

277. O. ROGER . SEAMER . AT . Y» . AXE = An axe. 
^. ON . REDRIFFE . WALL . 1667 «R .M.S. 

278. O. FRANCES . SEELLE = Three sugar-Ioaves. 
^. IN . REDRiF . F . s (in three lines across the field). 

279. O. WILLIAM . SIMONS = A bull. 
J^. IN . REDERIF = W . E . S. 

280. O. REBEKAH . SMALMAN . AT . Y« = A mill-StOne. 

J^. POWDER . MILL . IN . REDERIFF- HER HALF PENY. 
1669. 

281. O, lOHN . SNOADE-An angel. 

J^. AT. REDDRIFF . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

282. O. GEORGE . SYMONS = A lion rampant. 

^. OF. ROTHORITH . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

283. O, GEORGE . SYMONS = A lion rampant 

J^, OF . ROTHERHITH = HIS HALF PENY. 

284. O. ELIZABETH . SWAN = HER HALF PENY 
I^, AT . REDERIFF = A SWan. 

285. O. MARY . WARREN = A CfOWn. 
J^, AT . REDRIFE = M . W. 

286. O, ROBERT . WEBB . AT . Y= = A shlp. 

J^. TAVERN . ON . REDRIFFE . WALL = HIS HALFE PENY. 
R . H . W. 

287. O, lAMES . WRIGHT . 1667= The Bakers' Arms. 

jR. IN . REDRIF . BAKER = I . D . W. 



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SVRREY. 1 151 



SUTTON. 
288. O, SAMVEL . SEELEY = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF SVTTON . 1657 «= S . S. ^. StZC of \ 



THAMES DITTON. 

289. O, SAMVELL . HOY . AT = HIS FARTHIN. 
R. THAMES . DITTON . 1662 =S . E . H. 



TOOTING. 

290. O. EDWARD . ELDERFIELD . AT = A flcur-dc-lyS. 
R. LOWER . TOOTIN . 1 665 = E . E . E. 

291. O. lOHN . WILLIAMS . 1670 = The King's Arms. 

R, IN . LOWER . TOOTING = HIS HALF PENY. 



WALTON-ON-THAMES. 

292. O, CHARLES . ERwiN . AT . Y* . WHITE = A Hon rampant. 

R. IN . WALLTON . VPON . THAMES =» HIS HALFE PENY. 
C . L . E. \ 

293. A variety reads the instead of y^ and vppon and half. \ 

294. O, FRANCIS . HOLDEN . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, WALTON . ON . THAMES = F . M . H. \ 

295. O. lOHN . HOLES . OF . WALTONE . IN — HIS HALFE PENY. 

R, SVREY . THE . BVCHERS . ARMES = The Butchers' Arms. \ 

In the Feet of Fines for Trinity, 29th Charles II., 1677, is the record of: 

*'Jobn IloIIis, plaintiflf, and Miles Hall and Alice his wife, defendants, of one 
messuage, one barn, one stable, two gardens, two orchards, with appurtenances, in 
Walton-on-Thames ; Miles and Alice grant the same to John Hollis, who pays 
;f 60 sterling.*' 

And again in the Feet of Fines, Surrey, Trinity, 29th Charles II. : 

"John Hollis, plaintiff, and Miles Hall and Alice his wife, defendant, of one 
messuage, one barn, one stable, two gardens, two orchards, in Walton-on-Thames, 
the same being granted to the said John, who pays £(xi sterling." 

The Hearth-tax R(»lls give these entries— Hearth tax, 15th Charles II., 
No. 188.481 : 

"John Hollis, Walton-on-Thames, 4 hearths." 

Hearth-tax, No. 188-504 : 

"lo. Hollis, of Walton. 4 hearths.*' 

Hearth-tax, 25th and 26th Charles II., No. 188-496 ; 

"John Hollis, of Walton, 4 hearths." 

This man is noted as being a collector for Walton of the lay subsidies in the 
reign of Charles II. 

296. O, THOMAS . KING . 1668 . AT = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, WALTON . ONE . THAMES = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 



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1 1 52 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

297. O. THOMAS . & . WILLIAM . SMITH . OF = THAR HALF PKNV. 
T . W . S. 

J^, WALTON . Y« . GROSERS . ARMES-Thc Grocers' Arms. J 



WANDSWORTH. 

298. O, CHRiSTPHER . BAYLEY=x A man making candles. 

I^. OF . WANSWORTH = C . S . B. \ 

The name of this family occars in Ihe poor rate for Wandsworth, made 
April 10, 1666, in two places under the heading, ** Account of Persons gone oat of 
towne." 

299. O, CHRISTOPHER . BAYLEY=« A man making candles. 

I^. OF WANSWORTH = C. S . a i 

The following extracts are taken from the parish registers and other documents : 
Christening. 1607. June 21, Christopher, son of WilL Baylie. 

„ 1637. Sep. 25, ChriNtophcr, son of Rich. Bailey.* 

Burial. 1664. Aug. 25, Mr. Christopher Bayly. 

„ 1665. Dec. 20, Sara Bailey, widowe. 

It may be noted that she is not reported as having died of the plague. 1665 

was one of the plague years at Wandsworth. 
Christopher Bailey was churchwarden 1647-8. 
Churchwardens* accounts, 1649-50 : 
" p«* Xpr Bailey for nailes and pauing tyles, 00 03 5." 
About this date several entries to " Goodman Bayly for nayles." 
" 1654. Rec*d of Christop' Bay ley for a yeres rent for y« Clock acre, 02 00 oa" 
•* 1656. Pd Mr. Duncombe y« Clerke by Christopher Bayley the yeares Rent 

of the Clocke Acre for his looking to the Clocke and finding oyle etc, 02 00 oa" 
•• List of goods, 1661.— One hearse cloih y« Guift of Mrs. Bayly." 
" 1664.— Account of the Church stock Oweth for Mr. Christofer Bailyes gimue, 

6s. 8d." 
A/em. — He last signs the accounts in 1661. 

" 1665.— Receipts for the Church : Mrs. Bayley's grave, 00 06 08." 
In an indenture dated March 24, 1649, between '* Waulter St. John and Henry 

St. John, of Battersey," and the parish of Wandsworth, the name of Christopher 

Bayley, chandler, appears. 
Amongst the signatures to the Constitution of Vestry, on December 6, 1657, is 

•*Chr. Bayley." 

300. O. ELIZABETH . CROW = OF WANSWORTH. 

li. HER . FARTHING = E . C. i 

The parish registers of Wandsworth give the following entry : 
" 1664. July 3, Edward Crow and Elizabeth Games, Banns." 

301. O. lOHN . HAWKINES . AT . THE = HIS HALF PENY. 

I . M . H. 

-^. GEORGE . OF . WANDSWORTH = St. Gcorgc and the 

Dragon. J 

In the poor rate made April 10, 1666, the name of John Hawkins occurs for the 

amount of 6s. Majority of amounts are much smaller than this, most of them is. 

and under. 

* This appears to be a nephew of Christopher Bailey, being a son of his younger 
brother Richard. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SURREY, 1 153 

The following extracts are from the parish registers : 

** Margaret, wife of John Hawkins, buried 15 March, 1658-9." 

'* Margaret, daughter of William Hawkins, buried 21 March, 1657-8.'* 

" 1728, Mar. 9, Bapt. John, son of William and Elizabeth Hawkins.'* 

There is still an inn at Wandsworth known as the George and Dragon. 

302. O. loSEPH . KELE . OF = Drapers' Arms. 

Jd. WANDSWORTH . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY, ^ 

303. O. lAMES . srvBiNGTON = A dragon. 

^. IN . WANDSWORTH = 1 . E . S. J 

Id the rate made April 27, 1630, for new building the steeple and " repayring " 
the church of Wandsworth, is this entry : 
" James Stubbington, 2s.'* 

In the poor rate made April 10, 1666, for Wandsworth, is : 
"James Stubbington, sen., is. James Stubbington, jun., is.'* 
In the poor rate made 1707, equal to about ^^d, in the £, William Stubbing- 
ton appears as occupying a house at the Waterside, 9d., that is, £2 annual value ; 
and in 17 12 Widow Stubbington appears as the occupier, until 1726, when the 
value of the premises had risen to £4 per annum. 
The following extracts are taken from the parish registers : 
Marriage. 1628. Sep. 21, Jamas Stubbington and Elizabeth Hayes. 
Baptism. 1629. June 21, Elizabeth. 

„ 1630. Feb. 13, Elizabeth. 

•I 1633. Feb. 10, Katherine. 

„ 1634. Oct. 31, Elizabeth. 

,, 1636. Nov. 6, Margarett. 

„ 1640. Oct. 12, James. 

„ 1642. June 19, Willm. 

,, 1644. June 23, Mary. 

„ 1646. May 24, Anne. 

„ 1649. Sep. 9, Thomas. 

„ 1660. Dec. 21, Luke. 

„ 1663. May 3, James. 

„ 1664. Jan. 22, Charles. 

All above are sons and daughters of James Stubbington. 

Baptisms. 1668, Apr. 1 1, Martha, 167^, Feb. 12, Hannah, daughters of 
James Stubbington, jun. 

Baptisms. 1672, Mar. 16, James, 1675, Oct. 2, Elizabeth, son and daughter of 
James Stubbington, 

Baptism. 1678. April 14, Frances, daughter of J. S., jun. 

„ 1680. Dec 22, William, son of J. S. 

Burial. 1652. June 27, Thomas, son of J. S. 

„ i66t. Feb. 27, James and Charles, sons of J. S. jun. P. 

„ 166J. Feb. 28, Margarett, wife of J. S. jun. P. 

„ i66|. Mar. 12, Luke, son of J. S., jun. P. 

„ 1677. Dec. 4, the wife of James Stubbington, sen. 
P.— Item, These all died of the Plague. 

304. O. WILLIAM . woLCOCKES = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^, IN . WANSWORTH . BAKER = W . C . W. J 

William Wilcocks was one of the members of the Wandsworth Vestry, as 
appears by his endorsement of December 6, 1677, on parchment attached to deed 
of Constitution of Vestry. 
The following extracts are taken from the parish registers : 
Marriage. 1635. June 25, Willm. Woolcock and Cecillia Burton. 
Baptism. 1636. July 7, Anne, daughter of Willm. Woolcock. 
„ 1637. Dec 12, Thomas, son of W. W. 

„ 1643. Aug. I, Barbara, daughter of W. W. 

„ 1646. Jan. 10, Christopher, ""on of W. W. 



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IIS4 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

Baptism. 1647. Mar. 9, Richard, son of W. W. 

„ 1649. Nov. 13, Sibbill, daughter of W. W. 

Burial. 1648. May 24, Kichard, son of W. W. 

„ 1649. Sep. 17, Richard, son of W. W. 

>» 1653. April I, Mary, daughter of William Woodcock ( IVooicoci, sk), 

„ 1655. Nov. 14, Sibbell, daughter of W.W. 

„ 1658. Oct. 19, Sisseley, wife of W. W. 

„ 1660. Sep. 6, William Woolcock, Baker. 

,9 1678. July 21, Mary, y« second wife of William Woolcock. - 
Item. She did hang herself. 

In the churchwardens* account for 1650 appear the following interestbg 
memoranda : 

** Receipesfor the Poore : Rec'd of Emond Crips for Mr. Woolcoxe house for j« 
poore, /i2 00 <xx" 
William Woolcocks signs the accounts June, 1652. 
In the churchwardens' accounts for 1654-5, 1655-6 : 

" 1655. Disbursm«» for M". Smyths mony. P^ M'. Woolcocks for bread for the 
poore, 01 01 03." 

William Wolcocks signs this account. 

William Wolcocks signs the Constitution of Vestry on December 6, 1657. 

N.B.— The foregoing notes are most kindly contributed by Cecil T. Davis, £sq» 
B.A., Librarian of Wandsworth Public Library. 



WEST MOULSEY. 

305. O, ROBERT . CORTES . OF . WEST . MOLSEY= HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. C 

R, THE . RYALL . OCKE . 1 669 = An oak-trec with three 
crowns. i 

Royal Oak is still the name of an inn in the town. 

In the Will Office, Somerset House, is the will of Mary Osborne, of West | 

Moulsey, dated December 30^ 1667, which was witnessed amongst others by | 

Robert ^Cortis. 

WIMBLEDON. 

306. O, THOMAS . HEBVRNE = A rose. 

R. IN WIMBLETON . S9 = T . E . H. i 



WOKING. 

307. O, lAMES . COLLYER . IN = TwO shuttlcS. 
R. WOKING . SVRREY . 1553 = 1 . R . C. 

1654. April 30, James Collyer, son of James Collyer, bom. 

1654. May 17, James Collyer, son of Tames Collyer, baptized. 

1655. May 27, Katheren Collyer, wife of James Collyer, died. 
Kindly extracted from the parish registers by the Vicar. 

308. O. RICHARD . GARNER . OF « The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

R, WOKING . IN . SVRREY = R .E.G. 
The parish register reads : 

1657. Jan. 14, William Collyer and Ellenor Gardener married. 
1657. April 2, George Gardener, son of Richard Gardener, born. 



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Guildford. 



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Surrey. 



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Susscf- 



Number of Tokens issued 183 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 59 

Town Pieces issued at Midhurst and Rye. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

Fredk. E. Sawyer, Esq., F.S.A., 

3, Buckingham Place, Brighton. 



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The Sussex tokens are a series which possess considerable interest 
and importance. In appearance they present no very special feature ; 
most are of the ordinary shape, two only being heart-shaped and one 
octagonal. In devices but few present arms or crests of private 
individuals, and very many the ordinary trade arms and signs. Speak- 
ing types occur in tokens of Horsham, Uckfield and Chichester, in 
which a heart, a swan, and a hart are the punning devices. 

In some instances the spelling of the place-name is in a local 
phonetic form, as at Arundell, and by this we are enabled to verify 
change in village pronunciation. Many of the tokens were issued 
from places which are now small and insignificant villages ; but in • 
one noticeable instance, that of Brighton, the relative importance of 
the village in 1668, to the magnificent watering-place of 1890, affords 
remarkable evidence of the rapid growth and increasing importance 
of a town which, but a short while since, was a mere fishing village. 

Eastbourne is another similar instance, analogous, perhaps, to the 
growth of Clapham in Surrey. These places in the seventeenth 
century issued their one or two tokens only, but have grown to 
gigantic proportions, whilst places which issued many tokens in the 
early days have from various reasons dwindled down to mere villages. 
The thirty-three tokens of Chichester, eleven of Midhurst, and ten 
of Petworth, may be referred to as illustrative of these remarks. 
The persistence of local names is, however, one of the main features 
of this series ; and, from the valuable notes appended to the tokens, 
much important information on Sussex families and village life will 
be obtained. Nearly fifty tokeners announce the fact of their 
residence in the county upon their tokens. This is the largest 
proportion in any county of the United Kingdom of tokens bearing 
the county name, and it reveals that love of their home that still 
distinguishes Sussex men. The attribution of two of the East- 
bourne tokens is somewhat doubtful, but the fact of their having 
been found in the near neighbourhood is somewhat strong evidence 
for their removal from Lincolnshire and attribution to Sussex. The 
token of Peeter Sqvier, of Steining, No. 164, would suggest the 
question of hereditary chemical knowledge in that family. The 
coincidence of both name and trade is very remarkable. 

The leading authority on Sussex archaeology, Mr. Frederick Sawyer, 
F-S.A., has, with very great kindness, provided the notes to this 
series. No person is more qualified than Mr. Sawyer to speak with 

VOL II. 74 



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1 158 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

authority on the antiquities of Sussex, and very much time has 
been devoted by him to searching out information respecting the 
issuers of the tokens. Reference has also been made to a privately 
printed pamphlet on Sussex tokens by Mr. James Lowe-Warren i 
(1888), and to the collections of the Sussex Archaeological Society. j 
Notes to which the word " Warren " or the letters S. A.C. are attachwi ^ 
are taken from these latter sources. The Editor tenders his wannest \ 
thanks to Mr. Sawyer for his most able and valuable assistance, and 
also expresses his indebtedness to the other sources to which he has 
alluded. 

The Editor. 



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SUSSEX, 1 1 59 



ALDINGBOURNE. 



1. O. WILLIAM . DAMMER . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. ALLDiNGBORNE . 1669 = A flowcr between w . d. 
(Octagonal,) \ 

ALFRISTON. 

2. O. WILLIAM . CHiTENDEN = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R, IN . ALLFRISTON = W . C J 

The late Vicar (Rev. J. Puttick, now Rector of Kingston-by-Sea) gives the 

following entry as occurring in the parish register : 
" Ricl^rd Chittenden, the son of William Chittenden and Jane his wife, was 

baptized the eighteenth day of May, 1665." 
He was overseer in 1662, and surveyor in 1666. 



ANGMERING. 

3. O, lOHN . STONE . MERCER = I . E . S. 

R, IN . ANGMORING . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

Parish register of the period is very difficult to read, but the name appears in 
the following entry : 
"Jane Stone, widow, was buried December, 1665." — Rev. J. B. Orme, Rector. 



ARDINGLEY. 
4. O. WILL . AND . HENRY . BINGHAM = Three flcur-de-lys. 

R, OF . ARDINGLY . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 1669. \ 

The Rector (Rev. J. Bowden) kindly sends extracts from parish registers : 

168 1. William Bingham was buried Oct. 27. 

1695. Henry Husband {sic) of Elizabeth Bingham was Buryed Sept. 8. 

He adds : A farm in this parish, now in the possession of Lord Arthur Hill, of 
Wakehurst Place, and rented by Mr. Bannister, of Hay ward's Heath, bearing the 
name of Upper Lodge Farm in the Ordnance Map, is also called Bingham's Green 
Farm, and was, no doubt, therefore the old residence of the Bingham family. 



ARUNDEL. 

5. O, lAMES . CARTER . AT . Y« = A bear. 58. 

R. BEARE . IN . ARVNDELL= I .E.G. \ 

6. O, ALICE . CHARM AYNE =s A pigeon. 
R, OF . ARAN DELL . 1667 = A . C 

7. A variety is dated 1657. 

In 1645 a petition was presented to the Committee [of Parliament] for the Rape 
of Arundel for compensation for sufferings under Royalist expulsion, and Aljce 
Charman was awarded ;f26o. — Tierney, *' History of Arundel, p. 715. 

74—2 



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ii6o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

8. O, THOMAS . DREWETT . IN = A stick of candles. 

^. ARVNDELL . 1657 =T . E . D. \ 

9. O, THOMAS . DREWET= A Stick of candlcs. 

^. OF . ARANDELL . 1667 =T . E . D. 

10. A variety has the date 1666. 

The late Vicar (Rev. A. S. Thompson, B.D.) sends extract from parish register : 
** 1656. Ap. 7. Married Thomas Drewett and Elinor Janyon." 
Initials "t. r. d." thus elucidated, "Thomas and Ehnor Drewett." 

11. O. lAMES . MORRIS = A SWallow. 

^. OF . ARANDELL . 1652 = 1 . M. J 

The swallow is the Arundel arms, a pun on the French word " hirondelle." 
Tames Morris was Mayor in 1642, during the Mege (Dallaway and Cartwright, 
** History of Rape of Arundel," Part I, Vol. II., p. 207). He had ;f 536 compensa- 
tion for sufferings under Royalist expulsion (see token No. 6). — ^Tiemey, " History 
of Arundel," p. 715. 

12. O, lOHN . PELLET . OF . 1 659 = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

^. ARONDELL . MERSER = I . P. i 

13. O. lOHN . PELLETT . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. AROVNDELL . MERCER = I . M . P. J 

14. O. lONN . PELLET . 1659 = The Merccrs' Arms. 

^. ARONDELL . MERSER = I . P. J 

The family lived at Arundel in 1655. (See S. A. C. xvi., p. 72.) 

15. O. GEORGE . PENFOLD = G . S . P. 

^. OF . ARVNDLE= 1657. } 

He was Constable in 1655. 

16. O. lOSEPH . RVSELL . AT . THE = St. Gcofge and the Dragon. 

J^. IN . ARNDELL . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALF PENY. J 

17. O, THOMAS . WITHERS . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, ARNDELL . IN . SVSEX = 1 668. J 

The dialectal form of the place-name ** Amdell" on this token is worthy of 
special notice, being a dissyllable and not a trisyllable, as one would suppose. This 
has come down from the time of the Domesday Survey, where it appears as 
•• Harrundel," but now become ** Harndell " or ** Arndell." 

N.B.— The late Vicar (Rev. A. S. Thompson, F.D.) states that the names 
of Carter, Charman, Drewett, Morris, and Penfold are still common in the town 
{vide Nos. S, 6, 8, 10, and 14). 



BALCOMBE. 
18. O. GEORGE . WHITE . i668 = The Butchprs' Arms. 

^. IN . BALCOMBE . SVSSEX = H1S HALF PENY. G . A . W. J 

The Rector (Rev. R. G. Mead, M.A.) kindly sends the following note : 

I have looked through our register books for a good many years about 1688, 

but though White is a common name at that time, 1 do not notice that the came 

appears except in a child being baptized in 1688. 



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SUSSEX. 1161 

BATTLE. 

19. O. lONAS . LVLHAM . IN = The Merchant-TayloFs' Arms. 

^. BATTEL . IN . SVSSEX = I . L. i 

20. O, THOMAS . MANHOOD . OF = A heart pierced with two darts. 

T . M . M. 
I^, BAITELL . APOTHECARYE = HIS HALF PENY. J 

This carious name is no doubt derived from the Hundred of Manhood, in West 
Sussex (formerly Afanwode, or Meonude)^ which u-as probaltly part of the Jutish 
settlement in East Hants known as the province of the Meanwara, and given by 
King Wulfbere to iEthelwalch (King of Sussex) on his conversion.— Bede, 
"Ecclesiastical History," Book IV., c. xiii. 

21. O. lOHN . MEDHVRST . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. BATTELL . IN . SVSSEX = I . I . M. \ 

The name still exists in the town. 

22. O, THOMAS . PAGE . AT . THE = A double-hcaded eagle (dis- 

played). 

R. SPRED . EGEL . IN . BATTELL = T . P. J 

23. O. GiLLES . WATTS . OF = The Mercers* Arms. 

R, BATELL . IN . SVSSEX = G . W. \ 

In 1689 Giles Watts, of Battle, left by will £$0 for charitable purposes. He 
was an ancestor of James and William Watts, Esqs., of Battle. 

Hollington (Sussex) parish register records : 

" Dec 5, 1636. Marryed Gyles Waits, of the parish of Battle, and Dorothy 
Yclding, of Hollington. — Cit. 8. A. C. xxi. 139. 

Lower (*' Sussex Worthies," p. 232) gives a biographical notice of a descendant. 
Dr. Giles Watts, baptized at Battle in 1725, and died there in 1792. His father, Giles 
Watts (perhaps a son of the issuer) in 1722 married Jane Relf, of a gentle family» 
at Ashlnimham. 



BEXHILL. 
24. O. SAMVELL . iVRV . ATT = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, BEXLE . IN . SVSSEX . 65 = S . I. } 

The Vicar (Rev. C. L. S. Clarke, B.C.L.) kindly sends the following notes from 
the parish registers : 

ib7a John, son of Samuel and Mildred Jury, bapt 30 June. 

167a John, son of Samuel and Mildred Jurv, buried 15 Nov. 

1671. Hannah, daughter of Samuel and Mildred Jury, bapt. 17 Sept. 

1674. Samuel, son of Samuel and Mildred Jury, bapt. 25 Jan. 

1692. Samuel Jury buried March 7th. Affidavit brought the loth. (This was 
no doubt the issuer.) 

The spelling on this token curiously preserves the old pronunciation and spelling, 
which in the Domesday Survey is B&xeiei, 



BILLINGSHURST. 

25. 0, MATHEW . WESTON =1666. 

R, IN . BILL1NGSHVST=M . W. \ 

The Burrell MS., 5,699 Addl., p. 48 (British Museum), gives the following; 
extracts from the parish registers : 



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Ii62 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

Baptism. 1654. Elizabeth, d. of Matthew Weston, gent., Oct 15. 

,, 1657. Alan, s. of Matthew Weston, gent., March 27. 

,, 1666. Grace, d. of Matthew Weston, gent., Aug. 15. 

Marriage. 1682. Mr. Wm. Withy and Mrs. Mary Weston, July 27. 
BuriaL 1665. Susanna, d. of Mr. Matthew Weston, May 3. 



BOLNEY. 
26. O. THOMAS . LiNTOTT = A hart lodged. 

J^. OF . BOLNEY . l666 = T . L. { 

The Lintotts were long connected with Bolney. For an account of the hiinily 
see S. A. C. viii. 275. 

The late Mr. M. A. Lower refers to intermarriages between the family of 
Scrase, of West Blatchington, with Lintott, of Bolney, and other gentry families 
of the county.— S. A. C. xxiv. 18. 



BOREHAM. 

27. O. lOSEPH . ELSTON = The Mercers' Amis. 

J^. BOREHAM . IN . SVSSEX = I . E . 1 666. 
This place is a manor and hamlet in Wartling parish. 

BRAMBER. 

28. O, ROBERT. HIGGINSON = HIS HALF PENY. 
J^. IN . BRAMBARE . l666 = R . A . H. 



BRIGHTHELMSTONE {ftow Brighton). 

29. O, lOHN . BROOKER . 0F = I . A . B. 
J^, BRIGHTHELMSTON=l66o. 

John Brooker is described in the Court Rolls in 1692 as ** piscator," and was the 
fourth out of five generations bearing the same Christian name and surname. He 
was baptized at Brighton in 161 7, and buried there in 1698. At the same place in 
1656 he married Margaret Wood, but she had died prior to 1692, in which year be 
surrenders his copyhold property to the use of himself for life ; next to his wife 
Mary for life ; then to James Brooker, of Brighthelmstone, cooper, for life ; tiid 
afterwards to James Brooker, aged nine, son of before-mentioned James Brooker. 
His will, dated 1688, was proved at Lewes in 1698. 

30. O, HENRY . FORSTER . IN = A Still. 

jR. BRlGHTHELMSTON = H . E . F. J 

Henry Forster is no doubt to be identified with the person of this name who in 
1674 was one of the witnesses to the will of Captain Nicholas Tettersell, in whose 
vessel Charles II. escaped to the Continent in 1651. (See S. A. C. xxxii. 10a) 
If this conjecture be correct, the token throws an interesting light on the history 
of the Old Ship Hotel (the oldest inn in Brighton), and shows that Tettersell nut 
only owned the ** Old Ship," but kept it also, sending for Forster, his distiller, t«» 
witness his will. At a Court Baron held for Brighthelmstone Manor on 
October 22, 1708, the death of Mary, wife of Henry Forster, and daughter of 
Pteter Marden, is presented, and Samuel Forster, her youngest son, admitted 
tenant according to the custom of the manor. 



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SUSSEX. 1 163 

31. O. lOHN . GVNTOR . OF = Aims of Guntct of Racton : three 

sinister gantlets. 

J^. BRIGHTHELMSTON£ = I . G. 

The name of a John Gunter appears in the Subsidy Roll of 162 1 as of this place. 
He was probably father to the issuer. 

A branch of the Gunter family of Racton had been settled at Brighton from the 
early part of the seventeenth century, if not earlier. John Gunter occurs in the 
Subsidy 1621 (S. A. C. ix. 78), and was admitted to a cottage in North Street, 
Brighton, in 1624. At a court held for the manor April i, 1667, his death (in 
1666) was presented, and his youngest son, Edmund, admitted as customary heir. 
The issuer was no doubt an elder son, John Gunter, who died about 1669, leaving 
a widow, Elizabeth, a son John, and two daughters, Susanna Burton, wife of 
James Burton, and Mary Freeland. The widow at some date between 1670 and 
1674 Planted CapUin Nicholas Tettersell. (See S. A. C xxxii. 100 and loi.) It 
is perhaps more than a mere coincidence that Colonel Gunter, of Racton, arranged 
with Tettersell for the escape of Charles II. {/d. 83.) 

32. O. lOHN . PEERSY . OF = A ship. 

^. BRIGHTHELMSTONE = I . G . P. \ 

Amongst the signatures to a petition of the "Fishermen Inhabitantes of the 
distressed Towne of Brighthelmstone " to Parliament, dated March 4, 1609, occurs 
"John Pearsey" (Harl. MS., No. 6,838, p. 216). At the Halimote Court lor 
Brighthelmstone Manor on August 20, 1659, we find *' John Pearsey the elder" 
amongst the homage, but on August 26, 1668, at another court, the death of Juhn 
Peirsey is present^, and Gabriel his youngest son admitted. John Peersy (the 
issuer) was probably the elder son of the before-named, and in conjunction with 
his wife Elizabeth, at a court held for the manor on August 21, 167 1, surrendered 
his " shop and land under the Cliffe near the Eastgate to the use of Henry Peirsy, 
third son of the said John and Elizabeth.*' The *' MS. Records of the Society of 
Friends (volume * Friends* Sufferings ') for the S.E. District " contain the follow- 
ing interesting note relating to him : 

•* 1659. — In this yeare allso Nicholas Beard for speakeing to a Priest after he 
bad done his Sermon was haled out of the Steeplehouse of Brighthelmston by John 
Persy, Robert Baker and others of the Towne by the hair of the head and Evilly 
entreated amongst them, for bareing Witness against their Worship being mixe«.l 
with men's Traditions, and Not according to the Scriptures of Truth or Commands 
of Christ. 

*' It is observable allso Notwithstanding the Rage and fury of the Inhabitants 
of that 'lowne, against all friends to Truth, yet the Truth was Stronger and cQuld 
not be hindred from Takeing Root in the hearts of some of them, and Particularly 
John Persy Who was a Principall Actor in what is before Related, who came in 
Some time after to be Convinced and Dyed in the yeare 1679 and was Buryed 
among friends in their Burying ground at Rottingdean " (pp. 30 and 31). 



BROADWATER. 

33. O. WILLIAM . ROBisoN = A hand holding a pair of shears. 

Ji, OF . BROADWATER = W . M . R. J 

Mr. A. J. Fenton, late of Worthing, but now of Staines, has kindly searched the 
parish registers by permission of the vicar, and says the name occurs from 1559 
to 1678 as Robinson, Robynson, Robertson, Robi^on and Robisonn. On March 8, 
1678, is the burial of " Willm Robisonn," probably the issuer. 

34. O. ROBERT . TVRNAGAINE . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. BROADWATER IN . SVSSEX = R . S . T. 1 669. ^ 

Mr. A. J. Fenton has also kindly searched ihe parish register, Court Rolls, and 
Subsidy Lists, as to the Tumagaine family, which was very numerous from 1559 



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Ii64 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

onwards. The parish register records Ihc baptism on Sept. 3, 1626, of 
Robert, son of William Turnagaine, the elder, and no doubt the issuer. He was 
buned on May 21, 1679. ^'S wife's name was Susan, and the parish register 
records the baptism of three children of Robert and Susan, tiz. : 1669, Dec. 29, 
Mary ; 1673, AprU 28, Elizabeth ; and 1675, Dec. 16, Thomas, the latter, how- 
ever, being buried on Sept. 3, 1676. The letters ** R. s. T. " thus stand for " Rolicrt 
and Su^n Turnagaine." Robert Turnagaine appears amongst the homage at a 
Court Baron for Broadwater Manor on Oct. 22, 1678, and at a Court Lect for the 
Tithings of Broadwater, Worthing and Durrington, on Oct. 2, 167 1, he appears as 
a juror, being described as having been head borough or tithing* man {decimarhu) 
for the past year. At a Court Baron on Oct. 2, 1676, is a presentment of a 
surrender of a cottage, next the churchyard at Broadwater, to the use of Map', 
daughter of Robert Turnagaine and Susan his wife, and the heirs of her body, with 
remainder to Elizabeth Turnagaine, another daughter of Robert and Susan, and 
the heirs of her Iwdy. Mary Turnagaine, aged eight, was admitted, and Robert 
her father appointed her guardian. There is a gap in the Court Rolls, but irscems 
that Mary died without heirs, and that Elizabeth married one Ambrose Martin, as 
we 6nd from the proceedings at a Court Baron on Oct. 16, 1725, an admission cf 
Thomas Mot»r, of East Grinstead, to the property, on surrender of Ambiosc 
Martin and Elizabeth his wife. 



BURWASH. 

35. O, EDWARD . AVSTEN = E . C. A. 

R. OF . BVRWASH* 1658. \ 

36. O. EDWARD . AVSTEN = A tallowchandlei. e . c. a. 

R. OF . BVRWASH . 1669 = HIS HALF PENEY. i 

The late Rev. J. Coker Egerton, M.A., Rector, kindly searched the parish 
registers and account books. In the baptisms of 1635 is '* Edward Aostoi, the 
son of Edward Austen and Anne his wife, was baptized October 13." It is un- 
certain, therefore, whether these tokens were issued by father or son, or one bjr 
each of them. The oldest existing parochial account- book begiiis in 1673, in 
which year Edward Austen is assessed to the ability-tax " for the bouse of Correc- 
tion, Goale and mamed soldiers and other charitable uses/' at 6d., the highest 
assessment being that of Edward Polhill, Esq., at 6s. 

The signature, Edward Austen, appears among those of the auditors of the 
parochial accounts till 1686, when it ceases, its place l>eing supplied by that of 
Thomas Austen, who on Oct. 3, 1687, married Francisca More, and was lor many 
years churchwarden of the parish. The burial of "Edward Austen, sen'." is 
registered on Feb. 8, 1722, but an "Edwardus Austen filius Edwardi" had been 
baptized on July 21, 1661 ; the former was therefore probably the second Edward 
Austen, born 1635. Edward Austen married Sarah Nepeker (both of Burwash 
parish), on April 25, 1723, by license. 

BUXTED. 

37. O. RICHARD . TVCKER=«The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J<. OF . BVXTED . 1668 -HIS HALFE PENNY. k 



CHAILEY. 

38. O, lOHN . COMBRIDGE=l667. 

R. IN . CHAYLEY . IN . SVSEX = I . R . C 
The Rev. F. R. Hepburn, M.A., Rector, has kindly searched the parish regibters, 
and sends the following extracts : 



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SUSSEX. 1 165 

Baptism. 1662. Tbomasi y« sonnc of John Cumbridge and Rose his wife, 
Nov. 20. 
Baptism. 1678. John, the soun of John Combridge, August 27 day. 

„ 1679. Elizabeth, daughter of John Combridge, March 9 or y^ day. 

,, 1682. Sarah, the daughter of John Cumbridge, May 4. 

„ 1683. John, son of John Cumbridge. 

„ 1685. Mary, daughter of John Cumbridge and ElizabeCh his wife, Jan. 

„ 1688. Jane, daughter of John Combridge, Dec. 

,, 1690. Andrew, son of John Combridge and Elizabeth his wife, 

Feb. 18. 
Baptism. 1695. Robert, son of John Combridge and Elizalielh his wife, May 30, 
,, 1697. Christopher, son of John Combridge, deceased, and Elizabeth 

his widdow, Dec^ i. 
Burial. 1662. Thomas, y« sonne of John Cumbridge. 

„ 1669. Rose, y« wife of John Cumbridge, May >*» 10*. 
„ 1670. Elizabeth, y« wile of John Cumbridge, Sep* 6. 
,f 1687. Anne, a young child of John Combridge, Dec' I. 
„ 1696. John Combridge, March 16. 
„ 1697. John Combridge, Shopkeeper, June 18. 
The initials ** i. r. c. " clearly stand for "John and Rose Combridge." If it 
was his wife Elizabeth who died in 1670, then he must have married a third time, 
and we may probably Identify the John Combridge baptized in 1678 as his son, 
and the issuer as buried in 1697, especially as he is designated ''Shopkeeper." 



CHICHESTER. 

39. O, RICHARD . AYLWIN . OF = HIS HALFE PENY. 

J^, CHICHESTER. 1669 = Three horse-shocs. J 

The issuer lived in East Street. 

The Aylwins are one of the oldest Sussex families, and were long connected 
with Trey ford, in West Sussex. (See Eiwesand Robinson's "Castles, Mansions, 
and Manors of Western Sussex," p. 242.) 

In the Assessments for Hearth-tax in 1670 we find under East Streete, 
Chichester, " Mr. Richard Ayleing, three hearths."— S. A. C. xxiv. 82. 

The parish registers of St. Peier-the-Great (Subdeanery), Chichester, record 
the baptism of **Jonc, daughter of Mr. Richard Ayling, on Sept. nth, 1664."— 
Burrell MS., 5,698 Addl., p. 395. 

40. O, MATHEW . BALL=M . B. 

jR, OF . CHICHESTER = 1657. J 

We find in *' A Catalogue of Tavemes in lenne Shires about London," by John 
Taylor, London, 1636 : 

" Chichester hath these Tavernes. . . . Thomas Ball, Matthew Ball" 

These two may have been in partnership. 

Thomas Ball was Mayor of Chichester in 1643.— Dalla way, " History of 
Chichester," p. 166. 

In the Subsidy Return for Chichester in 1621, under " The Pallant," occurs : 

" Mris. — Ball, widdow, in goods £4, assessed at 4s." — S. A. C. xxiv. 77. 

41. O. I AMES . FARENDEN = I . I . F. 

jR. IN . CHICHISTER = The Blacksmiths' Arms. 

42. O. lAMES . FARENDEN = HIS HALF PENY. I . I . F. 

^. IN . CHICHESTER . 1667 = The Blacksmiths' Arms. ^ 

Amongst the " Sessors" for the subsidy in 1621 we find ** Thomas ffarington in 
goods ;Cio," assessed at los.— S. A. C. xxiv. 76. 



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Ii66 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

43. O. WILLIAM . FLETCHER =W . F. 

J^. OF . CHICHESTER = 1655. \ 

44. O. WILLIAM . FLETCHER = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR, IN . CHICHESTER = W . F. 1 667. J 

In the Assessment for Hearth-money in 1670 this name occurs under South Streete 
for five hearths. — S. A. C. xxiv. 80. 

The parish register of Si. Peier-the-Great (Subdeanery), Chichester, records ihc 
baptism on May 5, 1670, of Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. Wm. Fletcher.— 
BurreU MS., 5,698 Addl., p. 395. 

45. O. lOHN . GiTTiNGS = The Dycrs* Arms. 

jR. IN . CHICHESTER = I . G. \ 

46. A variety is spelt gittins. 
The issuer lived in North Street. 

In the subsidy of 1621, under South Streete, Chichester, occurs : 

" Constance Gil tens, widdowe, in lands 20s., assessed at i6d." — S. A. C. xxiv. 77. 

Daniel Gittins, LL.B., was Incunil)ent of South Stoke, near Arundel, in 173K. 

—Dallaway and Cartwright, ** History of the Rape of Arundel," Pari i. 

Vol. II., p. 223. 

47. O, FRAN . GOATER . OF= 1 659. 

^. CHICHESTER . MERCANT=F . G. i 

The issuer was Mayor in 1688. 

Francis Goater was Alderman in September, 17 16. — S. A C. xix. 147. 

48. O. THOMAS . GODLEMAN = An oak-trec. 

/^. IN . CHICHESTER . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. T . C . G. J 

In the Assessment for Hearth-money in 1670 we find under AVest Streete, 
Chichester, " Richard Godleman, for two hearths " ; and under South bireeie, 
" 1 homas Godman, for three hearths.'* 

The tree may ]ye intended for an olive-tree, the i.*-suer intendii g a Scriptural 
punning allusion to his own name. — Cf, Psalm lii. 9. 

49. O. lOHN . HATCH . OF = A man making candles. 

Ji, CHICHESTER . 1665 = 1 . H. J 

50. O, EDWARD . HiCHCOCKE . OF = 1 he Groccrs* Arms. 

JR. CHICHESTER . IN . SVSSEX = E . H. J 

Augustine Hitchcccke was one of the Commissioners in the Subsidy of 1C21, 
and was assessed on £4 in goods to pay 4s.— S. A C. xxiv. 76. 

In ihe Hearth-tax Returns for 1670 occurs : 

"John Hilchcocke," under the Lower Ward, "for two hearths;" and the 
s&me name, ui.der East Strteie and Little London, "for thiee hearths."— 
S. A. C. xxiv. 80, 82. 

51. O, EDWARD . HITCHCOCKE . OF = HIS HALFE PENY. 
Ji. CHICHESTER . IN SVSSEX = E . H. 

52. O. ROBERT. HicHCOCK . IN = The Necdlemakers' Arms. 

JR. CHICHESTER . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The Rector of St. Pancras parish (the Rev. George Cavill, M.A.) kindly sends 
the following extracts from parish legisters : 



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SUSSEX. 1 167 

" Stephen, the sonn of Robert Hitchcxxrk and Johan his wife, was borne the 
25th day of February, at 3 of the clock in ye morning. 1657." 

"Anno Dom., 1664. James, the sonn of Robert Hitchcock and Joan his wife, 
was bom the 14 of May m the year above written." 

"Joseph, sonn of Robert Hitchcock, etc., 1667." 

Chichester was formerly celebrated for its needles, but by 1725 the number of 
needle-makers was reduced to one. — Spershott*s "Memoirs of Chichester in the 
Eighteenth Century. "—S. A. C. xxx. 149, 150. * 

Robert Hetchcocke occurs in the Hearth-tax Retacn far f6fD wtdct St. Vaments 
parish without the Eastgate<— S. A. C xzhc MtL 

55. O. TtJOKMS^VOBBOm^T . M . H. 

i?. OF . CHICHESTER = 1652. 1 

He was Mayor in 1658. 

54. O. GEORGE . lENiNGS . OF = The Gordwainers' Arms. 

^. CHICHESTER . 1667=0 .A.I. J 

The name is still extant in the city. 

See Hearth-tax Return 1670, George Jennings bracketed with two others for 
house in North Streete with four hearths. — S. A. C. xxiv. 83. 

55. O. ANN . MiCHELL . IN . 1669 = A book with clasps. 

/^. BOOKSELER . CHICHESTER = HER HALF PENY. J 

In 1670 Mrs. Anne Michell, under East Streete and Little London, two hearths 
(Hearth-tax Returns).— S. A. C xxiv. 82. 

56. O. RicHARt) . MILLS = A mallet. 

^. IN CHICHESTER = R . C . M. \ 

The name still exists in Chichester. 

57. O, RICHARD . PELLETT . OF= 1 668. 

J^. CHICHESTER . MERCER = R . P. i 

In the Hearth-tax Return for 1670 Mr. Richard Pellatt, under East SUeete and 
Little London.— S. A. C. xxiv. 82. 

58. O. STEPHEN . PENFORD= 1658. 
jR. IN . CHICHESTER - S . P. 

Stephen Penfold was Mayor in 1669 and 1677. 

The name as spelled on the token appears in the Chichester Poll Book for 1667. 

Mr. Stephen Pcnford returned in 1670 under East Streete and Little London for 
six hearths.— S. A. C xxiv. 82. 

The burial register of St. Olave's, North Street, Chichester, records on 
February 16, 169}, the burial of Capt. Stephen Penfold, Alderman and twice 
Mayor of Chichester ; died February 13th.— Burrell MS., 5,699 Addl., p. 383. 

59. O. MARGREAT . REYNOLDS = The Bakers' Arms, m . r. 

^. LIVEING . AT . CHICHESTER -= HER HALF PENY. 1 667. J 

The name still exists in the city. 

60. O, lOHN . SMITH. wiTHOVT . THE = St Lawrence holding a 

book and gridiron. 

J^. EAST . GATE . OF . CHICHESTER = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

61. 0. lOHN . SMITH . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . CHICHESTER = I . S. i 

In Hearth-tax Return 1670, under the parish of St. Pancras-without-the-East- 
gate, assessed for six hearths.— S. A. C. xxiv. 82. 



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H6& TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

62. O. THOMAS . SPATEHVRST= HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. IN . CHICHESTER . 1667 ~ A Stocking. i 

He lived in North Street. 

Thomas Spatehurst probably died before 1670, as we find in Hearth-tax Retom, 
1670, under North Streete, " Widdow Spatehurst assessed for three hearths.**— 
S. A. C. xjdv. 84, 

63. O, WILLIAM . SWAN = A swan. 

jR. OF . CHICHESTER . I 668 = HIS HALF PENY. W. M . S. J 

The name still exists in the city. 

The parish registers of St. Peter-the-Great (Subdeanery), Chichester, record the 
baptism, on September 12, 1667, of William, son of Mr. William Swan.— 
Burrell MS., 5,698 Addl.. p. 395. 

In Hearth-tax Return, 1670, Mr. William Swann, under East Streete and Litdc 
London, for five hearths.— S. A. C. xxiv. 82. 

64. O. MAREY . TAYLOR . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. CHICHESTER . l666 = M . T. I 

65. O. RICHARD. TREVET=HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. IN . CHICHESTER . 1667 = R . T. A 

In Hearth-tax Return, 1670, under North Streete, occurs Richard Trcvalt, 
having six hearths.— S. A. C. xxiv. 83. 

66. O. THOMAS . VALER = A man making candles. 

J^. IN . CHICHESTER = T . V. i 

67. Another, with the name of the town in chirhester. { 

68. Another reads in Chester. 

All these are evidently from the same die altered ; what blunderers the die- 
sinkers were ! No such name as Valer is to be found at Chester. 

The issuer was Mayor of Chichester in 1666 and 1676. 

The parish registers of St. Peter-the-Great (Subdeanery) Chichester, record the 
burial, on March 24, 1688, of Mrs. El zabeth Vallor.— Burrell MS., 5,698 AddU 
P- 392. 

In the Hearth-tax Return, 1670, we find, under North Streete, Alderman 
(Thomas) Vallor with seven hearths.— S. A. C. xxiv. 83. 

69. O, AT . ieffrey . WHITE = The Butchers' Arms. 

jR, IN . CHICHESTER = I . M . W. J 

70. O, ROBEART . wiHiTHER . IN . 1669 = The Butchers' Arms. 

/C, CHICHESTER . HIS . HALFE . PENY . R . I . W. (in four 

lines). (Heart-shape) \ 

71. A variety reads cheste*^ in place of chichester. {Heart- 

shape,) 

72. O, RICHARD . YOVNGE = R . Y. 

K, IN . CHICHESTER = 1658. \ 

He was Mayor in 1667. 

In Hcarih-tax Return, 1670, we find, under North Streete, Mr. Richard Younge 
having eleven hearths.— S. A. C. xxiv. %'^ 



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SUSSEX, 1 169 



CLIFF. 



73. O. MARY . AKEHVRST . IN . THE = HER HALF PENY. 

J^. CLEFT . NEARE . LVEIST = M . A . 1667. J 

The issuer was probably a widow when she issued her token.. She was a 
member of the then new sect called Quakers, to the great displeasure of her 
husband, who treated her very brutally for her heresy. For an account of her 
sufferings for conscience' sake see S. A. C. xvL 

74. O, RICH . WHITE . IN . THE = A hammer. 

^. CLIFT . NERE . LEWIS = R . S . W. \ 

75. O. RICHARD . WHITE . BRAZIER . IN = A hammer. R . W. 

J^. Y» . CLIFE . NEARE . LEWES . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

A curious pamphlet (published in 1670) on the persecutions of the Nonconform- 
ists, reprinted in Horsfield's ** History and Antiquities of Lewes." Vol. I., app. 
p. XXV. mentions ** Richard White, brasier .... of the ClifTe near Lewes," 
fined 50s. for attending a religious service. 

CRAWLEY. 

76. O, RALPH . PATTRICKE= A harp. 

/^. OF . CRWLY . IN . SVSSEX = R . A. P. J 

The Rector (the Rev. J. B. Lennard, M.A.) has kindly searched the parish 
registers, and states that on September 18, 1693, is recorded ihe burial of Ralph 
Patrick, senior (doubtless the issuer). 

The following seven baptisms of children of Ralph Patrick occur : 

1659. Judith, Dec 21 

1666. Ralph, May 17. 

1667. Henry, Jan. 28. 
1669. Amy, Jan. 29. 

1690. Hen., Dec. 13. 

169 1. Eliza, Jan. 3. 
1693. Ralph, Sept. 17. 

If, as seems probable, the first four were the children of the issuer, then the last 
three may be children of his son Ralph, baptized in 1666. 

CUCKFIELD. 

77. O, EDWARD . BRiNCKHyRST= A lion rampant. 

^. IN . COVCK . FEILD=E . A . B. J 

Parish registers were kindly searched by Percy Boord, Esq., by kind permission 
of the Ven. Archdeacon Mount, M.A. (then Vicar) respecting Edward Brinckhurst, 
but no entries were found of the name. 

78. O. THOMAS . HVRST . OF . cvcKFEiLD = The Merccrs' Arms. 

^. IN . SVSSEX . HIS . HALF . PENV = T . H. J 

The name of Thomas Hursl appears on the Subsidy Roll of 1621 as of this 
place. He was probably father of the issuer. 

No baptism or burial of any Thomas Hurst recorded, but among-it baptisms, 
1616, Sept. 29, Roger, son of Thomas and Anne Hurst, and 1618, June 7, John, 
son of Thomas and Anne Hurst. Mr. Boord supposes these two to be brothers 
of the issuer, which agrees with Messrs. Smallfield and EUman*s view, that the 
Thomas Hurst on the Subsidy Roll of 1621 was the father of the issuer. The 
parish register, however, gives the following curious entry : 

" 1655, May 29th, Thomas Hurst and Elizabeth Taylor mahried at Mayfield." 

Now the letters "T. A. H. " would stand for Thomas and Anne Hurst, so that 



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1 1 70 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

this would proTC the first-mentioned Thomas Hurrt to have been the issner. The 
baptisms of two children of Thomas Mid Elizabeth Hurst are recorded, yii. : 
Elizabeth, bom Feb. 28, 1657 (buried Jan. 17, 1659), and John, bom July 3, 
1659 (buried May 16, 1726). Further burials : 1660, Aug. 4, Elizabeth, wife of 
Thomas Hurst, and 1677, Nov. 22, Anne Hurst, widow. 

79. O. lOHN . STONE 1666 = A griffin segreant. 

J^. CVCKFFILD . IN . SVSSEX = I .M.S. { 

The following entries occur in the parish register : 

1618. Feb. 4, Elizabeth, daughter of John Stone, shoemaker, baptized. 

1628. Dec 30, Infant son of John Stone buried. 

1658. May 28, Elizabeth, wiie of John Stone the elder, buried. 
„ May 21, William Stone buried. 

„ May 25, Mary, wife of Will. Stone. 
[This must be from plague or soms most infectious disease. — F. E, S.] 

1659. Jan. 14, John, son of Henry and Sarah Stone, baptized. 

1673. July 30, Isaalc and Jacob, twinne sons of John and Mary Stone, 
baptized. 

1675. July 9, Mary, daughter of John and Mary Stone, baptized. 

1677. Aug. 14, Jonathan, son of John and Mary Stone, baptized. 

1684. Nov. 21, John Stone buried. 

1726. Apr. 23, John Stone — old man — buried. 

The initials ** i. M. s " (John and Mary Stone) clearly show the issuer to be the 
second John Stone mentioned in the seventh, eighth and ninth entries, and the 
first of the name was no doubt his father. 

EASTBOURNE. 

80. O, WILLIAM . ELIZAB . DONN = A gloVC. 

^. IN . EAST . BOREN . IN . SVSX = HIS HALF PENY. J 

81. O, lOHN . ELLPHiCKE = A sugar-loaf. 

J^. OF . BORNE . IN . SVSSEX = I . E . E. { 

The surname Elphick still occurs in Sussex. It is found iu the Domesday 
Survey (under Sussex), as yEIfech, being the Saxon Alphege, or ^elfheah. 

82. O. WILLIAM . HALE =1667. 

^. OF . BOYRNE . 1667 = W . A . H. J 

83. O. CHARLES . LEEDS . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. BORNE . MERCER == C . K . L. 

It is a matter of conjecture at present whether these two tokens are correctly 
attributed to Bourne (Lincoln) or to Eastbourne, but we think the weight of argu- 
ment is in favour of the latter attribution. 

EAST GRINSTEAD. 

84. O. THOMAS . BODLE . IN = The Merccrs' Arras. 

^. EAST . GRIMSTED . SVSEX = T . E . B. f 

There is a hamlet in Hurstmonceux parish known as Bodle Street In the 
Parliamentary Survey of Pevensey Manor in 1650, under ** Portreeve service rents 
in Helsham [Hailsham]," occurs " Thomas Bodle of Helsham'* (S. A. C. xxiv. 
263). The name Bodle was, Mr. Lower suggests, corrupted from Bothel, one of 
whom in 1397 was witness to an Arlington deed (S. A C. xxii. 117, 118). Le Boihd 
is mentioned in the Nonarum Return of 1 341 as a parishioner of Hurstmonceux. 
Thos. Marchant, of Hurstpierpoint, in his Diary, 171 5, January 26, refers to " my 
cousin Bodle of Hailsham " (S. A. C. xxv. 171). 



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SUSSEX, 1171 

85. O. WILL . CLiFi'ON . svsEX = A sugar loaf. 

J^, IN . EAST . GRIMSTED = W . S . C. 

86. O. AT . THE . CATT . IN . EAST = A Cat. 

^. GREENSTED . 1650 = T . E . P. J 

The " Catt *' was probably the local term for the Dorset Arms, a not uncommon 
sign in the neighbourhood, where that noble family had formerly large landed 
esutes. The supporters of the Dorset Arms are two leopards, popularly styled cats, 
and the inn called the Dorset Arms at Lewes was in 1670 commonly known in the 
town as " The Cats.'* 

In John Taylor's *' Catalogue of Tavemes in tenne Shires about London" 
(1636)* the following note is given under Sussex : 

"At East-Greensteed lohn Lan^ridge and Henry Baldwin; the signes at East 
Greensted are the Crown and the Cat.*' 

Both surnames occur in the Subsidies of 1620 and 1628. John Laneridge was 
assessor in the latter (S. A C. xx. 171). Presumably Langridge kept tne Crown 
and Baldwin the Cat. 

87. O. RICH , PAGE . AND . HEN . SEASTID = A CrOWn. 

^. EAST . GRINSTED . IN. SVSSEX = THEIR HALF PENY. J 

This issuer may have been the same person who issued the token at Hellingly, 
and afterwards entered into partnership. 
The Crown Inn still exists. 

FALMER. 

88. O. RICHARD . ALDERTON » A goosc flapping its wings. 

J^. OF . FALLMER . 67 = R . E . A. J 

FRAMFIELD. 

89. O. THOMAS . PECKHAM . AT = The Groccrs' Arms. 

jR. FRANFIELD . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 1669. ^ 

It is not improbable that he was a connection of the Rev. John Peckham, 
Royalist Rector of the neighbouring parish of Horsted Parva, whose living vras 
sequestered by the House of Commons in 1643, and who subsequently practised 
physic and farmed lands there (S. A C. xxx. 120, 121). 

The name is met with in Framfield at a very early date. — See S. A C iv. 299. 

FRANT. 

90. O. NIGGLES . HOSMARE^The Merccis' Arms. 

^. OF . FRANT . IN . SVSEX = N . I . H. \ 

Amongst ten persons burnt at Lewes for heresy on June 22, 1557, we find W. 
Mainard and Alexander Hosman, his servant (Foxe's ** Book of Martyrs.*' — Cit. 
S. A C. xvii. 165). 

The parish register, kindly searched by the clerk, Mr. Isaac Wade, records 
amongst the marriages, '* 1672, May 30, John E. Hosmar to Sarah Wood, both 
of thb parish,'* and baptisms : *' 1676, May 28, John, v* son of John Hosmar," 
and *• 1677, Jany. 14, Thomas, y« son of John Hosmar.* 

HAILSHAM. 

91. O, SAMVELL . GILLES = S .E.G. 

J^, OF . HELSHAM . MERCER = 1657. J 

The Rev. F. C Harvey, M.A (the Vicar), has kindly searched the parish 
registers and finds recorded : 
*' A consent of marriage between Samuel Gilles of this parish, mercer, and 



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1172 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Elizabeth Winter of Hastings, spinster, was the first lime published March 29, 
1657 ; second, April 5, 1657 ; third, April 12, 1657/* 

As there is no entry of actual marriage, it protiably took place at Hastings ; bat 
the baptisms and burials of many of their children are recorded at Hailsham. 

The initials of s. ic g. are thus verified as Samuel and Elizabeth Gilles. 

92. O. WILLIAM . HARTNVP . OF = The GroccFS* Arms. 

J^. HAILSHAM . IN . SVSSEX = W . E . H. ^ \ 

The parish registers, kindly searched by the Vicar, have amongst the burials : 
. ** Buried William Hartnup the 17th day of September, 1675." 

HARIING. 

93. O. THO . VALLOR . MERCER = A foX. 

J^. HARTING . IN . SVSSEX*=T . E . V. J 

HASTINGS. 

94. O. AT . THE . MAYDEN . HEAD = A QuCCn's head. 
J^, IN . HASTING . 1651 =1 . K . F. 

HELLINGLY. 

95. O, RICHARD . PAGE . 1 669 = The King's head crowned. 

li. AT . HELLINGI.Y . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

The Vicar (the Rev. James Farrar, M.A.) has kindly searched the i>arish books, 
and finds mention of Richard Pa<»e, at Dicker, churchwarden, 1644 ; Richard 
Page, iun., 1664, surveyor ; three Richard Pages signed as present in 1665, and 
one of the name in 1666, 1667, 1669, 1670. Then Ricnard Page signs as 
surveyor of highways in 1673 and 1675 ; and again Richard Page is present ia 
1680 and 1681. 

There is siill (1S88) an inn known ns the King's Head. 

HENFIELD. 

96. O, THOMAS . PiLFOLD . AT . 68 « The Mercers' Arms, t . e . p. 

^. HENFEILD . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALF PENY. | 

The Rev. Dixie Rol)ertson, M.A. (late Vicar), kmdly searched the parish 
register*, but could only fihd the following entries r 

• ** 1668. Jane, daughter of Thomas Pilfold and Elizabeth his wife, baptized 
August the* third." 

** 1672. Ann, daughter "of Thomas Pilfold and of Mary his wife, baptized." 

There is no record of the death of his wife Elizabeth, or of his second marriage. 
The initials T. E. P. on the token thus evidently stand for Thomas and Elizabcih 
Pilfold. 

There is a farm named Pilfold Farm at Horshan), from which the family derived 
their surname. One branch o( the family resided in the neighbouring parish of 
Warnham, the parish register of which gives many particulars. (Sec 
S. A. C. xxxiii. 148 and 185.) 

Elizabeth Pilfold, of a West Sussex family, married Sir Timothy Shelley, and so 
became mother of Percy B\sshe Shelley, the poet. 

- 97. O. ELIZABETH . TRVNNELL= 1657. 

J^, OF . HENEFEILD = I . E . T. J 

The present Vicar (the Rev. C S. Dunlop, B. A.) has kindly searched the parish 
registers, and finds the following entry : 

" 1627. Elizabeth, daughter of John Trunnell, was baptized August 26." 



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SUSSEX, II 73 



HORSHAM. 

98. O, RICHARD BARNARD = A Stick of candles. 

J^, OF . HORSHAM . 1669 = R . S . B. J 

In Hearth-tax Return, 1670, occurs, under East Streete, for four hearths. — 
Lay Subsidies, Sussex, 191-414, Public Record Office. 
No doubt a relative of John Barnard, of Pet worth. (See token No. 138.) 

99. O. WILLIAM . HAMPER = A mat! making candles. 

J^. IN . HORSOM . 1653 = W . S . H. J 

The Rev. C. J. Robinson, M.A. (Vicar), kindly sends the following extracts 
from Horsham parish register : 

" Baptism. 1661. June 21, Elizabeth, daughter of Wm. Hamper by Sarah.'' 

"Burial. 1702. Sep. 5, William Hamper, householder.'* 

The parish register of West Tarring, Sussex, records the marriage of William 
Hamper to Susanna Carter on April 10, 1682. — Burrell MS., 5,698 Addl., p. 515. 

The initials w. s. H. (William and Sarah Hamper) clearly show the first- named 
to have been the issuer. 

100. O. lOHN . HART . OF = A hart lying under a tree. 

J^. HORSHAM . SVSSEX . l666 = I . H. J 

loi. O, lOHN . HiGiNGBOTTOM = The Mercers' Arms. 

/^. IN . HORSOM = I . H. i 

In Hearth-tax Return, 1670, ** Mr. John Higgenbottom, nine hearths.'* 

A Mr. Higaobotham was parson of Plumpton, Sussex, in 1612. (See *' Roll of 

Armour and Furniture of the Clergy,*' S. A. C. xi. 225.) 
Amongst the burials recorded in the parish registers (kindly searched by the 

Rev. C. J. Robinson, M. A., Vicar) is : 
** 1679. Feb. I, John, son of John Higenbottom, gent, a child." 
He died in 16S5, and bequeathed his shop in East Street, Horsham, *' unto Mary, 

my loving wife." — S. A. C. xxiv. 14a 

102. O. lOHN . HiNDLY = A hind couchant. 

J^. IN . HORSHAM . l666 = I . H. J 

The parish register records the following baptisms : 

1642. John, son of John Hindley, Gent, (by Mary), Jan. 29. 

1668. George, son of John Hindley, Gent., Aug. 14. 

1678. John, son of John Hindley, Gent., Apl. 15. 

—Burrell MS., 5,698 Addl., p. 426. 

It is not clear whether the issuer was the one baptized in 1642 ; but this seems 
not improbable, and if so, he was, doubtless, the father of the second and third 
alK>ve named. 

The Rev. C. J. Robinson, M. A. (Vicar), kindly adds two further notes from the 
parish registers : 

"Married. 1666, Oct. 23, John Hindley and Elizabeth Gratwicke, both of 
this." 

" Burial. 1685, Sept. 8th, Elizabeth, wife of John Hindley, gent.'* 

103. O. ROBERT . HVRST = A String of candles. 

^. IN . HORSHAM . 1664 = R . M . H. \ 

A Robert Hurst was a freeholder of Horsham in 1734. 

A later person of this name was a tailor, as we find from the^ " Marchant 
Diary " (S. A. C. xxv. 186) : 

** 1719. Dec. I2th, Rol)ert Hurst, of Horsham, brought my father a great-coat. 
He and my father »upt and spent the evening here." 

" 1721. Nov. 15th, paid R. Hurst for making me a camblet coat."~//5. 19a 

VOL. n. 75 



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1 174 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

The Rev. C J. Robinson, M.A. (Vicar), kindly sends the following extracts 

from the parish registers : 

*< Married. 1638, Oct. 2, Robert Hurst and Elizabeth Clcwser." 

" Baptism. 1662, Tune 17, John, son of Robert Hurst by Mary.'* 

As the initials R M. H. (Robert and Mary Hurst) connect the latter entry with 

the issuer, it is probable the first-named was his father. 
The member for the borough from July, 1865, to February, 1874, and from 

December, 1875, ^o February, 1876, was the late Robert H. Hurst, Esq. 

104. O. THOMAS . LVCAS = A fleur-dc-Jys. 

/^, IN . HORSAM . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The parish registers of the adjoining parish of Wamham have many entries of 
this name. Aniong>t burials : 

1612. Nov. 26, 'iliomas Lucas, gent 
„ Dec. 5, Margaret Lucas, Widowe of Tha Lucas. 

163I. March. 20, James Lucas. 

Administration of the goods of the last-named was, on April 2, 1633, granted 
by the Pierogaiive Court of Canterbury to his father, Thomas Lucas (perhaps 
the issuer, during the minority of deceased's son, James Lucas. — S. A. C. xxxiii. 202, 
and note 212. 

Mr. J. L. Warren, of Worthing College, Sussex, writing in Sussex Notes and 
Queries (xxvi. 9), says : 

** In restoring a house [in Horsham] in 1826 a vast number of these tokens were 
discovered.'* 

105. O, EDWARD . PARKHVRST = E . E . P. 

R. IN . HORSHAM =1657. \ 

Some churchwardens' accounts about the date of the token mention Edward 
Parkhurst, who was apparently church^'arden. — Horsfield, ** History of 
Sussex," ii. 266. 

The Hearth-tax Return of 1670 gives, under North Streete, " Thomas Parkhurst. 
three hearths and a forge." 

The name is still foimd at Horsham. 

106. O, ARTHER . ROWLAND . 1669 = A CTowiied head. 

R. IN . HORSOM . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

In Hearth-tax Return, 1670, this name occurs under North Streete as having ten 
hearths. No doubt, from the number indicated, he was an innkeeper. 

There is a King's Head Hotel existing ( 1 888). The name is still found in the parish. 

The Vicar (the Rev. C. J. Robinson, M.A.) kindly sends the following notes 
from the parish registers : 

"Baptism. i66o, Feb. 7th, Mary, daughter of Arthur Rowland by Mary." 

** Burial. 1687, May 23, Mary, wife of Arthur Rowland." 

107. O, WILLIAM . SHORTT = The King's Arms. 

R, IN . HORSHAM . 1667 = A horse. w . f . s. \ 

Two baptisms are recorded in the parish registers, viz. : 
1660. Dec 27, Samuell, son of Will. Short by Elizabeth. 
1663. May 8, Francis, dr. of Wm. Short by Eliz. 

HORSTED KEYNES. 

108. O, EDWARD . WATERS = A pair of scissors. 

R, IN . HOSTED . CAN . HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1668 (In fivC 

lines filling the field). (Heart-shape,) \ 

The Rector (the Rev. C. B. Rod well, M.A.) kindly sends the following extract 
from the parish rasters : 
" Edward, the sonne of Edward Walters, was Baptized the 13th July, 1662." 
The issuer was a tailor.— S. A. C. i. iii, 112. 



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SUSSEX. 1 175 



HURSTPIERPOINT. 

109. O. THOMAS . DONSTALL = A wool-comb. 

J?. OF . HVRST . MERSER = T . D. i 

The Rector (the Rev. Prebendary C H. Borrer, M.A.) kindly sends the follow- 
ing notes : 

His wife's name was Elizabeth. They had two daughters named Elizabeth, 
one bom in 1659 ; the other in 1664. The former was buried in 1659 ; and the latter 
in 1691. They had a son John, bom in 1661, of whom we have no further notice. 
** Mr." Thomas and Elizabeth his wife both died in 171 1. Our Thomas Dunstall 
may be the son of the Thomas of Shermanbury, or possibly the same man. In 
the Royalist Compositions occurs Thomas Donstall, of Shermanbury, ;f loa 
(S. A. C. xu. 94.) There is an old house, called *' Dnnstalls,*' of no great 
size or character, below the church ; and there are some fields by Friar*s Oak, 
called Dunstalls, which my father inherited from my grandfather. 

1 10. O. lAMES . MATHEW = A lion rampant. 

Ji. IN . HVRST . 1667 =1 . M . M. { 

The Rev. C H. Borrer, Rector^ sends the following extract from the parish 
roisters: 

•• 1662, Buried Mary, wife of James Mathew of Randidles, March 18." 

Randidles is an old house of flint and brick still standing. 

The lion rampant is the arms of Pier Point. 

The issuer was no doubt an early Quaker, for we find by the MS. " Book of 
Sufferings, Records Society of Friends, S.E. District*' (p. 48) : '* A meeting was held 
on March 28, 1663, at Ilurstprpoint, at which Ambrose Rigge, Nicholas Beard, 
Henry Scrase, Richard Scrase, Richard Webb, James Mathew, Ambrose Gallo- 
way and William Hoi beam were present." They were arrested and taken before 
Walter Bnrrell and other magistrates, ** at the instigation of Leonard Letchford, 
the hireling priest of Hurstprpoint, who stirred up the said Rulers to persecute the 
Innocent," being committed to Horsham Gaol. Letchford gave evidence 
against them, and all were convicted except Rigge. Elwes and Robinson, 
** Castles, Mansions and Manors of Western Sussex, ' p. 226, give a pedigree of 
Matthew of Stansted, with which the issuer might have been connected. 



LEWES. 

111. O. lOHN . DRAPER . IN . LEWES = A Hoti rampant. 

jR. BY . THE . MARKET . PLACE = I . F . D. } 

The lion rampant was no doubt borrowed from the borough arms, those of the 
Earls iJe Warenne, the former Lords of Lewes. 

112. O. AMBROSE . GALLOWAY =1667. 

jR, IN . LEWIS . IN . SVSEX = A . E . G. i 

The issuer was a tailor, and lived in All Saints' parish. He was a Quaker, and 
is named in the note under Mathew's token of Hurst. 
The name, now spelt " Galway," is still found in Lewes. 

113. O. lOHN . HENTY . OF=I . H. 

/^. LEWES . PEWTERER = A flcur-de-lys. I 

The name appears on the Subsidy Roll of 1621, and is still to be found in 
Lewes. 

114. O. EDMVND. MiDDLETON . OF = The Haberdashcrs* Arms. 

^. LEWIS . IN . SVSSEX . 1 666 = E . E . M. \ 

75—2 



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1 176 TRADERS' TOKENS 01^ THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

115. A variety reads edward midleion. 

Edmund Middleton was constable in 1666, and subsequently. 

Edward Middleton was churchwarden of St John's iu 1635, and was probably 
father to the two issuers. 

Parish register, St. Michael -in-the- Market, Lewes, records the burial of Mrs. 
Ann Middleton on October 2, 1695, ^^^ the parish register of All Saints', Lewes, 
that of Mr. Thomas Middleton on April 6, 1666.— Burrell MS., 5,698 Addl., pp. 
171 and 183. 

Edmund Middleton was constable in 1666, 1673 and 1679. 

116. O. lOHN . PEMELL . IN = Arms; three fishes in pale. 

jR, LEWIS . DRAPER . 57 = I . A . P. 1 

The issuer was constable in 1618. 

Robert Pemel was author of a work entitled *' Help for the Poor " (London : 
8vo., 1650).— See S. A C. xii. 219. 

Peter Pemel was constable of Lewes in 1635 and 1647. 

In Col. John While's "First Centurie of Scandalous and Lewd Ministers" 
(printed by order of the House of Commons in 1643), we find, Na 67 : 

" The Benefice of Anthony Hugget, Parson of the Parish Church of the Cliffe 
[now part of the Borough of Lewes], in the«county of Sussex, is seqnestred, for 
that he . . . . put one Peter Pennell, whom he had 7 yeers before admitted to the 
comunion, from the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, because he would not come 
among the Boyes to be catechized ; and likewu^ refused to deliver the Ssun^ment 
to WUliam Pennell, because he was lame and could not kneel to receive it" 

117. O. WILLIAM . READ . AT . Y"=HIS HALFE PENY. 1 669. 

jR. KINGS . HEAD . IN . LEWES = Bust of the King crowned, 
holding a sceptre. i 

William Read, constable in 1680 and 1690, is mentioned as encouraging the 
rabble (S. A. C. xvi. 123). 



LINDFIELD. 

118. O, SAMVEL . BLVNT . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. LINFEILD . IN . SVSSEX = S . G . B. i 

The late Vicar, the Rev. T. H. Edwards, kindly searched the parish register, 
which is very illegible, and found the following baptisms recorded : 
** 1650. July 18, John Blunt, Sonne of John Blunt." 
'* 165 1 • Sara, daughter of Samuell and Clara (?) Blunt, was baptized Aug. 3.** 

119. O. GEORGE . FLETCHER =1669. 

jR. IN . LINDFEILD = G . F. J 

120. O. FRANCIS . WEST . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR, LINDFEILD . 1659 = F . F . W. \ 

Francis West, jun., is mentioned in a parochial document of 1636k 



LITLINGTON. 
121. O. lOHN . PEARCE . OF = An article of dress. 

jR. LITLINGTON . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The name appears in early parochial documents, but the parish register only 
commences in 1698. 



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SUSSEX, 1177 



LOXWOOD (Parish of Wisborough Green). 

122. O. GEORGE . BiLLiNGHVRST = A blazing star. 

J?. OF . LOXWOOD = G . B. —J 

123. O, HENERiE . iERLAND = The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. LOOXWOOD = H . A . I. J 

The name is still found in West Sussex. 

Some notes on the family are given in S. A. C. xxx. 237. 



MAYFIELD. 

124. O. CLEMENT . READE . HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1668 (in foUF 

lines). 

/^. IN . MAYFEILD = C . V . R. ^ 

125. O, CLEM . READE = A whcatsheaf. 

jR, OF . MAYFEILD . 1652 =»C . V . R. J 

126. O, WILLIAM . WESTON » The Grocers* Arms. 

jR. IN . MAYFEILD . 1677- W . W. { 

The name of William Weston appears in a parochial document dated 1626, and 
the name is still extant in the district. 



MIDHURST. 

127. O. A . MiDHVRST . FARTHING . IN . svsEX (in onc circle) 

FOR . Y* . vsE . OF . Y* . POOR (in an inner circle) = 
A shuttle. 1670. 
jR. Two pilgrims near a palm-tree. iarge { 

128. O. ROBAT . ATKINSON =»R . I . A. 

jR, MIDHVRST . IN . SUSSEX = 1657. \ 

129. O. THOMAS . AYLWIN . IN=«T . R . A. 

/^. MIDHVRST . IN . SVSSEX= 1657. J 

The issuer was a resident in 1655, and his descendants still reside in the neigh- 
bourhood. 

130. O. HENERY . coRTNEY . iN = A doublc-headed eagle dis- 

played 

jR. MIDHORST . IN . SOSEX » H . K . C. J 

131. O. HENERY . CORTNEY . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. MIDHORST . IN . SOSEX = A double-headed eagle dis- 
played, i^ 
The Spread Eagle is the arms of the noble family of Montague, whose magnifi- 
cent seat of Cowdray was close to the town. An hotel with his sign still exists in 
South Street, and the family of Courtney are still in the parish. — Warren. 

132. O. GEORGE . CHANDLER . IN = A hart couchant. 

J^. MIDHVRST . T . . . . O - HIS HALF PENY. ^ 



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.1178 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
133* O. GEORGE . CHANDLER <= A blazing Star. 

li, OF . MIDHORST . IN . SVSSEX = G . C. i 

134. O, THOMAS . CROVCHER . AT = A roll of tobacco and two 

pipes. 

^. MIDHVRSTE . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALF PENY. i 

135. O. lOHN . PEPSON . 1669 = A Stick of six candles. 

. J?. IN . MIDHERST . IN . SVSX = I . E . P. { 

136. O. lOHN . STENT = A castle. 

jR. IN . MEDHVRST=»I .M.S. i 

A George Stent was a freeholder of Midhurst io 1734, but the name appears 00 
parochial docomeiUs as early as 162 1. 

137. O. lOHN . sHOTTER = The Gfocers' Arms. 

^. IN . MEDHVRST = I . S. i 

The will of Robert Shotyer of Linchmere (a neighbouring pansh), in 1544, 
directed his burial in the churchyard of that parish, and a family of Shotters is 
said to be Mill in this part.— S. A. C. xiu 82. 



PETWORTH. 

138. O, lOHN . BARNARD . IN = A stick of fivc candles. 

jR, PETVVORTH . IN . SVSEX = I . I . B. J 

139. O, lOHN . EEDE . SVSSEX«HIS HALFE PENY. 

jR. PETWORTH . 1670 = An ape smoking. i 

The name is still in the parish. 

140. O. WILLIAM . HVRST = W . H. 

jR, IN PETWORTH . 1653 = W . H. \ 

141. O. lOHN . IOHNSON = I . I. 

J^, IN . PETWORTH =1656. J 

142. O. lOHN . LAVNDER = l663. 

jR. OF . PETTWORTH = I . L. J 

Amongst those to be touched for King's evil, we find in Petworth parish register 
note of ** Certifficat given for Frances, dawghter of John Lander, March the 29th, 
i686.*'— S. A. C. XXV. 209. 

The family of Launder were for some time connected with the parish of Lurga- 
shall, N.W. Sussex, in the sixteenth century ("Castles, Mansions and Manors of 
Western Sussex," p. 143), and Jchn Launder, husbandman, of Godstone, Surrey, 
was one of those arrested in 1554 at Derick Carver's house, in Brighton, for 
heresy, and condemned to be burnt. — Lower, ** Sussex Worthies,*' p. 201. 

143. O. RICHARD . LEGATT = Two swofds in saltire. 

jR. IN . PETWORTH 1656 = R . M . U J 

144. O, WILLIAM . MANSER . AT = A stick of candles. 

jR, PETWORTH . IN . SVSSEX = W . A . M. { 

He was a tallow-chandler, and his name occurs in the parish register. 



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SUSSEX. 1179 

145. O. lOHN . PEACHEY = I . P. 

jR, IN . PETWORTH . 1656= 1656. J 

A marble monument on the east side-wall of Petworth Church has this in- 
scription : 

*' Here lieth tbe body of John Peachy, Esq., who departed this life the 25th of 
May, 1693, and the body of Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Robert Palmer, Esq., 
who died the 24th of July, 1683."— Burrell MS., 5,699 Addl., p. 18& 

Berry, " Sussex Pedigrees," pi 106, makes Edward Peachey marry Elizabeth 
Palmer, and gives quite different dates. 

146. O, lOHN . scvT . OF = Three cloves. 

J?. PETWORTH . IN . SVSSEX = 1 . S, 

The name is still in the neighbourhood. 

On March 4, 1634, John Scutt, of Petworth, obtained a license to sell tobacco. 
—Privy Seals, 9th Charles I., No. 696. 

** Certifficat given for Sara Scut, April the 9th^ 1688," to be touched for king's 
evil" — Petworth raster, cit. S^ A, C. xxv. 209. 

The sumanK Scutt has been quite common in West Sussex for more than two 
hundred years, and in the Index of Wills proved at Chichester we find John Scutt 
in 1674 (perhaps the issuer), John Scutt of Blackhurst, and another of Wamham, 
both in 1693, and a fourth John Scutt, of Coldwaltham, in 1725 ; whilst earlier we 
have John Scutt of Thacham in 1570, and John Skutt of Egdeane in the same 
year. 

147. O, RICHARD . si'RiNGER = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. OF . PETWORTH . 1652 = R . S. J 

A Richard Stringer was churchwarden in 1636. — Warren. 



PEVENSEY. 
148. O. GEORGE . FORD . 1658 = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. AT . PEMSIE . GROCER = G. F. 



PULBOROUGH. 

149. O. It>hn . Allen . 1669 (in three lines). {Script) 

R. Jn . Pvlbvrraugh . his . halfe . penny {Script) (in four 
lines). i 

The name is still in the parish. 

In the Hearth-tax Return, 1670, the first name under Pulborough Tithing is 
Mr. John Allen with six hearths. — Lay Subsidies, Sussex, 191 -41 4. 

150. O. RICHARD . HAINES = A pelican feeding its young. 

R, OF . PVLBORROW . 67 = R r H. \ 

In the Hearth-tax Return, 1670, occurs Richard Haynes with five hearths, and 
Henry Ha^es with one hearth. 

The parish register records the burials of Mr. Richard Haynes on April 5, 1689, 
and Anne, wife of Mr. Richard Haynes, June 4, 1702. 

A curious epitaph at Rudgwick (a neighbouring parish) on Edward Haines, 
surgeon (died April 30, 1708, at 33), b mentioned in S. A. C. xviii. loi. 



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ii8o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



ROBERTSBRIDGE. 

151. O, ROBERT . GROVE . DRAPER = The Arms. 

jR. or . ROBERTSBRIDGE . 1667= HIS HALF PENY. J 

152. O. lOHN . PADiAM . OF = Grocers' Arms. 

Ji. ROBARTSBRIDGE . SVSEX = I . E . P. { 



RYE. 

153. O. FOR . Y* . CORPORATION = A ship. 

iV. OF . RYE . 1 668=- A church. i 

154. O. THOMAS . BOYCE . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

jR, RYE . IN . SVSSEX = T . E . B. i 

Thomns Boys was one of Ihe witnesses to the will of Samuel Jeake, the elder, 
in 1651. 

Parish register records, amongst burials, llesther, wife of Mr. Thos. BoySi on 
August 21, 1657. — Burrell MS., 5,697 Addl., p. 206. 

"Thomas Boys, gent., admiiied a freeman by the Mayor and Jurats June 5, 
1651."— HoUoway, " History of Rye," p. 218. 

The surname travelled westward in tne eighteenth century, and there is still a 
small street connecting West Street and Middle Street, Brighton, called Boyce's 
Street. If the issuer's wife usually spelt her name Esther, without the " H " pre- 
fixed, we have an explanation of the initials '*T. e. b.** in No. 154. 

155. O, MicHELL . CADMAN . AT . THE -= A mermaid. 

A. MEAREMADE . IN . RYE«M . A . C. { 

Michael Cadman was landlord of the Queen's Arms in 1672. He was Captain 
of the Market Ward in 1679, and a Jurat in 1682. 

There is now no Mermaid Inn, but it formerly stood on the north side of the 
present Mermaid Street at Rye, and ceased to be an inn about 1770. 
The parish register contains the following entries : 
Baptism. 1680. Mary, daughter of Mr. Michael Cadman, Sep. 14. 

„ 1682. Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. Michael Cadman and Mary, 

Oct. 24. 
Baptism. 1684. Hannah, daughter of Mr. Michael Cadman, Nov. 3a 

„ 1708. Michael, son of Mr. Michael Cadman and Catherine, FeK 19. 

Marriage. 1686. Mr. William Parke and Anne Cadman, wid., Feb. 17. 
Burial. 1672. Ann, wife of Mr. Michael Cadman, sen., Apl. 21. 
„ I7I4< Mr. Michael Cadman, Sep. 21. 
,, 1714. Kath., wife of Mr. Michael Cadman, Sep. 10. 

—-Burrell MS , 5,697 Addl, p. 206. 
The initials ** M. A. c " evidently stand for Michael and Anne Cadman, and it 
would seem, therefore, that Michael (the issuer) died before February 17, 1686, 
and that it was his widow, Anne, who married William Parke. The other entries 
probably relate to a son of the issuer. 

There is an excellent description of the old Mermaid Inn in Louis Jennings' 
** Field Paths and Green Lanes," pp. 10-12. 

156. O, WILUAM . KEYE . AT . THE = A ship. 
jR. SHEEPE . IN . RYE . 1652 = W . 1 . K. 

There is still an inn on the Strand Rye known as the Ship. 

William Key was brother-in-law to Samuel Jeake, named above, having 
mnrried the latter's sister, Anne. He died in 1666, and she in 1665. — iS. A. C 
xiii. 78. 



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SUSSEX. Ii8i 

157. O, THOMAS . TVTTY . i668 = Two men carrying a barrel. 

jR. RYE . IN . SVSSEX= HIS HALF PENEY. J 

In a letter to Mr. Samuel Teake in 1669 Tutty is mentioDed. 

AjnoDgst the inhabitaDts charged to watch in 1679, ^^ ^"^ under " Land Gate 
Ward " the name of Thomas Tutty. — Holloway, ** History of Rye." 

The parish register records the following burials : 

1661. Elizabeth, wife of Mr. Thos. Tutty, Tune 23. 

1663. John, son of Mr. Thos. Tutty, March 27. 

167 1. John, son of Mr. Thos. Tutty, Oct. 8. 

167 1. Ann, daughter of Mr. Thos. Tutty, Oct 14. 

1687. Rebecca, wife of Thomas Tuttie, Gent., Oct. 17. 

-«-Burrell MS., 5,697 Addl., p. 206. 

On an election petition in 1690 the right of Thomas Tutty (amongst others) to 
▼ote was afiirmed by the House of Commons.— Hors. "Hist. Suss.," vol. ii., 
App., p. 64. 

A family of Tutty resided in All Saints' parish, Chichester, the parish register of 
which from 1677 onvrards contains many entries relating to them. 

SEAFORD. 

158. O. lOHN . HIDE . 0F = A wheatsheaf. 

jR. SEAFORD . 1656 = 1 . H. { 

Robert Hide was Vicar of Seaford for sixty-five years, and buried there on 
Ai^ust 25, 1638, and had in 1592 been Bailiff. 

The parish register contains so many entries of this name, it is difficult to 
identify the issuer, John Hide ; but as we find the Vicar's son, John (baptized 
1594)* was buried in 1643, and then described as " Sen.," it b probable the issuer 
was the son of the Vicar's second son, Samuel (baptized October 1, 1580, and buried 
Tune 15, 163 1 ), and was baptized on April 9, 1620. His first wife, Margery, was 
buried on April 12, 1665, another wife, Elizabeth, on March 7, 1675, and as the 
parish register gives the baptisms of his sons, Samuel on March 3, 1675, and 
James on June 4, 1676, he evidently married a third wife. — References to parish 
register from Burrell MS., 5,697 Addl., pp. 590, 591. 

SHIPLEY. 

159. O. BARNARD . TVLLY . iN = A fleur-dc-lys. 

J^, SHIPLY . IN . SVSSEX= 1668. J 

SHOREHAM. 

160. O. RICHARD . GLYN . IN . NEW = A griffin. 

jR, SHORAM . IN . SVSSEX = R . A . G. \ 

In the Hearth-tax Return, in 1670, for the adjoinine parish of " South weelce 
Fishersgate Hundred," we find Mr. Clyde six hearths.— Lay Subsidy, Sussex, 
191-414. 

161. A variety reads glyd. 

SLAUGHAM. 

162. 0, lOHN . LiSH . AT . THE = Chequers. 

J^, IN . SLAVGHAM . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

The Rev. Prebendary J. O. W. Haweis, M.A, late Rector, has kindly searched 

the parish register, but finds no refeience to this issuer or his family. He stales 



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Il82 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

there is now no inn named the Chequers, but on an allotment of &eats in the 
church in 1721, one pew was for Phineas Cuttis, John Gray, the Park Lodge, the 
Chequer. The Chequer sign was no doubt derived from the shield of the Earb de 
Warenne, Norman Lords ot the Rape of Lewes (which included Slaugharo), which 
was chequy or and ature. 



STEYNING. 

163. O. lOHN . GROOMES . IN » A stick of candles. 

R, STENING . CHANDLER = I . E . G. 
Charles and Thomas Groom were freeholders of Steyning in 1734. — Warrco. 

164. A variety reads s-i-enning. 

The parish register of Preston (near Brighton^ contains amongst the marriages 
performed by Anthony Shirley, Esq., one of th^ustices for the county, the follow- 
ing entry : 

*' 1656, June 19, John Groomes, of Steyning, and Elizabeth Whitington, of 
Beeding, had ye purpose of manage published 3 several market dayes, viz., ye 21 
and 28 of May and ye 4 of June, in ye market of Stenning, and no excepts madesg. 
it. And they were marred here ye 19th of June, Ano. 1656." — ** Churches of 
Brighton," iL 308. 

The initials I. E. G. are thus verified and shown to be those of John and 
Elizabeth Groomes. 

Mr. J. Penfold (Steyning), writing in Sussex Notes and Queries {xidx, 6) respect- 
ing this token, says : 

** This family owned a good bit of property at Steyning. They had a candle- 
factory near the present new White Horse Inn. The Groomeses of Worthing are 
direct descendants." 

165. O. WILLIAM . SMITH . IN= 1667. 
A*. STEAMING . MERCER = W . I . S. 

He lived in Steyning in 1655. — S. A. C xix. 95, 

166. O. WILLIAM . SQviER = The ApothecaHes' Arms. 

R. OF. STEINING . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

167. O, PEETER . SQViER = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R, AT . STEINING . svssix . iS'jo^'A half petty. (Script) 
Could this issuer have been an ancestor of the well-known late Peter Squire^ 

chemist-in-ordinary to the Queen ? The coincidence of name and trade is very 

remarkable. 
The parish register of West Tarring (a neighbouring parish) records the baptism, 

on May 11, 1684, of John, son of John Squire.— Burreil MS., 5,698 Addl.,p- h^h- 



STORRINGTON, 

168. O, CRISTOPH . CAPPLIN = C . C 

R. OF . STORRINGTON . 57 « 1657. \ 

169. O, lOHN . PENFOLD . OF = The Mercers' Arms, 

R, STORINGTON = MERCER = I . P. \ 

170. O, NATHANIELL . STREATER = A fleur-de-lyS. 

R, IN . STORINGTON . IN . SVSEX = HIS HALF PENY. i 



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SUSSEX. 1 183 



TARRING. 

171. O.. GEORGE . FLETCHER = G . F. 

jR. IN . TARRING . 1667 =G . F. i 

172. A variety is dated 1659. 

The parish register records, on March 31, 1657, the baptism of William, son of 
George Fletcher.— Burrell MS., 5.698 Addl., p. 515. 

In John Taylor's " Catalogue of Tavemes in tenne Shires about London," we 
find at Tarring William Fletcher, doubtless the Uithet of the issuer. 



TENTERDEN. 
(See Vol. I., p. 368.) 

173. O. lOHN . READER . OF = The Grocers' Anns. 

J^. TENTERDEN . IN . SVSSEX=I . R. J 

His grandson took an active part in the early part of the eighteenth century in 

trying to establish the Young Pretender on the English throne, but failed, and was 

executed. 
The issuer vras a grocer, who was ptarish constable in 1675. ^^ ^^^ ^^ '^4* 
The parish of Tenterden is really eight miles within the KentisU border. 

THAKEHAM. 

174. O, lOHN . LEE . IN = 1667. 

I^, THACKHAM . IN . SVSEX = I . L. i 



TICEHURST. 

175. O. THOMAS . NAYSH . 1667 {^^ three lines across the field). 

J?. IN . TISEHERST . IN . SVSSEX = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

176. O. RICHARD . BiRCHET . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. TISHVRST . IN . SVSSEX = R . L . B. 1667. ^ 

The late Rev. Arthur Eden, M.A. (Vicar), kindly searched his parish register, 
and sent the following extract : 

"Mary, dr. of Mr. Richard Birchett and Lidia, Bapt. Sep. 19, 1669." 

He mentions that few names are dignified with the tiile " Mr." at that date, and 
farther that a part of the parish is named Birchet's Green. 

The initials R. L. B. on the token are thus verified as those of " Richard and Lydia 
Birchett." 

TURNHAM HILL. 

I cannot identify this place. There b a Turner's Hill in Worth parish. 
No. 178 is a vulgar burlesque. 

177. O, NICHOLAS . ARNOLL . 0F = A pair of shears. 

^. TVRNEM . HILL . SVSEX . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

178. O. NICHOLAS . HASOLE . OF = A pair of shears. 

J^. STVRNEM . HILL . SVSSEX = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 



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Ii84 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



UCKFIELD. 

179. O. lOHN . DEVENiSH . IN = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J^. VICKFEILD . 1669 = 1 . I . D. 
" A family of this name is mentioned in the Herald's Visitations as at Hcllingly, 
Sussex, in 33rd Henry VI., but Mr. Lower thinks it is now extinct in the county."— 
S. A. C. XXV. 106. 

180. O. lOHN . HART . OF . vcKFEiLD = A heart 

J^, IN . SVSSEX . 1668 « I . M . H. 
Some notes as to the family of Hart, of Uckfield, occur in S. A. C. xxiiL 12. 



WALDRON. 

181. O. SAMVELL . DVRRANT . OF= 1666. 
J^, WALDRON . IN . SVSSEX =»S . M . D. 

The Rector (the Rev. W. J. Humble-Crofts, M.A.) has kindly searched the 
parish register, and finds the following entries : 

1632, June 3rd, baptized Samuel, sone of Edward Durrant. 

1659. Maryed Samuell Durant, of this Parish, and Mary West, of Southover, 
the 14th of June. 

171 1. Samuel Durrant, senr., buried Febv. 

The letters ** s. M. D." are thus explained as " Samuel and Mary Durrant." 

The name still remains in the parish. 



WISBOROUGH GREEN. 

182. O, NICHOLAS . HVNT . 0F = WISSBVRROW. 
H. GREENE . IN . SVSSEX = N . H. 



UNCERTAIN. 



183. O. RICH . LINTOTT . IN«=R . L. 

-^. I . . . . LD (detrited) svssix = The Grocers* Arms. 



N.B. — Mr. Luther Clements, of Peckham, has kindly examined 
the foregoing descriptions, and compared them with the tokens in 
his excellent collection. The descriptions have therefore had the 
advantage of his careful collation, and more perfect accuracy, it is 
hoped, has been thereby obtained. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Males. 



Number of Tokens issued .92 

Number op Places issuing Tokens ... .36 

Town Pieces issued at Beaumaris and Brecon. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

James W. Lloyd, Esq., 

Kington, 

Herefordshire. 



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Male0« 



The tokens of the Principality form a small but interesting series 
—more than half of those issued in North Wales being pennies, 
although no larger generally than ordinary halfpenny or farthing 
tokens ; while those of South Wales are all halfpennies and farthings. 
The large number of penny tokens in North Wales and its border 
counties of Chester and Salop is remarkable, for among them there 
are more than in the whole of the other counties. 

The earliest date is 1660, and none appear to have been issued 
after 1670. 

The only town pieces were issued at Beaumaris and Brecon. 

The former edition described fifty-one tokens, to which the present 
list adds forty-one : total ninety-two. 

The arrangement of the towns in alphabetical order, irrespective of 
counties, as in first edition, has been followed, as the most con- 
venient for reference. 



ABERCONWAY (Co. Carnarvon). 

1. 0, HENRY . HVGHES . 1 663 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . ABERCONWAY = 1°. Sma// I 

2. A variety without date. i 

3. 0. ELIZABETH . lONES = {detrtted). 

H, OF . CONWAY . 1668 = 1^. I 



ABERGELE. 
4. 0. lOHN . HVMPHREYS = The Mercers' Arms. 

R OF . ABERGELEY . l668 = l". 



BALA. 

5. 0, ROBERT . THOMAS = R . T . 1^. 
R. OF . BALLA . 1667 = R . T . 1". 



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Ii88 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



BANGOR FAUR (Co. Carnarvon). 

6. O, RICHARD . BOVLTON . 1667 = A pair of scales and 1°. 

R, OF . BANGOR . FAWR = A Cathedral church. i 

In former edition of this work Mr. Boyne stated that this was one of the towns 
in Snelling's list that issued tokens ; but as a specimen had not come onder his 
notice, he was unable to describe the token. 

The above token b now in the writer's possession, and Mr. Chas. Gooldiog, iu 
former owner, writes with respect lo it, that it is the original token referred to by 
Snelling. 

BEAUMARIS (Co. Anglesey). 

7. O. RICE . BOLD . 1669 = HIS PENY. 

jR. IN . BEWMARISS»R . B, I 

8. O. lOHN . DAVIS . HIS . PENY = A CaStlc. 

jR, OF . BEWMARis . 1669 = 1 . D., with an interlaced flower, i 

9. O. BEN . lONES . lOHN . woRSLEY = A shield bearing arms of 

France and England quarterly on a ship, a sceptre in 
prow. 
J^. IN . BEW . MARIS = Arms of the borough ; a single-masted 
ship, with shield bearing three lions passant gardant 
in prow and a castle in stem. 

10. O. BEN . lONES . lOHN . WO RSLEY = Shield bearing Arms of 

France and England quarterly on a ship, with sceptre 
at prow and stern. 
jR. IN . BEW . MARIS = Arms of the borough as in last 

A smaller token, probably intended as a farthing, and the larger one as a half- 
penny. 
These are evidently town pieces. 

BRECKNOCK (Co. Brecknock). 

11. O. THE . armes . OF . BRECKNOCK = A robe. 

J^. A . BRECKNOCK . FARTHING = B . B, 1670. ^arge { 

12. O. THOMAS . ivxsoN . GLOVER - A pair of shears and a glove. 

^. IN . BRECKNOCK . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. (OctagOnol,) \ 

CAERWYS. 

13. O, lAMES . HVGHES = A fox. 

R. IN . CAROVSE . 1669 = 1 . I . H. 1^. I 

14. O, THOMAS . WYNNE . OF . CARWIS = T . M . W. 1°. 

R, CHYRVRGEON . HIS . PENY . 68 = An Uncertain object ; on 

one side a tooth with three fangs, on the other a 

tooth with two fangs ; above a pair of forceps. i 

Thomas Wynne lived near the palace of Dr. Lloyd, Bishop of St. Asaph, and 

Richard Davies, the Welshpool Quaker (No. 74), stayed with him when he went 

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WALES, 1 189 

there to visit the Bishop, and accompanied him to dispute with the Bishop about 
water baptism. 

15. A variety dated '69, and with a slightly different design on 
field of reverse. 



CARMARTHEN (Co. Carmarthen). 

16. O. {Detrtted) . da we . in = A rose crowned. 

jR, . ARMARTHEN = DG. conjoined. \ 

17. O, ABRAHAM . HEELY . OF = A Spread eagle. 

jR. CARMARTHEN . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY. | 

18. O, lOHN . HVGHES . ivNiOR = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. OF . CARMARTHEN . MERCER = I . S . H. \ 

19. O. THOMAS, NEWSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. IN . CARMARTHEN . l668=T .K.N. ^ 

20. O. THOMAS . NEWSHAM = 1 666. 

jR, OF . CARMARTHEN = T .K.N. \ 

21. O, lOHN . WEBB . SOPE . BOYLER = Three doves, part of 

Chandlers' Arms. 

JR. IN . CARMARTHEN . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

22. O. ELIZABETH . WILLIAMS = A castle. 

R. IN . CARMARTHEN . 1663 = E . W. ^ 

23. O, lOHN . wiLLSON . GROCER =» The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

R. IN . CARMARTHEN . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

CARNARVON (Co. Carnarvon). 

24. O. ELLIS . lONES . 1664 = A bird. 

K. IN . carnarvan = 1°. sfnall i 

25. A variety from different dies. 

26. O. THOMAS . KNIGHT = A roll of tobacco. 

jR. OF . CARNARVAN . 1667 = 1^ I 

27. O. THOMAS . KNIGHT = 1**. and a roll of tobacco. 

jR. OF . CARNARVON = 1667. I 

28. 0. GRIFFITH . WYNN = 1°. 

R. OF . CARNARVON . 69 = A castle. I 



CORWEN (Co. Merioneth). 

29. O, ROBERT . WYNNE . OF . 1 669 = (^/r//^^/). 

R. CORWEN . MERCER . HIS . PENY = R . W. 1^ 

vou II. 76 



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II90 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



COWBRIDGE (Co. Glamorgan). 

30. O. WILL . BASSETT . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENY. 
Id. IN . COWBRIDGE . 1669 = W . K . B. 



DENBIGH. 

31. O, EDWARD . DAViCE = A chevron between three boars' heads. 

^. IN . DENBIGH . 1664 = E . D. 1°. I 

32. O, OWEN • LLOYD . MERCER = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. IN . DENBIGH . HIS . PENY = (?) 1 

33. O. THOMAS . SHAW . i666 = A goat. 

iV. IN . DENBEIGHE . GLOVER = 1°. I 

The goat or buck on the ol>ver8e of this token is a part of the Leathersellers' 
Arms, viz., three bucks trippant regardant. 

The Shaws were among the most celebrated of the Denbigh glovers of those 
times. 

One of this ancient and respectable family went by the name of ^^ London 
Shcnv^^' from the fact that in 1665 he set out for the Metropolis as a plague doctor, 
carrying with him a cartload of wormwood as an antidote for the pestilence, by 
which he rendered himself the laughing stock of the town ever afterwards. 

His skinnery occupied the site of the present residence of Dr. Lloyd Williams. 

He seems to have been of a rather covetous dii^osition, from the following 
record <»f the Council in 1671 : ** That Thos. Shaw, the elder, glover, be summoned 
to appre here next meeting day, etc., to shew cause why he erected a new biiil«:ing 
over agt his house in Henllan-street, to ye annoyance of ve publick. And to 
appear also to produce such writings as he pretends to have for the erecting of his 
new house upon the com'ons." However, we find him expiating for such en- 
croachments upon public rights by bequeathing *at his death a meadow calltfl 
Lavaria^ in the outskirts of the town, to the poor of Denbigh for ever. — Willbms's 
" Ancient and Modern Denbijjh." 

In the ** Records of Denbigh and its Lordship " it is stated that at the election 
of Aldermen, 1651, January 9, Thomas Shaw, tanner, vice Sir William Myddlc- 
ton, deceased, was elected. Also in the same, that on a monumental tablet at 
'Whitchurch it is stated that Thomas Shaw, gentleman, who died in 1717, was 
for many years Recorder of the lordship and town of Denbigh. This was 
probably a son of Thomaa Shaw the tanner and glover. 

We are indebted to the late Mr. Edward Rowland, of Bryn Offa, Wrexham, for 
these interesting extracts. 



HAVERFORDWEST (Co. Pembroke). 

34. O. WILL . BATMAN . MERCER = The Merccrs' Arms, 

above . 

R. OF . HAVERFORDWEST = W . S . B. I 

Richard Davies, the Welshpool Quaker (see No. 74), stayed at the house of 
William Bateman when he visited Haverfordwest in 1663 or 1664, where he says 
he had ** several brave meetings. " 

35. O. HENRY . BOWER . i666 = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. OF . HAVERFORD . WEST=H . K . B. \ 



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WALES. 1 191 

36. O. THO . BOWTON . OF = Arms : on a bend between two fleurs- 

de-lys, three heads, a star for a difference. Crest : on 
a helmet, an arm holding an arrow. 

J^. HAVORFORD . WEST = T . B.. ' \ 

37. O. RICE . lONES . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. OF . HAVERFORD . WEST = R . A . I. An interlaced flower 
between. J 

38. O. lANE . SPARKE . 1 667 = The Mercers' Arms. 

/^. OF . HAVERFORD . WEST = I . S. { 

39. O. THOMAS . WILKIN . op = A ship issuing from a castle. 

Arms of the borough (?). 

^. HAVERFORD WESTE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. T . D . W. i 

HAY (Co. Brecknock). 

40. O. MATTHEW . PARRY . 1663 = OB. 

J^. MERCER . IN . THE . HAY = M . P. J 

This Matthew Parry was descended from a younger branch of the family of 
Parry of Poston, in the Golden Vale, co. Hereford ; Blanche Parry, one of the maids 
of honour to Queen Eliza^jeth, being descended from the elder branch of the same 
family. 

** Matthew Parry, of Hay, Mercer, married Priscilla Watkins, of Llanigon, co. 
Brecon." — ^Jones's ** History of Breconshire," Pedigree of the Parry family, vol. it, 
pp. 557-9. 

HOLYHEAD (Co. Anglesey). 

41. O, HVGH . DAVIS . 1 666 = Three books clasped. 

/^. IN . HOLY . HEAD = HIS 1°. I 

42. O. lOHN . HALL=1^ 

/^. IN . HOLLY . HEAD = A holly bush (?). I 



KIDWELLY (Co. Carmarthen). 

43. O. MORRIS . HOWELL = A church. 

jR. A . KIDWELLY . FARTHING = A Castle. J 

44. O. EDWARD . LLOYD . OF . KIDWELLIE = HIS HALFE PENY. 

J^, Arms : a lion rampant crowned, within a border of nine 
cinquefoils. ^ 

45. O. Same as the last. 

^. QviD . LEONE . FORTivs = Arms as the last. Crest : on a 
helmet, a lion's head erased. | 

KNIGHTON. 

46. O. lAMES . MASON . MERCER . OF^The Mercers' Arms. 

jR. KNIGHTON . HIS . HALFPENY = 1668. i 

76 — 2 



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1192 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

47. O, lOHN [ MASON I HIS [ HALF | PENNY | 1668. 
J^, IN I KNIGHTON | PLAINE | DEALING | I . S . M. 

We have been favoured with the following extracts from the parish register of 
Knighton, relating to the Mason family, through the courtesy of the Victr, the 
Rev. Martin H. Ricketts. 

" 1668. — Baptizati. 

Tohan'es filius Waited Mason et Eleanorse uxoris. Novemb. 16. 

firigeta filia Jacobi Mason et Elenorse uxoris feb. 15." 

48. O: lAMES . wooLLEY = The Groccrs' Arms. 

i?. OF . KNIGHTON = I . W. J 



LANTWIT MAJOR (Co. Glamorgan). 

49. O, EDWARD . MADOCKES . IN = A pair of scales. 

J^, LANTWIIT . MAIOR . MERCER = E . M . M. J 

50. O. LEWIS . MADOCKS . OF = The Gfocers' Arms. 

jR. LANTWIT . MAIOR = L . M. { 

LLANGOLLEN (Co. Denbigh). 

51. O. OWEN . MORGAN . OF = o . M. with an interlaced flower 

between. 

J^. LLANGOLLEN . 1667 = HIS PENNY. I 

LLANIDLOES (Co. Montgomery). 

52. O, lENKiN . THOMAS . OF = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

jR. LLANNIDLOES , 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. I . T. J 

LLANRWST (Co. Denbigh). 

53. O, lOHN . DAViES . 1667= The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. LLANROOST . PENCE = I . D. I 

LLANVYLLIN (Co. Montgomery). 

54. O, WALTER . griffithes . OF = A goat 

J^, LLANVILLINGE . HIS . J . PENY = W . M . G. f 

Walter Griffiths was Bailiff of Llanfyllin in 1661. 

His brother, Tohn Griffiths, of Bachie. is said to have sheltered in his home, 
Bachie Place, the first congregation of Independents, under the ministry of the 
celebrated Vavasour Powell. 

An engraving of this token is given in ** Montgomeryshire Collections," in illus- 
tration of an article on the ** Vaughans of Llwydiarth,*' the goat passant scemiDg 
to indicate a relationship between the families of Griffiths and Vaughan. 

MACHYNLLETH (Co. Montgomery). 

55. O. ISACK. pvGH . 1 660 = A rose. 

^. OF mathenleth = I . p . i 



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WALES, 1 193 



MOLD (Co. Flint). 



56. O. lOHN . RICHARDSON. 
/^. OF . MOVLD . 1669. 

57. 0, EDWARD . WILLIAMS = 1»>. 

I^. GROCER . IN . MOVLD . l666«E . W. 



NARBERTH. 



58. 0. ALLEX . BATEMAN = A shield of arms (probably the 

Mercers'). 
jR. OF . NORBERTH . 1667 = A dove Standing. | 

We are indebted to the late Rev. B. W. Adams, D.D., of Santry, Dublin, for 
description and sketch of this token. 

NEATH (Co. Glamorgan). 

59. O, THOMAS . LOVE « The Mercers' Arms. 

jR. OF . NEATH . MERCER^T . B . L. i 



NORTHOP (Co. Flint), 

60. 0. RICHARD . WILLIAMS = A dog. 

jR, OF . NORTH APP . l668<=HIS PENNY. 



OVERTON MADOC (Co. Flint). 

61. O. lAMES . OWENS . 1667= HIS HALF PENY. 

^. OF . OVERTON . MADOCK = I . A . o. An Uncertain object 
below. i 

James Owens was buried Jan. 7, 1692. 

Add Owens was buried Jan. 27, 1697.— Overton parish registers. 



PEMBROKE (Co. Pembroke). 
62. O, lOHN . HiNTON . OF = A Stag couchant 

-^. PEMBROOK . HALF . PENNY = I . H. 1669. 



PRESTEIGN. 
63. O. lOHN . CONWAY = An angel. 

J^. IN . PRESTEIGNE . 1665 = HIS . HALF . PENY. ^ 

John Conway was a mercer. 

The following entries relating to the Conway family during the seventeenth 
century are from the Presteign parish registers : 



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1 194 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

1641. Jane, the daughter of John Conway, by Margaret his wife, was ba p t i zed 
the xxviiith day of March. 

164 1. Jane, the daughter of John Conway, was buried the vth of May. 
1652. John Conway buried the 31th {stc) day of August, in Templo. 

1666. iliomas, the sonne of John Conway, was buried the nfteenth day of 
February, in Templa 

1667. John, thejK>nne of John Conway, mercer, was baptized the iith day of 
February. 

1669. Thomas, the sonne -of John Conway, was baptized the 50th day of 
August 

1672. Samuell, the sonne of John Conway, was baptized the 28th day (tfjnly. 

1675. Edward, the sonne of John Conway, was baptized the seaventh day of 
December. 

1676. Anne, the wife of John Conway, was buried the 27th day of August, in 
Templo. 

1676. Edward, the sonne of John Conway, was buried the third day of October. 
1689. Burial, feb. 6, John Conway. 

64. O. lOSEPH . GRONNOvs . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

i?. PRESTEEN . COVNTV^ . RADNOR = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The Gronnous or Gronous families were numerous here and in the nei^booriiw 
town of Kington, where two members of the family issued tokens (see Herefbrd- 
shire list). The name, although it continued in the above form until the beginning 
of the present century, seems to have passed into the more euphonious one of 
Greenhouse. 

It would appear the family originally belonged to Radnorshire, some memben 
migrating into the adjoining county of Hereford, this Joseph probably for one, as 
his name does not occur after 1673 in the Presteign registers, while in the registers 
of Kington (see undtrr Kington in the Herefordshire libt) the name appears Erst in 
1676, and ends with his death 1686. 

The following entries are from the Presteign registers : 

1646. Mathew, the sonne of Richard Gronouse, gent, by Anne his wife, was 
baptized the ffirst of January. 

1648. James, the sonne of Richard Gronouse, gent., by Anne his wife, was 
baptized the 19th of Aprill 

1657. Edward, the sonne of Richard Gronuse, gent., by Anne his wife, was 
baptized the third day of July. 

i66a Cellion (?), the wife of John Gronuse, was buried the 27th day of 
November, in Templo. 

1661. James, the sonne of John Gronouse, the younger, was baptized the 14th 
day of July. 

1663. Elinor, the daughter of John Gronnose, Chanler, was baptized the 17th 
day of January. 

1664. William Knight, of Lyngen, Tanner, and Margerett Gronouse, were 
married the third day of February by licence. 

1665. Elizabeth, the daughter of Hugh Gronouse, was baptized the 7th day of 
August. 

1667. Joseph, the sonne of John Gronouse, Chanler, was baptized the seaventh 
day of July. 

1667. Richard Beddoes and Johan Gronouse were married the 8th day ot 
October by Lycence. 

1668. Richard Gronouse, of Stapleton, was buried the ffirst day of November, in 
Templo. (This was probably the father of the issuer of the token, also of the two 
Kineton issuers.) 

1SS9. Katherine, the daughter of John Gronouse, Chanler, was baptized the 
i6th day of Aprill. 

1669. Anne» the daughter of Joseph Gronouse, was baptized the second day of 
May. 

1670. John Gronouse, chanler, was buried the 19th day of Aprill. 



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WALES. I19S 

1671. Joseph, the Sonne of Joseph Gronouse, was baptized the 13th day of 
August. 

1673. Beni^mine, the sonne of Joseph Gronouse, Was baptized the 14th day of 
January. 

1673. Richard Whetnali and Jane Gronouse were married the 9th day of 
flcbruary. 

1676. Richard, the sonne of Mat hew Gronouse, by Anne his wife, was baptized 
the 31th of July. 

1679. ffndayesweed (/), the daughter of Mathew Gronouse, gent, was buried the 
19th day of June, in Templo. 

i68a Edward Gronouse and Margaret Warberton were married the second day 
of June by Lycence. 

1680. Margaret, the daughter of Mathew Gronouse, was buried the 26th day of 
June, in Templo. 

1681. John Bent and Jane Gronouse were married the 4th day of January by 
Lycence. 

1682. Richard, the sonne of Mathew Gronouse, of Kinsam, was buried the ffirst 
day of flfebruary, in Templo. 

1685, May 12. Thomas, y« son of Thomas Gronouse, by Anne his wife. 
Burials for 1685 : Aug. 6, John Gronouse. 

1695 • Feby 14, Hugh Crr^^«house. 

1697 : July 5, Catherine Greenouse, one of y« poor. 

flfeby 26, Matthew Greenouse, in y« little chancel. 
1690, Sep. 19. Mary, y« daughter of Hugh Gronouse, Baker, by Sibil his wife. 
1692, June 8. Mary, y" daughter of Joseph Grinoos, by Martha his wife. 
1698, January nth. Elizabeth, y« daughter of Hugh Greenouse, Baker, by 
Sibiil bis wife. 
1700, December y* 1st. Elizabeth Greenouse, one of y* poor. 
On a table tomb near the south porch of Presteign Church is the following : 
** Howard Gronous, the last of the numerous offspring of Gilbert and Elizabeth 
Gronous, died on the loth day of March in the year 1819, Aged 80 years.'* 
Other portions of the inscription are illegible through peeling of the stone. 

PWLLHELI (Co. Carnarvon). 

65. O, RICHARD . PREECE = A double-headcd eagle displayed. 

R. OF . PORTHtLLIE . l666 = R . P. 1". I 

In first edition this token was assigned to Ponhelly, Cornwall, but the absence 
of other penny tokens in that county, and their abundance in Wales, together with 
ibc name of is>uer being a decidedly Welsh one, and the native pronunciation of 
the place precisely as spelt on the token, the balance of evidence is believed to be 
in favour of Wales. 

66. O. WILLIAM . REYNOLDS = The Mercers* Arms. 

R, OF . PVLL . HELY . 1667 = 1°. I 



RUTHIN (Co. Denbigh). 

67. O, RICHARD . GOODEN . IN = A shield (detHted), 

R, RVTHIN . IN . WALES . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

68. O, DAVID . VAVGHAN . i668 = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. OF . RVTHIN . MERCER = D . V. V\ I 

69. O. BASIL . WOOD . APOTHECARY = The Aix)lhec3ries' Arms. 

R. IN KVTHIN . His . PENCE . 65 =^ 1^. 1 



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II96 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



SWANSEA (Co. Glamorgan). 

70. O, ISAAC . AFTER - I . A* 
J^. IN . SWANSEY = I . A. 

71. O. MATHEW . DAViES . IN = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

I^. SWANZEY . MERCER . l666 = HIS HALFE PENY. 



TENBY. 

72. O. lOHN . SAYES . MERCER « I . o. s. io monogram. 

J^, OF . TEMBY . 1667 = I . o . s. in monogram. I 

73. A variety dated 1668. 

John Sayes was Bailiff of Tenby in 1649, and Mayor in 1657. 

*' Saysc, a surname in Tenby in 1405, signifies M^ Sassenach, a sobriquet given 
to many Anglicised Celtic Welsh by their countrymen, and afterwards converted 
into a surname, which has been modernized into Seix in Ireland, where some of 
this name were falconers to the Earls of Kildare, and others gentlemen in the 
household service of the Earls of Ormond. The sex of the mason appears to be 
the modem type of the short sais, or short sword, whence the Saxons are said to 
derive their designation."— Ex ♦•Arch. Camb.," New Series, Part XIV. 



WELSHPOOL (Co. Montgomery). 
74. O, RICH . DAVIES . FELTMAKER = A Hon rampant. 

i?. IN . WELCH . POOLE , 1 667 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

The "Montgomeryshire Collections," vol. xiii., for 1880, contain an interesting 
account of Richard Davies, the probable issuer of this token. 

** He was known as * the Welshpool Quaker,* a man of remarkable simplicity of 
character, yet of no mean aVulity. He was bom in Welshpool in 1635, and left 
behind him a remarkable autobiography, entitled '* An Account of the Convince- 
ment, Exercises, Services, and Travels of that Ancient Servant of the Lord, 
Richard Davies." He commences thus : " I was bom in the year 1635 in the town 
of Welshpool, Montgomeryshire, in North Wales, of honest parents that had a 
small estate there." He was brought up in the "religion and discipline of the 
Church of England," but early in his career he followed the Independent people, 
" especially one Vavasor Powell, who was a very zealous man in his day." 

Richard Davies was bound apprentice to Evan Jones, a feltmaker, in the parish 
of Llanfair. In 1657 he came into contact with Morgan Evan, a Quaker, of South 
Wales, and the " consideration of his words took fast hold of him," and he became 
a Quaker, the first in this part of Wales. After settling to his trade as a fell- 
maker in 1659, he married. In 1660 he was had before the first justices that were 
made in those parts by the authority of King Charles II., and was interrogated by 
them and the priest aliout **his new way and strange religion." He was im- 
prisoned for two weeks, and many of his fellow-prisoners were " convinced " by his 
ministrations, and afterwards became Quakers. 

Manv of his followers were imprisoned and suffered great hardships, but Davies 
himself seems to have escaped further punishment, and eventually, through his 
influence with Lord Herbert of Cherbury, the severity of their treatment was 
gradually relaxed. 

Richard Davies was buried in the Quakers' Burial (>round, at Cloddiau 
Cochion, near his former place of abode. 



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WALES. 1 197 

75. O. HVMPHRY . DRAPER «= Arms of the Draper family; bendy 

of eight, over all three fleursde-lys. 

/^. OF . WELCH . POOLE = HIS HALF PENY. J 

76. O, THOMAS. FARMER. MERCER =>= A griffin passant ; in chief 

three lions' heads erased. 

^. IN . WELCH . POOLE . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. {OciagOnal.)\ 

TJ. O. CHARLES . HVMFFREis = A dexter hand holding palewise a 
sinister glove or gauntlet. 
R, IN . WELSH . POOLE = (detrited). 

This token was found during the restoration of Welshpool Church in 1870, and 
is preserved in the Poi^ysland Museum there. An engraving and description of 
the token is given in ** Montgomeryshire Collections," vol. xiii., 2, October, 
iS8a 

78. O, SAMVELL . WOLLASTON = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

JR. IN . WELCH . POOLE . 1667 = s . w . with an interlaced 
flower between. | 



WREXHAM (Co. Denbigh). 

79. O, THOMAS . BAKER . OF = HIS HALFE PENY. 
R, WREXHAM . MERCER = T . I . B. 

80. O. GEORG . BVTTALL . HIS HALPENY = G . G . B. 

R, IN . WRIXHAM . IRONMONGER = 1664. The Ironmongers' 
Arms. J 

81. A variety dated 1668. 

82. O. LAWRENCE . COOKE = A roU of tobacco. 

i?. IN . WREXHAM . l666 = L . E . C. 1^. I 

83. O, EDWARD I DAVIES | 1 666. 

R, IN . WREXHAM = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

84. O. lOHN . DAVIES . OF . WREXHAM = HIS . PENNY . 1668. 

R. FOR . NECESSARY . CHANGE = I . I . D. I 

85. O. lOHN . HVGHES . i666 = A pair of spectacles (?). i . k . h. 

R, OF . WREXHAM = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

86. O. lOHN . HVGHES . i666 = A pair of spectacles, i . k . h. 

R. IN . WREXHAM = I . K . H. (?). \ 

87. O. ROBERT . lACKsoN = Arms ; three lions* heads erased. 

R. IN . WREXHAM = R . I. \ 

88. O, EVAN . lONES . OF = A pair of scales. 

R. WRIXHAM . 1666 = HIS . HALF . PENY i 



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1 198 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

89. O. WILLIAM . LEWIS . 1 666 = The Cordwainers' Anns. 

w . A . L. 
J^, IN . WRIXHAM = HIS . HALF . PENY. ^ 

90. O. lOHN . PERRY . 1667 = HIS . HALFE . PENNY. 

^. IN . WREXHAM = I . (?) P. \ 

91. O, THOMAS . PLATT = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

J^, IN . WREXHAM . l666=T . M . P. | 

The following token, described by Mr. Boyne in his former edition amoug 
•• Uncertain Tokens," p. 528, probably bt^longs to Wales : 

92. O. OWEN . WILLIAMS = A lion rampant. 

J^, HIS . HALFE . PENNY = . I . W. 1666. 



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Marwichsbice. 

Number OF Tokens ISSUED 191 

Number of Places issuing Tokens . . . - 3 ^ 

Town Pieces issued at Coventry, Hemlingford, Strat- 

FORD-ON-AVON, AND TaMWORTH. 



Sub-Ediivr and Collaborateur : 

W. H. Taylor, Esq., Menib. Num. See, London, 
Ivy View, 

Erdington. 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Marvoicltebire. 

By the revision of this county the total number of tokens has been 
increased from 144 in the original edition of this work to 191. Two 
tokens are now omitted, viz., that of Nathaniel Sweet, Austrey ; and 
one* of Kineton, John Whitroe's, both having been assigned to 
Devonshire. Three additional places which issued tokens in the 
seventeenth century have to be added, viz., Griff, Lapworth, and 
Tysoe. For the interesting notes on the Birmingham families we 
have been indebted to the very great kindness of Mr. Joseph Hill, of 
that town. The Vicar of Tamworth (the Rev. W. Macgregor) and 
the Rector of Rugby (the Rev. J. Murray) also very kindly searched 
their respective registers, and sent us the results. 



ALCESTER. 

1. O. ROBERT . BROOKE = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR, IN . ALCESTER . l668 = R . B. J 

2. O. MATTHIAS . CRABB=» The Drapers' Arms. 

R. OF . ALCESTER = M . A . C. ^ 

3. O. lOSEPH . DEWES . 0F= A mortar and pestle. 

R. ALLCESTER . 1654 = ! . B . D. \ 

4. O, FVLKE . EMES = The Merccrs' Arms. 

JR. ALCESTER . 1657 = F . A . E. J 

5. O. CHARLES . lOHNSON = A pair of scales. 

R. OF . ALVCF^TERNE=CI COnjoiucd. \ 

6. O, THOMAS . PICKARD = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . ALCESTER . 1667 -HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

7. O, TOO . PiCKERD . HIS . HAL . PENY = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . ALSESTER . l664=»T . E . P. \ 

8. O. lOHN . REINOLES . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R. OF . ALCESTER. 1670 = The Mercers' Arms. ^ 

9. O, WILLIAM . REYNOLDS = A foX. 

R, IN . ALCESTER . 1652 = W . E . R. J 

10. There is a variety dated 1662, and reads of on reverse. \ 



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I202 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

11. O, STEPHEN . ROVND . AT . Y» . GRAY = HALF PENY. 

I^, HOVNDS . HEAD . IN . ALSSESTER = A greyhound's head. 

12. O. THOMAS. ROVYND = A crown. 

/^, OF . ALCESTER . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 

13. O. lOHN . YARNOLD = i . E . Y. A basket (?) 

i?. OF . ALCESTER . l668 = I . E . Y. 

14. O. MARGARET .YARNOLL = A jar. 
J^, OF . ALCESTER . 1651 = M . Y. 

15. O. ANN . WADE . OF . ALCESTER = A man making candles. 

/^, HER . HALFPENY . 1670 = A . W. 



ATHERSTONE. 

16. O. KATHERiNE . BERRY = An angel. 

Ji, AT . ATHERSTONE . l666 = K . B. 

17. O. WILL . CRISPE . 1667 = A swan. 

R, IN . ATHERSTONE = ^ . 

18. O. WILLIAM . CRISPE = A swan. 

W^ ■ A* 
R, IN . ETHERSTON . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

19. A variety reads half. 

20. O, RICH . EVERETT . IN = A man making candles. 

R, EADERSTONE . l666 = R . E . E. 

21. O, lOHN . POWER . BAKER = A shoveL 57. 
R. IN ATHERSTONE = I . A . P. 

22. O. GEORGE . SADLER = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, IN . ATHERSTONE . 1667 =G . A . S. 



BARFORD. 

23. O, MARY . BRINE . IN = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R. BARFORD . 1667 = HER HALF PENY. 

24. O, WILL . COCKBILL . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1668 (in five linCs] 

R, OF . BARFORD . NEARE . WARWICK (in four lines). 



BIRMINGHAM. 
25. O. lOHN . BRiNGTON = The Cutlers' Arms. 

R, IN . BIRMINGHAM = HIS HALFE PENNY. 



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WARWICKSHIRE. 1203 

26. A variety dated 1666, and reads halfe peny. J 

John BringtoQ, or Brineton, was the son of Guy Brineton, and was born 1619. 
It is probable that he was identical with John Brewerton, who had a shop in Com 
Cheaping. 

27. O. WILLIAM . BVRBERRY = HIS HALFE PENY. 

jR, IN . BRVMiNGHAM = A Catherine wheel. J 

This name occuri still in Birmingham as the name of a street in the outskirts. 

28. O. WILLIAM . coLMORE=Bust with three-quartcr face. 

^. IN . BIRMINGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

The fiunily of Col more is one of the most ancient and honourable in the town. 
Mr. Hill says of it, ** The family for length of connections, acquirement of wealth, 
and landed property surpasses all others." An isolated mention of the name 
occurs at Aston in 1337. 

In 1469 Richard Colmore, and his wife Joan, and Robert Colmore were members 
of the Guild of St. Anne of Knoll, but it was not until the end of the fifteenth 
century that the family settled in Birmingham, and at first farmed the Tenter 
Fields, and afterwards as mercers in the Bull Ring acquired considerable wealth. 
The family marriage connections with the Smallbrokes, Harmans ( Veseys), Porters, 
and Willoughb/s, and the purchase of lands (when the dissolved religious houses 
rendered its acquirement on a large scale an easy matter), gave the Colmores a high 
position in the Midlands. 

The issuer of the token was probably William Colmore, a colonel in Crom- 
wcirs army (mentioned in Dugdale's " Diary ") or his son William, who was 
a mercer. 

An earlier William is recorded as having given £2$ in aid of £lizabeth*s fund 
to raise an army and fleet igainst the invasion of the Spanish Armada. 

The name is commemorated in Birmingham by Colmore Row, Great Colmore 
Street, and Little Colmore Street. 

29. O. EDWARD . ENSOR . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. BIRMINGHAM . 1652 =» A fleuF-de-lys. E . E. J 

30. Another similar, dated 1660. i 
Edward Ensor settled in Birmingham about 1614, and had a large family, and 

it is a common name now in the town. The issuer of the token was a mercer, 
and lived in Moor Street, near the Roebuck Inn. 

31. O. EDWARD . ENSOR . i66o = The Grocers* Arms. 

Id, IN . BIRMINGHAM . ^P*!?'!? = "'S HALF PENY. ^ 

32. O. GEORGE . FENTHAM = The Haberdashcrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . BIRMINGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. |^ 

This name does not occur earlier than 1630, and George, the son of Christopher 
Fentham, who issued the token, was a mercer in one of the ancient houses in a 
short alley off the Bull Ring, his back yard abutting into the parish church. 

George Fentham is worthy of special mention for his benefactions to Hampton 
in Arden, and Birmingham. In 1690 he liberally endowed charities to benetit the 
poor of those places with land at Birchfield and Erdington. 

33. O. EDWARD. FREEMAN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . BIRMINGHAM = The Groccrs' Arms. ^ 

A family of this name existed in the town for a century before the probable issue 
of the token by Edward Freeman, who was bom about 1610 ; he held from 1640 
until the time of his death, about 1670, several important posts. There is a Free- 
man Street in Birmingham. 



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IZ04 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

34. O. SIMON . HEATH = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

^. IN . BIRMINGHAM = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

There was a family of this name in Queen Elizabeth's time, living in Dale End or 
Welch End. 

35. O. EDWARD . HENSON . i666 = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . BIRMINGHAM = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

This family cannot be traced ; it is probably a misspelling of Edward Ensoi^s 
surname. 

36. O. lOSEPH . HOPKINS = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

/^, IN . BIRMINGHAM . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

This is probably the same person as Joseph Hopkins, who founded a charity here 
in 1681 with land situated at Sutton Coldfield. 

37. O. lOHN . lESSON . MERCER = HALF PENY. 

-^. IN . BIRMINGHAM . 1670 = The Mercers' Arm& J 

There were several Jessons in Birmingham in Queen Mary*s time ; probably the 
issuer of the token was a descendant of them. 

38. O. WILLIAM . KING . IN = The Blacksmiths' Arms. 

^. HIS . HALF . PENY . BRVMINGHAM = W . A . K. 1668. i 

T. S. S. quotes, reverse, brumingham before his half peny. 
William King's grandfather, William, was a prosperous tradesman in Diggbathe 
(Digbeth) or Well Street in 1525, and his father, John, in 1540; the Utter, t 
fuller, had three sons — William, an ironmonger ; Roger, a fuller ; and John. 

This family contributed £2$ to aid Queen Elizabeth against the Spanish 
invasion. 

39. O. EDWARD . LEATHER . IN = BRYMINGHAM 

>?. HIS . HALFE . PENY . i6$2 ^ {detrtUd). \ 

40. O. RICHARD . LEATHER = Two daggers in saltire. 

R. IN . BIRMINGHAM . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. } 

Rather a numerous family, dating from Queen's Elizabeth's time. Richard 
Leather, born 1612, was the probable issuer of the token. In 1691 his son, 
probably, was constable of Birmingham. 

In 1663 a Thomas Leather was assessed for four hearths, his house being in the 
beast market, now High Street. 

41. O. WILLIAM . NASEBiT = A pair of scales. 

R, BIRMINGHAM . 1 66 = HIS HALFE PENY. W.E.N. \ 

Mr. Hill cannot trace this name at all. 

42. O. THOMAS . PEMBERTON = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R, OF . BVRMINGHAM = HIS HALFE PENNY. i 

This is a well-known old Birmingham family, and dates from Queen Mary's 
reign. 

In 161 3 Roger Pemberton was a prosperous man ; his son, Thomas, bom 1589, 
was in 1628 a goldsmith. They were Quakers, and held a leading position in the 
town. 

The issuer of the token was an ironmonger ; his shop was in Rother, or Beast 
Market, now Hii^h Street, and afterwards taken down to make way for the present 
Union Street. The Pembcrtons became considerable landowners and wealthy; they 



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WA R WICKSHIRE. 1 205 

carried on a money-changing and lending business in the last century, and were 
really the preceders of the well-known Lloyds, the bankers. 

John Pembertbn erected a mansion in New- Hall Lane, Colmore Row, and 
married Elizabeth, the daughter of Charles Lloyd, of Dolobran, which brought 
the Lloyd family to Birmingham. 

43. O. THOMAS . PEWTRILL . AND = IN . BIRM . ING . HAM (in foUT 

lines). 

^. lOHN . POTTERILL . t666 = THEIR HALF PENY (in three 

lines). 

These names should be respectively /fewtrill and Cotterill, not as on token. 

Thomas Fewtrill was a respectable saddler, who lived in High Street, near the 
Dall Ring ; he held positions of trust in the town. 

John Cotterill was a cutler, and was constable of Birmingham in 1680 ; he lived 
probably in Dale End. 

44. O. THOMAS . RvssELL = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

/^. IN . BIRMINGHAM . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

This is a very old Birmingham family. In 1327 John Russell was assessed in 
Birmingham for the subsidy on the invasion of the Scots. 

William Russell was Master of the Birmingham Guild in 1517, and his son, 
Henry, about 1540, lived in Dale End. 

Thomas, the issuer of the token, was the son of Richard Russell ; he was an 
ffonmaster, or merchant, in Rother Market, a man of great public employment 
until the close of his century. 

The family have always been distinguished for their public spirit, energy and 
private integrity and worth. They were sufferers in the Priestley riots otiygi. 
The name b commemorated in Russell Street, Great Russell Street, etc. 

45. O, NICHOLAS . SANFORD =- The Ironmongers' Arms. 

/?. IN . BIRMINGHAM = HIS HALFE PENY. | 

He carried on business in the Rother Market about i66a As he was assessed for 
five hearths, he must have been a substantial man. 

46. O. ROBERT . SMALBROOKE = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . BIRMINGHAM = The Mercers' Arms. ^ 

His place of business was in the Bull Ring, or Corn Cheaping, and he was a 
mercer. The family vrzs an important one, and related to Richard Smalbroke, 
Bishop of Lichfield about this time. 

There is a Smallbrook Street in Birmingham, named after this family no doubt, 
as it is a very old thoroughfare. 

47. 0. lOHN . TAYLOVR . OF = A Uon's head. 

J?. BRVMIGHAM . 1662 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

This is another old Birmingham family. John Taylor, son of Zachary, was bom 
1616; their house, in Bull Street, was burnt down by Prince Rupert in the 
civil war. 

This family was probably the progenitors of Taylors, the bankers, who were 
connected with the Lloyds. 



BRAILES. 

48. O. THOMAS . RIMILL = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

/^. OF . BRAYLES . l666 = T . M . R. 
VOL IL 77 



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i2o6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

49. O. FRANCIS . SHARLEY = HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. OF . BRAYLES . i666 = St. Gcorge and the Dragon. 
. (Square.) i 

50. O, lANE . SHERLEY . OF . BRAYL = The Groccrs' Anus. 

J^. HER . HALFE . FENNY . 1665 = 1 . S. J 

COLESHILL. 

51. O, THOMAS . CROOKE . IN . COLSHILL = HIS HALF PENNY. 

/^. TALLOW , CHANDLER . 1670. =T . M . a J 

52. O, WILLIAM . WALKER -HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. IN . COLSHILL . 1 669 = The Mercers' Arms. i 

COUGHTON. 

53. O, EDMVND . HORNBLOWAR = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . COFFEN . 1667 = A hammer. } 

COVENTRY. 

54. O, THE . ciTTY . OF . COVENTRY = All elephant and cistle ; the 

Arms of the City of Coventry. 
J^, THEYRE . HALFE . PENNY = A leopard ; the crest of the 
City. i 

55. O, A . COVENTRY . HALFE . PENNY . 1 669 (in five llnCS). 

J^, c . c. [City of Coventry] = Arms of Coventry. J 

56. O, A . COVENTRY . FARTHING = C . C 1 669. A leOpafd. 

J^, THE . ARMES . OF . COVENTRY = An elephant and castle. 

An order of Council made by the Corporation of the City of Coventry in 1669 
is as follows : 

** That the tokens which have lately been issued in this city be called in under a 
penalty of ;^5, as many persons are obliged to received 13d. of these tokens for 
1 2d. in silver, and that none be suffered to remain out, except those which have 
the cily*s stamp ; and whatever profit there be the sword-bearer to take it After 
the i6lh of April the above tokens to be called in.*' 

57. (7. SAMVEL . ALSOP = The Cordwainers* Arms. 

i?. IN . COVENTRY . 1 666 = 8 . A. { 

Samuel Alsop, of Coventry, aged 22, married Mary Jones, of Evesham, aged 
22, on October 18, 1662. 

58. O, NATHANiELL . ALSOPP = A merchant's mark. 

J^, OF . COVENTRY . 1656 = N . A. J 

Nathaniel Alsopp was captain of the city militia in 1659. 

59. O, WILLIAM . AVSTEN = Three tuns. 

J^, IN . COVENTRY = W . A . A. { 

60. A variety reads coventrey. i 

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WARWICKSHIRE. 



1207 



61. O. NATHANIEL . BARNARD = A globe. 

J^. IN . COVENTRY . MERCER = N . B. i 

He was SherifT in 164 1. 

62. O. ROBERT . BEDFORD . 1 666 = The Wcavers* Arms. 

/^. IN . COVENTRY = R . B. J 

63. A variety has r . b. on obverse as well as reverse. i 

64. O. ROBERT . BEDFORD . IN = An anchor. r . B. 

J^. Y= . CITTY . OF . COVENTRY = R . A . B. J 

He was Sheriff in 1643 ; Mayor 1650. 

65. O. lOHN . BROOKES . OF . COVENTRY = HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. STATIONER. i668 = Abook. ^ 

He left funds to parchase Bibles to be given annually to poor children. 

66. O. BIRMINGHAM . HINKLY = E . A . C. 

Ji. COVENTRY . WARWICK = HIS HALF PENY. J 

67. O. AT . THE . SVGAR . LOFE = A sugar-loaf. 

/^, IN . COVENTRY . MARCER = F . C. i 

68. O. MERCER . AND . GROCER = F . C 

Ji. IN . COVENTRY = 1 665. J 

69. A variety reads covetrey, and fc conjoined. 

F. c. are the initials of Francis Cater, merchant and mercer. He was Sheriff in 
1669, and churchwarden of St. Michael's in 1666. 

70. O, lOHN . CARPENTER . 0F = A crcscent and seven stars. 

^. COVENTRY . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . E . C. ^ 

He was churchwarden of St. Michael's in 1666. 

71. O. lOHN . CRICHLOWE . DRAP* = OF COVENTRY. 1 668. 

J^. lOHN . CRICHLOWE. DRAP** = OF COVENTRY. 1668. ^ 

Crichlowe was Sheriff of the city in 1652, Mayor 1658, and captain of the city 
militia the same year. His is one of the most frequently met with of the Coventry 
tokens. 

72. O. EDWARD . CRVSSE = A pack-horse. 

I^. OF . COVENTRY . 1 663 = E . M . C. { 

73. O, MiCHAELL . EARLE . OF = The Mercers' Arras. 

J^. COVENTRY . MERCER = M . E. 



74. A variety reads m . m . e. 



i 



He was Mayor in 1677, when the famous Lady Godiva procession took place for 
the first time. 



75. O. EDWARD . FAYERBROTHER = A fleece. 

-^. CLOTHIER . IN . COVENTRY . 66 = E . S . F. 

76. O. WILLIAM . GILBERT = A boot 

J^. MERCER . IN . COVENTRY = W . G. 



i 



77—2 



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i2o8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
TJ. O. WILLIAM . GILBERT . IN = Arms in shield. 

I^, COVENTREY . MERCER = W . M . G. 

78. O, EDWARD . LAPWORTH = A dove. 
J^. IN . COVENTRY . 1659 = E . L. 

He was a clothier ; churchwarden of St. Michael's in 1666, Mayor in 1676, and 
removed as Alderman by Charles II. in 1684. 

79. O. lOHN . LAX . AT . THE = A Star of six rays. 

/^, IN . COVENTRY . 1659 = 1 . M . L. 

80. O, ABRAHAM . LVCAS = The Gfocers' Arras. 

i?. IN . COVENTRY . GROCER = A . E . L. 

81. O, lOHN . MVRDOCK . BAKER . 1 668 (in four lines). 
I^. IN . COVENTRY . HIS . HALF . PENNY (in four lines). 

82. O. IN . COVENTRY . 1667 = E . o. [Edward Owen]. 
J^, FELTMAKER = A hat with feathers. 

Owen was Mayor in 1680. 

83. O, MATHEw . PARKER . OF = The Arms of England. 

^. COVENTRY . MERCER = M . S . P. 

84. O. SAMVEL . PEiSLEY . AT . Y= = A blazing sun. 
J^, soNN . IN . COVENTREY = A barrel. 

85. A variety reads at . the. 

86. O. SAMVEL . peaslye = A blazing sun. 

i?. THE . SVN . IN . COVENTR (y) = S . E . P. 

87. O. AP0THECARIE = T . P. [Thomas Pidgeon]. 
J^. IN . COVENTRY = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

Thomas Pidgeon was Mayor in 1661 ; he lived on the west side of Broid- 
gate. 

88. O, WILLIAM . ROWNEY . SENIOR = An elephant and castle. 

J^, IN . COVENTRY . 63 = HIS HALF PENY. 

89. O. WILLIAM . ROWNEY . iN = An elephant and castle. 
I^, COVENTRY . MERCER = The Mercers' Arms. 

90. O. WILLIAM . ROWNEY . SENIOR = A globe and castle. 

^. IN. COVENTRY. 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. 

91. (7. lOHN . SMITH = The Pewterers* Arms. 

/^, COVENTRY . 1651 =1 . L . S. 

92. O, WILLIAM . SNELL . MERCER = W . A . S. 

A, IN . COVENTRY . 1 665 =The Mercers' Arras. 

W. Snell was churchwarden of St. Michael's 1666, Sheriff 1675, and Mayor 
1688. 

93. O. SAMVELL. TISSALL = A thistle. 

i?. IN . COVENTRY . 1650 = HIS HALF PENY. J 



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WARWICKSHIRE. 1299 

94. O. SAMVELL . TISSALL . AT = A thistlc. 

/^. IN . COVENTRY . l668 = HlS HALF PENY. ^ 

Samuel Tissall was churchwarden of Trinity Church in 1667. 

95. O. IN . COVENTRY . l666 = S. W. 

/^, WOOLSTED . WEAVER = A shuttlC. ^ 

96. A variety reads woollsted, and is a j^d. ^ 

97. O, lOHN . WOOLRICH . 1663 = A FOSe. 

Ji. IN . COVENTRY . MERCER = A SUnflowef. 1 . W. J 

He was Sheriff in 1655, and Mayor i66a 

98. O. IN . COVENTRY . SOVTHAM = H . E . W. 

-^. RVGBY . LVTTERWORTH = DYER. 1666. i 



DERITEND. 

99. O. JOHN . LILLY . OF . DARRATON = 1667. 

Ji, NEARE . BIRMINGHAM = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

This is now a thoroughfare in the heart of Birmingham, and might be more 
conectly placed to that town. 



GRIFF (CHILVER'S COTON). 
100. O. AT . GRIFF . POOLE . iN = A miner holding a pick. 

Ji. WARWICKSHIRE. 1654 = V. W. 



HEMLINGFORD HUNDRED. 
Id. O. EDWARD . TAYLOR . BAYLiFE = A fuU-faccd head. 

Ji. OF . HEMLINGFORD . HVNDERED = HIS HALFE PENY. 

1668. ^ 

102. O. EDWARD . TAYLOR . BAYLiFFE = Side-faced head. 

J^. OF . HEMLINGFORD . HVNDRED = HIS. HALF PENY. 

1669. i 

HENLEY-IN-ARDEN. 

103. O. ROB . HANDLEY . MERCER = HENLEY IN ARDEN. 

/^. SAMVELL. PERKINS. l666 = THEIR HALF PENY. ^ 

104. O. lOHN . HEMiNS . IN . HEVLE . NORDEN=»The Bakers' 

Arms. 

J^. Y» . PACK . HORSE . WARWICKSH = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

105. A variety reads henle on the obverse, and on the reverse 

Y» . PORCH . HOVSE >. WARWICKSHIRE = HIS HALFK 
PENNY. 



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I2IO TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



KENILWORTH. 
io6. O. lOHN . NORTON = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. KENELWORTH . 1664= HIS HALF PENY. J 

107. O. THO . BOVCHER = HIS HALF PENY. 1668. 

J^, SWAN . IN . KENELWORTH = A SWan. J 



KERESLEY. 

108. O. ROBERT . SEDDON . OF . CARESLY . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 

1669 (in six lines). 
J^. R . M . s = A man with a pole on his shoulder, leading a 
greyhound J 

KINETON. 

109. O. SAMVEL . BACON . IRONMONGER = The IronmoDgcn' 

Arms. 

J^. IN . KENTON . WARWICKSH = HIS HALFE PENNY. large J 

iio. There is a specimen in existence struck in silver. 

111. O, 10 . EBORNE . IN . KINGTON = The Grocers' Anns. 

J^. IN . WARWICKSHIRE = I . E. \ 

112. O. WILLIAM . SHEPPARD . OF = W . M . S. 

J^, KENTON . HIS . HALFPENY = {detrtted), \ 

This is doubtful if belonging to Warwickshire. 



KNOWLE. 

113. O. WILLIAM . EEbES=HIS HALF PENY. 

H. IN . KNOLLE . 1666 = W . E . E, \ 

1 14. A variety reads eeds. \ 



LAPWORTH. 
115. O. THOMAS . HALL = A chopper. 

R, OF . LAPWORTH . 1 667 f= A COCk. 



MEREVALE. 

116. O, lOHN . RAYNOR . AT = A hart passant. 

R, MERYVALE . PITS = A man getting coal with an axe. 



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WARWICKSHIRE. 121 1 



MERIDEN. 



117. 0. THOMAS . AVERY . 1 667 = The Cordwaincrs* Arms. 

J^. IN . MERIDEN . SHOO . MAKER = HIS HALF PENY. 



NUNEATON. 

118. O. GERVASE . BOSWELL . IN = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J^. NONEATON . MERCER = G . M . B. i 

119. O. WILUAM . FAWCETT = W . F. 

J^, OF . NONEATON . 1 66 = HIS HALF PENY. I 

120. O. WILLIAM . GLASCOCKE = A cock. 

^. IN . NONETON . 1652 = W . M . G. I 

121. O. EDWARD . WARDEN . MERCER = A heart picrced with an 

arrow. 

^. IN . NONEATON . 1652 = E . A . W. J 



PILLERTON. 

122. O, WILLIAM . EARLE . OF . PILLERTON = HIS HALFE PENY. 
I^. IN . WARWICKSHIER . l666 = W . A . E. 



123. A variety dated 1670. 

RUGBY. 

124. O. LVKE . BARROW . FELT = Three hats. 

-ff. MAKER . IN . RVGBY . 67 = L . E . B. i 

125. A variety not dated, and three hats different in shape. J 

126. A variety, l . b. only. J 

127. O. WILLIAM . BOYES . 1669 = A knOt. 

J^. MERCER . IN . RVGBEY = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

128. O. WILLIAM . CHEBSEY = A sugar-loaf. 

J^. IN . RVGBEY . MERCER = W . C. i 

The name of Chebscy frequently occurs in the parish registers of this period. 
Children of William Chebscy were baptized in 1665, 1667, 1668, and 1670. 

129. O, ABRAHAM , HARPER = The Mercers* Arms. 

^. MERCER . IN . RVGBY = A . H. \ 

A son of Abraham Harper was baptized July 6, 1662 ; and there are other 
entries referring to his family. 



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I2I2 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

130. O, MILLECENT . TILGMAN = A crown. 

J^, IN . RVGBY = M . T. J 

She was probably the widow of William Tilghroan, who was churchwarden of 
Rugby in 1663, and was buried July 11, 1670. 

(The Rev. J. Murray, Rector of Rugby, who kindly supplied me with notes from 
the roisters, could 6nd no mention of Barrows or Boyes, the other issuers of tokens 
in this town.) 

SHIRLEY STREET (Parish of Solihull). 

131. O. HVGH . HYMAN . 1667 = A Hon. H . F . H. 

I^. OF . SHERLEY . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. i 

132. A variety reads SHERLAY. 

SOLIHULL. 

133. O, JOHN . BRANDAN = I . M . B. A pair of scales. 

I^, IN. SOLIHVLL . 1666 = HIS HALF PENNY. i 

134. O. THOMAS . PALMER = T . A . P. 1 669. 

/^. OF . SOLIHVLL . BAKER = HIS HALF PENY. J 

There are several monuments of this family in the parish church. In an old 

volume of churchwardens' accounts there occurs this entry in 1657 : 

** For eight charges @ 3 times for s ye Papists names at Colcshill<8iid. 

Given to Mr. Palmer in a Pari"** order to Travell into Ireland, 6d." 

SOUTHAM. 

135. O. lOHN . CHEBSEY = A doublc-headed eagle displayed. 

/^. OF . SOWTHAM . l666 = I .E.G. i 

136. O. STEPHEN . CHESTON = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^, IN . SOVTHAM . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

137. O, STEPHEN . CHESTON = Three lions or leopards. 

J^. OF . SOVTHAM = S . S . C i 

138. O. THO . EADY . APOTHECARY . IN = T . E. 

J^. IN . SOVTHAM . HIS . HALF . PENY = T . E. J 

139. A variety reads eads and sovthnam. i 

140. O. MARGRAY . HANSLAPP = The Mercers' Arms. 

Ji. OF . SOWTHAM . 1658 = M . H. i 

141. A variety has mh conjoined. 

142. Another, dated 1667. } 

143. O. BRIDGET . LOE . OF = A bunch of grapes. 

I^. SOWTHAM. 1665 = HER HALF PENY. . i 

144. O, lOHN . NEwcoMBE = A pack-horse. 

J^. IN . SOWTHAM = I . 1 . N . A. I 



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WARWICKSHIRE. 1213 



STRATFORD-ON-AVON. 

145. O, A . STRATFORD . HALF . PENY = The arms of the borough: 

a chevron between three leopards* faces. 

J^, FOR . NECESSARY . CHAING= 1669. J 

146. O. lOHN . BOVLTON . CARIER = A WOOlpack. I . M . B. 

/^. OF . STRATFORD . VPON . AVON = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

147. O, RICH . HicKES . OF . STRATFORD = An angel. 

J^. VPON . AVON . HIS . HALF . I>ENY = R . E . H. ^ 

148. O. LAWRANCB. HORWOOD = L . E . H. 

^. STRATFORD . VPON . AVON = L . E . H. ^ 

149. O. RICHARD . HVNTT . OF= 1667. 

^. STRATFORD . VPPON . AVON = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

150. O, DANiELL . MASON . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. STRATFORD . ON . AVON = D . M. J 

151. O, DANIELL . MASON . i668 = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . STRATFORD . VPON . AVON = HIS HALF PENY. D . M. ^ 

152. O. lOSEPH . PHiLLiPPS . AT . y" = A falcon. 

R. IN . STRATFORD . VPPON . AVON = HIS HALF PENY. 1 668. ^ 

153. A variety has i . a . p. under the falcon's feet on obverse. ^ 

154. 0, EDWARD - ROGERS . BOOKBINDER = Two keys crossed. 

E . R . M. 
R. IN . STRATFORD . VPON . AVON = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
1668. i 

155. O. EDWARD . SMITH = E .M.S. 

R. STRATFORD . VPON . AVON = E . M . S, J 

156. O, EDWARD . SMITH . IN = HIS HALF PENY. i 
R. STRATFORD . VPON . AVON = E . M . S. 

157. O. FRANCIS . SMITH . OF = Cross keys. F . A . s. 

R, STRATFORD . VPPON . AVON = HIS HALFE PENNY. |^ 

158. O, THOMAS . TAYLOVR . OF = T . A . T. 

R. STRATFORD . VPON . AVON = T . A . T. \ 



TAMWORTH. 

159. O, TAMWORTH . CHAMBERLAINS = THEIR HALF PENNY. 

R. FOR . CHANGE . AND . CHARiTiE = A fleur-de-lys, ^ 

160. A variety is Octagonal. ^ 

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I2I4 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

i6i. O. WILLIAM . AND . ROBERT . CAWNT=A man making 
candles. 

I^. OF . TAM WORTH . l668 = THEIR HALFE PENY. J 

William Cawne was churchwarden of Tam worth in 1673, ^^^ Bailiff 1667. 
Robert Cawne was churchwarden 1681, Chamberlain 1694. 

162. O. ROBERT . GREENE . OF -HIS HALFE PENY. 1671. 

/?. TAMWORTH . MERCER = The Mercers' Arms. J 

He was churchwarden 1676, Chamberlain 1699. 

163. O. WII.LIAM . MiCHELL = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^, OF . TAMWORTH . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

Churchwarden in 1670. 

164. O, THO . WAGSTAFF = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

/^. OF . TAMWORTH = T . F . W. i 

Churchwarden 1683, Chamberlain 1693. 

165. O, lOHN . WELCH . IRONMONGER = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

/?. IN . TAMWORTH . 1 667 = I . E . W. \ 

He was Bailiff 1676. 

166. O. EDWARD . WHITE = A fleur-de-lys. 

i?. IN . TAMWORTH = E . W. 1663. i 

167. A variety dated 1658. i 
White was Bailiff 1640. 

(The above information was courteously supplied by the Vicar of Tamworth.) 



TANWORTBL 

168. O. lOHN . CHAMBERS . OF = The arms of the Chambers fiunily : 

a chevron between three cinquefoiis. 
^. TANWORTH . HIS . HALF . PENY = Arms as on obvcTse. i 
There are monumental brasses in Tanworth Church to John Chambers, who died 
1670, and to his wife, 1666. 

169. O, EDWARD . MORGAN = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

/^. OF. TANWORTH . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. i 



TYSOE (near Kineton). 

170. O. EDWARD . BOREMAN = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . MIDLE . TYSOE . 1656 = E . A . B. 4 

171. O. lOHN . lAGOE . RVDDELL = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. TYSOE . WARWICKSHIRE = Rose and crown, i . i . R- i 



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WARWICKSHIRE, 1215 



WARWICK. 

172. 0. CRlSlt) . AYLESBVRY = A still. 
/?. IN . WARWICK . 1665 =C . A. 

173. 0. RICHARD . BIRD = A bird. 

-/?. OF . WARWICK . 1654 = R . M . B. 

In an old volume of churchwardens' accounts (1656-91) there appears this 
item: 

*' 1678. Paid to Mr. Richard Bird, his work in painting the Resurrection in Ovle 
at the west end of the (Beauchamp) chapel (y« like before being decayed), £6, 

174. O. AT . Y» . CROWNE . IN = A crown. 

J^, WARWICK . 1657 =T . M . C. 

175. O, IVDITH . DVNN . wiDDOWE = The Butchcrs* Arms. 

J^. IN . WARRWICKE . 1 669 = HER HALF PENY. 

176. A variety reads ivdeth. 

177. O. ROGER. EEDE = R. E. 
-/?. IN . WARWICK = R . E. 

178. O. lOHN . GARUC . AT . THE = An angel. 

-/?. ANGELL . IN . WARWICK = I . A . G. 

179. O, AT . THE . SWAN . IN . THE = A swan on a coronet. 

J^. CROWNE . IN . WARWICKE = M . E . H. 

i8o. O, ATT . THE . swANNs* A swan. 

-/?. CROWNE . IN . WAREWICKE = M . E . H. 

181. O. RICHARD . HAWKS . AT . YE . BLA . . = A raven. 
/^. RAVEN . IN . WARWICKE = R . E . H. 

182. (7. THOMAS . HEATH = (^^/rrV^^. 
J^. IN . WARWICK . PEWTERER = HIS HALF PENY. 

183. O. THOMAS . HICKS = A dolphin. 

/^. OF . WAREWICK = T . S . H. 

184. A variety reads warrwick. 

185. O. lOHN . iACKSON = A horse. 

J^, OF . WARWICK = I . S . L 

186. O, lOHN . KERBY = I . I . K. 

J^. OF . WARWICK = The Grocers' Arms. 

187. O. STEPHEN . NICHOLS = A castle. 
Ji, CHANDL* . IN . WARWICK = Bear and ragged staff. 

188. O. THOMAS . STRATFORD = A bell. 
I^. IN . WARWICK . 1656 = T . E . S. 



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I2i6 TRADERS' TOKENS. OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

189. O. SAM . WHEELER . IN . WARWICK = A chandler. 

J^. HIS . HALF . PENY . l668 = S . E . W. J 

There are monuments in St. Mary's Church, Warwick, to the WTiecler family. 

190. O, ROB . WHINICKE ..PIPE = A FOSC cfowned. 

j^. MAKER . IN . WARRWICK = R . W. 1 666. { 

191. O. EDMVND wiLLSON = The Apothccaries' Arms. 

A. IN . WARWICK = E . M . W. J 



WILLINGTON. 

192. O, lOHN . WALLis . IN . WILLINGTON = Three crowns on the 

royal oak. 

I^, IN . WARRICKSHEIRE . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
L . E . W. t 

193. A variety reads walles on obverse. i 



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Mestmorlanb. 

Number of Tokens issued .... . . 19 

Number of Towns, etc., issuing Tokens .... 5 

Town Pieces issued by the Mercers' and Shearmen's 
Companies of Kendal. 



Sub-Editor and CoUaborateur : 

E. Foster Bell, Esq. 

(Mem. Num. See Lend.), 

Botcherby, 

Carlisle. 



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Mcatmorlanb* 

The number of tokens pertaining to this county is very small, and 
they consist of halfpennies and farthings, and range from 1656 
(No. 12) to 1669 (Nos. 3, 4 and 16). The literature touching upon 
them is somewhat large, when we compare the very limited issue of 
pieces. The principal are : 

" The Tradesmen's Tokens (of the seventeenth century) of Cum- 
berland and Westmorland," by William Henry Brockett, Gateshead- 
upon-Tyne, 1853. Reprinted from an article in the Gateshead 
Observer of March 5, 1853. 

" The Ancient Commerce of Westmerland." Reprinted from the 
Gentleman^ s Magazine for May, 1853. 

" The Tradesmen's Tokens issued during the Seventeenth Century 
in Appleby, in the County of Westmorland," by T. Fisher, Kendal, 

^855. 

" The Tradesmen's Tokens issued during the Seventeenth Century 
in Kirkby Stephen, in the County of Westmorland," by T. Fisher, 
Kendal, 1855. 

There are also articles in the GentlemarCs Magazine for March, 
1792, in Nicholson's "Annals of Kendal," and in the Kendal 
Mercury for December 14, 186 1, and March 28, 1863. 

E. Foster Bell. 

The loan of the woodcuts was most kindly promised by the late 
Mr. ComeHus Nicholson, F.S.A., at the time that this work was 
commenced, and we are now indebted to Miss Cornelia Nicholson, 
the daughter of the deceased antiquary and author, for the fulfilment 
of the promise. We are very grateful to Miss Nicholson for kindly 
assistance, so valuable, and to Mr. Bell for his interesting and 
important notes. 

The Editor. 

APPLEBY. 

1. O. CHRISTOPHER. BiRKBECKE = The King's head crowned to 

left. 

R, IN . APPLEBY . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

2. O. EDWARD . GVY . 1 666 : = . IN . APPLEBVE. 

R. I . SERVE . FOR . CHANGE = E . M . G. \ 

Edward Guy lived in Brig Street, Appleby, and held two burgages there. lie 



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I220 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

was a supporter of Richard Tufton in the Parliamentary election of February, 
1678-9.— Machell MSS., i., p- 223- 

The name of the Rev. Edward Guy (instituted Vicar of St. Lawrence's, Appleby, 
1636) appears in the list of Mayors of the borough for the years 1627, 1631, 1634, 
1635 ^^^ 1650.— h'ayer's ** History of Westmorland,*' ii., appendix, p. Wiii. He 
was probably the father of the issuer. 



3. O. WILLIAM . SMITH = A pigcon peeking. 

J^. IN . APPLEBYE . 1669 = W . S. 



i 



^^ 



mSv- 






This token has hitherto been attributed to Appleby, a village in Leicestershire, 
but there is little doubt that it belongs to the county town of Westmorland. A 
specimen struck in brass was found in 1863, on taking down some old buildings 
on the south side of Allhallows' Lane, Kendal. — See KendcU Mercury^ 
March 28, 1863. 

The issuer was a mercer and held property in the Borough Gate (Machell 
MSS., i., p. 213), where he probably had his residence. He, b'ke Guy, was a 
supporter of Richard Tufton («/ stipra^ p. 223), and his name appears in the list 
of Mayors of the borough in the years 1667 and 1673. — Sayer's " History of 
Westmorland," vol. ii., appendix, p. lix. 

There is an engraving of this token in the GeniUmatCs Magazine for March, 
1792 (p. 209). 

GRAYRIGG. 

4. O. Ric : ROWLANDSON . OF . GRAYRiG = A pair of scales and a 
spade. 

R. IN . KENDALL . PARISH . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 



\ 




Richard Rowlandson was a fellmonger and woolstapler ; he lived on his own 
estate at Lambert Ash, Grayrigg, where he carried on his business, as well as at 
Kendal, Kiikby- Stephen, and Kirkby-Lonsdale. 

To the above he seems to have combined that of stationer, as appears from the 
following entry in the accounts of the churchwardens of Kendal : 

" 1665. Paid Mr. Richard Rowlandson for a booke of Homilies 00 06 oa"— 
"Transactions of Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian Society," ix., 
p. 27a 

It is stated that he walked to London and back, on business, three times, and 
that he was there in the time of the Great Plague in 1665. 

There is an entry in the parish register of burials, July 18, 1735, of Richard 
Rowlandson, at Grayrigg, supposed to have been the issuer of this token : if so, he 
lived to a great age, which he is said to have done. 

One Richard Rowlandson was Town Clerk of Kendal in 1683. — -Nicolsonand 
Burn's "History of Cumberland and Westmorland/' i., p. 71. 



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WESTMORLAND. 



I22I 



KENDAL. 

5. O. MERCERS . COMPANY . IN . KENDAL = The Mcrccrs* Arms. 
J^, K . K . 1657 = Arms of the Corporation of Kendal. J 




The arms are those adopted by the Corporation of Kendal when the charter of 
Charles I. was obtained, as they are not registered ; they are Quarterly, first and 
ibarth, three spindles, second and third, three woolhooks— the bearings being in- 
dicative of the staple trade of the town. The same arms are engraved on a silver 
tankard and a sword, belonging to the Corporation, with ^e motto *' Pannus 
mihi panis " (Cloth is my bread). 

• The letters K. K. probably stand for the initials of Kiikby-Kendal, and 
are engraved on the silver seal which has been in use in the Corporation 

since the first charter of Elisabeth in 1576, the date of which it bears. In 

Soelling it b engraved without the K. K. above the shield — probably a 

variety. 
The original dies, much worn, were found in 1803 among the ruins of the New 

^iSEii^t where the Cordwainers had their hall, and are now preserved in the 

mosemn at Kendal.— Gat^sAead Observer, March 5, 1853. 

6. O. COMPANY . OF . SHEARMEN = A pair of Cropper's shcars. 
R. IN . KENDALL . i666 = A teascl-brush. i 




7. A variety struck in lead, having a star of five points on the 
reverse on either side of the teasel-brush. 

These implements of the cloth manufacture are now almost entirely disused, 
the great improvement in machinery, which does the work better and cheaper, 
having superseded them. The large shears were used by the croppers to cut all 
the long hairs off the cloth ; and unless great care and precision were used, there 
was danger of cutting the cloth, so that none but experienced workmen were em- 
ployed, and they earned great wages. During the Luddite riots, in the West 
Riaiog of Yorkshire, in 18 12, many of these artisans were implicated, some of 
them having been thrown out of employment by the improvements in manufacture, 
and many by their intemperate habits. The long hairs are now removed by a 
spiral steel blade fixed on a revolving cylinder, which gives a fine, even nap to the 
doth. The hand teasel-brush was used for brushing ine cloth, one being held in 
each hand ; this is now done by machinery, the teasels being placed in a long, 
tianow iron frame, worked by steam power. 

There were formerly twelve free companies in Kendal, which gradually became 
extinct, the last of them, the Cordwainers, being broken up in i8<x>, in consequence 
of Robert Moser, one of the craft, refusing to recognise any legal power in the 
VOL. IL 78 



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1222 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

company to impose a fine upon persons, not being freemen, commencing bosiness 
withm the borough. Monopoly was obliged to succumb to Moser, and the charter 
was declared to be powerless. 

8. O, EDMOND . ADLiNGTON = The Dycrs' Arms. 

-^. IN . KENDAL . l659 = E . I . A. J 




One Edward Adlington was sworn a shearman-dyer in 1649 (Kendal *'Boke of 
Recorde "). The faniily came originally from Yealand, in Lancashire, and caxried 
on business there and at Kendal. They were Quakers, and tradition says that 
Edmund was a man of immense bulk, weighing upwards of twenty-four stone, 
and that his wife was of little inferior weight, being upwards of twenty-two stooe. 
He retired from business, aqd died at a great age. 

Nicolson and Burn's ** History of Westmorland,'* i., p. 536, on the authority of 
Francis Higginson, Vicar of Kirkby-Stephen in the time of Cromwell, states : • 

** Some of the Quakers stood naked on the market cross on market days, 
preaching to the people, particularly the wife of one Eklmond Adlington, who 
went naked through the streets there." 

This is corroborated by Mrs. Greer, who, in " The Society of Friends," voL ii., 
p. 189. says, 

** The wife of Edmund Adlington, of Kendal, went through the streets naked 
on the 2 1st of November, 1653 ; and Mary CoUinson, another Quaker lady in the 
same town, rebuked those who covered her, by telling them they had hindered the 
work of the Lord." 

The Dyers seem to have been associated corporately in Kendal with the Shear- 
men, the full title of the ancient Free Company being that of ** Shearmen-Dyers, 
Fullers and Websters." The Shearman -dyers are mentioned in a poetical account 
of a guild procession in Kendal in 1759, the last that took place. 

The compliment paid to the Kendal industry is as follows : 

** The English Wool by Shearmen-dyers wrought 
Equals the finest silk from India brought." 



O. I AMES . COCKE . 
Ji, OF . KENDALL . 



iVNiOR = A cock to left. 

1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 




James Cocke was sworn a member of the Mercers* Company in 1655 (Kendal 
" Boke of Recorde "), and a burgess jn 1659. He was Mayor of Kendal in 1681-2, 
and died in 1694. 

His residence was in The Park, and his family owned property in the Butchers' 
Row. 

The British Museum possesses a specimen restruck upon a Yorkshhre token of 
Bradford (No. 37, ^.v.). 

** Will Bancks, of Bradford, Carrier for Kendal." —** Numismatic Chronicle,*' 
3rd series, vol. iv., p. 334. 



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WESTMORLAND. 



1223 



10. 



a 



lOHN . HADWEN = A sugai-loaf. 

IN . KENDALL = I . E . H. 




The names of John Hadwen and John Hadwen jun. (doubtless father and 
son) appear in the list of Mayors of Kendal no less than six times, from the year 
1704 to 177a 

The issuer was sworn a member of the Mercers' Company in 1656 (Kendal 
** Boke of Recorde "), and had his residence in Finkle Street, Kendal, as appears 
from the following entry in the accounts of the churchwardens, 1658 : 

" Rcc for y« cloth & bur in y« Lady quier of John Hadwens childe of ffinkel 
Streett M'cer . . . . x» iiij<*.*'— ** Transactions of Cumberland and Westmorland 
Antiquarian Society," ix., p. 270. 



II. 



O. OLIVER . PLAT . OF = Three Maltese crosses. 
R. KiRKBY . KENDALL = 1659 between six stars. 




Oliver Plat was a gentleman of considerable property in Kendal, and lived on 
his own estate at Summer How in Skelsmergh. He owned the property in 
Kendal known as the Rainbow Inn. He was a Roman Catholic. The parish 
register records his burial, March 18, 1686, in the ninety-sixth year of his age. 

One Oliver Plat, probably son of the above, appears in Cousin's ** List of 
Recusants." 

12. O. THOM . SANDES . 0F = A teasel and wool-hook. 
J^, KENDAL . i656==A woolcomb. 




He was Mayor of Kendal in 1647-8. He made a fortune as a dealer in Kendal 
cottons, which, being dyed green, obtained for the cloth the famous names of 
Kendal Green and Kendalls (7 Jas. L, c. xvi.). 

The following entries in the churchwardens* accounts show the estimation in 
which the colour of the staple commodity was held by the townsfolk : 

** 1676. The Communion table was covered with green and a hanging at the 
back also was preen." 

** 1676. Paid to Mr. James Simpson (by order of the Vicar and Churchwardens) 
for 15 yeards & a quarter of fiae-green-cloth, eleavcn yeards of ffine-HoUan and 
silk.ffringeforthegreen-tablecloth, etc., 12 11 06." 

** Paid to Will" Webster (by consent of Churchwardens) for coullering of y« 
Rayles within the chancell, the frame of the Comunion-table, the frame also 
wherein the green-cloth doth hing, w^** some pannells belonging the Pulpitt where 

78—2 



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1224 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

was needful, vir* all greene, the sum of 02 00 00." — "Transactions of Cumber- 
land and Westmorland Antiquarian Society," vol. ix., p. 276. 
Of Kendal, Drunken Bamaby sings : 

** Veni Kendall, ubi status " Thence to Kendall, pure her state is, 
Prsestans, prudens Magistratus, Prudent too her Magistrate is, 

Publicis festis purpuratus, In whose charter to them granted 

Ab Elizabetha datns ; Nothing but a Mayor wanted ; 

Hlc me juvat habitare. Here it likes me to bee dwdline, 

Propinare et amare.'* Bousing, loving, stories telling. 

Also: 

*'Nunc ad Kendall, propter Paonum, " Now to Kendall, for cloth-making, 
Coetum, situm, Aldermannum, Sight, site. Alderman awaking, 

Virgines pulchras, pias matres, Beauteous damsels, modest motheis, 

Et viginti quatoor liratres, And her foure-and-twenty brothers, 

Ver^ clarum et beatum. Ever in her honour spreading, 

Mihi nactum, notum« natum." Where I had my native breed^." 

The fame of Kendal manufactures is immortalized by other and more important 
writers. Thus Drayton : 

" Where Kendal town doth stand 
For making of our cloth scarce matched in all the land." 

Shakspeare refers to "Three mis-begotten knaves in Kendal Green" 
(** I Henry IV.," iL, 4) ; and Camden, in his " Britannia," eulogizes the quality of 
cloth manufactured in the town. 

The issuer resided in the fronthouse of the Elephant Yard (now the Elephant Inn), 
and his two coining presses and other instruments were found in making alterations 
in the premises. By deed dated September 6, 1670, he founded Sandes* Hospital, 
in Kendal, endowing it with considerable property for the maintenance of eight 
poor widows, three to be chosen out of Strickland Gate, three out of Stramongate 
and Hishgate, one out of Strickland Roger and one out of Skelsmei^^h and Paton 
{** MacheU MSS.," ii., p. 471), and for the support of a school for poor children, 
until they should be fitted for the free school or elsewhere. He bequeathed to the 
hospital a collection of books, chiefly of the early Fathers of the Church ; these 
he so highly prized that he ordered that they should be kept in the ** great room,** 
and that a certain quantity of fuel should be regularly brought from the property 
he bequeathed to the hospital, and that the schoolmaster should, in addition, ex- 
pend **at last twelve-pence in peats every quarter of a year," for the better keep- 
ing and preservation of the booics. And he further ordered that men of quality 
and learning should have free access to them. The books originally, ana for a 
long time afterwards, were fastened to the shelves by chains just long enough to 
allow the reader to reach them down to the table. He died August 22, 1681, 
aged seventy- five. 

A handsome marble monument was erected to his memory in Kendal Church, 
and bears the following eulogistic inscription : 

Heus Peripatetice ! 
Siste, disce, et (si pcssis) imitare. 
En pulchrum tibi virtutis, specimen 
Eximium, ingenij et laboris, exemplar. 

Humana, quicquid valuit, solertia ; 

Quicquid magnum, laudabile, utile 
Honesta, potuit assequi, vel efficere, industria, 
Illud totum, optim^ valuit, assequutus est effecit 
Prudential, charitate, diligentia summa ; 

Illud nempe 
(Quem nee mirari licet nee satis dolere) 

Egregius industria? Fautor 

Singularis Literarum Patronus 

Pauperum perpetuus Pater 

Thomas Sandes. 



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WESTMORLAND. 



1225 



Qui annis satiatus, Coelo matunis 
(Charissimae conjugi heu ! brev^ nimis superstes) 

Hinc abijt 
Vicessimo secundo die Augusti 
A««/* 5 Salutis humanse J mdclxxxi. 
^^^^ JyEtatissu* Jlxxv. 
Abijt (iDquam) non obijt nequit enim mori 
Dam sit hominibus virtus aut virtuti historia 
Atat ! 
Sileat periturum marmor. 
Omni dum marmoro Perennius 
£t vel Memphitical diuturnius Pyramide 
Ipse sibi monumentum, struxit 
Gerontocomium. 
It was originally placed against a pillar at the west end of the aldermen's pew, 
bat was moved in 1852 to a more appropriate site at the west end of the south 
aisle. 

One Thomas Sands, probably the issuer, was sworn a member of the Armourers* 
Company in 1641 (Kendal •• Boke of Recorde "). 

KIRKBY-STEPHEN. 

1$. O. lOHN . FALLOWFEILD = & R . P. 

J^, IN . KIRBYSTEPHEN - MERCERS. \ 

14. O. KiRRBY . STEPHEN . IN=A pair of scalcs. 

/^, WESTMOR . LAND-H . R. 1659. J 

The parish rasters contain the following entry : 

"17 Apl, 1661. Thos. the son of Hugh Raw of Kirkby- Stephen baptized.** 

This is the only entry in the registers combining the letters on the token, h . R. 

15. O. IN . KIRBY . STEPHVEN . IN . WESTMORELAND . HIS . HALFE . 

PENY = w . R . R. (in eight lines). 
J?. {No legend,) The Merchant- Adventurers' Arms. {Heart- 
shape^ \ 




16. O. IN . KlRBY . STEPHEN . 1669 = . S. \. 
R. IN . WESTMEER . LAND -I . P. 




17. O, MARORE . SANDERSON -A CfOWn. H . A. 
R. IN . KIRBYSTEPHEN = I . B. 



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1226 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
1 8. O. lEOFFERY . THOMPSON = A crown. 

J^, IN . KiRBY STEPHEN = A heart pierced with two arrows, 
with an eye above it. i 

The parish register, under date August 4, 1668, has the following : 
" Agnes Steadman Serv* to Jeoffrey Thompson buried." 



19. o. 



KIRKLAND. 

THOMAS. WILSON = Arms as on No. 5, except 
fourth quarter has three guttae or drops. 

THOMAS . WARDE . OF = KIRKLAND . 1666. 



that the 




Kirkland adjoins the town of Kendal, and now forms part of both the Parlia- 
mentary and municipal borough, and being without the jurisdiction of the Mayor, 
was formerly much resorted to by tradesmen not free of the Girporation. 

Only one specimen is at present known of this token, which is in the Bodleian 
Library, Oxford, and bequeathed to it by Brown Willis, the antiquary, in 1760.— 
Nicolson and Burn's " History of Cumberland and Westmorland," i., p. 73. 

A variety with the arms of Kendal, as shown on that of the Mercers* piece, was 
found in Kendal in li^.— Gateshead Observer ^ March 5, 1853. 

Drunken Barnaby, whose lines on Kendal we quote above, sings of Kirkland : 
" Nunc ad Kirkland, et de eo, ** Now to Kirkland, truly by it 

* Prope Templo procul Deo* May that say be verified, 

Dici potest, spectant Templum, * Far from God but neare the Temple ;' 

Sacerdotis et exemplum, Though their pastor give exemple, 

Audient tamen citius sonum They are such a kind of vermin, 

Tibia qukm concionem." Pipe they'd rather heare than sermon." 



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Miltsblre. 



Number of Tokens issued 279 

Number of Places issuing ToKEXb 50 

Town Pieces issued at Marlborough and Salisbury. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

W. CUNNINGTON, ESQ., F.G.S., 

58, Acre I^ne, S.W. 



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MiIt0bire. 

The tokens of this county are mainly of ordinary character. They 
are all halfpence and farthings, there being no pennies amongst the 
series. They commence early, one of them, issued by John Gage, of 
Bradford, bearing the date 1649 ; and they continue to 1671, almost 
the last year in which such tokens were permitted to circulate. 

To the places of issue named in the first edition we are enabled to 
add the names of Barford, Bratton, Hilmarton, Heytesbury, Marsh- 
field, Road, and Shurston-Magna. 

Several tokens attributed by Boyne to Wilton have been transferred 
to Wilton in Norfolk, the parish registers of that place having proved 
that the former attribution was incorrect 

The number of tokens issued at Salisbury is unusually large for 
one place, and gives information as to the commercial importance of 
the city in the seventeenth century. 

Much assistance in the compilation of notes has been rendered by 
an examination of the large collection of tokens in the Devizes 
Museum, the property of the Wiltshire Archaeological Society. This 
examination was kindly undertaken by F. M. Willis, Esq., of Steeple 
Ashton, Wilts, and for his correction from the specimens the Editor 
is very grateful. Mr. F. Goldney, of Chippenham, and Mr. H. S. Gill, 
have rendered much assistance also, but to Mr. W. Cunnington, F.G.S., 
the Editor is mainly indebted, and to his energetic and patient 
investigation the main value of this list of Wiltshire tokens is 
obtained. Much of Mr. Cunnington's labour of love has been 
pursued while his health has been far from good, and even while 
sufifering from a painful inflammation in his eyes, and a very full 
expression of gratitude is accorded to him for courtesy and considera- 
tion of a rare order and generous type. 

The Editor. 



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I230 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ALDBOURNE. 

1. O, lOHN . ADEE . OF . ALBORN = A citiquefoil bctwccn I and a. 
Ji, IN . wiLTSHiERE . 1656 = Three rabbits feeding. \ 

2. O, lOHN . ADEE . OF . ALBORN = I . A. 

J^. wiLTSHER = The Mercers' Arms. I 

3. O, lOHN . ADEE . OF . ALBORN = I . A. 

J^. I . CLARK . BISHOPSTON = I . C J 

The above was probably struck in error, and proves that the same die-sinker 
prepared the dies for Nos. i and 2 ; or it may be that the two persons were 
partners ; vide Kirkland token, No. 19. 

4. O. RICHARD . CLARK . IN= 1658. 

J^. ALBORN . wiLTSHER = R . E . c. and thrcc diamonds. \ 

5. O. FRANCIS . STRONE = HIS HALFE PENY. 

J^, OF . AWBORNE . i66o = A tree and F . s. i 

6. O, EDWARD . WITTS = A shuttle. 

/^. IN . AWBORNE . l666 = E , W. { 



AMESBURY. 

7. O. ROBERT . HARRISON = A garb. 

Ji, OF . AMSBVRY. 1653 = R . M . H. J 

8. O, lOHN. MOORES, 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^, OF . AMBROSBVRY = I . M . D. J 



ASHTON KEYNE& 
9. O. RICHARD . MARSH . OF = A nag's head. 

J^. ASHTON . KEYNES = R .A.M. 



BARFORD, 

10. O, MARY . BRINE . IN = The arms of the Ironmongers' Com- 

pany. 
/^. BARFORD . 1667 = In the field her . halfpenny and a 
cinquefoii. | 

BISHOPSTONE. 

11. O. I . CLARK . BISHOPSTON = I . c and a mullet. 

/^. IN . WILTSHIERE . 1656 = The Mercers* Arms. i 



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WILTSHIRE, . , 1231 

BRADFORD-ON-AVON. 

Several towns in England having the same name, it is difficult to apportion the 
tokens bearing that name. Under the name of Bradford there are tokens in 
Yorkshire, Wilts, and Somerset. By searching parish registers, and by other kinds 
of inquiry, Mr. Boyne had done his best to distinguish them. • To Bradford in 
Yorkshire he assigns the following : Wm. Bancks ; John Cooke, 1666 ; John Cook 
and Josiah Farrand ; John Durham, 1667 ; Wm. Hopkinson ; Thos. Ibbotson ; 
John Preston, 1666 ; Jacob Selbee, 1665. To Bradford (near Taunton), co. 
Somerset, Will. Serle, 1659. Those in the text to Bradford, Wilts, now called 
Bradford- on- Avon. 

It will be seen by reference to IViUs Archaological Magazitu^ vol. v., p. 50, that 
some of the tokens there considered to belong to Bradford in Wilts are among those 
assigned by Mr. Bo3me to Bradford in Yorkshire. 

12. O, WILLIAM . BAiLY . MERCER = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R, IN . BRADFORD . i668 = A nag's head, w . b. large \ 

William Baily, of Bradford, erected a monument in Bradford Church in 1695, 
which still remains. He died March, 17 12, and was described in the register as 
a mercer. His monument bears his crest, a nag*s head, and the Mercers' arms. 

13. O, WILLIAM . BAILY . MERC = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 
R, IN . BRADFORD . 1667 = A nag*s head couped. 

14. O, WILLIAM . CHANDLER = The Giocers' Arms. 

R. IN . BRADFORD . 63 = W . C. 

15. O, WILLIAM . CHANDLER = The Giocers' Arms. 

R. IN . BRADFORD . 1650 = W . C. 

16. O, SAMVELL . DAVISSON = A Stag. 
R, OF . BRADFORD . 1669 = 8 . D. 

17. O. DANIELL . DEVERRELL = A crown. 
R, IN . BRADFORD . 1663 = D . D. 

18. O, lOHN . GAGE . OF = The Merceis' Anns. 

R, BRADFORD . 1649 = 1 . G. 

19. O. lACOB . SELBEE . OF = Two pipes crossed. 

R. BRADFORD . 1665 = 1.3. 
This token has been found very frequently in large numbers in Bradford-on-Avon. 

20. O. PAVLE . METHWiN = A chevron ensigned with a cross patt^e, 

in base a heart. 
R, IN . BRADFORD = A cross between p.m. \ 




The device on obverse is the merchant's mark of the issuer of the token, not 
the coat-of-arms of the Methuen family. 
This issuer was an ancestor of Lord Methuen. 



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1232 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



BRATTON. 

21. O. lOHN . ALLDREDG = Arms of the Merchant-Tailors, but with 
a ball on the top of the pavilion and no flag. 

I^. IN . BRATTON . 1664 = 1 . E . A. J 



CALNE. 

22. O. lAMES . BARTLETT = A CFOWn. 
I^, OF . CALNE . 1669 = I . a 

23. O. STEPHEN . BAYLiE = The Merccfs' Arms. 

J^, OF . CAVLNE . 1669 = 8 . S . B. 

24. A variety has no date. 

25. O, lOHN . DASH = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

jR, IN . CALNE . 1669 = 1 . P . D. 

26. O. ROBERT . DIER = A talbot. 
/^. IN . CALNE = R . I . D. 

27. O. ARTHVR . F0RMAN = HIS HALF PENNY. 
I^. CHANDLER . OF . CALNE = A . I . F. 

28. O, ARTHVR . FORMAN . 1669 = HIL | MAR [ TEN. 
^. CHANDLER . OF . CALNE = A , I . F. 

29. O. lOHN . FORMAN = Two tobacco-pipes crossed. 

J^. IN . CALNE=I . A . F. 
The pipes on this and other tokens are of the kind called hj the vulgar '* hhy 
pipes," which were made at the commencement of the seventeenth century. They 
are frequently found in ploughed fields, whither they have been carried in manure. 
They are generally Mrithout stems, but when perfect are about eight inches long, 
thicker in the stem than modern pipes, with small heads almost egg-shaped. In 
some districts they are found with the maker's initials at the bottom of the head. 
By some they are believed to have been made long prior to the rei^ of Elizabeth, 
during whose reign tobacco was first introduced; there are ceriamly reasons for 
supposing that the custom of smoking is more ancient than the introduction of 
tobacco. When half of the great tower of Kirkstall Abbey, ca York, fell 
down in I779». a number of these " fairy pipes" were found imbedded in the 
mortar, and it is known that the most modern part of the tower was built in the 
reign of Henry VII. ; and after the abbey was dismantled at the Reformation, 
there was no access to the upper part of the tower. Several were lately found at 
Newcastle in the castle midden on removing the houses built on that ancient 
accumulation. These pipes are called in Ireland " Danes* pipes." One was found 
in a Danish cairn in 1855. (See Ulster Journal of Atxhaology^ iiu, p. 32a) 

30. O, lOHN . lEFFREis = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. OF . CAVN . t668 = i . m . l i 

31. O, wiL . lEFFREY . ELDER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . CALNE = W . L \ 

32. O, GRACE . LAWRENCE = An anchor. 

R, OF . CAVLN . 1669 = 1 . G . L. \ \ 



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WILTSHIRE, 1233 

33. O. wiTHERSTONE . MESENGER = Three Folls of bread. 

jR, OF . CALNE . BAKER = W . M . M. J 

34. O. lOHN . NORMAN = The Grocers' Anns. 

I^. IN . CAVLNE = I .M.N. J 

35. O. AT . THE . GLASS . HovsE = A warehousc with turret on the 

top. 

-^. IN . CALNE . 1669 = A • I • S. J 



CASTLE COMBE. 

36. 0. lEREMiAH . BERRY = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^. OF . CASTLE . COMBE . 68 = I . E . B. ^ 

37. O, THOMAS . BERY . MERCER = T . I . B. 

Ji. IN . CASTLE . COMBE . 66 = A castle. \ 



CHIPPENHAM. 

We learn from the " Records of Chippenham," by Fred. Hastings Goldney, Esq., 
Mayor of the borough 1889, that the names of the issuers of all the following 
tokens still exist in Chippenham, save that of Gage, which has died out. Hear- 
man has become Hereman. 

The following notes as to some of the issuers are extracted from the same work : 

** 1654. John Steevens is paid £i 5s. for six sugar-loaves weighinge 18 J lb. at 
IS. 4d. per lb., presented by the town to Coll. Popham.*' 

"John Steevens, John Webb, and others are paidjf4 15s. 5d. for Gunpowder 
spent on the day of the corronacon of the King's Ma*'®, Ap. 25, 1 661." 

" Nov. 10, 1676. John Shorte, being convicted before the Bayliffe for approbious 
words spoken against John Stevens, one of the burgesses, and others of the 
fraternity, by calling them knaves and other scurilous language, it is agreed by the 
Baylifie and the court that the said John Shorte shall be debarred," etc. 

" 1684. Sam^ Elliotte is paid for work done to the towne arms los. lod.'* 

" 1683. John Shorte made free of the borough on payment of fee, lis. 8d." 

38. O. WILL . ADYE . MERCER = W . E. A. 

I^, IN . CHIPENHAM . 1665 = W . E . A. ^ 

The issuer was Bailiff in 1691. 

39. O. lOHN . EDWARDS = I . E. 

J^. OF . CHIPPINHAM . 1665 = LINEN DRAPER. \ 

The issuer was Bailifi in 1654 and 1663. 

40. A variety larger, having an ornamented knot between i . e. 

41. O. SAMVELL . ELLiOTE = Two swords crossed, ^nd a carbine. 

J^. OF . CHIPPENHAM = S . A . E. 1668. \ 

42. A variety is dated 1666. 

43. O. SAMVELL . GAGE . OF = Three doves (the Tallowchandlers' 

Arms). 

J^, CHIPPENHAM . 1653 = 8. E.G. ^ 



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1234 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

44. Akerman gives one dated 1658, and has no of on reverse. 

45. O. lOHN . HEORMAN - A WOOlcomb. 

J^. IN . CHIPPENHAM . 167I =1 . M . H. J 

46. O, HENRY . LAMBERT . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. CHIPPENHAM . MERCER = H . S . L. J 

The issuer was Bailiff in 1648 and 1665. 

47. O. BRISTOW . PLACE = I . A . S. 

-^, CHIPPENHAM . 1665 = 1 . A . S. } 

Bristow is a common name in Chippenham, but there is no trace of any house 
or estate bearing the name of ** Brisiow Place." There were lately living in five 
cottages in the Urban District Matthew, Mark, Mark, jun., Luke, and John 
Bristow, all related to one another, and all voters of the borough. — F. H. G. 

48. O. lOHN . SHORTE = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

/^. IN . CHIPPENHAM = I . A . S. i 

49. O, lOHN . STEVENS . OF= I . M.S. 

jR, CHIPPENHAM . 1652 = 1 .M.S. \ 

The issuer was Bailiff in 1661. 

50. O, lOHN . WEBB = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

^. IN . CHEPPENHAM = I . I . W. \ 

Thomas Webb was Bailiff in 1682. 

51. O. lOHN . WILLSHEARE . or = CHIPPENHAM. 

/^. ANDREW . WILCOX . l668 = MERCER. } 



CLACK (Parish of Lineham). 
This is not quite certain, as the name of Clack occurs in Yorkshire. 

52. O. ROBERT . GOODMAN = A pair of scalcs. 

jR. OF . clack = A crescent moon. { 

53. O, FRANCES . ROGERS = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

^. OF . CLACK . 1658 = F . I . R. i 

COLLINGBOURNE. 

54. O. RICHARD . BLACKMORE= 1665. 
jR. OF , COLLING BORNE = R . E . B. 

55. O. BARNABAS . RVMSEY = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . COLLINGBORNE . B . R. = 1 667. J 

56. O. BARNABAS . RVMSEY = A tree between i6 and 64. 

li. IN . coLLiNGBovRNE = A tree between b . and r. i 



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WILTSHIRE, 1235 



CORSLEY. 



57. O. GEORGE . CAREY = The Cloth workers' Arms. 

I^, IN . CORSLEY . 1666 = G . M . C. 

58. A variety is dated 1667. 



CORSHAM. . 

59. O. WILLIAM . GIBBONS = w . G. and a true lovers* knot. 
i?. CORSHAM = {detriied). 

60. O, EDw . SALWAY . CLOTHER = A pair of shears. 

J^. IN . CORSHAM . WILTS = E . K . S. J 

61. O. EDITH . a" . DA° . WOODMAN -A Stilk 

J?. MERSER . IN . eORSHAM = D . M . W. ' J 

CRICKLADE. 

62. O. THOMAS . DEIGHTON = A cross placed on Steps. 

^. MERCER . IN . CRICKLAD = T . S . D. ^ 

63. O, ANTHONY . woRME = A horse trotting. 

J^. KRICKLEAD . CARRIER = A . A . W. ^ 

DEVIZES. 
Out of fourteen issuers in this town, no less than eight were grocers. 

64. O, STEPHEN . BAYLY . 0F = A mermaid. 

JR. DEVIZES . MERCER = S . B ..1668. J 

The issuer was elected Maister of the Fraternity, or Guild, of Mercers of the 
Devizes, and sworn accordingly in 1682. 

65. O, lOHN . FREY=Thp Grocers' Arms. 

^. THE . DEVISES = I . F. J 

This issuer held the same office in 1677. 

66. O. lOHN . FRY . 1664 = An open hand. 

^. IN . THE . DEVISES = Two pipes CTOSSed. I . F. J 

67. O. FRANCIS . GOVLDlNG = A castlc. 

/^, IN . Y^ . DEVISE = GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. ^ 

68. O. EDWARD . HOPE = A ship. 

I^. OF . THE . DEVIZES . 1 65 2 = An anchor. J 

Edward Hope was Mayor of Devizes in 1624. His son Edward was Mayor 

>° 1654, and again in 1661 ; and Richard held the office in 1706, 1716, and 1721. 
Edward Hope is mentioned in the return of the Lord -Lieutenant of Wilts to the 

Council of James II., 1687, as " a very honest and fitt person to serve his Maj»y." 



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1236 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Further on he is spoken of as a Dissenter, and ** 6tt to be a Deputy-Lieutenant 
and Justice of The Peace ;'' and a^ain, in the King's Agents' report to bis 
Majesty, it is said that *' Sir John Eyles (also a Dissenter), and Edw<* Hope are 
both right {ue., in favour of the repeal of the Test and Penal Statutes), and that 
they would unaoubtedly be chosen as members of Parliament" — Vide ** Rawlinsim 
MSS. " in the Bodleian Library. 

This issuer was sworn Maister of the Guild on July 2, 162 1, and his son Edward 
in 1656. 

69. O. EDWARD . HOPE . OF = A shlp within a dotted ring. 
li. THE . DEVIZES . 1 65 2 = An anchoi within a ring. 

70. O. lOHN . HAMMOND = I . S . H. 

J^. OF . THE . DEVISES = Three clasped books. 

71. O. GRACE . NAISH . OF . THE = A CaStlc. 

i?. DEVIZES. 1652 = Three cloves. 

72. O. FRANCIS . PARADiCE = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

J?. CHANDLER . IN . Y^ . DEVIZES = F . M . P. 1 669. 

The issuer was Mayor in 168S. 

Will Paradice was Mayor in 1681, 1682, 1692, and died in office in 1703. 

Francis Paradice was Master of the Guild in 1657, and hb son Francis in 1696. 

73. O. lOHN . SLADE . GROCER = A sugar-loaf. 

J^. IN . THE . DEVIZES . 1 666 = I . S. 

74. O. RICHARD . SLADE « The Gfocers* Arms. 

J^, IN . THE . DEVIZES . l663«R . S. 

75. A variety has on the reverse two pipes crossed. 

76. O. WILLIAM . soMNER . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

B. THE . DEVIZES . GROCER = W . S. 1652. 

77. O, WILLIAM . STEVENS = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J?. IN . THE . DEVIZES . l663 = W . A . S. 

78. A variety has no date. 

79. O. RICHARD . WATTON . i666 = R . w . and two mullets. 

J^. GROCER . IN . Y= . DEVIZES = R . W. 

80. O, RICHARD . WATTON = R . W. 
J^, GROCER . IN . DEVISES = R . W. 

The issuer was Mayor in 1670, 1679, 1680 and 1699, and again took office on the 
death of V^Till Paradice in 1703. He was Master of the Guud in 1661, 1667, tad 
1672. 

In 1696 the clothiers and others of Devizes petitioned the House of Commons, 
complaining of the scarcity of coined money, and their petition was referred to the 
Committee on the Coinage Bill. 



DOWNTON. 
81. O, PHILLIP . ROOKE = A rook. 

J^. IN . DOWNTON . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. P . R. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WILTSHIRE. l?37 



GREAT BEDWYN. 

82. 0. lOHN . BVSHEL . OF . GREAT =» Three dovcs with olive 
branches (Tallowchandlers' Arms). 

J?. BEDWIN . MERCER . 1669 = 1 . E . B. J 



HARNHAM. 

83. 0. lOHN . VENABLES . AT . HARNHAM = A shuttle. 

H, NEAR . SARVM . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. I . A . V. 



HEYTESBURY. 
84. 0. JOSEPH . BELL = The Mercers' Arms. 

J?. IN . HETESBVRY= 1659. I . H . B. 
The figure of the Virgin on the shield of arms is placed upside down. 



HIGHWORTH. 

85. O. RICH . BATSON . HIGHWORTH = R . R 

J?. EDWARD . FORDER = E . F. | 

86. O. LEONARD . BOLL . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. HIGHWORTH . GROCER = L . B. ^ 

87. O. lOHN . ELTON . iN = A paschal lamb. 

J^, HIGHWORTH -I . c . E. A lamb. J 

88. O. lOHN . ELTON . AT . Y« . LAMBE = A paschal lamb. 

J^. IN . HIGHWOORH . 1669 = HIS | HALF | PENY. ^ 

89. O. THO . HARTWELL . OF . HIGHWORTH = A CrOWD. J 

J?. THO . HARTWELL . OF . ABINGDON = A Uon. J. J 

90. O. EDMUND . HIDE . IN . HiwoRTH = A bear with chain. J. 

J?. RICH . LEADER . IN . HiwoRTH = A greyhound rynning. 
J (Heart-shape,) \ 

91. O, EDMUND . LEWIS . BRAZEAR = The Armourers* Arms. 

R, IN . HIGHWORTH . 1669=3 HIS HALF PENY. E . K . L. \ 

92. O, WILLIAM . MATHEW = W . M. 

R. IN . HIGHWORTH . 1659 = A lion rampant \ 

93. O. THOMAS . OSBORNE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . HYWORTH . 1653 »T . O. \ 

YOU II. 79 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1238 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

94. O. lOHN . PEACHEY = {detrttcd), \ 

R, IN . HIWORTH=l656. 

95. O. lOHN . TOMES = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . HYWORTH . 1652 = 1 . T. \ 

96. O, RICHARD . WILLIAMS = A pair of spectacles. 

R, WILLIAM . FRANKLIN . OF . H1GHW0RTH = W . F. \ 



HILMARTON. 

97. O, ARTHUR . FORMAN (in two liiies). 

R. HiLMARTiN . 1 669 (in one line). 
This token is very rare. 



KINGSWOOD.* 

98. O. EDWARD . TANNER =165 8. 

R, IN . KINGS . WOOD = E . D . T. i 

99. O. THOMAS . WALFORD = The Clothworkefs' Arms. 

R, OF . KINGS . WOOD = T . P . W. \ 



LACOCK. 
100. O, RICHARD . GRIST = A pair of scales. 

R, IN . LACOCK . 1669 = R . G . G. \ 

loi. O, RICHARD . GRYST = A Uon rampant. 

R, IN . LECOCK . 1669 »R . G. \ 



LAVINGTON. 

102. O, lOHN . HAYWARD = A ship. 

R, IN . LAVINGTON . 1663 = 1 . H. \ 

103. O, ROBERT . HAYWARD = A ship. 

R, IN . LAVINGTON . l668 = R . H. \ 



LUDGERSHALL. 

104. O. No legend, A castle. 

R. OF . LUGGASALE . 1665 = wi. coDJoined. 



* KiDgswood occurs in sevend counties. 

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WILTSHIRE. 1239 



MAIDEN BRADLEY. 



105. O. GEORGE . AVDREY = A CTOWD. 

^. IN . MAYDEN . BRADLEY = G . A. 



MALMESBURY. 

06. O, lOHN . BLONCE = (dctrtted). 

R. IN . MALMSBVRY . 1661 = I . M . B. 

07. O, EDWARD . BROWNE = A man standing by a still. 

R, OF . MALMESBERY = E . M . B. 

08. 0. SAMVELL . CHAPP . IN = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

R, MALMESBERY . 1665 = S . M . C. 

09. O, PHiLiPP . EDWARDS = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

R, IN . MALMSBVRY . 1658 = P . M . E. 

10. 0. THOMAS . EVAN . F . s . OF = The Giocers' Arms. 

R, MALMSBVRY . IN . WILTS = T . E . E. 

11. O, ELI AS . FERRIS . APOTHECARY = The Apothecaries* Arms, 

R, IN . MALMESBVRY . 1 669 = HIS . HALF . PENY . E . A . F. 

12. O, lOHN . GOLDNEY . IN = 1 . M . G. 
R, CLOTHYR . MALMSBVRY = I . M . G. 

The issuer was an ancestor of Sir Gabriel Goldl^ey, of Chippenham. 

13. O, EDMVND . HANDY . AT . Y" = A diagOn. 
R. IN . MALMESBVRY = E . E . H. 

14. O. Nico . LAFFRis . WOOL = A woolcomb. 

R, MALMESBVRY . ABYE = N . M . L 

15. O. RICHARD . PLAYER = Three cloves. 

R, MALMSBVRY = R . N . P. 1 65 7. 

16. O, lOHN . SANSVM = A Still. 

R, OF . MALMSBVRY . l66 = I . I . S. 

17. O. THOS . TANNER . CARIER = A WOOlpack. 
R, IN . MALMESBVRY = T . O . T. 

18. A variety has on the reverse t . t. only in the field. 

19. O. ROB . THOMAS 0F = A bull. 
R. MALMESBVRY . 64 » R . H . T. 

20. O. RICH I THORNBR . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. MALMESBVRY . 64 = R . T. 

79—2 



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1240 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

121. O. WILLIAM . WAYTE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

/^, IN . MAMSBVRY . 165I =W . W. { 

122. O. WALTER . WOODMAN = The Groccrs* Arms. 

^. CARiER . MALMESBVRY = w . M . w. in monogram. \ 



MARLBOROUGH. 

123. O, A . MARLBROVGH . FARTHING » A CastlC. 

jR. IN . Y« . covNTY . OF . WILTS . i668 = A bull. large \ 




The bull and castle are part of the bearings of the Arms of the borough of 
Marlborough. 

124. A variety has a large castle and three turrets. 

125. Another variety has a small castle and four turrets. 

126. O, lOHN . BAYLY — The Grocers' Arms. 

I^. IN . MALBROW = I . N . B. 

127. O. ROBERT . BRIANT = ^ ' !?' 
' D . S. 

I^. OF . MALLBROWGH = E . S. 

128. O. ROBERT . BVTCHER=«The Grocers' Anns. 

I^. IN . MALBROVGH . l663 = R . M . B. 

129. O. ROBERT . BVTCHER=The Groccrs* Arms. 

I^. IN . MALBROW . 66 = R . M . B. 

130. O. HENRY COLEMAN =» A pair of scales. 

J^. IN . MARLBOROVGH . l657 = H . E . C 

131. O. WILLIAM . CRABBB» A man making candles. 

I^, OF . MALLBROVGH . 1668-W . M . C 

132. O. WILL . CRABB . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^. IN . MALBOROVGH . 1664 = W . M . C. 

133. A variety reads wiluam. 

134. O. EDWARD . DELAMAiNS= Crest : a hand • s . d. 

J^. OF . MARLBORO W= 1665. 



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WILTSHIRE. 



1241 



135. O. lOHN . HAMMOND . OF- A claspcd book. 

i?. BIARLEBOROVGH . 66 = I . K . H. i 

This man was a bookseller, and suflfered very heavy losses in the Great Fire of 

1653. He says : " I have but little left saved, not above £S worth of all my 

goods and books. The children are crying to go home, and I tell them we have 

none to go to. What shall I do ?*' 
Id 1642 the Royalists took Marlborough, and fed a fire for three hours with 

Hammond's stock-in-trade.— yt(/e " Wavien's History." 
The following issuers, marked " N.B., ' also lost heavily in the fire : 
John Bayly, grocer, heavily ; Thomas Keene, ;f 270 ; William Pureur, ;f 230 ; 

Richard Shipre, £$60 ; Oliver Shropshire, innkeeper, ;f 204 —all evidently men of 

substance.— Fi^ir " Waylen*s History." 



136. 0. THOMAS . KEENE ~ Three doves. 

jR, IN . MARLBOROVGH=T . K. 1652. 





137. O. lOHN . MORGAN . i6s6=The Grocers' Arms. 

Ji, AT . MALBVRROW-I . M. 




r 138. A variety dated 1657. 



139. O. lANE . PEARCE«The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J?. IN . MARLBOROW = I . P. 

140. O. SIMON . PIKE . OF— The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. MARLEBOROVGH . 1677=8 . A . P. 

141. O. WILLIAM . PUREVR . piNN=The Pinners* Arms. 

Ji, MAKER . IN . MARLBROW = W . D . P. 

142. O. THOMAS . SHiPPERE = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

J?. IN . MARLBOROVGH = T . A . S. 

143. O. RICHARD . SHIPRE = The Salters' Arms. 

/^. OF . MOVLBROVGH = R . S. 

144. O, OLIVER . SHROPSHIRE = An angel. 

J^. IN . MALBROVGH . 1665 =0 . S. 

145. O, lEREMiAH . SLOPER» A sugar-loaf. 

jR. IN . MALBROVGH = I . B . S. 

146. O. lOHN . SMITH . IN = Two tobacco-pipcs crossed. 

J?. MALBROVGH . 1665 = I . K . S. 



i 



i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 



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1242 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



MARSHFIELD. 

147. O. WILUAM . HOSEE . IN = W . H . M. 

J^, IN . MARSH . FEILD . l65l==W . H . M. { 

MARSTON. 

148. O. RICHARD . WALKER = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . MARSTON . GROCER = R . W. 1 658. 

MELKSHAM. 

149. O, AMBROSE . AWDREY . OF . MELKESHAM = The Merceis' 

Arms. 

J^. lOHN . AWDREY . OF . STEEPLE . ASHTON= 1668. J 

150. O. A . A . OF . MELKESHAM = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^, I . A . OF . STEEPLE . ASHTON= 1665. i 

151. A variety is dated 1668. 

The L A. of No. 150 probably stands for Joseph Awdrey, who, according to the 
vestry book of Steeple Ashton, was appointed an overseer for the poor on April 12, 
1664, and again on March 28, 1665. He was buried December 15, 1668. 



MERE. 

152. O. THOMAS . GAMBLIN . 1 665. 

J?. IN . MEERE = T . G. J 

153- O. RICHARD . PITMAN = A man making candles. 

li. OF . MEERE . 1669 = R . I . P. J 

154. O, ROBERT . PITTMAN . OF = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^, MEERE . DRAPER . i668 = The Drapers' Arms. J 

155- O. WILLIAM . ROGGERS = A horse ambling. 

J?. IN . MEERE . 1666 = WR. conjoincd. i 

PURTON. 

156. O, lOHN . FARMER = I . E . F. and a roll of tobacco. 

J^. OF . PYRTON . 1668 = his" HALF PENY. i 

157. O. lOHN . FARMAR . 1656 = A roll of tobacco. 

J^, IN . PYRTON = The Grocers' Arms. J 



RAMSBURY. 

158. O, lOHN . STON . OFsA man making candles. 

i?. RAMSBVRY . 1655 = 1 .M.S. i 

159. A variety has i . e. in the field of the obverse, without 

any figure. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WILTSHIRE. 1243 

160. O. WILLIAM . WHITE = The Habcrdashers' Arms. 

J^. IN . RAMSBERY = W . R . W. 



ROAD. 

161. O. DAVID . IEFRES = A barrel. 

I^. IN . ROAD . 1664 = D . I. ^ 

162. O. WILLIAM . WHITCHVRCH = A WOOlpack. 

-^. IN . ROAD . 1668 = W . W . S. J 

ROLLSTONE (Near Amesbury). 

163. O. lAMES . SWAN . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

J?. ROLSTON . GROCER = I . S. \ 

SALISBURY. 

Hatcher, in his " History of New Sarum," quotes the following interesting note 
from the city records : 

"Octr. 30th, 1658. Mr. Stone and Mr. Hely, then in London, requested to take 
coarse for stamping 5 pounds worth of farthings with the city arms and such 
inscription as they may tnink fit." 

The die-sinkers were probably confined to London and a few of the large 
towns, and hence, perhaps, the frequent errors and variations in the spelling of local 
names, mistakes wnich would not have been made by persons familiar with the people 
and places, as, for instance, John Cragge, grocer in Sarum— John Gracce, grocer in 
Sarum. 

Amongst the list of the eighty-six burgesses who voted in 1656 for the return of 
two members of Parliament are found the names of the following issuers : 
Thomas Cutler, jun. (171), George Godfrey (184), Henry Gilbert, William Gapen, 
Edward Fanlconer (176), Nicholas HaskoU (195), William Joyce (199), Christopher 
Legg (200), Edward Mason (206), Simon Rolfe (222). 

Hatcher also mentions, in reference to the rising of Royalists in the West of 
England in 1654, that Edmund Mack (203) was an apothecaiy in Salisbury, one of 
the seven who pleaded guilty of raising war against the Government, and was 
probably pardoned. 

164. O. FOR . THE . MAiOR . OF . THE . 1659 = A double - headed 

eagle displayed, gorged with a ducal coronet azure 

beaked and legged or, being one of the supporters of 

the city arms. 

J^. ciTTY . OF . NEW . SARVM = Arms of the city : barry of 

eight azure and or. ^ 

This is curious, in having a double-headed eagle for mint -mark on both sides ; on 

other pieces these marks are usually stars, mullets, cinquefoils, etc. 

165. O, ROGER . BEDBVRY = St. George and the Dragon. 

^. IN . SARVM . 1664= R . A . B. i 

166. O. AT . THE . BVSH . IN = A bush. 
R. SALSBVRY . 1657 =T . R. 

167. O. GEORGE . CLEMENS = A dragon. 

R. IN . SARVM . 1664 = . A . C. i 

The issuer was Mayor in 1687. 



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1344 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1 68. O. h£nry . COLE = A Saracen's head. 

J^. OF . SARVM . 165s = H . C. i 

169. O. WILLIAM . covRTNEY . BOOK = Two aogels Supporting an 

open book. 

J^. BINDER . IN . SARVM . 1670 = HALF PENY. i 

170. O. lOHN . CRAGGE = A dog. 

I^, GROCER . IN . SARVM = I . P . C. J 

171. O. THOMAS . CVTLER . IUNIOR = HIS HALF PENY. 

/^, IN . SARVM . 1666 =!T .I.e. i 

172. O. THOMAS . CVTLER . SENIOR = HIS HALF PENY. 

-^. IN . SARVM . 1666 = Two snakes entwined, t . c. J 
The issuer was Mayor in 1657. 

173. O, CHisTOPHER . EGG « The Ironmongers* Anns. 

J^, IN . SARVM = C . E. i 

174. O. GODDERD . ELLIOT . iN = Arms of the Elliot family: a 

fesse. 
I^. SARVM . GROCER . 1 666 = The Grocers' Arms. J 

175. O, IN . SARVM . 1667=0 . E . F. 

i?. HIS . HALFE . PENNY = Two snakes entwined. \ 

176. O, EDWARD . FAVLCONER = The Skinners' Arms. 

J^, IN . NEW . SARVM . 1659 = E . M . F. { 

The issuer was Mayor in 1686. 

177. A variety has 1656 after sarvm. 

178. Another variety has 1657 after sarvm. 

179. Another variety has 1659. 

180. O. EDWARD FRipp = The Skinners' Arms. 

/i. IN . SARVM . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

181. A variety is dated 1669. 

182. O. lOHN . GILBERT . AT . THE = A bclL 

J?. BELL . IN . NEW , SARVM = 1 . H . G. { 

183. A variety reads sarid, and is probably the Woric of an 

illiterate die-sinker. 

184. O, GEORGE . G0DFERY = A rat 

J^, IN . SARVM . 1659 = . G. i 

185. O, WILLIAM . GAPEN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . SARVM . 1652 = W . G. } 

186. A variety is dated 1652. 

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WILTSHIRE. ti4S 

187. O, WILLIAM . GASSEN = The Grocew* Arms. 

J^. IN . SARVM . 1662 = W . G. 

188. O. lOHN . GRACCE = A dog. 
A GROCER . IN . SARVM = I . G . P. 

Probably the spelling is in error, and the token was issued by the issuer of 170. 
See note on p. 1243. 

189. O. GEORGE . GODFERY = A rat. 
^. RAT . KILR . IN . SARVM = 0.0. 

190. O. ROGER . GODFREY . IN = A knife and cleaver. 

I^. NEW . SARVM . 1666 = R . E . G. 

191. A variety is dated 1664. 

192. O. lOHN . HELE= A lion rampant. 

J^. GROCER . IN . SARVM = I . H. 

193. A variety reads hale. 

194. O. lOHN . HANCOCK . IN . NEW = 1 . H. 

Ji. SARVM . APOTHECARY = The bust of a Turk. 

195. O. NICHOLAS . HASKOLL . 1658= The Ironmongers* Arms. 

i?. IRONMVNGER . IN . SARVM = NH COnjoined. 

196. O. THOMAS . HAYTOR . OF . SARVM = The Cordwaincrs' Arms. 

i?. HIS . HALFE . PENY . l666 = T . H. 

197. O, lONATHAN . HILL. l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
/^. IN . SARVM = I . E . H. 

The issuer was Mayor in 1688. 

198. O. GEORGE . HVGHEs = A fox with a goose. 

i?. OF . SARVM . 1658 = . H. 

199. O, WILLIAM . iOYCE = A camel couchant 

A IN . SARVM . 1652 =W . L 
The issuer was Mayor in 1639. 

200. O. CHRISTOPHER . LEGG=The Ironmongers' Arms. 

I^. IN . SARVM = C . L. 
The issuer was Mayor in 1653. 

201. O. EDWARD . LISTER . IN . SARVM = The SUn. 
J?. AT . WINCHESTER . GATE = HIS HALFE PENY. 

202. ^. £ . D . M . IN . SARVIM . 1651 = A skuU. 

^. IF . THOV . BELEivEST = A heart. 

203. O, EDMOND . MACKS = A mitre. 

J?. OF . SARVM = E . M. 

204. O, FRANCIS . MANNINGE = A goat 
A IN . SARVM . 1664= F . I . M. 



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1246 TRADERS TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

205. O. FRANCIS . MANINGE . IN = A gOat 

J^. KATHREM . STREET . SARVM-F . I . M. i 

206. O. EDWARD . MASON = An apc. 

J^, OF . SARVM . I6S8 = E . E . M. \ 

207. O. HENRY . MAtTERSHAW = A cook's knife. 

i?. IN . SARVM . COOKE . 58 = H . P . M. i 

208. O, RICHARD . MiNiFiE-The Skinncrs' Anns. 

J^. IN . SALSBVRYsR . M. \ 

The issuer was Mayor in 168 1. The family came to Salisbury from Somereet- 
shire, and were connected with the lace trade. The name appears on a Hooiton 
token. 

209. O. lOHN . NEALE=A flcur-de-lys. 

J?. OF . SOLSBERY=I .E.N. { 

210. O, IN . THOMAS . PARISH = I . D . P. 

/^, CHEESE . CROSE . SARVM = The Grocers' Arms. i 

The cheese cross is in St. Thomas Parish. Thomas Parish is not the name of 
the issuer, as proved by the initials i. D. p. 

211. O. GEORGE . PAGE . GROCER -A dove with oUve-branch. 

-^. IN . SARVM . 1656-G . K . P. i 

212. A variety is dated 1657. 

213. Another variety is dated 1658. 

214. Another 1667. 

215. O. EDWARD . PENNY . IN = The Butchers' Anns. 

Ji, SARVME . 1 67 1 = HIS J TOKEN. J 

216. A variety is dated 1667. 

217. O, CHARLES . PHELPS . OF = The Skinners' Anns. 

J?. SARVM . CONFECTIONER = C . S . P. i 

218. O. I . POORE . AT . BARNETS = A cross calvary. 

/^. CROSS . IN . SARVM = I . S . P. J 

219. O, VAVGHAN . RICHARDSON = A dolphin. 

-^. KATHERINE . STR . IN . SARVM = V . E . R. 1 668. J 

220. O. WILL . SACKLER . i666 = The Upholsterers' Anns. 

/^. VPHOLSTER . IN . SARVM = W . M . S. i 

221. O. ROGER . REDBVRY=St. George and the Dragon. 

J^, IN . SARVM . 1664 = R . A . R. \ 

222. O. SIMON . ROLFE = Arms of the Rolfe family : three ravens. 

Crest : on a helmet a raven. 

i?. IN . SARVM . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WILTSHIRE. 1247 

223. O. ARTHER . SANDERS = A squirrel. 

/^, OF . SARVM . 1656= A . S. J 

224. O. JOSEPH . SAXTON = St. Gcorge and the Dragon. 

J^. IN . SALSBVRY = IS conjoined. ^ 

This and Minifie's are th6 only tokens where the city is called Salsbury. 

225. O, HENRY. SEWARD. oF = Arms: chevron ermines between 

three escalop shells. 

/^. SARVM . GROCER = H . M . S. \ 

There are no arms attributed to Seward corresponding to these. The Eyes of 
Suffolk bear argent chevron ermine between three escalops gules. The Salisbury 
Eyes had different arms. The nearest arms belonging to Salisbury or the neigh- 
bourhood are those of Grove — ermine on a chevron gules, three escalops. 
It is just possible it is a fancy coat, not ermines, but seven cloves on a chevron. 

226. O. THOMAS . SHERGOLD . OF . SARVM = A CrOWn. 

-^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = T . S. ^ 

227. O. WILLIAM . viNER = A bunch of grapes. 

^. IN . SARVM . 1657 = W . E . V. \ 

The issuer was Mayor in 1668, and died 1677. 

He bad £$ worth of halfpennies struck, according to the town books, but the 
above is clearly a farthing, 

228. O, CHRIS . wiLLMOTT = A lamb. 

R, IN . SARVM . 1666 . C . W. \ 

The issuer was a clothier, who lived at the comer of Silver Street, Salisbury. He 

died on January 28, 1691. Descendants of the family are still resident in the city. 

229. (7. . . . CLOTHIER. 
R, OF . SALISBVRY. 

This is probably a token of Willmott's. 

SHALBOURN. 

230. O, lOHN . BRADEL . LENARD . LEE = A bear. 

i?. IN . SHLATBOVRN .71=^. \ 



SHERSTON MAGNA. 
231. O. THOMAS . DAViES . IN = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. SHVSTON . MAGNAE = T . D. 1651. 



STEEPLE ASHTON. 

(See Melksham.) 

232, O, 140B . IEFFREYES = A church. 

R, STEPLE . ASHTON = R . M . L. \ 

The issuer was churchwarden in 1652, overseer in 1655, waywarden in 1657 
and i66a On April i, 1662, he was again appointed diurchwarden, but died 
within a few days, and was buried April 22, 1662. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1248 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

STRATTON (St. Margaret), 
There are places named Stratton in several counties. 

233. O. lOHN . CANN = The Mercers' Anns. 

I^, OF , STRATTON . 1652 = 1 . C 

234. O. THOMAS . BANT = Arms. 

J^. IN . STRA1T0N = T . B. 



SWINDON. 

235. O. THOMAS . FARMER . BAKER = A pair of SCalCS. 
J^. IN . SWINDON . 1 669 = HIS HALFE PENY. T . A . F. 

236. O, WILLIAM . HEATH = w . E . H (in monogram). 

/^, IN . SWINDON = w . E . H (in a monogram varying from 
the obverse). 

237. O, HENRY . MVNDAY . CHANDLER = The Gfocers* and Tallow- 

chandlers* Arms. 

J?. HIS . HALF . PENY . IN . SWINDON = H . M . 1669. 

238. O. HENERY . RESTALL = TW0 tobaCCO-pipCS CTOSSed. 

J?. IN . SWINDON . 1656 = Three sugar-loaves. 

239. A variety is dated 1668. 

240. Another variety is dated 1664. 

241. O. HENERY . RESTALL = TW0 pipeS CTOSSed. 

/^. IN . SWINDON . 1 664 = Two pipes crossed. 

242. O, lOHN . SMITH = The Bakers* Arms. 

/^» IN , SWINDON . 1664 = 1 . C . S. 

243. O, WILLIAM . WEBB = Two pipes crossed. 

H. OF . SWINDON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. W . W. 

244. O. AMOS . wiLKiNS . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. SWINDON . IN . WILKSHER = A . W. 

245. O, AMOS . WILKINS . AT = The Mercers* Arms. 

J^. SWINDON . IN . WILTS = A . M . W. 



TINHEAD (Parish of Edington). 

246. O. lOHN . BERRY . OF = The Mercers* Arms. 

J^. TINHEAD . 1668 = 1 . A . R 

247. A variety is dated 1661. 

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WILTSHIRE. 1249 



TROWBRIDGE. 

248. O. lOHN . CLARKE . 1667 = The Drapers* Arms. 

jR. IN . TROWBRiG = A Latin cross between i and c. i 

249. O. TROWBRiDG . IN . wiLTis = E . D. [Edward Davis]. 

I^. TROWBRIDG . IN . WILTIS=H . D. \ 

In St. James's Church, Trowbridge, is a tablet of beneflEictors of the poor, on 
which appears : 

1661. Mr. Edward Davis, ;f4a 
1687. Mrs. Marnjret Davis, ;f 10. 

1662. Mr. John Davis gave ;^io ; the profits thereof, together with the several 
snins above named, are to be distributed to the poor of the parish at the Nativity 
of onr Saviour yearly for ever. 

250. O, ROBERT . DARCKE . 1 669 = A merchant's mark, r . d. 

J^. IN . TRVBRIDGE . IN = WILLTS. J 

A Robert Darke, gent., was a freeholder of land in Steeple Ashton in 163a 

251. O. WILLIAM . SMITH = Two pipcs crossed. 

i?. IN . TREVBR1DGE = W . S, J 

252. A variety reads trve . bridge. 

253. A variety with tvb . bridge as the name of the town. i 

254. Another reading trevbridge. J 

255. O, ROBERT . wiTCHELL= A fleuT-de-lys. 

I^. IN . TROWBRIDGE = R . W. \ 

This issuer was churchwarden in 1671, and on the tablet above named are the 
following benefactions recorded : 
1661. Mr. Robert WhitchcU, £$, 
1661. Mrs. Ann Whitchell, £$. 

WARMINSTER. 



256. O. lOHN . BUCCHER = A heart crowned. 

jR. IN . WARMISTER . 1651 =1 . B. ^ 

257. O. I AMES . ELi0TT= An opcn hand. 

J?. OF . WARMISTER = A COCk. \ 

258. O, lOHN. SLADE . 1667 a A heart. 

A IN . WARMISTER = I . S. i 

259. O. THOMAS . TOOMER = A dove with olive-branch. 

Ji. OF . WARMESTER . 1651 =T . T. \ 



WESTBURY. 
260. O. WILL. cocKELL. OF. WEST = The Merchant-Tailors* Arms. 

J^, BVRV . COVNTY . IN . WILTS = W . S . C 58. \ 



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1250 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

261. O. THOMAS . HANCOCKE = A cock. 

jR. IN . WESBVRY . 1656 = A hand. 

262. O. WALTER . HAYNES = The Groccrs' Anns. 

J^. OF . WESTBVRY = W . H. 

263. O, lOHN . MATRAVERS . IN = A flcur-dc-lys. 

J^, WESTBVRY . 1669 = 1 . E . M. 

264. O. FRANCIS . PASHENT = The Tallowchandlcrs' Arms. 

jR. OF . WESTBVRY . 1668 = F . K . P. 

265. O. lOHN . WATTS = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. IN . WESTBVRY = I . W. 



WESTPORT (Malmsbury). 

266. O. WILLIAM . FRY . IN = The Weavers' Arms. 

J^, WESTPORTE . l666 = W. A . F. 

267. O. GILES . HOONE . AT . THE = Three cups. 

I^. IN . WEESTPVT = G . I . H. 



WILTON. 

268. O. STEPHEN , BRASSIER . 1667 = 8 . H . B. 

^. WILTON . IN . WILTSHEERE = HIS HALF PENY. 



WOOTTON BASSET. 

269. O, GABRIEL . ARMAN = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

I^, IN . WHETEN . BASE1T = G . E . A. 

270. A variety reads gabrell. 

271. O. lOHN . KNIGHTON = A crown. 

I^, IN . WOOTTON . BASSETT = I . I , K. 

272. A variety has on the obverse two keys crossed. 

WRAXHALL (SOUTH). 

273. O. valentine. STEVENS = The Butchers* Arms. 

jR. in . SOVTH . WRAXILL = V .M.S. 

274. O, lOSEPH . STONE =1667. A fleur-de-lys. 

J^, IN . SOVTH . WREXSELL = I .M.S. 



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Morcestetsbire. 



Number of Tokens issued 171 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 20 

Town Pieces issued at Bewdley, Evesham, Stourbridge 
AND Worcester. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 
Vide Prefaa. 



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Morceeterfibire* 

It is with infinite regret that the Editor has to record the death of 
one of the most energetic helpers and generous of men whom it has 
ever been his good fortune to know. 

Mr. W. A. Cotton, of Bromsgrove, to whom the Editor is indebted 
for almost all of the notes and the preface to the tokens of Worcester- 
shire, died in June, 1889, at the very early age of 37, before he was 
able to rejoice in the completion of his labours. Few men have been 
of greater service to their native town than Mr. Cotton, and almost 
every public work owed much to his self-sacrificing energy. As 
the historian of the locality, and as the author of the important work 
on the "Coins, Tokens, and Medals of Worcestershire," his aid in 
the compilation of the following pages was of the highest importance, 
and his stores of knowledge were always most generously placed at 
the disposal of the Editor whenever required. 

Mr. Cotton's abilities as a token and coin collector were of a 
marked order. He was scrupulously exact in details, and punctilious 
in descriptions, and he possessed a merit that immediately com- 
mended him to the Editor, in that he always answered letters. 

The blocks that illustrate the county, and the very fine folding- 
plate of coins and tokens, were lent by him to the Editor, and all he 
knew and all he possessed was, in his own warm-hearted way, placed 
at the service of the book. No tribute can be paid to his memory 
that is too warm, and with deep regret the Editor deplores the loss of 
a dear and valued correspondent, helper, and friend. 

The four plates of the tokens that follow this part are very kindly 
presented by Mr. John Cotton, architect, of Birmingham, "/« 
memortam " of his brother. 

The workmanship of the Worcestershire tokens is, as stated by 
Mr. W. A. Cotton in the book above referred to, creditable, 
generally, to the period, and will compare favourably with some of 
the productions of later date. They afford much curious informa- 
tion, especially as to trades carried on in the various towns, and the 
unsettled state of English orthography, as instanced by the variety of 
ways in which the same word is spelt. Many of them are ingenious 
in their style, some being of brass with a plug of copper in the 
centre, others square, octagonal, and heart-shaped ; but by far the 
larger number are round. Those issued in the county now under 
notice furnish one or more of all these varieties. They are all half- 
pennies and farthings — no pennies being issued, and about two- 

VOL. II. 80 

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1254 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

thirds of the entire number are farthings. They frequently bear 
heraldic devices on the obverse side, usually indicating the trade or 
business in which the issuer was engaged, or else the arms of the 
town where he lived. A few of the issuers bore arms, which appear 
on their tokens. In the case of the " town-pieces " issued by " Th^ 
IVardens of Bcwdley^^ the bvrrow of evesham, -and the City of 
Worcester, the arms of the respective places appear. Stourbridge 
also issued an interesting "townp'ece," bearing the Ironworkers' 
Arms on the obverse, and the Clothworkers* Arms on the reverse, 
thus showing the principal trades carried on in the town at that time. 
In the centre part of the reverse of the tokens the trader's initials with 
that of his wife very frequently occur, as in the case of Walter Palmer, 
of Bewdley, wa, who married Anne Clare, the initial of the surname 
being uppermost. Only one trader — William Chetle, of Worcester- 
issued a token bearing a merchant's-mark. 

" Every community, tradesman, or tradeswoman, that issued this 
useful kind of specie, was obliged to take it again when it was 
brought to them, and therefore in cities and larger towns, where many 
sorts of them were current, a tradesman kept a sorting dox^ into the 
partitions of which (which we may suppose were nearly as many as 
there were people there that coin'd) he put the money of the 
respective coiners, and at proper times, when he had a competent 
quantity of any one person's money, he sent it to him and got it 
changed into silver. One of these sorting-boxes I once saw in the 
city of Rochester, in Kent, with ten or a dozen partitions in it."* 

The writer has one of these boxes, with twelve compartments, 
believed to have been used for this purpose by Henry JefTerys, a 
grocer in Bromsgrove at that period. In London the changing of 
these tokens became a business, and there are examples of tokens 
issued by those who styled themselves " farthing changers." 

Some of the tokens bear a remarkable resemblance to each other, 
leading to the belief that many of the dies were engraved by the 
same person. An illustration of this is found in the ornamentation 
partaking of the same character — a device something like the Wake 
and Ormond knot, from the ends of which flowers appear — to be 
found on the tokens of Porter, Rogers, and Timothy JefTerys, all of 
Bromsgrove ; and on those of Fransham, of Evesham, and William 
Finch, of Worcester. 

These tokens " or ginated with a public necessity, but in the end 
became a nuisance." They partook largely of the nature of trade 
advertisements, and, as they were payable only at the shop at which 
they were issued, they were inconvenient. 

With reference to the " dipt " money, various sums were collected 
throughout the county, and in the accounts of the parish of Bromsgrove 
we find that on " April 5th, 1700, Granted on Houses to make good 
the Clip'd Money, ;^47 ^s." A like entry, on May 2, 1702, informs 
us that the sum raised for this purpose amounted to jQt^ 16s. 

* S. P., in GeiitUmaii' s Magazine y 1757, vol. xxvii. An illustration is given of 
ihc token and ihe dies. 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 



1255 



Boyne (first edition) describes 1 1 2 varieties of tokens issued in 
Worcestershire in the seventeenth century, which are included in 
the present bst, 'additions being marked. Green gives engrav- 
ings of thirty- six tokens issued in Worcester, and Nash of thirty- 
six issued in the city and county. The collection in the 
possession of the Corporation of Worcester has been examined, 
and private friends and collectors have afforded much valuable 
information. 

In Green's " Worcester,"* allusion is made to a coin of lead " now 
in the library at Oxford ; it appears by the inscription to have been 
designed for a halfpenny : from its rarity there is great reason to 
believe very few were struck; the industrious Mr. Snelling having 
taken no notice thereof." Dr. Nash and Green each give an engrav- 
ing of this token, but as both these — especially that of Green — are in- 
correct, I have pleasure in presenting my readers with what I believe 
to be a facsimile of the original in the Bodleian Library, engraved 
from a plaster cast obtained through the kindness of F. Madan, Esq., 
sub-librarian. This token, marked No. 91, under the head of English 
medals, is in a good state of preservation, and believed to be unique. 
It came to the library in the Browne-Willis collection, between 1739 
and 1 760, and was given to that gentleman by Mrs. Bridget Price, of 
Gloucester. It was probably struck at Worcester. 





0, GOD BLE'' : C . R. IN MINDING THE POORE FROM FRAD = WAR 

BRINGS PECE. A sword and olive-branch crossed. C R. 

£x, WORTH SOE MVCH. 

^. GOD . DID PRESARVE c R FROM wosTER . 1 66 1 = An oak-trce 
bearing three crowns, worth a Ex. hapeny. 

The modem reading of this token is : 

O. GOD BLESS KING CHARLES IN MINDING THE POOR FROM 
FRAUD == WAR BRINGS PEACE. £x, WORTH SO MUCH. 

/^. GOD DID PRESERVE KING CHARLES FROM WORCESTER. 1661. 
£x. WORTH A HALFPENNY. 



* VoL il., p. 102. 



80—2 
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1256 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

From the date on the token we gather that it was not struck till the 
year of the accession of Charles II. to the throne of England. The 
oak-tree, with the crowns in its branches, has reference to the 
hiding of this King at Boscobel, after the Battle of Worcester ; 
whilst the phrase, " war brings peace," denotes that the troublous 
times, in which the city of Worcester played such an important part, 
had passed, and that the country was then in a state of quietude. 
Who the issuer of this unique and interesting piece was it is 
impossible to surmise, but it is clear that he was one of the many- 
loyal subjects who viewed with pleasure and satisfaction the restora- 
tion of the King to the throne. 

It has occurred to me, however, says Mr. Cotton, that it might 
possibly have been issued by some of the Carliss or Carless 
family, of whom the famous and loyal Colonel William Carless 
was a member. After the Battle of Worcester, the Colonel, with 
the King and numerous of his followers, passed out of the city, the 
King making good his escape to Boscobel, where he was subsequently 
joined by Colonel Carless. In the belief that the rebels would search 
the premises, the King and the Colonel decided to spend the day in 
a " thick-leaved " oak-tree which stood at no great distance from the 
house. Here, securely screened from view, the King, tired and 
weary, rested his head on the knees of the Colonel, and fell into 
a deep sleep. From Boscobel Charles made his escape to Moseley, 
and afterwards to the Continent, where his trusty friend the Colonel 
subsequently joined him again. It is stated that the name was 
changed to Carlos at the request of the King, and that on May 21, 
1658, the following arms, crest, etc., bearing a striking resemblance to 
the ornamentation adopted on this token, were granted to him : Or, 
on a mount in base vert, an oak-tree proper, over all on a fess gules 
three regal crowns of the field. Crest : A sword argent, hilt and 
pommel or, and a sceptre of the last in saltire, enfiled with an 
oaken civic crown vert. Motto : " Subditus fidelis R^s, et salus 
Regni.'* 

Colonel Carlos was born at Bromhall, in Staffordshire, about two 
miles from Boscobel, and is said to have been descended from 
an ancient Shropshire family. He was buried at Brewood, and left 
nearly the whole of his property to Edward Carlos, then of Worcester, 
apothecary, and his issue. Grazebrook (p. 102) says, " W^at relation- 
ship, if any, existed between them does not appear, but there was 
an Anthony Carless who was Warden of the Clothworkers' Com- 
pany at Worcester, in 1665, who may have been the father of 
Edward. . . . Walter Carless, of Worcester, but afterwards of Powick, 
apothecary, evidently one of the family, died in 1843, ^&^^ ^4» 
and has a monument at Powick, whereon are represented the 
Carlos arms." 

It is possible that this lead piece was struck as a pattern halfpenny 
token by one of the members of the Carless or Carlos family, some 
of whom were trading in Worcester in the seventeenth century at the 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. i ?57 

time when this token was struck (1661), and when tokens were being 
issued in the city in considerable numbers. Nothing is more natural 
than that the principal charges contained in the arms and crest 
so recently, and under such peculiar circumstances, granted to a 
member of the family, should appear on any token they thought 
it desirable to issue. 



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1258 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



ALVECHURCH. 

Only one token is known to have been issued here, and it is the only one in ihc 
county struck by a woman. It was described by Boyne, bat was evidently a poor 
specimen. I have never been able to meet with this token, and conclude it b very 
rare. 

I. O, ELIZABETH . BALDWIN =DrA (detfited). 

A*. IN . ALLCHVRCH . 1669 = HER HALF PENY. J 

The roisters of the parish have been searched for about one hundred years, with 
the following unsatisfactory result : 

*• Elizabeth, daughter of John Baldwin, baptized 4th of August, 1652." 
" 1693. Buried Ann, wife of Joseph Baldwm." 



BENGEWORTH. 
2. O. EDWARD . PiTTWAY . AT . THE = A Hon rampant. 

J^. RED . LYON . IN . BENGWORTE = E . F . P. { 

Edward Pitt way appears to have been one of the leading Quakers of the 
district, and a man of good position, having been 'Mayor of Evtrsham in 1648. 
When George Fox, in 1655, obtained information that the magistrates of tvcsham 
had put several of his followers in prison, he determined to visit the town, 
previously sending for Edward Pittway, to ascertain if the information he bad 
received was correct, and to know if it was true, as had been reported, that the 
magistrates of the town had ordered a pair of high stocks to \ye erected on the 
occasion of his proposed visit. Pittway informed him that the rumour was 
quite correct, and at night both set out for the town, and in the evening there »^ 
'* a large and precious meeting " of Friends. The followers of Fox had become 
objects of rancorous persecution by the magistrates of Evesham, and formal 
representation was made to Cromwell concerning their conduct. Twelve of the 
persons who^e names had been attached to the document were fined in sums vary* 
mg from £2 to ;f 20, the amount last mentioned being laid on Pittway. 

The following entry occurs in one of the books of the Evesham Corporation : 
•* s^^ Oct', 1655. This day Edward Pitviay, the capital burgess, was removed 
therefrom ; being indicted at the sessions for publishing a scandalous paper against 
the magistrates ; for abusing Mr. Robert Martin ; for his rude behaviour in court ; 
and for his evil behaviour towards Mr. Recorder. '^ 

A short time alter this several of the most prominent Quakers of the district were 
imprisoned, and others persecuted ; but their numbers rapidly augmented. They 
met at Pittway's house, afterwards the Red Lion Inn — from which our token was 
issued— and subsequently the Northwick Arms. By the year 1675 ^^^ Quakers bad 
obtained a distinct burial-place at Bengeworth, behind the dwelling-house of 
Pittway, which, says May, m his ** History of Evesham," remains the property of 
the Society, though at present cultivated as a garden. This piece of land, by 
feoffment dated July 16, 1675, was, in consideration o( £Sy conveyed by Edward 
Pittway, of Bengeworth — and again, by feoffment of March 19, 1678, by Stephen 
Pittway — unto tiustees (being Quakers), their heirs and assigns, " for such purposes 
only as between the parties and other persons concerned were formerly agreed 
upon, and no otherwise." 1 he properly is described as a small piece of garden 
ground in Bengeworth, adjoining *• the Parsonage Close," and behind the dwelling- 
house of the said Edward Pittway. with way or passage through the yard gates on 
the south side of the said dwelling-house. 

An engraving of this token appears in Tindal's " History and Antiquities of the 
Abbey and Borough of Evesham " (plate v., p. 142), reading on the 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1 259 

3. J^. RED LION . IN . BENGWORTH = E .P.P. 

Nash ^ives an engraving of what was evidently a poor specimen of this token, 
reading 

O PITTWAY AT THE = A Hon rampant. 

a. RED LYON IN BENGVVORTE-R . I . P. J 

There was probably a considerable number of tokens issue<l by Pittway, as they 
arc comparatively common ; 1 have several in my own collection. 



BEVVDLEY. 




The tokens of Bewdley are, perhaps, the most interesting of any town in the 
county, presenting a variety of shapes unknown in other places, and including 
town-piece, the above illustration, bearing the arms of ihe borough, representing 
the reverse side of the same. Bewdley church is a chapel-of-ease to the mother 
church of Ribbesford. 

4. O. The I Wardens . | Halfe . peny \ . 0/ . Beivdley (in four 
lines). {Script.) 
R. 1668 = An anchor between a rose and a sword. J 

This token is octagonal in shape. Boyne, in the letter-press of his work, gives 
the inscription on the obverse of the token with a small **h" in the word "halfe," 
but in his illustration of this town-piece it is correctly represented with a capital 
*' H." An engraving of the token appears in Nash, and in Snelling 
(plate L, No. 7). The arms of Bewdley, as given in Grazebrook's ** Heraldry of 
AVorccbtershire " (vol. i., p. 50), are, '* Argent, an anchor in pale azure, the nng or, 
the anchor surmounted with a fetterlock of the second ; within the fetterlock, on 
the dexter side of the anchor, a sword erect of the last, pommel and hilt or ; on 
the sinister side of the anchor (also within the fetterlock) a rose gules." (Burke's 
•• Armory," and "Town Seal.") Nash (vol. ii., p. 284), quoiing Habingdon, 
describes the arms as depicted in the church, "Argent, an anchor azure through a 
tUD or, on the dexter point a sword in chief of the second hilted of the third, on 
the sinister a rose gules with a branch slipped vert." The same coat was found by 
Synionds, " depicted on the wall " of Bewdley church. (See his Diary, published 
by the Camden Society.) On the town seal the principal charge is a fetterlock, 
not a tun ; but in some old examples of the coat the base of the fetterlock is fashioned 
somewhat like a tun or barrel. In " The Visitation of ihe C)ounty of Worcester," 
in 1682-83, l^c arms are given as " an anchor in pale suraiounted by a fetterlock, 
within the fetterlock on the dexter side of the anchor a sword erect ; on the 
sinister side of the anchor a ruse." 

(I am indebted to the kindness of the Rev. John R. Burton, Rector of Dowles, 
for the following extract from the records of the Coii>oration, as well as for notes 
on the other tokens issued in Bewdley.) 

" 1668. Whereas the eight-square [octagonal] peeces of brass stamped on the 
side with the armes of the said Borough and by an inscription on the other side, 
entituled the wardens' half peny of Bewdley, upon experience are found con- 
venient for the more ready change of money and usefull in point of trade and com- 
nierce, especially to the poorer sort of the same Borough — And whereas the 



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i26o TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

quantity thereof already stamped (admitting them current coine of y« value of each 
of ibem of a silver half peny) amounts to thirtie pounds. Now for the encourage- 
ment of such as shall take them, etc., it is ordered that the Brideewardens of the 
said Borough shall |^ve in exchange for every fourc and twenty of such pecces one 
shilling in current silver, and so proportionably, and if any losse should occur, the 
Bridgewarden may reimburse himself out of y« lowne rents." 

5. O, SAMVELL . CART = A Hon passant gardant. 

J^. IN . BEAVDLY . 1653 = 8 . M . C J 

6. Nash gives an engraving of a token, reading on the 
O. SAMVELL CARTER = A lion passant gardant. 

I^. IN . BEAVDLY . 1653 = 8 . M . C \ 

The letters forming the surname have the appearance of being unduly crowded. 

On three specimens in my collection the reading is as No. 5, and it is not 

imprr>bable that the letters ER existed only in the fertile imagination of the 

engraver. 

(Platf, No. I.) 

7. O, THOMAS I DEDICOT | GROCER | HIS . HALF | PENNY (in five 

lines). 
J^. IN I BEWDLEY | (three cloves) | sqvare | dealing. \ 

This token is the only one in the series square in shape. Engravings of it 
appear in Nash and Snelling (plate v., No. 24), but without the dot between 
** HIS " and ** half " on the obverse. 

Thomas Dedicot was bailiflf of Bewdley in 1661. In 1667 a William Dedicot 
succeeded Edward Longmore (who *'died in his office"), being again baili£F in 
1 68a In the Ribbesford registers is an entry of the baptism : 

" I594f Oct. 30, Anne, the daughter of Thomas Dedicott, of wrignall." 

Dr. Brewer, in his ** Dictionary of Phrase and Fable," describes r(wi«</ dealing as 
** honcbt straightforward dealing, without branching off into underhand tricks, or 
deviating from the straight path into the byeways of finesse," an idea here in- 
tended tu be conveyed by square dealing. 

8. O, Tho . Farloe . Capper . in Bewdley (in four lines). 

R, 1670 . his . halfe . peny = A hat. \ 

This token is heart-shaped. Nash gives an engraving of a token, also heart- 
shaped, reading : 

9. a Tho I Farloe \ Capper in \ Bevdley (in four lines). 

R. 16 (a hat) 70 | his halfe \ Peny. \ 

Bewdley was famous for its sailors' caps, which were ordered to be worn by Act 
of Parliament in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, under a penalty of 3s. 4d. They 
were worn by all classes, until the present French hat was introduced about 1685. 
The Act required "that all above the age of six years, except some of a certain 
state and condition, shall wear upon the Sabbath or holy days, upon their heads, 
one cap of wool, knit, thicked, and dressed in England, upon forfeiture of 
3S. A^r 

10. O, THO : I FARLOE | CAPPER | IN . BEWD | LEY (in five lines). 
R. (A cap) 1670. \ 

This is engraved in Boyne. 

The following interesting entry is found in the Ribbesford registers : 
•• 1671, Feb. 9, Thomas, son of Thomas ffiurloe and Joane, t^me in April, 1665, 
baptized before by a minister not ordain'd by a Byshop, for w<^ his ffathcr was 
p'senied and ordered to have this child baptized by one episcoimlly ordained." 



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WORCESTERSHIRE, 



1261 



(Plate, No. 2.) 

II O, WALTER . PALMER . OF = A hat. 

J^. BEWDLEY . CAPPER . 1656 = W . A . P i 

One of the most eminent cappers of Bewdley was Walter Palmer, who lived in 
the High Street, in the house now belonging (1883) to Mr. Marcy. His daughter 
Sarah was married at Ribbesford, August 23, 1688, to Israel Wilkes, grandfather of 
the notorious John Wilkes, member for Middlesex, and editor of the NofiA Briton. 
Another daughter married Dr. James Douglas, Physician to Queen Caroline, 
and his son George married Anne Johnson in 1687, and was grandfather of 
Mrs. Skey, wife of Jonathan Skey. Fuller ("Worthies," p. 49) says this occu- 
patk>n ("capper ") set no less than fifteen callings to work. Machinery was for- 
bidden, and the trade protected by law. In 22nd Edward IV. a penalty of 40s. was 
inflicted upon anyone setting up a fulling-mill. A mill would thicken and full 
more caps in a day than four score men, and it was considered inconvenient to turn 
se many labouring men to iiileness. In the 3rd Henry VIII. it was enacted that no 
caps or hats ready wrought >hould be brought from beyond seas. In 13th Elizabeth 
caps were to be worn by all oersons (some of worship and quality excepted) on 
Sabbath and holy days, under penalty of ten groats. This was repealed in 
39ih Elizabeth. By an act of the common council of London in 1665 all caps were 
to be brought to Blackwell Hall, except Monmouth and Bewdley caps. The French 
Protestant refugees brought into England the use of hats, and the new fashion 
caused the decline of the Bewdley manufactures. In the time of Charles II., Mr. 
Tarrington says : " Cap-making in Bewdley is grown so low, that great part of 
the ancient cap-makers in that town are wholly decayed, and the rest at this 
present day are in a very low condition." — Burton's " History of Bewdley " (8vo., 
1883, pp. 12 and 13). Mr. Burton further says the trade appears to have after- 
wards revived, and to have lingered on till the beginnmg of the present century. 
The ** Worcestershire Guide" for 1797 enumerates amongst the callings exercised 
here, ** Dutch and sailors' caps, which are much prized for excellent napping.** 
Capmaking is now a thing of the past. 

The connection of John Wilkes, a member of Parliament, and editpr of the 
NbrtA Briton newspap>er, with this family, will be seen from the pedigree follow- 
ing. He was prosecuted for bis independent attack against the abuses of the 
Government. In 1768 he was returned for Middlesex, but declared by the 
(Commons to be disqualiHed from taking his seat ; though he was four times re- 
turned as member for the county, the rival candidate, Colonel Luttrell, with only 
a fourth of the votes, was declared to be the silting member, and took his seat in 
the Commons in his stead. The agitation arising out of these things led to the 
pubhcation of the splendid letters of ** Junius," the author of which has never been 
discovered ; as well as the dSbut of the celebrated Charles James Fox, in defence 
of the liberties of the people. 

Walter Palmer = Anne Clare (married April 
19, 1652). 

Daughter 
= Dr. James Douglas, 
Physician to Queen 
Caroline. 



Sarah 
— Israel Wilkes (married 
August 23, 
1688, at Rib- 
besford. 
Nathanael 
— Sarah 



George 
= Anne Johnson 
(1687) 



Daughter 
.... Freeman 



Israel 



I 
John Wilkes, M.P. 
- Miss Mead 

I 

Mary 



Heaton Daughter 

— Rev. . . . Jones 



Daughter 
= Jonathan Skey, Esq. 

Mary 



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1262 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

It seems probable that the Wilkes family originally came from Bewdley. 
There are still some people of that name at Button Oak, in Dowles parish. The 
following extracts from the Ribbesford registers should be of interest : 

Baptism. 1593. Oct. 14, Katheren, the daughter of John Wilkes. 

Marriage. 1615. Oct. 12, Arthyr Palmer and Elizabeth Shelly at Dowles. 
„ 1680. Aug. 26, Walter Palmer and Anne Pooley. Liceuce. 

,, 168S. Aug. 23, Israeli Wilks and Sarah Palmer. Licence. 

In the Bewdley Chapel and Bridgewardens* Accounts we find entries referring 
to Mr. John Wilkes, who was chapelwarden in 1643. '^^ ^ mercer in the town : 

i6oa — P<* to John Wilkes the 12 of May 1600 by Mr. Cowpur appo}Titment for 
the hier of a horse to Lichfield about the survaur of the schole house. 

1630. — Receipts for Seates in the chappell of John Wilkes mercer 00 03 oa 

The gateway on the old bridge was pulled down when the bridge was removed. 
It ** was under an arch in a timber- house of two stones which stood on one of the 
piers of the bridge ; on one side of the house was a dwelling for the gaiekeeper, 
and on the other a prison ! It is said there was an ancient chapel at the foot of 
the bridge, which was dedicated to St. Ann, and the old inhabitants inform me 
that the place thereabout was in former years called * St. Ann's Comer.' The in- 
tention in erecting these chapels on or near bridges was that travclleR should 
return thanks in them and pray for safe journeys. The custom is of very high 
antiquity."* 

12. O, PETER . WALKER . OF . BEWDLEY = A rms : a fcss between 

three pears. 

^. MERCER . HIS . HALF . PENY = P . W i 

Nash gives an engraving of a token reading like the above, and this may have 
been copied by Boyne ; but on one in my own collection the name is perfectly 
plain, and reads : 

13. O. PETER . WALTER . OF . BEWDLEY = AmiS I a ftSS betWCCD 

three pears. 
A'. (Same as No. 12.) J 

The name of Peter Walter appear^ in the list of capital burgesses present at the 
herald's visitation of the county on August 21, 1682. 

BLOCKLEY. 

A token issued here is by Boyne included under those of Gloucestershire, V* 
14 O. THOMAS . WARNER = A pair of croppei's shears. 

iV. OF . BLOCKLEY. 1667 =T . V . W 

BROADWAY. 

(Plate, No. 3.) 

15. O, MICHAELL . RVSSELL = A dog. 

J^. OF . BROADWAY . 1670 = M . A . R i 

On the token in ray collection there is i on the reverse, but in Poyne this is 
omitted, and no mention is made of the value of the token. Whether or not there 
is another variety in which this does not appear 1 am unable to say. 

16. O, PHILIP . HODGES . IN = A hart lodged. 

J^, BRODWAY . 1669== HIS HALF PENY. i 

The Hodges were an ancient and respectable Broadway family ; they bore anus 

and purchased lands in the parish 20th of Elizabeth. In 1686, a Thomas Hodges 

* " The Rambler in Worcestershire," by John Noake, 1S51. 

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WORCESTERSHIRE. 



1263 



founded and endowed a school in Broadway for educating, clothing, and appren- 
ticing twenty poor boys. The hart forms no part of the arms or crest of the 
family, although an antelope*s head erased or, ducally gorged gules, is the crest of 
the Hodges of Harvington, Worcestershire, who, like the Hedges of Hampton 
Lovett and Devonshire, each bear the same arms as the Broadway Hodges, viz., 
Or, three crescents sable, on a canton of the last a ducal coronet of the first. 

BROMSGROVE. 

Bojrne describes only five tokens as being issued here ; I am therefore enabled 
to add five unpublished varieties of this town, making a total of ten. The name 
of the town is variously spelt Brovmsgrove, Bromesgrove, and Broomsgrove. It is 
supposed by many that Bromsgrove was formerly known as Boarsgrcve, and 




Burcot as Boctrscot, but there appears to be no evidence in support of the supposi- 
tion ; at all events, the tokens of the seventeenth century do not in any way 
favour the idea. The device adopted on the seals of the various town authorities 
is a boar, similar to the above woodcut. 

O, lOSIAH . DINGLEY . OF = HIS | HALF | PENY. 

BROVMSGROVE . l668 = l . D. i 



17. 



18. 



a 



lOSIAH . DINGLEY = I . D. 
IN . BROMSGROVE =1669. 



i 




During the restoration of Beoley Church, near Rcdditch, on taking up the belfry 
floor, among other coins found was one of Josiah Dingley.*s tokens. 

The Dingleys or Dineleys are an old Worcestershire family, and in reference to 
the name ** Oddingley," a village in Worcestershire, the following ancient couplet 
relates to a traditional fight between two Saxon giants. Odd and Dingley, as to 
the name of the place, in which Odd, getting the worst of the encounter, shouted : 
*• O Dingley ! Dingley ! spare my breath, 
It shall be called Oddingley Heath.'* 

John and Luke, two sons of Josiah Dingley, were buried in 1686, the former on 
January 6, and the latter on June 11. A Joseph Dingley, probably a brother to 
Josiah, was living in the town at that time. 

19. O. HENRY . iEFFREYS = The Groccrs' Arms. 

iV. IN . BROMSGROVE = H . I. \ 




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1264 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
20. O. HENRY . JEFFREYS . HIS = HALF PENY. 

I^, IN . BROMSGROVE = The Groccrs' Arms. 






This well-struck and interesting token is of brass, with a plug of copper in the 
centre. The parish registers furnish us with the following information : 

1650. January 16, Marryed Mr. Henry Jefferies and Miss Mary Woodcock. 

1652. September i, Bapt : Elizabeth y* daughter of Henry Jeffereys. 

1654. April The two and twentieth, bom Sara, the daughter of Henry Jefferies, 
Mercer, and Mary his wife, bapt. 28. 

1654. July, Buried The one and twentieth Sara, daughter of Henry and Mary 
Jeffreyes. 

1655. June The twenty-third, born Sara, the daughter of Henry Jefferies. 

He probably combined the business of mercer with that of grocer. The 
daughter, Sara, bom on April 21, died exactly three months after, on July 21, and 
the child next bom being a daughter was also christened Sara. 

2 1. O. lOHN I lEFFERYS | IN . BROMS | . GROVE . (in foUf linCS). 

jR. HIS I HALF . PENY | I . 1 | 1 668 (in four lines). i 






This token is engraved in Nash. It does not appear from the token what 
occupation he followed, but from* his will and inventory of his effects he was 
evidently a mercer, and, judging from the amount of his stock-in-trade and personal 
estate, we may presume he was in a fair position, which surmise is borne oat by 
the frequency of^his signature in the parish books about the year 1684, &nd by h^ 
will, from which we gather that he was owner of the property where he carried on 
the business, subject to a mortgage. He left two children — both daughters— 
and all his property passed to his wife, in "good assurance" that she would 
"educate and breede the children to the "best of her ability." His slock-in- 
trade and debts were valued at;£300, "besides a certaine lease of houses'* at 
;f 250, and an item of ;f 10 for " moneyes forgott." 

** In the name of God Amen. I John Jefferies of Bromsgrove in the County 
of Wore' Mercer beinge weake in body but of sound and pfect mind memory 
and understandinge doe make this my last Will and Testament hereby 
revokeing all and evry Will and Wills Testam* and Testaments by me made 
First and principally I comitt my Soule to Almighty God my Great Creator 
bopeinge through free mercy and by the meritts of Jesus Christ my Blessed 
Redeemr to be pdond all my Sins and my Body I comiit to the Earth to be 
decently buryed in Christian manner at the discretion of my Executors. And 
my estate I give and dispose of as followeth first I give and devise to Frances 
Jefferies my deare and lovinge wife the house I now live in w*** all buildings 
yards gardens Courts l>acksides and apptenncs to the same belonging or in 
anywise appteyninge To have and to hold to her the said Frances her cxor* 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 126$ 

adms and assignes duringe all such time and terme of yeares estate and 
interest I have or ought to have of in or to the same she dischargeinge the 
mortgage that b upon the same And all the rest of my goods chattells 
utincells of household shop goods book debts Creditts bonds bills specialities 
and pson^ile estate whatsoever I doe hereby allsoe give & devise to her my said 
loveing Wife havetnge trust and good assureance in her that she will p'serve 
the same the best she can for my dear children who I comitt to her care and 
tuiton not doubtinge but she will out of the same educate and breede them to 
the best of her ability & give to them w** she can possibly p'serve neVtheless 
my Will is that if she my sd Wife happen to marry that then she doe forthw^** 
pay and deliv' out of the same estate to M*" John Hill Gierke and M' William 
Tilt In trust and for the l)enefit of my two daughters Elizabeth and Hannah 
the sume of One hundred pounds to be equally devided and p** to them at their 
age of one and twenty yeares And in case of her refusill to doe the same I do 
hereby impower will & appomt the s^ W Hill and M' Tilt to raise & levie the s** 
sumo of One hundred pounds out of my estate (for the uses afores**) by sale of 
the same or any pte thereof And I make my sd loveinge Wife Frances sole 
Kxecutrix of this my sd last Will and the sd M' Hill and M' Tilt Feofifees & 
Trustees of y« same. 

•* Witness my hand & seale dated the nynth day of March Ano dni one 
thousand six hundred eighty five 

**Jo. Jeffreys. (l.s.) 

" Signed sealed published and delived in the p'sence of 

"Hannah Jefferys. 
*' Signed— Jane Hiller. Jos: Butler. 

** Proved S^h day of April 1686." 

* A true Inventory of all the goods chattells and creditts of M' John Jeffreye 
of the Towne and Parish of Bromsgrove in the County and Diocese of 
Worcester Mercer deceased or the value of all after they were pticularly 
apprised by us whose names are here subscribed the nine & twentyeth day of 
March Ano. Dom. 1686. 

£ s d. 
Imprimis. Wearing Apparell and money in purse ... 05 00 00 

It. In the matted Chamber Beds and Bed Steeds and the 
whole furniture of that Chamber wth the little Roome 

in the house il 1800 

It. In the Chamber over y« Hall Beds Bedsteeds trunke 

and the whole furniture theie 091500 

In the Chamber over y« Warehouse Beds Bedsteeds chests 

& all other goods there 040500 

It. Linnens of all sorts 10 00 00 

It In the Hall a table board and frame w**» stooles 

chayres forks, spitts and other things 05 10 00 

It. In the Buttery Hrasse and Pewter of all sorts, tinne 

ware vessells and other things 05 1700 

It. In the Brewing house a furnace and brewing vessells 

w^ some Mault 070000 

II. In the Shop & Warehouse all sorts of goods and 
Mercery Ware after their pticular apprizeing w^** all y« 

Booke debts 3000307 

Goods unseen not known & unapprized 00 10 00 

Besides a certaine lease of houses 2500000 

Item. Moneyes forgott 10 00 00 



Sum tot ;f62i 08 07 



William Tilt 
William Wati^s 
William Porter Junior 

Ben : KiMBRRLEY *' 



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1266 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



2 2. 



O. 



TIMOTHY . lEFFERYES-His HALF PENY and three muUcts. 
IN . BROMSGROVE . 1668-T . 1. within a sprig. 





lie was buried in 1677. 

23. A variety reads ieferyes. 

24. O. lOHN . MASON . 1667 = The Mercers' Arms. 
/^, OF . bromesgrove = his half peny. 




In the churchyard is a stone to the memory of the wife of John Mason : 

HERE LYETH THE BODY OF ELIZABETH 
MASON WIFE OF lOHN MASON 
MERSSER WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE 
..... NOVEMBER I675. 

When the Hop Pole Inn, Bromsgrove, a fine specimen of half-timlicred work, 
was pulled down (now re-erected as the Worcester City and County Hank), one 
of these tokens — with others— w.is found. 



*s- 



o. 



J 



THOMAS . porter = HIS HALF PENY. 

IN . BROMSGROVE . i668 = T . P. Conjoined. 

In the registers the following entries occur referring to this family : 

1652. Nov 4 Bapt Rebeccah, daughter of Thomas Porter of y' town. 

1654. Sep The 24 Samuell son of Mr. Thomas Porter Married. 

1656. Oct 31 Born Priscilla the daughter of Mr. Thomas Porter. 

1702. November 16 Bur. Mary Porter Wid. in linnen. 

Joseph, a son of the said Thomas Porter, was buried March 20, 1688. Over 
he priests' entrance, on the outside wall of the chancel of Bromsgrove church, is 
a tablet to the memory of this family : 

** Under these 3 stones, are interred the Bodies of Thomas Porter, of Broms- 
grove, Mercer, who died in the year 1673, lieing the 73"* year of his age. And of 
Mary his wife, who died November the 13**' 1702, being the 86**» year of her age. 
And of Samuel their Son, who died November i**, 1703, With several other of 
their children. 

** * Blessed are the dead which die in the lord.' Revelations I4»** V' I3*^'* 

The dale of the death of Thomas Porter is not stated on the tablet, but we 6nd 
from the registers that he was buried on March 16. Samuel Porter, above re- 
ferred to, left the rentals of two leasehold estates at Stoke Prior (the rents of which 
at the time of his death amounted to £^6 lis. 2d.), to be ** distributed among 
such poor of the parish as received no pay." The term expired in 1803. It was 
probably this Samuel Porter who caused the above tablet to be erected. 

In 1690, Mary Porter paid poll-tax for herself and five children — six shillings. 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 



1267 



Memorandum. — ** That on or about y« 12*** day of December in the year of our 
Lord one thousand six hundred ninety two Thomas Porter of the parish of 
Bromsgrove in y« County of Worcester Mercer being then sick of y« sickness 
whereof he shortly after died but of sound mind & disposing memory did make & 
declare his Will nuncupative thereby to settle & dispose of his temporal estate 
in manner following (viz«) I give unto my Sister Mary Dowland twenty pounds 
Item I give unto my Brother Samuel all my Hoggs I make my Mother sole 
Executrix & to dispose of to my Sisters Hester Porter & Priscilla Porter as she 
pleases all which word or words importing y° very same sence & meaning he y* s^ 
Thomas Porter did utter & declare with a full & serious intent & resolucon y«same 
should stand for & be his last Will and Testam^ nuncupative in y« p'sence & heat- 
ing of us whose names are hereunto subscribed. 

Samuell Porter 
Hester Porter. 
Priscilla Porter. 

Proved on the twenty-second day of March 1692. 

26. O. WILLIAM . PORTER = HIS HALF PENY. 

/C*. IN . BROMSGROVE . l668 = W . P. h 





In the parish registers we find ; 
* *' 1655. January The 29^'* pub. y"^*^ time in y® market an intended marriage 
between William Porter Mercer and Frances Vernon Daughter of M' Richard 
Vernon of Doderhill prsh gent. & Marryed Feb 14 next." 

His wife Frances died November i, 1685, and a son John in the same year. A 
Robert Porter was baptized December 27, 1687, and was buried January 10 in the 
year following. 

"William Porter Sen' & his daughter paid Poll tax in 1690 — 2 shillings & 
William Porter Jun' and his wife — 2 shillings " 

A William Porter, of Bromsgrove, disclaimed arms at the Visitation of the 
County in 1682-3. 

From the will we gather that the father (the issuer of the token) had disposed of 
the business to his son William. He had also parted with possession of land and 
personal effects to a considerable extent in his lifetime, th'JS accounting for the 
small sum at which his furniture, etc., was valued at his decease. He leaves 
Willinm Porter half-a-crown, to buy him a pair of gloves ; he gives Joseph 
Porter and his daughter Frances each " one twenty shilling piece of old broad 
Rold ;" the latter was to receive in addition ** the lesser of the two bigger brass pols," 
as he had given with her to John Johnson " a very competent marriage portion in 
money and goods proportionable to the estate of the same John Johnson." 

I pive below his will, and the interesting inventory of his personal effects. 
Memion is made of a truckle-bedstead in the chamber over the pantry. This 
truckle or trundle-bed was a low piece of furniture, which in earlier days was 
rolled under a higher l)ed>tead, the name being of considerable antiquity. The 
rollicking host of the Garter, in the Merty Wives of Windsor* in describing 
Falstaff's room, says : 

"There's his chamber, his house, his castle, his standing-bed, and truckle-bed : 
'tis painted about with the story of the prodigal, fresh and new." 

Bishop Hall, in his ** Toothless Satires," makes the trencher chaplain 

*Mie upon the trtukle-bed 
Whiles his younir maister lielh o'er his ht*ad." 



• Act IV., Scene V. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1268 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Butler, the Worcestershire poet, who died in 1680, thus alludes to the tnickle- 
l>ed»ttad : 

** When Hudibras, whom thoughts and aching 
'Twixt sleeping kept, all night, and waking. 
Began to rub his drowsy eyes. 
And from his couch prepared to rise, 
Resolving to dbpatcn the deed 
He vow*d to do, with trasty speed, 
But first, with knocking luud, and bawling, 
He rous'd the Squire, in truckU lolling."* 

"In the name of God Amen this eleventh day of July in the year of our Lord one 
thousand six hundred eighty nine and in the 6rst year of the reign of our 
Sovereign Lord and Lady William the third and Mary the second by the 
Grace of God King and Queen of England Scotland France and Ireland 
Defenders of the faith I William Porter the elder of Bromsgrove in the 
County of Worcester Mercer having a compitent mesure of health and being 
of a sound and disposing mind and memory (Blessed be God therefore) But 
con'-idering my Mortality the certainty of death and incertainty of the time 
thereof (hereby revoaking and making void all former last Wills and Testa- 
ments by me at any time heretofore made and every gift bequest device and 
thing in them and every of them contained) Do make my last Will and Testa- 
ment in manner and forme following First of all I comend my Soul into the 
hands of God my most mercifull Father hopeing for the salvation thereof in 
and through the only and alone merits and satisfaction of Jesus Christ his only 
begotten Son and my alone Loid and Savo' and my body to the earth to be 
decently interred in the same according to the discresion of my Eiecutrix 
hereinafter named And as touching and concerning such part of my personal 
estate I have yet left and undisposed off I dispose of the same as followeth 
Whereas I have upon the marriage of my eldest Son William Porter setled and 
assured upon and unto him a considerable estate in land and also given unto 
him a great share and part of my personal estate And upon the marriage of 
my second son Joseph Porter 1 have given to him a proportionable part of 
such my estate m money. And upon the marriage of my youngest daughter 
Frances unto John Johnson I have given with her unto the said John Johnson 
a very compitent marriage portion in money and goods and proportionable to 
the estate of the same John Johnson with which setlement and several and respec- 
tive Gifts I hope my said three children William Joseph and Frances wilt be 
well satisfied and contented I do therefore Give and bequeath unto my said 
Son William Porter only two shillings and sixpence to buie him a pair of 
Gloves And unto my said Son Joseph Porter only one Twenty shillings peicc 
of old broad gold And unto my said Daughter Frances only one twenty 
shillings peice of old broad gold also And the lesser of the two bigger brasse 
pots that are now in the Kitchin in the house I do now dwell To be paid and 
delivered to them respectively within the space of one month next after my 
decease by my Executrix hereinafter named And as for touching and concern- 
ing all such money I shall have in my possession at the time of my decease 
And all debts due and owing unto me then upon bond bill or other wayes And all 
household goods chattels and personal estate whatsoever (After my debts (if I 
shall owe any at the time of my decease) and the legacyes above mentioned 
shall be paid delivered or tendred and all and singular my funeral charges 
shall be discharged) I give devise and bequeath the same unto my eldest 
Daughter Elizabeth Porter whom I make constitute and apoint sole Executrix 
of this my last Will and Testament In witnesse whereof I have hereunto set 
my hand and seal the day and year first above written. 

** William Portrr. (ls.) 
** Signed sealed and published in the presence of 
Ro : Bagott 
Sam u ELI. Porter 
Richard Bell 

" Proved iith June, 1694," 

* Iludibras, Canto II. 

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WORCESTERSHIRE. 



1269 



A tree and pfect Inventory of the goods and Chattels of William Porter late of 
Bromsgrove in the County of Worcester Mercer deceased taken and appraised 
the sixth day of July Anno Dni 1693 by Henry Cooke and Richard Handy as 
foUoweth : 



Imprimis. His wearing apparrell and money in his purse.. . 
In the Parlour Chamber. 

Item. One pair of Bedsteads one Feather Bed Bolster and 
Pillow one pair of Blanketts one Rugg curtained 
Vallence ... .!. 

Item. One Clock one watch two gold rings two silver 
spoones one silver dish 

In the Chamber over the Pantree. 
Item. One trunk one desk one grate One truckle -bedstead, 
One Coffer, Six Paire of hempen sheetes one dozen of 
Napkins fower pillow beares ... : . . 

In the Parlour. 
Item. One Bedstead one feather Bed one flock Bed one 
paire of Blanketts & coverlet with curtaines & Vallence 
One Bolster, ten dishes of pewter, ten plates one bason 
two porringer dishes one pewter Candlestick one salt 
one halfe pint pott one Chamber pott one Grate fower 
pairs of Tonges two fire shovells one Bar one paire of 
Andirons, one chest two chaires two stooles, one close 
stoole one coffer three joynd stooles & one fork 

In the Hall. 
Item. One Brass pan three brass potts three skilletts one 
warming pan one sklmer one brass spoone one little 
kettle one paire of racks, two spitts two candlesticks 
one frame & scures one flesh forke one paire of bellowes 
two dripping pans two chopping Knifes one Skreene 
one side Cupboard fower chaires two stooles three tables 
two bouls one basket one dozen and a halfe of trenchers 
one cupboard six book es and one case 

In the Seller. 
Item. Two candells two Brkins two Skeeles 

Item. One pocket PistoU 

Item. All things forgot or not scene 



27. O. SAMVELL . ROGERS . l668 = S . R. 

/^. IN . BROOMSGROVE = HIS HALFF PENNY. 



£ 
8 



o 



8 10 o 
3 15 6 



2 17 6 



7 4 10 



3 16 4 



10 
2 
I 



6 
6 


£S4 18 


2 




This Samuel Refers was a Papist, and in 1690 paid poll-tax for himself two 
shillings, and for Ms wife one shilling, all Papists and Quakers being diarged 
doable tax. He had a son Joseph, born in May, 1654 ; and on November 24, 
1656, was " bom James son of Sam. and Jane Rogers." He left no will, and his 
wife took out letters of administration to his estate, which was evidently small, his 

VOL, n. 8r 



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I270 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

entire personalty being sworn at £23 los. 2d. He was an apothecary, in addition 
to which he fulfilled the duties of a barber-surgeon, a ** barber's shop doth" beiog 
included in the items valued. Amongst the other matters mentioned in tbe 
inventory were : 

£ s.l 

Item. His wearing apprl and money in his purse 200 

Item. In the shopp the counter, one nest of small boxes 
and sheelves gallipotts w^ a . . . some other boxes, 

dn^es, and some other things in the shopp 800 

Item. Books 100 

In the hall was " one trunk, one old coffer, one kneading tubb, several boxes and 
sheelves, two chavers, one Jacke, one fire grate, fire shovell and broach (?), ooe 
brass candlestick, ' etc. 

" The Barber-Surgeon was formerly known by his Pole at the door, the reason 
of which is sought by a querist in the *' British Apollo," fol., London, 170S, 
No. 3 : 

" ' I*de know why he thkt selleth ale 

Hangs out a chequer'd part per pale ; 

And why a barber at port-hole 

Puts forth a party-coloured pole.' 

** * Ansiver, 
•* * In ancient Rome, when men lov'd fighting. 
And wounds and scars took much delight in, 
Man-menders then had noble pay, 
Which we call surgeons to this day — 
*Twas ordered that a long pole, 
With basin deck'd, should grace the hole 
To guide the wounded, who unlopt 
Could walk, on stumps the other hopt. 
But when they ended all their wars. 
And men grew out of love with scars, 
Their trade decaying, to keep swimming. 
They join'd their other trade of trimming ; 
And to their poles, to publish either. 
Thus twisted both their trades together.* 

The pole was used by the barber-surgeon for the patient to grasp in blood-letting, 
a fillet or bandaging being used for tying his arm. When the pole was not in use, 
the tape was tied to it, and twisted round it ; and thus both were hung up as a 
sign. At length, instead of hanging out the actual pole used in the operation, 
a pole was painted with stripes round it, in imitation of the real pole and its 
bandages ; hence the barber's pole. Lord Thurlow, in his speech for postponing 
the further reading; of the Surgeons' Incorporation Bill, July 17, 1797, stated that, 
' by a statute still m force the barbers and surgeons were each to use a pole.' "* 

CHADDESLEY CORBETT. 

28. O. HVMPHREY . POTTER . OF = Arms of WorcestCT : three 

pears. 

/^, CHADGLY . CORBET . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

(Plate, No. 4.) 

29. O. HVMFREY . POTTER . OF = Anns of Worcester: three pears. 
J^. (Same as No. 28.) i 

In the token in my collection there is only one H in the Christian name. The 
letter engraved as F may possibly be a P, but the token does not convey that 

♦ "Things not Generally Known," by John Timbs, F.S.A., 1856. 

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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1271 

impression. Whether this is a variety, or an error of Boyne's, I am unable 
to state. 

A Humphrey Potter was a prominent member of the early Baptist cause in 
Bromsgrove, and the name appears in the list of members, as well as amongst the 
signatures confirming resolutions, whilst it has not been found in the Chaddesley ' 
registers. 

CLIFTON-ON-TEME. 

30. 0. lOHN. lENCKINS . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

I^, OF . CUFTON . VPON . TEAM = I . A . I. J 

DROITWICH. 

The tokens of Droitwich each bear the arms of the borough, and it is a matter 
for surprise that only three are known to have been issued in this ancient town. 

(Plate, No. 5.) 

31. O, STEPHEN . ALLEN = HIS HALFE PENY. 

/^. APOTH . IN . DROYTWicH = Arms of the town of Droitwich : 
quarterly, first and fourth, cheeky ; second and third, 
two barrows. ^ 

Grazebrook gives the aims of the town : ** Argent, two lions passant in pale sur- 
mounting a sword of state in pale point downwards ; impaling, quarterly first and 
foorth, cheeky argent and sable ; second and third, gules, two barrows or. The 
seal of the Statute Merchant of Droitwich bears cheeky argent and sable ; 
impaling the two barrows." Barrows were conical baskets, into which the salt was 
put to let the water drain from it. 

There were many families of the name of Allen living in Droitwich in the 
seventeenth century, and in the registers of St. Andrew's the following entries are 
to be found relating to this branch : 

** Bap : Steephen, the sonne of Roger Allen, was baptized the xxvj day of 
December, 1639." 

"June 23, 1675. Stephen, the sonne of Stephen Allen, was buried." 

The issuer of our token was churchwarden in 1 661, when " Robert Norbury 
was minister," and a John Allen carried on business in the town as a mercer at 
that time. 

32. O, THOMAS . CALCOTT= Arras : three barrows. 

J^, IN . DROITWICH = Arms : cheeky. i 

In the roisters of St. Andrew's we find : 

" Bur : IHiomas, the sonne of Thomas Calcott, was buried the xiv^ day of 
April, 1642." 

" Bap : Thomas, a second sonne of Thomas Calcott was baptized the xxviij day 
of AprUl, 1642." 

33. O, GEORGE . OLDBACK . AND . WILL . TOMPSON = THEIR HALF 

PENY. 

J^, OF . DROITWICH . 1 667 = Arms of the town of Droitwich. J 

On a list of Worcestershire tokens published by Boyne in Arises Birmingham 
Gazette^ prior to the issue of his work, this token is given as : 

34. O. GEORGE . OLDBACK . & . . . SON = THEIR HALF PENY. 

R, (Same as No. 33.) \ 

(Plate, No. 6.) 

35. O. GEORGE . LENCH . WILL . TOMSON :- THEIR HALF PENY. 

R. OF . DROITWICH . 1667-Arms of thetown of Droitwich. J 

81—2 



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I27a TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

36. A variety reads on obverse george . lenche . will . Thomp- 
son, and in other respects as No. 35. 

As will be seen from the illustration, the specimen in my collection is not a Yeiy 
^rfect one, but the variations on it are very plain ; in fact, there is good reason to 
donbt if ever a token was issued as No. 33. The lettering is very crowded, ind 
the die was probably of an inferior character. 

A careful search of the registers of St. Andrew's parish proves that families of 
Lench and Tomson were resident in Droit wich during the seventeenth century, 
whilst no mention whatever can be found of the name of Oldback. The Lencfaes 
seem to have held good positions. The issuer of our token was churchwarden in 
I684-85-86, and 1695; ^^ ^*s ^^ * ** Burgess of the Corporation." In the 
records of the borough his name, with those of Edward, Thomas, and John 
Lench, very frequently occurs during the years from 1676 to 1684, and Thomas 
Lench filled the office of "BayliflS." In the nave of St. Andrew's Oiurch is 
a stone to the memory of some members of the family. The registers afford 
information as under : 

** Dec 9, 1689. George Lench's man was Buryed, viz., Jn® Sheldon.** 

** Nov. 30, 1694. Elizabeth, y« wife of M' George Lench, was buryed." 

" 1703. George Lench, Burgess of this Corporation, aged 86 (?) yeais and 
1 1 months, died October y« 28***, and was buryed the 30^ day of y« said month.*' 

He left no will, and letters of administration were granted to his only son, 
Edward Lench, on November 10 in the same year. He was a " chirurgeon," and 
in the **shopp" was '*one table board and six chairs." Amongst other things 
in the brewhouse was " one cuckinge pott.*' He held the lease of two tenements 
in the borough. A shilling was put down for " trumpery and things forgotten and 
unappraised, and xxx» for ** two piggs." 

William Thomson was one of the churchwardens of St. Andrew's in the years 
1665 and 1667. 

'* Bap : Richard, the sonne of William Tomson, was baptised February the 27, 

1659." 

"June 3, 1674. William, the sonne of William Thompson, was buried.** 
•* Tune 30, 1689. Tone Toinpson was buryed.** 
" bee. 10, 1689. William Tompson was buried.*' 



DUDLEY. 

Dudley properly belongs to Worcestershire, although surrounded by Stafibrd- 
shire. The tokens, however, assign it to both counties. 

37. O. WILL . BIGGS . OF . DVDLEY . IN -The Mercers' Anns. 

/^. STAFFO -W . M . B. J 

(Plate, No. 7.) 

38. O. WILL . BRiGGS . OF = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^, DVDLEY . IN . STAFFO = W . M . B. J 

(Plate, No. 8.) 

39. O. lOHN . FINCH . OF . DVDLEY = HIS HALFE PENY. 

i?. IN . WORCESTERSHIRE = The Ironmongers' Arms. i 

The Ironmongers* Arms are : On a chevron between three gads, as many 
swivels. 

40. O. EDWARD . NIGHTINGALE = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. MERCER . IN . DVDLEY = HIS HALF PENNY. ^ 

Nash gives an engraving of this token, but Dudley is spelt with a u instead of 
V, as in the above specimen. 
Edward Nightingale made his will January 4, 1705. He left a messuage, then 



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WORCESTERSHIRE, ' 1273 

in two dwellings, to his daughter Elizabeth. To his son Samuel, who owed his 
father three score pounds on bond, twenty shillings. He left ^10, part thereof, 
to his executrix toMrards defraying his funeral expenses, and the remainder of the 
/60 he left to his daughter Elizabeth. To his other daughters, Mary Baber and 
Annie Dixon, he left twenty shillings apiece, ** they having had and received their 
portions.'* To his son Joseph one shilling, " he having received his portion." To 
the son of his son John, deceased, one shilling. To the children of his late son 
Edward he gave ;f 12 apiece. To his daughter Elizabeth he gives one-hall of his 
household stufis at her mother's death, the wife taking the remainder absolutely, 
and being appointed sold executrix. The personal estate was sworn at 
£93 13s. 2(L, Robert Seney and John Bagnall, sen., being the appraisers. In the 
inventory is an 

£ s. d. 

Item. For things forgot & out of sight 00 10 00 

41. O. THOMAS . OXFORD = A hand, holding a pen. 

J^. DVDLEY . IN . WORCESTER = T . E . O. } 

EVESHAM. 

The name of the town is variously spelt Eveshem, Eveshame, Esham, Evisham, 
Ewsham. 

42. O. THE . BVRROW . OF . EVESHAM = Arms of the borough : a 

prince's coronet between two ostrich feathers in chief 
and a garb in base, the whole within a border 
bezant^. 

/^. FOR . NECESSARY . EXCHANGE = B . E. [BorOUgh of 

Evesham]. ^ 

Evesham obtained its charter of incorporation in the 3rd of James I., through 
the interest of Henry, Prince of Wales : hence the above coat, which contains the 
coronet and ostrich feathers of the Prince of Wales, the garb of the Earldom of 
Chester, and the bezant^e bordure of the Earldpm of Cornwall. 

Varieties read : 

43. O, (Same as No. 42.) 

J^. FOR . NECBSSARY . EXCHANG = B . E. ^ 

(Plate, No. 9.) 
The A and N in " exchang" are joined thus Av. It is so engraved in Tindal's 
*' Evesham," in Nash, and in Snelling (plate i.. No. 33). 

44. O, {No legend.) Arms of Evesham. 

R. FOR NECESSARY EXCHANG = B . E. ^ 

45. O, {No legend,) Arms of Evesham. 

R, FOR . EXCHAINGE=B . E. \ 

From a search of the minute-book of the borough, the first entry having 
reference to these town-pieces occurs during the mayoralty of Richard Goddard, 
about the year 1666 : 

"Item. Pd. to the present Mayor ;fii los. for the advance upon the settinge 
oat of ffarthings & half pence." 

In 1668 we find an 

"Item. Then pd. by the late Mayor, cost the present Mayor, the sum of 
Sixteen pounds being by him advanced in his mayorallty upon the settinge out of 
ffiirthings & halfpence which he accounted as p' of the aforesaid £ts*^ 

^^2^75 refers to the sum handed over by the late Mayor to his successor, and 
has no connection with the tokens. A little later we find it ordered : 



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1274 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

** That the Present Mayor is to render an aocompt for the surplys of the moQey 
upon the last settinge forth of halfpence." 

No mention of the number or nominal value of the tokens ordered to be issoed 
is to be found, but that the number struck was considerable is evident from the 
following entry, in December, 1672, after which date no reference is made to these 
town-pieces : 

" ItenL The late Mayor payd to W™ Lane the present Mayor the sume of One 
hundred & ffifty pounds in full of a Bond which hee sealed. Butt of this fforty 
nine pounds was paid in fiieurthings and halfpence, which are lodged in the great 
Chest in the HalL^' 

46. O, PHILLIPP . BALLORD = HIS HALF PENNY. 

/^. OF . EVESHAM . 1664 = ? . B. J 

The Ballard family appear to have been of very ancient date in the neighboor. 
hood of Evesham. They bore arms : Sable a griffin segreant ermine ' boik and 
fore legs or. 

A Phillip Hawford, a/ias Ballard, a young monk of Evesham, was in 1539 
created Abbot of Evesham for the sole purpose of surrendering the abbey, which be 
did on November 17 of thcf same year.* For this act of treachery he was 
rewarded with a pension of jf 240 per annum, and afterwards with the Deanery of 
Worcester. 

In 1660^ ** Phillip Ballard, gent., was elected and sworne to be one of the 
assistants of the said borough." His signature appears in the borough note- 
book in 1661, and he was elected Mayor in 1664. 

A John Ballord was Mayor in 1656, and Martin Ballord in 1676, thus showing 
that the family was one of position and influence in the seventeenth century, 
although we find that a John Ballord— with two others— was expelled from the 
Common Council of the borough for " non-subscription," on July ii, 1662. 

Martin Ballord and two other gents were paid £9 i<^ for ** going to Windsor, 
and thence to London, and thence to Windsor, to deK an address to his Matie." 

A Phillip Ballord was buried in All Saints* Church, Evesham, January 17, 1670, 
aged 38. 

In the Universal Magazine for October, 1758, an illustration is 
given of a token, reading : 

47. O. PHILLIP . BALLARD = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
R, OF -f EVESHAM . 1664 = ? . B. 

48. O, RICHARD . BENETT= A wheatsheaf. 

R. OF . EVESHAM . 1666^ HIS HALFE PENNY. 

49. O. PAVLE. BENNING = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R, IN . EVESHEM . 1664 = A sugar-loaf. 

50. O, WILLIAM . BROOKE = W . A . B. 
R. IN . EVESHAM . l656 = W . A . B. 

51. O, PETER . CROSS = P . M . C. 
R, IN . EVESHAM . 1649 = ? . M . C 

52. A variety reads : 

O, (Same as No. 51.) 

R. IN . EVESHAME . 1649 = P . M . C 
An engraving in Nash also corresponds ; so that it is probable that the omissioD 
of the second E in the name of the town is an error of Boyne's. 

♦ May's •* Evesham," p. 81. 

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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1275 

53. O. PHILLIP . CROSS «P . M . C. 

j^. (Same as No. 51.) j 

54. O. lOSHVA . FRANSHAM = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. IN . ESHAM . 1666 = 1 . S . F. i 

Joshua Fransham, as appears from the following extract of Friday, March 25, 
1653, from the minute-book of the borough, was a tailor, and a boy was 
apprenticed to him by the parish authorities : 

** The same day and yeare it is resolved & agreed that James Rooke shall be putt 
apprentice to Josliua Fransham of this borough Taylor, & that the maior of this 
borough having undertaken to pay the sum of foure pounds for taking him in 
apprentice it is agreed the said sum of foure pounds shall be paid to thesaid maior out 

of the money that shall due out of the money given by Sergeant 

Crcsheld." 

55. O. RIC . GODDARD . IN . BRIDG = R . M . G. 

J^. STREET . IN . EVESHAM = R . M . G. \ 

56. A variety reads : 

O. (Same as No. 55.) 

J^. STREETE . IN . EVESHAM = R . M . G. J 

(Plate, No. 10.) 
Kidiard Goddard was Mayor of Evesham in 1666. In the minute-book of the 
borough we find : 

•• 5U1 of May, 1654. Memorand. the day and year above sayd Richard Goddard 
with another were * chosen to the Common Counsell of this Burrough.' " 

Bridge Street is the most picturesque and interesting street in the town, and 
several of the houses bear evidence of considerable antiquity. It doubtless 
received its name from the bridge over the Avon, to which it leads. 

57. O. lOHN . LACEY = A flowCF. 

J^, OF . EVISHAM . 1654 = 1 . M . L. i 

58. O, TIMOTHY . MATHEWS = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. OF . EWSHAM = T .P.M. i 




59. O. MATHEW . MiCHELL = The Gfocers' Arms. 

jR, OF . EVISHAM = M . M . M. i 

A James Mitphell was Mayor of Evesham, and left ceruin charities to the 
poor. 

60. O, WILLIAM . RVDGE = W . A . R. 

jR. IN . EVESHAM . l649 = W . A . R. i 

William Rudge was Mayor of Evesham in 1661 and 1675. A John Rudge v^as 
Mayor in 1691, and a William Rudge in 1698 and 17 12. Several gentlemen of 
this name have represented the borough in Parliament. At the visitation of the 
county, in 1682-83, William Rudge, of Evesham, disclaimed all right to bear 
arms. Nash ^ves an illustration of this token. 

Mr. Woof, m his list of the tokens in the collection of the Corporation of 
Worcester, mentions a token of Elizabeth amvs, of ebisham ; but this will be 
(bond described as belonging to Surrey. 



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1276 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

HALESOWEN. 
6i. O. WILLIAM . BODELEY = w . A . B. A frying-pan. 

J^. IN . HALSOWEN . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

62. A variety reads : 

O. WILLIAM . BODELY = w . A . B. A frying-pan, 
^. (Same as No. 6i.) i 

(Plate, No. ii.) 
The device on the obverse of this token bears but small resemblance to a fiying- 
pan, and may possibly have been intended for a key. 

63. O. WILLIAM . ROBERTSON = Three escalop-shells. 

jR, OF . HALSE . OWEN = HIS HALFE PENY. i 

Inhabitants of the name of Robertson are still living in Halesowen. Three 
escalops sable form part oif the arms of Lyttelton, lords of the manor of Hales- 
owen. 

KIDDERMINSTER. 
Here we have a list of seventeen tokens of this century. The name of the 
town is spelt in a variety of ways : Kidermvnster, Kitterminster, Kederminsta, 
and Kiderminster. The tokens bear evidence of the staple trade of the place at 
that time, for we find the Weavers' and Merchant-Tailors* Arms, shears, and a 
shuttle amongst the devices adopted by the issuers. 

64. O. AT . THE . RAVEN . IN = A ravcn. 

J^, KIDERMVNSTER . l652 = R . M . B. J 

(Plate, No. 12.) 

65. O, THOMAS . BALAMEY . IN = The Weavers* Arms, t . m . b. 

J^, KIDDERMINSTER . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

A Thomas Bellamie, of Kidderminster, disclaimed arms and gentility at the 
Herald's visitation of the county, 1682-83. 

The Weavers' Arms are : On a chevron between three leopards* faces, as many 
roses. The arms are often represented by three leopards' faces without a shield. 

The issuer of this token carried on business as a ^ cloathier," or, judging from 
the inventory of his effects, a manufacturer of cloth. By his will, dated 
November 26, 1 691, he left to his sons, Thomas, John, and Joseph, and to his soo- 
in-law, Richard Clarke, "twelve pense apiece.'* To his daughters, Dorothy 
Manley, Hannah Read, and Mary Clarke, " twelve pence apiece." To his two 
daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, the sum of forty pounds each. The remainder 
of his estate he led to Margarett, " my nowe deare and loveing wife," whom he 
appoints sole executrix ; his brother-in-law, Thomas Potter, and **my loveing kins- 
man, Thomas Taylor," being named as overseers. From the inventory of his 
effects deposited with the wUl we learn that amongst other things in his parloori 
such as "6 Red chayers " and "one Red Couch," were a warming-pan and "one 
Baken crotch.** His books were valued at;fi. In the chamber over the parlour 
was "one Trukell bedsteed.'* In the top lofts were " one half-headed bedsteed, 
Two Racks, Two Tubs and one chayer, Corne and Mault, Tubs and Lumber, 
Three Brasse potts, two brass kettles. Three brass pans and one skelett, one Beame 
scales and w'^ one warping bar and scar, and some leather shreads.** Several 
items in the inventory refer to his " Stock-in-Trade '* : 

Wooll and Lynen yam 

Nyne double prints foll^ and in the loomes 

Eight Loomes one sett of Tyers wheels and all working 

Tooles 

Woollen yame Collered and not collered 

Three leads for oyle 

Boords, lathers, Powles and ffarks 



£ 


X. ii 


ID 0000 


24 


00 00 


08 


10 00 


06 00 00 


04 


00 00 


01 


00 00 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1277 

A " pigg" was valued at 8s. ; his '* wearing appareH and money in the Purse '* 
at;fi2; "flSve Barells, shelves, and odd things" at £1 ; whilst "lumber and 
thiogs omitted ** were estimated to be worth los. His book debts amounted to 
£77t and the total of his personal estate was £206 6s. 9d. 

66. O. FRANCES . CARTER = A pair of shears. 

J^. IN . KITTERMINSTER = F . M . C. \ 

67. O. EDWARD . CHAMBERLIN = HIS HALF PENY. 

I^, IN . KIDDERMINSTER = E . A . C. ^ 

68. O, EDWARD . CHAMBERLIN = A man making candles. 

jR, OF . KEDERMINSTER = E . A . C. J 

69. A variety reads : 

O. (Same as No. 68.) 

jR. (Same as No. 68.) = e . p . c. \ 

From the registers we glean that *' Edward Chamberlyn " was buried February 24, 
1673. 

(Plate, No. 13.) 

70. O, WILLIAM . MOVNTFORD = A tankard, w . m. 

Ji. IN . KIDDERMINSTER . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

An engraving of this token is given in Nash. In the registers of the parish we 
find: 

"Feb. 1605, the 20* day christned William, the sonne of Mount- 
ford." 

"Jan. 1614, the i^ day christned William, the sonne of Edward Mumford and 
Margery his wyf." 

"May 6, 1677. Married William Mountford & Elizabeth Mitchell by bands.** 

" Jany. 28, 1680. Buried M' William Mountford in woollen.'* 

(Plate, No. 14.) 

71. O, LAWRENCE . PEARSALL = Arms : St. George's Cross, in the 

first quarter a lion's head erased. 

jR. IN . KIDDERMINSTER = HIS HALF PENY. i 

72. O, SIMON . PITT . 1670 = HIS FARTHING. 

jR, IN . KIDERMINSTER = S . E . P. \ 

In the parish rec;iaters we note : 

** 1618. Sep. 8*^ christned Symon, the sonne of Henry Pytt and of Alice 
his wyf." 

In 1616 a Thomas P)rtt is referred to as one of the " Highe Baylifes." 

This is one of the very few farthing tokens which have the value expressed on 
them. 

(Plate, No. 16.) 

73. O. WILL . PRiTTY . MERCER = A pair of scales. 

/^. IN . KITTERM STER . 57 = W . P. i 

There is a flaw in the die between the M and s in the name of the town, other- 
wise I think it would read kitterminster. 
Mary, the wife of William Pretty, was buried March 28, 1678. 

74. O. RICH . RADFORD . HIS . HF . PENY = The Weavers' Arms. 
-^. OF . KIDDERMINSTER . i666 = The Merchant - Tailors' 

Arms. i 



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1278 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

75. A variety reads : 

O, RICH : RADFORD . HIS . HALPENY = The WeavcTS* Arms. 
J^. OF . KIDDERMINSTER . 66 = The Merchant-TailoFs' Aims. J 

From the registers we note that in 

1602, March 25, was christned Richard, the sonne of John Radford, junior. 
1608, Feby 26, was buried M' John Radford, one of the highe Bailifes of 
Kidderminster. 

1672. March — , Bapt. Adam, the son of Richard Radford & Hannah. 
1^73) July 29, Bu : Adam, the sonne of Rich. Radford & Hannah. 
1684, April 7, Married Richard Radford & Margaret Bradock by bands. 

76. O. EDMVND . & . WILLIAM . READE = The Weavers' Arms. 

/^. IN . KEDERMINSTER . l666 = THEIR HALF PENY. J 

In the registers, amongst very numerous entries referring to members of this 
family, we note the following : 

1674. April 24, Buried Nathaniel, the sonne of Will : Read & Eliza. 

1674. July — , Buried William Reade. 

1676. May 19, Buried John, son of William Reade & Joane. 

77. O. lOHN . ROWDEN . IN = A nag's head. 

R, KIDDERMINSTER . 1656 = 1 . A . R. J 

(Plate, No. 15.) 

78. O, NEVIL . SIMMONS . BOOKSELR = IN | KIDDER | MINS | TER. 
J^. EDWARD . BVTLER . MERCER . 1 663 = THEIR | HALF | 

PENY. J 

There is a curious pamphlet, printed for Nevil Simmons in 1656, being : 

The Agreement | of divers | Ministers of Christ | in the County of | Worcester, | and 
some adjacent parts, | for Catechizing or Personal Instructing | All in their 
several Parishes, that will | consent thereunto. 

Containing 

I. The Articles of our Agreement 

II. An exhortation to the People to submit to this necessary Work. 
III. The Profession of Faith, and Catechism, which we desire them first to 
Learn. 

London, Printed by ^. H^. for J^gvil Simmons \ Bookseller at ICieUlerminster, and 
are to be sold there by | him, and at London by William Royhotdd^ at the 
Unicom in Pauls Church-yard, 1656. 

A portion of the book is in black letter, and the agreement is subscribed to by 
forty-three ministers, pastors, preachers, rectors, and teachers in Worcestershire and 
adjacent counties, the list banning with 

Richard Baxter, Teacher of the Church at Kidderminster, 

79. O, THO : SADLER . HIS . HALF . PENY = The Tallowchandlcrs* 

Arms. 

R, IN . KIDDERMINSTER . 1664 = T . A . S. J 

The registers furnish the following : 

1673. Was Born Thomas, the sonne of Thos. Sadler & Ann. 

1674. Feby. 24, Buried Tho., the son of Thomas Sadler & Ann. 
1682. Sep. 4, Bu : Thomas Sadler in woollen. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I 


X. 


d. 


OI 


02 


00 


03 


00 00 


00 


0806 


03 


00 00 


01 


95 


00 


04 


15 


CO 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 1279 

8a O. WALTER . THATCHER =« A shuttle. 

-^. IN . KIDDERMINSTER = HIS HALF PENY . 167O. J 

Id August, 1885, one of these tokens was found at Arley-Kings Church. 
Walter Thatcher's signature appears to Kidderminster Bye-laws, April 11, 1655. 
From the registers we learn : 

1672. April 3, Bapt. Sarah, the Daughter of Walter Thatcher & Sarah. 
1683. Oct 23, Bu : Richard, son of Mr. Walter Thatcher, in woollen. 

Walter Thatcher carried on business as a " cloathier,'' and appears to have manu- 
factured cloth for wholesale trade, as well as that required for his retail business. 
The inventory of his effects, taken shortly after his death, was made and 
••apprised " by Phillip Doolittle, Mary Doolittle, James Hinkes, and John Browne 
on September 20, 1 657. 

In the Hall Chamber was : 

One Iron grate and Implem^ belongin to the chimney 

The Plate wee value at 

One frame for wax candles and 18 Alcomy spoons ... 

In the Cellar : 

Two furnaces with the grates 

One Cistone and one oyle vessell 

All the household provision 

In the Shopp : 

Five Loomes with all working tools and Implem^ thereunto 

belonging and one Iron pott 080208 

The ware in 3ie Loomes &c we valine at 08 01 00 

In the " Wool! " chamber was 

Woollen yame in the house and at the Spiners collered 

and not collered wee value at 200803 

Lhien warp and Three gallants of the best oyle 03 04 03 

Half a hogshead & two gallants of oyle 02 13 00 

Feald and Leather shreds 01 1304 

Forks & Bowles 000500 

Money oweing for stuffs sent out 250000 

Lumber & things forgotton ... 000500 

The whole was valued at ;^i89 is. lod. 

The clothing trade was carried on at Kidderminster in the thirteenth century ; 
and three centuries later, Worcester, Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, and 
Kidderminster were the only towns in the county which were allowed to make 
cloth for sale. Weaving of stuffs and linsey-woolseys for hanging rooms and beds 
were carried on in Kidderminster in the seventeenth century. It will be seen that 
several of the tokens bear reference to the weaving and clothing trades, the issuers 
citber adopting the arms of their company, or some implement in use by them, as 
t pair of shears or a shuttle. Spinning the wool, from the above inventory, 
would appear to be a separate business. That credit was given is evident from 
the item of jf 25, •• money oweing for stuffs sent out"- 



LYE-WASTE (Parish of Oldswinford). 
(Plate, No. 17.) 

81. O, WILLIAM. BVFFERY = HIS HALFE PENY. 

jR. LYE . IN . swANFORD . PARECH = A Catherine wheel. J 

His will was proved at Worcester on August 16, 1678, and his personal estate 
unounted to ;f 229 19s. 4d., the particulars of which are given. 



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laSo TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

A true and perfect Inventary of the goods cattells and cbattells and personall ertate 
whereof William Bofferey late of the Lye in the parish of Oldswinford in the 
County of Worcester died possessed of taken and apprised the twelfth day of 
August 1678 by Nicholas Addenbrooke Thomas Lyxiall John Read Jan. and 
William Skeldmg. 

Goods in the Hall. 

£ s. d. 
Imp's. One long table board four joyned stooles i forme 

and little chaire 2 little stooles 01 04 00 

Item. One Handiron fire Showvell Tongs and Gaile ... 00 06 08 
Item. Two Spitts a paire of cobbords frying pann and 

dripping panne 000300 

A paire of Mlows and other odd implements 000008 

Pewter dishes a bason and six porringers a chamber-pott 

and candlestick a fflaggon and Cupp 01 04 00 

Goods in the Buttery. 
Item. One Iron pott one brasse pott four brasse kettles 

a brasse panne a Skimer &. a basting spoone 01 01 06 

Barrelb tubbs & other odd implements &, trumpery ... 00 03 04 

Goods in the Chamber over yb Hall. 

One table board one chaire 2 coffers & a box 00 ii 06 

One Bedstead feather bedd flock bedd boulster pillow 

blankett coverlett curtaines & valiane 031000 

Six cttsheons 000500 

Goods in the Chamber over the Buttery. 
One Bedstead 2 flock bedds and bedding vallians and 

curtaines 01 1304 

One chest two coffers 00 10 00 

Linnens. 

Seaven paire of sheets 2 board cloathes one pillow board 

six table napkins 02 05 00 

His Apparell and money in the house 11 00 00 

Item. Divers sorts of goods in the house and abroad in 
severall Townes and places within the Countyes of 
Worcestersheere and Sroppshire and severall sumes of 
money owing in the said severall Countyes which are 
used as a stock in a way of trading which cannot at 
p'sent be viewed by reason of the great distance from 
us at p'sent but according to the information of 
Margaret Bufferey Executrix and Mathew Read to 
whom the same stock is given by Will after the 
decease of the said Executrix 1000104 

Item. Due to the said deceased William Bufferey at the 
time of his decease by severall bills and bonds the 
which are sithence the decease of the said deceased 
delivered unto Edward Perks and Margaret his Wife 
or one of them being given unto them by the said 
deceadant by his last Will and Testament 106 19 04 

Thesume £229 19 (K 

Nicholas Addenbrooke 
Thomas Lynall 
John Reads 
William Skelding 

1 6th August 1678. 

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WORCESTERSHIRE, 12S1 

On January 10, 1669, William Bnffery and Martha his wife leased four plots of 
land at Dudley to William Lowe, of Dudley, ironmonger, who, in 1675, conveyed 
the unexpired interest of the lease to Edmund Wells. 

Bufleiy was evidently a man of property and position, and it b not at all un- 
likely that the " Old Buffery " furnaces were named after him or his family. 



OLDSWINFORD. 

(Plate, No. 18.) 

82. O. lOHN . RICHARDSON = HIS HALF PENY. 

A ovLD . swiNFORD . 1669 = Arms of Worcester: three 
pears. ^ 

An engraving also appears in' Nash. 

83. O. lOHN RICHARDSON, OVLD SWINFORD PARECH. 

jR. HIS . HALF . PENY = A Catherine wheel. | 

This is described by Woof. 

PERSHORE. 

All the tokens issued here are halfpennies. On three of them the name of the 
town is spelt Parshore, and on a fourth Parshoe. 

84. O. HENRY. GIBBS = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . PERSHORE . l666 = H . G. | 

85. A variety reads : 

O. (Same as No. 84.) 

I^. IN . PARSHORE . l666 = H . G. J 

86. O. GIDEON . PALMER . OF = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^, PERSHORE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. G . S . P. J 

87. O. SAMVELL , PALMER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

i?. OF . PARSHORE . 1667 = S . P. J 

(Plate, No. 20.) 

88. A variety reads : 

a (Same as No. 87.) 

^. OF . PARSHOE . 1667 = S . p. ^ 

Samuel Palmer, who in his will describes himself as " Mercer of St. Andrews 
being weake in bodie but of good and perfect memory thanks be given to God,*' 
leaves his daughters, Elizabeth and Bridget, £iSO each, both of which sums were 
to remain in the hands of his executrix for seven years, without interest or any 
other consideration. Evidently the daughters were young, as provision was made 
"in case. either died before they were eighteen," the survivor was to receive the 
whole amount. His wife Hannah was left the remainder of his estate, and sole 
executrix to his will. The entry of his marriage in the Pershore registers was 
kindly forwarded to me by Rev. William Walters, M.A. 

" Samuel Palmer married Hannah Symonds October, 1664." 



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1282 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Amongst the items enumerated in the inventory and valuation of his effects at 
liis death we find : £ s. tL 

Wearing apparell & monie in purse 20 oo oo 

Item. One silver Tankard 060000 

Item. In the Chamber over the Shopp one table horde one 
chest one stoole, Six cushins, one bedsteed w*** curtains 
and valions one Featherbed, one feather bolster one 

Bed Rugg and one paire of Blankett 04 14 00 

Item. In the shopp woolen cloth, Lyning cloth, stufiBs, 
fflannills, Aproning, cord .... and hobcrdachers 
wares & Silkenware and other small things there ... 441 17 09 

Item. Debts now Judged by us to be good 100 00 00 

The personal estate was valued at over £(iOO. 

89. O. EDWARD . PERKINS . HIS . HALF . PENY = The Apothecaries' 
Arms. 

R, OF . PERSHORE . APOTHECARY . l664»E . P. \ 



SHIPSTON-ON-STOUR. 

Three more tokens are here described than are given in Boyne (first edidoo). 
The name of the place is frequently spelt Shipson, and six of the eight tokens are 
halfpennies. 

90. O. RICHARD . COOPER . 0F = A paiiier-basket* 

R, SHIPSTON . VPON . STOWER = HIS HALF PENY. 1 669. \ 

(Plate, No. 21.) 

91. A variety reads : 

O, (Same as No. 90.) 

R. SHIPSON . VPON . STOWER = HIS | HALF | PENY | 1 669. \ 

92. O, (Same as No. 90.) 

R. SHIPSON . VPON . STOWER = R .B.C. 1 669. \ 

This is probably a farthing, but in the list of Seventeenth Century Tokens in 

the B. M. not described in Boyne's work (** Numismatic Chronicle ** for 1884, 

P* 337)» No. 92 is included as a halfpenny. 
The name of Cooper has long been associated with Shipston-on-Stour. In 

1753 a William Cooper of that town was fined £^ for taking money of William 

Taylor, of Armscot, to excuse his serving upon the jury at sessions. f 

93. O. HENRY . COTTERELL . IN 1 666 = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

R. SHIPSTON . VPPON . STOWER = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

(Plate, No. 22.) 

94. O. ROBERT . FiTZHVGH = The Apothecarics' Arms. 

R. IN . SHIPSON . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

95. O, EDWARD . piTTWAY = The Ironmongers* Arms. 

R. OF . SHIPSTON = E . P. \ 

96. O. SIMON . SIMONS = The Mercers* Arms. 

R, OF . SHIPSON . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. S . I . S. \ 

* In Bo]me*s *' List of Tokens issued in Worcestershire,*' which appeared in 
Ariis Birmingham Gasftte^ this is described as " a bee-hive." 
t " Notes and Queries for Worcestershire," p. 77, 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1283 

This token is octagonal in shape, and on a variety, also octagonal, the read- 
ing is: 

97. O. (Same as 96.) 

J^. OF . SHIPSON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. S . I . S. J 



STOURBRIDGE. 

Thirteen tokens and varieties are given as belonging to this town. They are 
chiefly halfpennies, and include the town piece, which is a very creditable pro- 
duction. The Ironmongers' Arms is a common^device upon the tokens, showing 
that the iron trade has beta connected with the town for a considerable period. 

(Plate, No. 23.) 

98. O. A . STOWERBRiDG . HALF . PENY = The Ironmongers* Arms. 
J^. FOR . NECESSARY . CHAiNGE = The Clothworkers' Arms. J 

An engraving is also given in Nash and Snelling (plate iii., 4). Following the 
description, Boyne has a note : " This town piece shows the principal trades 
carried on there. Amongst the Worcestershire tokens bequeathed by Dr. 
Prattington to the Society of Antiauaries, there is a specimen of this token having 
the reverse indented, caused by the previously-struck coin not having been re- 
moved from the die when the new blank was placed on it. Many examples of this 
kind are found. 

Scott, in his "History of Stourbridge'* (p. 65), says: "The woollen manu- 
factory planted within the precincts of this town cannot be traced to its source, but 
evidence is extant of its existing in 1693, 4th William and Mary ;" and on page 62 
we read that "ip earlier times the banks of the river, with those of its trilmtary 
streams, presented a series of works in which the various processes of the iron 
manufactory were conducted." In another note (p. 381) the same writer states 
that **a brass Stourbridge halfpenny was dug up in the town, 1830, and presented 
to the writer by W. Evans, Esq." 

99. O. JONATHAN . BVTLER . MERCER = Arms of Worccstcr : three 

pears. 

J^. IN . STOWERBRIDGE . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

(Plate, No. 24.) 

100. A variety reads : 

O. (Same as No. 99.) 

jR. IN . STOWER . BRIDG . 1665= HIS | HALF | PENY. J 

(Plate, No. 25.) 

10 1. O. John I Clare \ his halfe \ peny (in four lines). 

R. IN STOWERBRIDG . 1 666 = The Ironmongers' Arms. \ 

102. O. ANDREW . MVCHALL . IRONMONGER . HIS . HALF . PENY 

(in five lines). 
R, OF . STOWERBRIDGE . 1 669 = The Ironmongers' Arms. \ 

103. O. THOMAS . NOTT . 1657 = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. OF . STOVRBRIDGE = T . N. \ 

104. O, EZEKELL . PARTRIDG = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . STOWERBRIDG . 1665 = E . M . P. \ 



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1284 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

105. A variety reads : 

O. (Same as No. 104.) 

J^. IN . STOWER . BRIDG . 1665 = E . M . P. ^ 

106. Other varieties read : 

O. EZEREL PARTRIDG = HIS HALF PENV. 

^. (Same as last). | 

107. O. EZEKELL . PARTRIG = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. (Same as last.) J 

Scott, in his *' History of Stourbridge " (p. 381), refers to '* another tradesmaQ's 
token, in possession of Mr. Green, of Lichfield,** having for its inscriptioo— 
'* Ezerell Partrig of Stourbridge." This token is no doubt the same as the one last 
described, the K in the Christian name having been mistaken for an R. 

108. O. EDWARD SPARRYE = E . I . S. 

1^. OF , STOVRBRIDGE= 1656. J 

A John Spanye, of Stourbridge, left a charity to the poor of Old Swinford, the 
income of which was about 15s. per annum. 

109. O, HVMPHREY . SVTTON = H .8.3. 

J^. OF . STOVRBRIDGE=l657. } 

(Plate, No. 26.) 
no. A variety is dated 1656. J 



TENBURY. 

Only a few tokens were issued here, but they are of a very interesting diaracter. 
Boyne gives three varieties, whilst six are here included. 

(Plate, No. 28.) 

111. O. lOHN . covNLEY = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . TENBVRY = ic as a monogram. { 

x666. John, son of Thomas Coundley, baptized October 14. 
1682. John, son of Thomas Coundley, buried June 18. 

This token was described in the Reliquary for April, 1868, as : 
** Worcestershire — Tenbury. 
O, JOHN . covNLEV-The Grocers* Arms. 

R, OF . TENBVRY = I. 

This token— a farthing (?)--i8 of very rude workmanship, and is apparently of 
an earlier dale than the usual type of seventeenth century tokens." 

The token is in a fair state of preservation, appears to have been coated with 
white metal, and there is no reason to doubt that it was issued in the seventeenth 
century. 

112. O. EDMOND . LANE = Arms: on a chevron, between three 

piles or arrow-heads, five helmets. Crest : on a 
helmet an arm holding a battle-axe. 

R, IN . TEMBVRY = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

1662. Edmund, son of Thomas Lane and Alice his wife, baptized December 7. 
1667. Edmund, son of Edmund Lane, baptized October 4. 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. . 1285 

(Plate Na 27.) 

113. O. EDMOND . LANE = Arms as on the last 

J^. OF . TENBVRY = E . L. J 

This description is not quite correct, as there are no helmets on the chevron, 
probably on account of the size of the token. 

114. O. EDMOND . LANE = Arms: a chevron between three 

arrows. 

JR. OF . TENBVRY = E . L. J 

This reverse is from an entirely different die to the last. 

Grazebrook gives the arms of Lane, " Sable, a chevron between three arrows," 
and states that the arms were borne in 1563 (Harl. MSS.) by Nicholas Lane, of 
Stratford-on-Avon. An Edward (altered afterwards to Edmund) Lane, gent, 
appears in a list of the landowners of the county, 1703-4. In Tenbury Church (on 
the north wall) was a monument to '* Edmund Lane, with Patience, and three 
SODS and one daughter ; he died 9 Tan. 17 17, se. 81."* The names of members of 
the Lane family occur in several early terriers connected with the church at 
Tenbury. 

115. O. ANTHONY. SEARCH = PLAINE DEALINGS IS BEST. 

^. IN . TENBVRY = The Mcrccrs' Arms. ^ 

Snelling gives an engraving of a token in Plate V., 23, of his work, reading : 

116. O, ANTHONY . SEARCH = /Va/Vi^ | dealing I is best \^, 

R, IN . TENBVRY . 1670 = The Mercers' Arms. J 

A sunilar one being found in the collection of the Corporation of Worcester. 
(See note to No. 5. ) 
At Kington, in Herefordshire, a token was issued reading : 

0, ANTHONY . SEARCH = The Groccrs* Arms. 

R. IN KINGTON MERCER -A .M.S. J 

In the Roll of the Hearth-tax for 14th Charles IL (1662), a "Margarett Search, 
widow, hath in her house six fire-hearths ;'' and again, '* Margarett Search, 
widow, hath in her house (Tower fire-hearths," showing she occupied two goodly- 
sized houses. This may have been the mother of the issuer, Anthony. 

A careful search in the parish registers of Kington results in the discovery of 
the following entries only relating to this family, viz. : 

1670, October 25 — Margarett Search widdow was buryed in y« chauncell. 

1676, October 7 — Alice Search, a young mayd was buried in y* church. 

Alice was probably the daughter of Anthony. 

The Tenbury registers have been searched by the Rev. T. Ayscough Smith, 
Vicar, but the name of Search is not to be found. Tenbury being on the 
borders of Herefordshire, and distant about twenty-five miles from Kington, it 
is probable that Search lived at Kington and carried on a business at both places, 
thus accounting for the entries in the Kington registers. 

UPTON-ON-SEVERN. 

Only the first token here alluded to is distinctly assigned to this county, and 
Boyne says the others he describes (three) may belong elsewhere, as the name of 
Upton is found in several counties. 

Frequent mention of all the names occurs in the registers of the parish of Upton- 
on-Sevem, and there is little doubt that all the tokens included in this list are 
correctly assigned to Worcestershire. I am indebted to the Rev. R. Lawson, The 
Vicarage, Upton-on-Severn, for his kindness in forwarding me the extracts from the 
registers, and other notes. 

♦ Nash and Evans' " History of Tenbury." 
VOL. II. 82 



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1286 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

117. O. lOHN . BAYLY . OF . VPTON = A man making candles. 

jR, VPPON . -SEAVERNE = The Arms of Worcester : three pears. J 

The following entries concerning this family occur in the parish registers : 
1627, April 16. Buried Anne, wife of Rowland Bayly. 

1672. Baptized September 23^^ Elizabeth, daughter of John Bayly. 

1673. Buried, February 21 Elizabeth, wife of John Bayly. 
1681. Buried September 20 John, son of John Baily. 

A John Bayly stood as godfather on February 26, 1671. 

The registers of Upton-on-Severn were, as was generally the case, very imper- 
fectly kept during the times of the Civil Wars, and in places the entries are 
illegible. 

(Plate No. 29.) 

118. O. PHILLIP . BOVND = The Grocers' Arms. 

JR. OF . VPTON . 166 . =P . K . B. J 

An engraving of this token is c'iven in Nash. 

In a very interesting book, " The Records and Traditions of Upton-on-Severn," 
a chapter is devoted to some account of this family, but as it does not deal 
specially with the above Phillip Bound, I have thought it advisable to quote only 
the following : 

" During the greater part of the seventeenth century the family of Boood, or 
Bounde, was one of the most influential in Upton. Its members lived in gcxxl- 
sized houses, held parish offices, and were frequently sponsors to the children of 
well-to-do parents. Three or four of them were Koitees of Hall's charity, tnd 
associated in trust deeds with the Lechmeres and others of the neighbouring gentry. 
They were people of some fortune and honourable station, and they were held as 
a family in good repute. 

** Yet, for no excellence or virtue, but for the evil fame of one individual of the 
race, their name is preserved in local tradition. While the old Royalist Rector, 
and the learned Puritan who displaced him, the good lord of the manor, and the 
soldiers who fought for the Kin^or Parliament in Upton Church3^rd, are alike for- 
gotten, the name of the Bounds is remembered amongst us still, from the detestation 
which hangs around the memory of Thomas, generally called Captain Bound. 
There were two families of Bounds, who seem to have settled here towards the end 
of the sixteenth century. They were probably related to a certain Dr. Philip 
Bound, whd stirred up the whole Sabbatarian controversy by his work, * On the 
Sabbath.* He was an ultra-Calvinist, and one of the foremost theologians of that 
school. Phillip was a favourite name among the family in Upton, and they were 
on the anti-Royalist and anti-Church of England side in politics. The father of 
Captain Bound was possessed of several pieces of land near the town. He was 
churchwarden once or twice, and in demand as a godfather. There is no entry of 
the baptism of the younger Thomas Bound, but it must have been early in the 
century, as he was sponsor in 1627. He was yet young when, in 1640, he was a 
married man. His clear, firm signature is in two or three pages of the roister, 
just below the neat writing of the Rector. He outlived three wives, but did not 
try matrimony a fourth time. He had many children, and lived the latter part of 
his life at Southend." 

119. O, lOHN . BAYLIS . RICHARD = I . E . B . R . M . H. 

J^, HVDSON . IN . VPTON = A | HALF | PENE | Y. J 




From a search of the parish registers we glean that " Jhon Baylyes" stood as 
godfather to a child in 1637, and " Jhon Baylise " in June of the same year. On 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1287 

November i, 1664, a John Baylys (?) was buried. Richard Hudson had a 
daughter baptized on July 2S, 162S, and stood as godfather to a child in June, 1639. 
Another Richard Hudson, ** the yonger," stood as a godfather in February, 1640, 
and in December, 1643. His wife's name was Margaret. 

Amongst the entries in the parish books we find that a shilling was paid to take 
*'Mordecai Hudson's mother-in-law out of prison." "The Hudsons have been 
Nonconformists during two hundred years of their abode in Upton, and this 
individual, whose identity seems to have been merged in that of ner son-in-law, 
may have been imprisoned for attending some illegal place of worship."* 

From an old deed we find that " Rioiard Hudson of Upton uppon Seaveme in 
the County of Worcester Chandler sonne and heire apparent of Richard Hudson 
late of Upton aforesaid deceased " conveyes an acre of land, in conformity with his 
fiuher's will, the date being June 14, 1666. 

120. O. WILLIAM . cowELL = A cheese-knife. 

jR, OF . VPTTON . l664 = W .E.G. J 

This name occurs frequently in the Upton-on -Severn registers in the seventeenth 
century. A William Cowell stood godfather on sundry occasions, and buried two 
daughters between 1629 and 1641. 

(Plate No. 30.) 

121. O, CHRiSTOP . wiNBERY = The Meicers' Arms. 

A OF . VPTON . MERCER = C . E . W. ^ 

The Winberys were a very old family in Upton, and carried on business as 
mercers for upwards of a century. 

Christopher Winbery left los. a year, payable out of a piece of land called 
** Dyers hay,** to be laid out in bread, and distributed on January i for ever. A 
Christopher Wjmberry was a sponsor between 1631 and 1644, and C. W., 
"junior," in 1641 and 1642, together with **Methus€ilah Baylyes," another old 
Upton name. 




WORCESTER. 

122. O. A . WORCESTER . FARTHING = A costle, with a falcon 
above it. 
jR. FOR . NECESSARiE . CHAiNG = c . w. [City of Worcester]. 
1667. i 

The large number of tokens issued in this city gave the authorities some cause 
for alarm, for we find that in 1666 the Worcester Chamber ordered " that the 
Chamberlains demand security of all persons that shall set forth brass farthings or 
halfpence, for the re-taking of such as shall be brought to them." And in the 
following year (1667) the Chamber made- an order "that the sum of ;£'50 be 
dispensed, on making farthings, for the necessary exchange, and that the Chamber- 
lain shall from time to time exchange them for silver as often as thev shall be there- 
unto required, and to keep a stock in hand for that purpose, and that all other 
larthings and halfpence be called in by proclamation, "t An order to the same 
effect was subsequently made, but in stronger terms, occasioned by the excessive 
number of halfpence put in circulation by divers persons in the city. Two years 

* "The Nation in the Parish ; or, Records of Upton-on-Sevem," p. 89. 
t " Worcester in Olden Times," p. 49. 

82—2 



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1288 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

after (1669) the issue of this farthing a petition was sent to the Hotise of Commou, 
asking them ** to put a stop to y« further co3mi«g of copper money under tbe 
comon seale of this city ;*** whilst in the following year Worcester, Yarmoatii, 
and other towns had to petition his Majesty for pardon " for putting out £uth- 
ings in this city/* bv which they had forfeited their charter of privilege in btving 
usurped the kings prerogative of coining. In 1 671 there was paid "For 
exchange of the city farthings £41 14s. ;*'* and an item, " To Mr. Streete's man, 
for his pained in the business about the farthings and drawing a petition,*** also 
appears. In 1673 there was paid " To Greg, for carrying the fiutnings from the 
hall, 3<»." ;♦ and "To M. J. Higgins, to buy farthings, ;f 2a "• 

123. O. RICHARD . ALDNEY . IN . THE = The Anns of Woiccstcr: 

three pears. 

^. CITTY . OF . WORCESTER = HIS HALF PENY. J 

(Plate No. 31.) 

124. O, RICHARD . ADNEY . IN . THE = The Arms of WorcestCT : 

three pears. 
jR, (Same as No. 123.) } 

This token is so engraved in Green (No. i), and the addition of the l in the 
surname is probably an error in Bo3me. 

125. O, EDWARD . BARON . OF . Y** . CITTY = EB. COnjoined. 

I^, OF . WORCESTER . HIS . HALF . PENY = The Arms of Wor- 
cester : three pears. J 

Edward Baron died on April 18, 1684, and a tablet was placed to his memoiy 
on the wall of St. Alban's Church, Worcester.— (Nash.) 
This token is not engraved in either Nash or Green 

Green, 2 and 3 ; and Nash, i. 

126. O. RICHARD . BEDOES = The Arms of Worcester; three pears. 
J^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY = The Mercer's Arms, r . b. i 

I have two specimens of this token in my collection : one is struck on copper 
and the other on brass, the former being much larger than the latter. Both are 
engraved by Green, the smaller one only being engraved by Nash. 

Green, 4 ; and Nash, 2. 

127. O, (Same as No. 126.) 

jR. HIS. HALFE. PENNY. 1 664 = The Mercers' Arms. r.b. J 

(Plate No. 32.) 

128. O. RICHARD . BEDOES . OF . Y» = The Arms of Worcestcr. 59. 
jR. CITTY . OF . WORCESTER = The Mercers* Arms, r . b. J 

Nash, 3. 

129. O. RICHARD . BEDOES IN Y« = The Arms of Worcester. 

jR. (Same as No. 128.). i 

Green, 5. 

130. O. RICHARD BEDOS IN Y^ = The Arms of Worcester. 

jR, (Same as No. 128.) J 

Richard Bedoes was an Aldeiman of the city, and Mayor in 1661. He died 
October 29, 1688, and his wife, Joan, July 30, 1670, a mural tablet in St 
Swithin's Church recording the fact. — (Nash.) 



Woof. 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1289 

Green, 12. 

131. O, lOHN . CHERRY . HIS . HALFE = The Arms of Worcester. 

^. PENY . IN . WORCESTER . 1664 = 1 . S . C. J 

Green, 13. 

132. O, (Same as No. 131.) 

^- PENY IN WORCESTER 1664 = 1 . C . S. ^ 

In the centre part of the reverse of this token there is no ornamentation wbat- 
erer, that of No. 131 having a boss on either side the c, one between the I and the 
s, and another at the bottom. 

(Plate No. 33.) 

Nash, 4 ; Green, 7 ; Boyne, Plate III., 23. 

133. O. WILL . CHETLE . IN . BROD . STR*^ . IN = w . s . c. Mer- 

chant's mark. 
I^. woRSTER.CLOiHis. HALF. PENY=TheArmsof Worcester. J 

134. O, WILLIAM CHETLE . 1666 = Initials and merchant's mark as 

the last. 
j^. OF . woRSTER . CLOTHIER = The Arms of Worcester. \ 
(Plate No. 34.) 
Nash, 5 ; Green, 8. 

135. O. WILLIAM . CHETLE . i666='w . c and merchant's mark as 

No. 133. 
jR, (Same as No. 134.) J 

The engraving in Nash reads ** WILL " only on the obverse, and was pro- 
bably taken from a poor specimen, as a blank is left, and the en^ving in Green 
appears to have been copied from it. I have one in my collection on which the 
obverse only of the token is struck, the reverse being indented, and corresponding 
with the obverse. 

These are amongst the most interesting tokens issued in this county, being the 
only ones bearing a merchant's mark. As will be seen from the token, William 
Chetle was a clothier, several members of the family having been connected with 
the Fraternity of Clothiers at Worcester. They were incorporated by Queen 
Elizabeth, in the 32nd year of her reign, by the name of the ** Master, Wardens, 




and Comonality of the Company of Weavers, Walkers, and Clothiers within the 
City of Worcester,*' and at the Heralds' Vbitation of the county, in 1682, a John 
Chetle was one of the Wardens of the Weavers and Clothiers. A Francis Chetle 
was warden in 1695 and 1696, and left by his will, amongst other charities, 
*' a good cloth coat, as well to the companv*s beadles as to poor and ai>proved 
objects, at the Midiaelmas quarter meeting "of the company. The mark itself is 
the same on both tokens, whilst on the farthing the initial letter of his wife's name 
(Sarah) is omitted. The upper portion of the mark is no doubt intended for a 
Catherine wheel, and is supported by a shaft rising from an interlaced arrangement 



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I290 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

at the base. Boyne gives engravings of thirty-five ** merchants' marks and un- 
certain devices," found on the tokens he describes, but the one here referred 
to bears a distinctive character, and is the only one of which the Catherine 
wheel forms a part. This device alone appears on a token of William Bufirey 
(No. 53), of the Lye Waste, who was engaged in the linen or cloth trade. The 
Catherine wheel was a charge on the Turners' Arms, and was the badge of the 
Order of the Knights of St Catherine, created 1063, for the protection oT pilgrims 
on their way to and from the Holy Sepulchre. It was also a comparatively 
common device adopted by innkeepers at one period. An inn in Friar Street, 
near the Cardinal's Hat, now the Coventry Arms, bore the sign of the Catherine 
wheel. William Chetle, although a clothier, may have kept the inn bearing this 
sign. A Thomas Chetle, probably a brother, was host of the Green Dragon, at 
the comer of Cooken Street and High Street, in 1686. 

The following interesting extract, from ** Worcester in the Olden Times," may 
have some bearmg on this subject : **The last of the interesting objects belonging 
to this (the Clothiers') Company is a pall, formerly used at the Amend of deceased 
members. It is composed of alternate stripes of embroidered velvet and tapestiy. 
The embroidering on the velvet consists of fleurs-de-lis, eagles, double-headed, 
displayed ; pineapples [query, teazles], and angels with expanded win^s, standii^ 
on wheels [queryt St. Catherine]. The tapestry consists of figures of saints and 
passages from Scripture history ; at the sides are four shields of arms or devices, 
emblematical of the manufacture of cloth. It was suggested by Miss Agnes 
Strickland, during her recent visit to Worcester, that this pall might beamonnaiy 
cloth used at Prince Arthur's funeral ; that the embroidery is Spanish ; that the 
pineapple, or teazle, is a pomegranate ; the purple, the imperial colour ; and that 
the wheels are Catherine wheek, introduced into the arms through Prince Arthur's 
marriage with Catherine of Arragon. Mr. Gutch states that this opinion is 
strengthened by a MS. of the time in the College of Arms, published in the 
' Antiquarian Repertory,' which details the particulars connected with the arrival 
of Queen Caroline in England, the pageants at her marriage with Prince Arthur, 
and his decease, six months after, at Ludlow, including the offering of palls of 
cloth of gold to the corse by the lords mourners." 

Mr. Hartshorne, in a paper read before the members of the Archaeological 
Institute at Cambridge, is of opinion that the pall has nothing whatever to do with 
Prince Arthur, but that it consists of two copes sewed together, and that the angels 
represented on it refer to the vision of Ezekiel. 

Prince Arthur was buried on the south side of the choir in Worcester Cathedral, 
and a chapel was erected to his memory. 

The Catherine wheel may have been suggested to Chetle, who was probably a 
member of the City Clothiers' Company, as a suitable device for a merchant's 
mark, by the fact of its appearing on the pall used at the funeral of any deceased 
member of the company, as well as from the fact that St. Catherine was patroness 
of spinners and spinsters. 

Cussans, in his ** Handbook of Heraldry," refers to merchants' marks as 
** badges of great antiquity," and says, ** When the right of bearing arms was 
restricted exclusively to Nobiles^ and any infringement of this ordinance was visited 
by severe punishment and heavy fines, citizens were permitted to adopt certain 
devices, which were placed upon their merchandise. These were not strictly 
armorial, but were employed, for the most part, by merchants to whom arms 
were denied, in much the same manner as trade-marks are at the present day. 
In one of the Harleian manuscripts, preserved in the British Museum, we read : 
• Theys be none armys but a marke as merchaunts use, for every man may take 
hym a marke, but not armys, without a herawde or purcyvante.' Those by whom 
such marks were principally adopted were Wool-staplers, or Merchants of the 
Staple. . . . The devices which they adopted were generally a combination of a 
cross and their own initials." 

By a Statute 39th Elizabeth, justices were to appoint " searchers and seal«s of 
cloth yearly, who shall fix their seals to it." Broadcloth was to contain the 
quantity mentioned on the seals, or the seller was to forfeit a sbtth part. Mill- 
men who refused to fix seals, and others defacing or counterfeiting, etc., to forfeit 
;f 20. Leaden seals, bearing the mark of the merchant, were attached to the 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1291 

cloth, indicating the maker, and assuring the purchaser that the length represented 
was in the piece sold, as it was impossible to open the roll without breaking the 
seal or cutting the string by which it was fastened. I have several of these old 
merchants' lead pieces by me, which bear evident marks of having at some former 
period been attached to packages by tape or string. 

In Henry VIII.*s reign the dothing trade of Worcester was in a most prosperous 
condition, and Leiand thus quaintly alludes to the fact : " The Wealthe of the 
towne of Worcester standeth most by draperinge, and no towne in Elngland at this 
present tyme maketh so many cloaths yearly as this towne doth." 

The names of Mr. Wm. Chetle, Mrs. Sarah Chetle, and Mrs. Sarah Chetle, 
daughter to Mr. Wm. Chetle, are amongst those found attached to the original 
declaration or manifesto of the "Independent" Church at Worcester in 1687. 
Mrs. Sarah Chetle died in 1701, intestate, her estate being valued at £^2 15s. 
She was probably living with her son Joseph, who administered to her effects, and 
was indebted to her to the extent of ;£'i2. Her wearing apparel and money in 
purse was valued at ;f2, and "one trunk and one blankett " at 6s., the remainder 
bebg made up of debts. 

Green, 9. 

136. O. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1667: = WILL: | COLBAT : | CH 

jR. THE . ciiTY . OF . WORCESTER = The Arms of Wor- 
cester, i 
Nash, 6 ; Green, 10. 

137. O. WILLIAM . COLBATCH . OF = wc conjoined. 

J^, Y . ciTTY . OF . WORCESTER = The Arms of Worcester. J 
In both these engravings the b over the Y is omitted, but it is quite plain on two 
in my collection. 

Green, 11. 

138. O. WILLIAM . COLBATCH = The AriDS of Worcester. 

j^. OF . WORCESTER = wc. conjoined. J 

Nash, 8 ; Green, 14. 

139. O. WILLIAM . FINCH . OF . Y" . CITTY . OF = The Arms of 

Worcester. 

jR. WORCESTER . HIS . HALF . PENY . 1665 =W . K . F. | 

Nash, 7. 

140. O, WILL . FINCH . OF . Y"^ CITTY = The AriDS of Worcester. 

jR, OF . WORCESTER . 1665= W . K . F. J 

Green, 15. 

141. O. WILL . FINCH OF Y CITTY = The Axms of Worcester. 

J^, OF WORCESTER l666 = W. K . F. i 

Green, 16. 

142. O. THOMAS . FOWNE . AT . THE = A nag's head. 

jR. NAGS HEAD IN WOSTER = T . E . F. J 

Nash, 9 ; Green, 17. 

143. O. THOMAS . HACKETT . OF . i666 = The Arms of Worcester. 

jR. WORCESTER . HIS . HALF . PENY = T . M . H. ^ 

Thomas Hackett was Mayor of the dty in 1664. Owing probably to his 

advanced age and the death of his wife, he retired from business. In his will, 



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1292 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

which was made only a few days previous to his death, and when ** weake in body 
but of perfect memory," he is described as of the ** Citty of Worcester, Gent." 
He possessed considerable property in Worcester, including an " ancient messuage" 
at tne corner of Badam's Lane, divided into three tenements, with other properties 
adjoining, also houses in the Shambles, New Street, and several *' old decayed 
tenements*' in St. Peter's parish, in a "street or lane there, called Frog Lane." 
He had an interest also in some other property in St Helen's parish. In his will 
he takes unusual precautions as to the disposal of his freeholds, and provides for 
several contingencies. For a ** gentleman " his personal effects are of a very 
limited character, being valued at the moderate sum of ;f22 los., as will be sea 
from the inventory following. He leaves a cousin five shillings and a fur cap, to his 
cousin's wife and the two gentlemen who valued his personal estate, and were to act 
as " overseers " of his will, ten shillings each to buy a mourning ring. To Richard 
Jones he gives a pair of sheets and his old suit of clothes, and the rest of his 
wearing apparel he bequeaths to his brother. 

Badam's Vine was that part of Needler's Street (now called Pump Street) 
between the Shambles and Friar Street.* Frog Lane leads from Diglis to Edgar 
Street and Sidbury. His will and the inventory of his effects are here given 
in full : 

In the name of God Amen I Thomas Hackett of the Citty of Worc^ Gent being 
weake in Body but of perfect memory (praised be God) Doe make and ordaine 
this my last Will and Testam' in manner and forme following that is to say : 
First I comend my soule into the hands of Almighty God my Maker in assured 
confidence of enjoying everlasting life And my Body to the earth to be 
buried at the discretion of my Executrix herein after named and as touching 
my worldly estate Imprimis I give and bequeath unto my Sister Elizabeth 
Hackett All that ancient messuage or tenem' & premises in the parish of 
St Hellens in the Citty of Worc*^ in a certaine Strecte or Lane there called 
Badams Vine and the new Streete and bein^ the Comer house and beii^ 
formerly an entire messuage and now divided mto three tenem** and is in the 
tenure or occupaton of one Edward Cole Nathaniell Barnes and Margarctt 
Ashby Widdow And alsoe all that other messuage or tenem' & premises 
adjoyning to the s** Comer house being in the Streete or Lane called Badam's 
Vine now in the tenure or occupaton of one Richard Jefferies And alsoe all 
that one other messuage or tenem* & premises adjoyning to the s^ comer house 
lyeing in the Streete there called the new Streete and is in the tenure or occupa- 
ton of one Rebecka Roberts And alsoe one other messuage or tenem' &. p'mises 
in a Streete there called the Shambles Street in the parish of St. Swithen & 
Citty of Worc*^ now or late in the tenure of one Margery Smith Widdow 
And alsoe one other messuage or tenem' & p''mises in the s** new Strecte in 
the parish of St. Marten in the s** Citty of Wore' now or late in the tenure or 
occupaton of one Thomas Cooke, weaver And alsoe all that peece of 
Ground w* severall old decayed tenem** thereupon in the parish of St. Peters 
in the s<* Citty of Wore' in a certaine streete or lane there called the Froglanc 
And all buildings stables gardens backsides lights easem*^ wayes waters water- 
courses priviledges profiits comodities & advantages whatsoever to the afbres<* 
messuages or tenem** & p'mises belonging or in any wise apperteyning And 
alsoe all deeds evidences & writeings which any way concerae the sf^ messuages 
or tenem** & p'mises with all & singuler the appertennces. Subject neverthe- 
less to the provisoes exceptons and conditons herein after mentoned unto the s*' 
Elizabeth Hackett for the terme of her naturall life and after her decease to 
the heires of her Body and in case shee dye without yssue then I give Ail the 
afores** messuages or tenem*^ & p'mises unto my Brother Edward Hackett for 
the terme of his naturall life and at his decease to the heires of his Body law- 
full begotten And in default of heires of his body lawfully begotten then I 
S've all the afores** messuages or tenem** & p'mises unto my Sister Christian 
ackett for the terme of her naturall life and at her decease to the heires of 

* Green, voL ii., p. 3. 

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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1293 

her body and in default of such issue then to the heires of the said Elizabeth 
Hackett for ever And whereas my Sister Christian Hackett is possessed of a 
messuage or tenem< in the parish of St. Helen afores** in the 8<* Citty of Wore 
for the terme of her naturall life and afterwards to the heires of her Body but 
in default of issue then it legally returns to me soe in case shee dye without 
issue I give and bequeath the revertion & remaind' of the s^ messuage or 
tenem* unto my sister Elizabeth Hackett for the terme of her naturall life and 
afterwards to my Brother Edward Hackett for the terme of his naturall life and 
at his decease to the heires of his Body lawfully begotten and in default of 
such yssue to the right heires of the said Elizabeth Hackett for ever Item I 
give and bequeath unto my Broth' Edward Hackett a certaine anuity oryearely 
sume of Five pounds of lawfull English money at fower usuall feasts or termes 
in the yeare (that is to say) at Christmas Lady Day midsomer & mickmas by 
even and equall portions, the first paym« to be made at the next quarter day 
which shall happen after my decease And in default of paym< of any of the 
s* sumes or any part thereof at the days and times aforcs*' or within foureteene 
dayes after any or eyther of the s^ dayes of paym* as afores** it shall and may 
be lawfull to and for the s** Edward Hackett to enter upon the afore** ancient 
messuage or tenem' & p*^mises now divided and in the possession of 
Nathaniell Barnes Edward Cole and Margaret Ashby, Widdow and there to 
distreyne or sease upon the coods & chatteTes and to take board &. carry away 
such goods & chatteles as shall be seized or distreyned on in or upon the s** 
p'mises untill such part or parts as at any time or times shall be behind or 
unpaid as afores^ be paid and satisfied Item my Will is that my Executrix 
herein after named shall (and by those p'scnts is fully authorised & Impoweed 
notw'^standing the former grant to her & them) to sell so much of my 
messuages lands tenem*» & hereditam^ as the value thereof may be sufficient to 
pay my debts ie|^acies and funerall expenses Item my Will is that if my 
Sister Christian Hacket shall retume into England and there abide then I give 
and bequeath unto her the sum of Ten pounds of lawfull money of England 
to be yssueinc & payable out of the afores** demised messuages or tenem" to 
be paid out of the s^ rents any time wi*^in twelve yeares at the discretion of my 
Executrix till it be discharged. Item I give and bequeath unto my Coss Henry 
Wright five shillings & my Fur Cap. Item I give and bequeath unto M' Richard 
Harris ten shillings to buy him a rooming King. Item I give and bequeath unto 
my Cossen Joseph Carwardines Wife the sume of ten shillings to buy her a 
moorning King. Item I give & bequeath unto my Cossen Edward Trovell 
the sume of ten shillings to buy a Ring Item I give & bequeath unto Richard 
Jones one paire of sheetes & my old suite of Clothes And all the rest and 
residue of my wearing apparrell I give and bequeath unto my Broth' Edward 
Hackett And all the rest & residue of my goods & chatteles whatsoev I give 
& bequeath unto my Sister Elizabeth Hackett who I make & ordaine the sole 
and onely Executrix of this ray last Will & Testam* desireing her to fulfill the 
same and of the executon of this my last Will and Testament I make and 
ordaine my friend M' Richard Harris and my Cossen Edward Trovell the 
Overseers hereof desireing them to see' the same faithfully fulfilled and to 
render assistance to my s^ Executrix in all things needeful In witness where- 
of I have hereunto put my hand & scale this fourteenth day of February 
• Anno Dom 1687. 

Tho: Hackett. (l.s.) 

Memorand that in the second sheete of this Will in the fourth nineteenth & foure 
and twentieth lines are erasures. 

Signed sealed published & declared to be my last Will and Testam' 
in the p'sence of us 

William Stenhall 
Hugh Walford 
John Waight 



Proved the 28*»» day of February 1687. 

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L 


J. d. 


<H 


0000 


OI 


0000 


07 


02 00 


00 


1500 


02 


1006 


03 


0606 


01 


00 10 



1294 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

A true and perfect Inventory of all & singular y* goods and chatties of Thomas 
Hackett of y^ city of Worcester gent deed taken and apprized the foore and 
twentieth day February Anno Dom 1687 by us whose names are hereunto 
subscribed. 

Imprimis. His wearing aparol & pocket money 

Item. A Gold ring 2 small silvd spoons and a paire of 

silver Buckelb 

Two feth*^ Beds bolsters pillowes, Curtaines valians 

Ruggs Coverlids & blanketts 

Bedsteads 

Linen 

Brass Pewter tin & ironware 

Old stuff chaires and seg chaires 

A Looking glass, Tables bords truncks chests, 

cubbords, coffers boxes, vessells tubs and oth*^ old 

Timb^ 02 15 02 

A parcell of Lease Land @ £$ 

Sum tot* ... ;f27 1000 

Apprized by us 

Richard Harris 
Edward Trovell 

(Plate No. 35.) 

144. O. HIS . HALF . PENNY . CITTY = lARV | AS . H j ALL. 

jR. OF . WORCESTER . 1 667 = The Arms of Worcester. J 
The die for this token may have been by the same artist as that of John Hard- 
man, No. 146 ; the name in both cases occupying the field. 

Green, 18. 

145. O. lOHN . HILL . DISTILLER = The Aritis of Worcester. 

J^, CITTY . OF . WORCESTER . 64 = HIS | HALF . | PENY. J 

Green, 19. 

146. O, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l667 = IOHN | HVRD | MAN. 

i?. THE . ciiTY . OF . WORCESTER = The Arms of Worcester. J 
An Edward Hurdman was last Bailiff and first Mayor of Worcester. 

147. O. HENRY . ISONLOW = HIS HALF PENY. 
jR. IN . WORCESTER = H . I. 

This is said to be on a manuscript list of tokens belonging to the Numismatic 
Society. 

Green, 20. 

148. O, lOHN . lONES . OF . Y» . CITTY. OF = The Worcestei Arms. 
J^, WORCESTER . HIS . HALF . PENY . i666 = An Open book, 

with clasps. ^ 

The specimen from which Green's engraving was taken was evidently a poor one, 
as the centre of the reverse bears but small resemblance to a book. There is one 
in the collection of the Corporation of Worcester which is in a fair state of preser- 
vation, and from which I have supplied the information unknown to Boyne. 

John Jones was a bookseller in Worcester, and his name appears attached to a 
pamphlet published in 1684 . 

** * Discourse in the Cathedral Church of Worcester on the Anniversary thereof 
His Majesties Restauralion,' by Dr. George Hickes of Worcester. Quarto. 
Worcester : John Jones, bookseller, 1684." 



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WORCESTERSHIRE. 1 295 

This discourse was delivered before the Ma3ror and Aldermen of Worcester, 
which city had then a sufficiency of readers to support two booksellers, one 
Sampson Evans carrying on this business there at this time. 

Jones also published *'The Carpenter's Rule made Easie for the use of 
the Carpenters, Masons, etc, of Worcester,'* by John Darling. I2ma J. Jones, 
bookseller, Worcester, 1658. 

(Plate No. 36.) 

Nash, .10 ; Green, 21. 
149. O. THOMAS . lONES . 1669 = The Feltmakers' Arms. 

jR. IN . WORCESTER = HIS | HALF | PENY. J 

His will and the inventory and valuation of his personal estate are of sufficient 
interest to give in full. He appears to have been in only a small way of business, 
although described as a ** feltmaker." His stock of hats in the "forshop," or 
front shop, six dozen *' good and bad," were valued at £$ ; those in the '* work- 
hous," with the iron pots, planks, and lumber, at £2 3s. 4d. 

In the name of God Amen. The tenth day of March in the year of o' Lord One 
thousand six hundred eighty and Five According to the computation of the 
Church of England I Thomas Tones of the parish of S^ Martin in the City of 
Worcester Feltmaker being weake in Body but of sound and perfect minde & 
M'mory (Fraysed be God therefore) Doe make this my last Will and Testa- 
ment in manner & forme following Imprimis I commend my Soule into the 
hands of Almighty God who gave it trusting in his sole mercy through the 
merits and mediation of Jesus Christ for redemption and Salvation. And ray 
Body I commend to the earth to be decently interred in Christian Buriall 
And for my wordly goods Sc estate my Will is as followeth I give and 
bequeath unto my Son Richard Jones the sume of twenty shillings to be paid 
to him within one yeare after my decease Item I give and beaueath unto my 
Son Charles Jones the sume of twenty shillings to be paid to him within one 
yeare after my decease Item I give and bequeath unto my daughter Anne 
Homblower the sume of twenty shillings to be paid to her within one yeare 
after my decease. Item I give and l>equeath All the residue and remainder of 
mine estate Goods &am